Sie sind auf Seite 1von 31

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Micro,  Small,  Medium  Enterprise  (MSME)  Definitions  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jeff  Bloem  (Calvin  College)  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Partners  Worldwide,  Summer  2012  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This  study  was  completed  and  compiled  by  Jeff  Bloem  while  interning  for  Partners  
Worldwide  during  the  summer  of  2012.    
 
Explanation  Note  
 
The  majority  of  the  ideas  and  thoughts  presented  here  are  from  Tom  Gibson  
(SMEthink)  and  H.J.  van  der  Vaart  (Small  Enterprise  Assistance  Funds)  in  a  paper  
entitled  “Defining  SMEs:  A  Less  Imperfect  Way  of  Defining  Small  and  Medium  
Enterprises  in  Developing  Countries”  for  the  Brookings  Institute:  Global  Economy  and  
Development.  
(http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2008/09/development-­‐gibson)  
Summarized  and  adapted  for  the  use  of  Partners  Worldwide  by  Jeff  Bloem  (Calvin  
College),  Summer  2012  
 
  Creating  and  implementing  a  worldwide,  multilateral  definition  of  micro,  
small,  and  medium  enterprises  (MSME)  quickly  becomes  very  technical  and  
challenging.  Definitions  vary  between  multilateral  institutions  like  the  World  Bank  
and  United  Nations  Development  Program.  Definitions  also  vary  between  countries,  
largely  depending  on  geographic  location  and  the  size  and  scope  of  a  nation’s  
economy.    
 
  However  it  is  important  to  come  up  with  some  sort  of  working  definition  that  
can  be  applied  to  all  countries  and  regions  of  the  world  for  several  reasons.  SMEs  
have  been  called  the  backbone  of  the  global  economy,  with  some  definitions  
showing  SMEs  accounting  for  95%  of  the  world’s  GDP.  Developing  countries  are  
often  economically  defined  by  a  “missing  middle”  or  a  lack  of  small  and  medium  
business  to  provide  jobs,  innovation,  and  wealth.  Partners  Worldwide  is  an  
organization  that  works  to  use  business  as  mission  to  restore  a  world  without  
poverty.  So  we  as  an  organization  should  have  some  agreement  about  what  defines  
an  SME.  
 
  There  are  three  criteria  that  organizations  and  countries  use  to  define  an  
SME.  These  criteria  are  number  of  employees,  total  assets,  and  annual  revenue.  The  
challenge  lies  in  the  fact  that  organizations  and  countries  use  a  variety  of  
combinations  and  definitions  of  these  criteria.  (For  more  detailed  information  on  
the  diversity  of  definitions  of  SME  within  the  countries  that  Partners  Worldwide  
operates  see  the  “Expanded  Document”.  There  you  will  find  a  summary  of  how  each  
country  defines  SME  and  a  detailed  definition  for  each  country.)      
 
Problems  with  the  current  criteria  
  Using  the  number  of  employees  employed  by  an  enterprise  to  define  SME  
raises  a  number  of  difficulties.  Paramount  among  them  is  the  false  idea  that  more  
employees  leads  to  economic  growth.  A  more  accurate  assumption  would  be  a  
possible  effect  of  economic  growth  is  more  jobs.  Closely  related  is  the  idea  is  that  a  
simple  measurement  of  the  number  of  employees  within  an  enterprise  does  not  
indicate  the  efficiency  of  the  employees.  Also,  many  countries  around  the  world  
have  taxes  in  place  that  actually  create  a  disincentive  for  the  hiring  of  more  
employees  by  entrepreneurs.  Entrepreneurs  looking  to  expand  their  business  will  
hire  a  new  employee  if  and  only  if  the  employee  can  produce  more  than  they  cost.  
Lastly,  each  country  on  our  earth  rests  in  a  different  location  on  the  labor  -­‐  capital  
spectrum.  Some  countries  use  more  labor  for  production  because  labor  is  cheaper  
than  capital.  Likewise  in  some  other  countries  capital  is  cheaper  than  labor.  In  
general  as  technology  advances  and  access  increases  an  economy  tends  to  lean  more  
heavily  on  capital  rather  than  labor.  Therefore  growth  in  a  technological  sense  is  
defined  by  a  decrease  in  employment.    
 
  Measuring  assets  to  categorize  an  enterprise  creates  more  difficulties.  Chief  
among  these  challenges  is  the  reality  that  the  definition  of  an  asset  is  not  universally  
understood.  Next,  inflation  causes  an  unknown  understatement  of  the  true  value  of  
an  asset.  Also,  SMEs  often  minimize  the  total  amount  of  assets  reported  for  tax  
reasons.  Furthermore,  a  measurement  of  assets  does  not  indicate  and  potentially  
overlooks  the  importance  of  capital  efficiency.  Finally,  as  the  use  of  technology  
increases  assets  tend  to  naturally  depreciate  in  value  with  little  or  no  relationship  to  
the  economic  growth  of  the  enterprise.      
 
  The  annual  revenue  of  an  enterprise  is  perhaps  our  best  bet  for  accurately  
measuring  an  SME.  After  overcoming  potential  difficulties  of  obtaining  this  
information  and  adjusting  for  the  size  of  a  given  country’s  economy,  annual  revenue  
shows  us  perhaps  the  most  accurate  indicator  of  an  SME.  Furthermore  this  criterion  
also  may  show  which  small  enterprises  are  likely  to  grow  into  a  medium  enterprise  
and  which  medium  enterprises  are  likely  to  grow  into  a  large  enterprise.  
 
About  the  proposed  formula    
  The  proposed  formula  for  defining  SME  ignores  number  of  employees  and  
total  assets  as  variables  in  the  definition  and  focuses  on  the  annual  revenue  of  the  
enterprise  in  question.  It  also  attempts  to  create  a  universal  process  of  categorizing  
enterprises  in  any  country  in  the  world.  This  formula  creates  a  range  for  SMEs  to  
dwell  in  parity  no  matter  where  they  are  geographically  located.    
 
  As  noted  in  the  MSME  Definitions  Summery  page  my  proposed  definition  for  
and  SME  and  in  turn  microenterprise  is  as  follows:  
   
    An  SME  is  an  enterprise  with  annual  revenues,  in  U.S.  dollar  terms,  
  between  10  and  1000  times  the  mean  per  capita  gross  national  income  (GNI)  of  
  the  country  in  which  it  operates.    
 
  With  this  definition  the  GNI  of  a  given  country  is  multiplied  by  10  and  by  
1000  and  we  are  given  our  country  specific  range  for  the  annual  revenue  of  an  SME.  
This  formula  gives  us  not  only  a  more  specific  but  also  a  country  sensitive  definition  
of  SME.  The  beauty  of  this  formula  is  it  is  specifically  vague  in  nature.  This  allows  for  
the  diversity  of  the  countries  and  regions  Partners  Worldwide  serves  to  be  an  
indicator  rather  than  a  hurdle  in  defining  SMEs.      
 
MSME  Definitions  Summary  –  By  Country  
 
Original  study  completed  by  Khrystyna  Kushnir,  Companion  Note  for  the  MSME  
Country  Indicators.  The  World  Bank,  2010.  
Adapted  for  use  by  Partners  Worldwide  by  Jeff  Bloem  (Calvin  Colege),  Summer  2012  
 
 
 
Country   #  of   Industry   Assets/   Definition  
Employees   Turnover/   distinguishes  
Capital/   between  
Investment   micro,  small  
and  medium  
enterprises  
Asia          
Cambodia   x     x   X  
China*   x   x   x    
Hong  Kong   x   X      
India     x   x   X  
Philippines   x     x   X  
Caribbean          
Haiti          
Trinidad   x     x   X  
East  Africa          
Kenya   x     x   X  
Uganda   x     x   X  
Ethiopia   x   x   x   X  
Rwanda   x       X  
Tanzania   x   x   x   x  
Latin  America          
Ecuador          
Honduras   x     x   X  
Nicaragua   x     x   X  
Bolivia   X        
Guatemala          
Mexico   x   x     X  
Southern  Africa          
Malawi          
Mozambique   x       X  
South  Africa**   x   x   x   X  
Swaziland          
Zambia          
Zimbabwe          
North  America          
United  States***   x   x   x   X  
Canada****   x   x   x   X  
Eastern  Europe          
Romania          
West  Africa          
Cote  d’Ivoire          
Ghana          
Liberia          
Nigeria   x     x   X  
Sierra  Leone          
 
*  Definition  distinguishes  between  small  and  medium  enterprises  only  
 
**  Definition  distinguishes  between  micro,  very  small,  small  or  medium  enterprises.  
Some  reports  also  distinguish  the  'survivalist'  business,  which  is  generally  defined  
as  providing  income  only  below  the  poverty  line.  "survivalist  enterprises…  involves  
activities  by  people  unable  to  find  a  paid  job  or  get  into  an  economic  sector  of  their  
choice,  that  is,  people  whose  activities  cannot  be  viewed  as  sustainable  micro  
enterprises,  even  though  many  of  them  may  eventually  achieve  such  a  position.  
 
***  To  be  considered  an  MSME  an  enterprise  must  be  independently  owned  and  
operated,  and  not  be  dominant  in  its  field  of  operation.  
 
****  Definitions  by  different  agencies  e.g.  Canadian  Bankers  Association,  Export  
Development  Corporation  and  Industry  Canada  have  different  turnover  limits.  
 
Crossed  Out  Country  was  not  included  in  World  Bank  study.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Country  Breakdown  
 
Cambodia    
Agency:  Cambodia  SME  sub-­‐committee.    
 
Legal  definition:    
N/A    
 
Interpretation:    

 
Source:  Peter  Baily,  "CAMBODIAN  SMALL  AND  MEDIUM  SIZED:ENTERPRISES:  
CONSTRAINTS,  POLICIES  AND  PROPOSALS  FOR  THEIR  DEVELOPMENT,"  Economic  
Research  Institute  for  ASEAN  and  East  Asia,  Research  project  No.  5,  2007,  p.  6,  
http://www.eria.org/research/images/pdf/PDF%20No.5/No,5-­‐1-­‐Cambodian.pdf  
(accessed  on  July  21,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
China    
Agency:  NDRC  (National  Development  and  Reform  Commission).    
 
Legal  Definition:    
“Interim  Categorizing  Criteria  on  Small  and  Medium-­‐sized  Enterprises  (SMEs),  
published  in  2003  and  based  on  the  SME  Promotion  Law  of  China,  sets  the  
guidelines  for  classifying  SMEs.    
 
Interpretation:  

 
Source:  LIU  Xiangfeng,  “SME  Development  in  China:  a  Policy  Perspective  on  SME  
Industrial  Clustering,”  Economic  Research  Institute  for  ASEAN  and  East  Asia,  
Chapter  2,  pp.  38-­‐40,  
http://www.eria.org/research/images/pdf/PDF%20No.5/No,5-­‐2-­‐China.pdf  
(accessed  on  May  12,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hong  Kong  
Agency:  The  Government  of  the  Hong  Kong  Special  Administrative  Region,  
China/Trade  and  Industry  Department  -­‐  Support  and  Consultation  Centre  for  SMEs.    
 
Legal  Definition:    
N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
“Manufacturing  enterprises  with  fewer  than  100  employees  and  non-­‐manufacturing  
enterprises  with  fewer  than  50  employees  are  regarded  as  small  and  medium  
enterprises  (SMEs)  in  Hong  Kong.”  
 
Source:“  What  are  SMEs?”  SMEs  in  HK,  Useful  Statistics,  Market  Information,  Service  
&  Facilities,  The  Government  of  the  Hong  Kong  Special  Administrative  Region,  
China/Trade  and  Industry  Department  -­‐  Support  and  Consultation  Centre  for  SMEs,  
http://www.success.tid.gov.hk/english/lin_sup_org/gov_dep/service_detail_6863.h
tml  (accessed  on  June  21,  2010).  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 India    
Agency:  MINISTRY  OF  LAW  AND  JUSTICE  (Legislative  Department).    
 
Legal  Definition:  
Too  long  to  include  
 
Interpretation:    
“In  the  Indian  context,  micro,  small  and  medium  enterprises  as  per  the  MSME  
Development  Act,  2006  are  defined  based  on  their  investment  in  plant  and  
machinery  (for  manufacturing  enterprise)  and  on  equipments  for  enterprises  
providing  or  rendering  services.  According  to  the  Micro,  Small  and  Medium  
Enterprises  (MSME)  Development  Act  of  2006,  (India)  a  micro  enterprise  is  where  
the  investment  in  plant  and  machinery  does  not  exceed  twenty  five  lakh  rupees.  A  
medium  enterprise  is  where  the  investment  in  plant  and  machinery  is  more  than  
five  crore  rupees  but  does  not  exceed  ten  crore  rupees.  A  small  enterprise  is  where  
the  investment  in  plant  and  machinery  is  more  than  twenty  five  lakh  rupees  but  
does  not  exceed  five  crore  rupees.  In  the  case  of  the  enterprises  engaged  in  
providing  or  rendering  of  services,  as    
 
(a)  a  micro  enterprise  is  where  the  investment  in  equipment  does  not  exceed  ten  
lakh  rupees.    
 
(b)  a  small  enterprise  is  where  the  investment  in  equipment  is  more  than  ten  lakh  
rupees  but  does  not  exceed  two  crore  rupees.    
 
(c)  a  medium  enterprise  is  where  the  investment  in  equipment  is  more  than  two  
crore  rupees  but  does  not  exceed  five  crore  rupees.    
According  to  the  Ministry  of  Micro,  Small  and  Medium  Enterprises,  recent  ceilings  
on  investment  for  enterprises  to  be  classified  as  micro,  small  and  medium  
enterprises  are  as  follows:”  
 

 
 
Source:  The  Micro,  Small  and  Medium  Enterprises  Development  Act,  2006,  No.  27  
OF  2006,  PART  II  -­‐  Section  1,  The  Gazette  of  India,  No.  311  NEW  DELHI,  FRIDAY,  
JUNE  16,  2006/JYAISTHA  26,  1928,  MINISTRY  OF  LAW  AND  JUSTICE,  
http://www.msme.gov.in/MSME_Development_Gazette.htm  (accessed  on  May  14,  
2010).    
Philippines    
Agency:  Small  and  Medium  Enterprise  Development  (SMED)  Council.    
 
Legal  Definition:  Small  and  Medium  Enterprise  Development  (SMED)  Council  
Resolution  No.  01  Series  of  2003  dated  16  January  2003.    
 
Interpretation:    
“MSMEs  Defined    
Micro,  small,  and  medium  enterprises  (MSMEs)  are  defined  as  any  business  
activity/enterprise  engaged  in  industry,  agri-­‐business/services,  whether  single  
proprietorship,  cooperative,  partnership,  or  corporation  whose  total  assets,  
inclusive  of  those  arising  from  loans  but  exclusive  of  the  land  on  which  the  
particular  business  entity's  office,  plant  and  equipment  are  situated,  must  have  
value  falling  under  the  following  categories:    
 
By  Asset  Size*  
Micro:  Up  to  P3,000,000  
Small:  P3,000,001  -­‐  P15,000,000  
Medium:  P15,000,001  -­‐  P100,000,000  
Large:  above  P100,000,000  
 
Alternatively,  MSMEs  may  also  be  categorized  based  on  the  number  of  employees:  
Micro:  1  -­‐  9  employees  
Small:  10  -­‐-­‐  99  employees  
Medium:  100  -­‐-­‐  199  employees  
Large:  More  than  200  employees”85    
 
Source:  “MSMEs  Defined,”  Department  of  Trade  and  Industry  of  Philippines,  
http://www.dti.gov.ph/dti/index.php?p=532  (accessed  on  May  25,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trinidad  
Agency:  National  Legislature.    
 
Legal  definition:    
 
Following  the  recommendations  of  the  1998  Task  Force,  the  following  definitions  
are  adopted:    
1.  Micro  enterprise  –  employs  1  to  5  persons,  with  less  than  $250,000  in  assets  and  
less  than  $250,000  in  sales;    
2.  Small  enterprise  –  employs  6  to  25  persons,  with  assets  valued  between  $250,000  
and  $1,500,000  and  sales  between  $250,000  and  $5,000,000;    
3.  Medium-­‐sized  enterprise  –  employs  26  to  50  employees,  with  assets  exceeding  
$1,500,000  but  not  exceeding  $5,000,000  and  sales  amounting  to  $5,000,000  but  
less  than  $10,000,000.  “102    
102  “Enterprise  Development  Policy  and  Strategic  Plan  2001  –  2005,”Ministry  of  
Enterprise  Development  and  Foreign  Affairs,  July  2001,  p.  35,  
http://www.sice.oas.org/ctyindex/TTO/INDPolicy_e.pdf  (accessed  on  June  19.  
2010).    
 
Interpretation:    
N/A    
 
Source:  “Enterprise  Development  Policy  and  Strategic  Plan  2001  –  2005,”Ministry  of  
Enterprise  Development  and  Foreign  Affairs,  July  2001,  p.  35,  
http://www.sice.oas.org/ctyindex/TTO/INDPolicy_e.pdf  (accessed  on  June  19.  
2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kenya    
Agency:  National  Legislature.    
 
Legal  Definition:  MSME  bill  2009.    
 
Interpretation:    
“In  Kenya,  the  MSME  bill  2009  has  used  2  criteria  to  define  SMEs  in  general:  Number  
of  people/employees  and  the  company’s  annual  turnover.  For  enterprises  in  the  
manufacturing  sector,  the  definition  takes  into  account  the  investment  in  plant  and  
machinery  as  well  as  the  registered  capital.  This  SME  definition  is  therefore  as  
follows:”  
 

 
 
Source:  “MARKET  ACCESS  FOR  SMES  THROUGH  PRIVATE  AND  PUBLIC  
PROCUREMENT  IN  KENYA,”  Kenya  Association  of  Manufacturers,  pp.  1-­‐2,  
http://www.esabmonetwork.org/fileadmin/esabmo_uploads/Kenya_Position_Pape
r_on_SME_Market_Access_09.pdf  (accessed  on  June  15,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Uganda    
Agency:  Uganda  revenue  Authority  and  Uganda  Investment  Authority.    
 
Legal  definition:    
N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
“Uganda  defines  and  classifies  SMEs  into  micro  businesses  with  less  than  five  
employees  and  small  business  as  having  less  than  100,000  pounds  in  turnover  and  
capital,  and  the  same  applies  to  mid-­‐sized  businesses  with  less  than  250  employees  
(Uganda  revenue  Authority;  Uganda  Investment  Authority;  Uganda’s  Top  100  mid-­‐
sized  companies  survey,  2009)”1  
 
“One  of  the  key  challenges  of  MSEPU  was  develop  a  working  definition  of  MSMEs.  
Accordingly,  the  following  definition  was  adopted:    
 
-­‐  Micro  enterprises  are  defined  as  business  undertakings  employing  less  than  5  
people,  often  family  members;  value  of  assets  excluding  land,  buildings  and  working  
capital  is  below  Ush2,5  million;  annual  turn  over  is  below  Ush10  million,  which  is  
the  threshold  for  business  related  tax.    
Qualitative  characteristics  of  micro  enterprises  are  that  they  operate  seasonally,  
usually  they  are  not  registered  formally  and  hence  have  no  access  to  formal  services.  
They  do  not  pay  enterprise-­‐related  taxes  and  their  management  is  rather  weak  in  
terms  of  both  education  and  administrative  capabilities.    
 
-­‐  Small  enterprises  on  the  other  hand  were  defined  as  enterprises  employing  a  
maximum  50  people;  the  value  of  assets  excluding  land,  buildings  and  working  
capital  is  less  than  Ush  50  million;  annual  turn  over  is  between  Ush10  –50  million  
which  is  the  tax  bracket  for  1%  business  tax  on  annual  turn  over.    
Other  qualitative  characteristics  of  such  enterprises  are  that  they  operate  the  whole  
year  round,  are  formally  registered  and  taxed  and  owners/managers  are  educated  
and/or  trained.”2  
 
Source  1:  “BRAND  EQUITY  AND  PERFORMANCE  OF  SMALL-­‐MEDIUM  SIZED  
ENTERPRISES  (SMEs)  IN  UGANDA,”  Enterprise  Uganda,  Whitman  School  of  
Management,  Syracuse  University,  
http://whitman.syr.edu/ABP/Conference/Papers/Brand%20Equity%20and%20Pe
rformance%20of%20SME%E2%80%99s%20in%20Uganda.pdf  (accessed  on  June  
16,  2010).  
   
Source  2:  HENRY  MBAGUTA,  “GOVERNMENT  OF  UGANDA  INITIATIVES  FOR  MSME  
POLICY  DEVELOPMENT,”  Enterprise  Uganda,    
http://www.enterprise.co.ug/downloads/GOVERNMENT%20OF%20UGANDA%20I
NITIATIVES%20FOR%20MSME%20POLICY%20DEVELOPMENT.pdf  (accessed  on  
June  16,  2010).    
 
Ethiopia    
Agency:  Central  Statistical  Agency.    
 
Legal  definition:    
N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
“Manufacturing  establishments  are  divided  into  three  major  groups.  These  are:    
 
a)  Large  and  Medium  Scale  Manufacturing  Establishments,  engaging  10  or  more  persons  
and  using  power  -­‐driven  machinery.    
b)  Small  Scale  Manufacturing  Establishments  engaging  less  than  10  persons  and  use  
power  -­‐driven  machinery.    
c)  Cottage/Handicraft  Manufacturing  Establishments  performing  their  activities  by  hand  
(i.e.,  using  non  -­‐power  driven  machinery).”1  
 
Agency:  Ministry  of  Trade  and  Industry.    
 
Legal  definition:    
N/A  
   
Interpretation:    
“1.1.10.1  Micro  Enterprises2  are  those  small  business  enterprises  with  a  paid-­‐up  capital  
of  not  exceeding  birr  20,000,  and  excluding  high  tech.  consultancy  firms  and  other  high  
tech.  establishments.    
 
1.1.10.2  Small  Enterprises  are  those  business  enterprises  with  a  paid-­‐up  capital  of  
above  20,000  and  not  exceeding  birr  500,000,  and  excluding  high  tech.  consultancy  
firms  and  other  high  tech.  establishments.”3  
 
Source  1:  “REPORT  ON  SMALL  SCALE  MANUFACTURING  INDUSTRIES  SURVEY,”  THE  
FEDERAL  DEMOCRATIC  REPUBLIC  OF  ETHIOPIA  CENTRAL  STATISTICAL  AGENCY  REPORT  
ON  SMALL  SCALE  MANUFACTURING  INDUSTRIES  SURVEY,  April  2010,  
http://www.csa.gov.et/surveys/Small_Scale_Manufacturing_Industries/es-­‐eth-­‐ssis-­‐
2007-­‐08/survey0/data/Docs/Small%20Scale%20Report-­‐2010_F.pdf  (accessed  on  July  21,  
2010).    
 
Note  2:  Due  to  the  similarity  of  their  characterstics,  informal  sector  activities  and  micro  
enterprises  are  often  lumped  together  and  in  this  strategy,  they  are  also  treated  as  
micro  enterprises.    
 
Source  3:  "MICRO  and  SMALL  ENTERPRISES  DEVELOPMENT  STRATEGY,"  FEDERAL  
DEMOCRATIC  REPUBLIC  OF  ETHIOPIA  MINISTRY  OF  TRADE  AND  INDUSTRY,  November  
1997,  p.  8,  http://www.bds-­‐ethiopia.net/documents.html  (accessed  on  July  21,  2010).    
Rwanda    
Agency:  Private  Sector  Federation  -­‐  Rwanda.    
 
Legal  definition:    
N/A  
   
Interpretation:    
Micro  enterprise:  1-­‐10  employees    
Small  enterprise:  11-­‐30  employees    
Medium  enterprise:  31-­‐100  employees    
 
Source:  "Business  &  Investment  Climate  Survey,"  Private  Sector  Federation  –  Rwanda,  
2008,  p.11,  
http://www.psf.org.rw/index.php?option=com_docman&task=cat_view&gid=38&Itemi
d=86  (accessed  on  June  21,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tanzania    
Agency:  National  Legislature.    
 
Legal  definition:  2002  Tanzania  Small  and  Medium  Enterprise  Development  Policy.    
 
Interpretation:    
 

 
 
Source:  "African  E-­‐Index:  Towards  an  SME  e-­‐ACCESS  AND  USAGE  across  14  African  
countries,"  Research  ICT  Africa!,  2006,  p.  54,  
http://www.researchictafrica.net/new/images/uploads/sme%20access%20and%20usag
e%20in%2014%20african%20countries.pdf  (accessed  on  June  23,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Honduras    
Agency:  Gallup.    
 
Legal  Definition:    
N/A  
   
Interpretation:    
Micro  enterprises:  1-­‐10  employees;    
Small  enterprises:  11-­‐20  employees;    
Medium  enterprises:  21-­‐49  employees  
 
Source:  "Estudio  de  Micro  y  Pequeña  Empresa  no  agrícola  en  Honduras  MYPEs  
2000:  INFORME  COMPARATIVO-­‐  1996  -­‐2000,"  Desarrollo  S.  A.-­‐CID/Gallup,  p.  37,  
http://www.microfinanzas.org/centro-­‐de-­‐informacion/documentos/estudio-­‐de-­‐
micro-­‐y-­‐pequena-­‐empresa-­‐no-­‐agricola-­‐en-­‐honduras-­‐mypes-­‐2000-­‐informe-­‐
comparativo-­‐1996-­‐2000/  (accessed  on  June  21,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nicaragua    
Agency:  National  legislature.    
 
Legal  Definition:  "Arto.  3  de  la  Ley  645,  Ley  MIPYME.”  
 
  Micro  enterprise   Small  enterprise   Medium  enterprise  
Employees   1-­‐5   6-­‐30   31-­‐100  
Total  Assets   <  200,000   <1.5  million   <6.0  million  
Total  Annual  Sales   <  1  million   <9  million   <40  million  
 
 
Source:  "Arto.  3  de  la  Ley  645,  Ley  MIPYME,"  Registro  Único  de  la  Micro,  Pequeña  y  
Mediana  Empresa,  Ministerio  de  Fomento,  Industria  y  Commercio,  
http://www.mific.gob.ni/INICIO/REGISTROUNICODELASMIPYMES/tabid/112/lang
uage/en-­‐US/Default.aspx  (accessed  on  July  14,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bolivia    
Agency:    
Bolsa  Boliviana  de  Valores  S.A  (original  source:  Estado  de  Situación  de  la  
Competitividad  en  Bolivia,  varios  autores,  Sistema  Boliviano  de  Productividad  y  
Competitivida).  
 
Legal  definition:    
N/A  
   
Interpretation:    
Micro  enterprise:  1-­‐9  employee/s    
 
Small  and  medium  enterprise:  10-­‐49  employees  
 
Source:  (2002)  Armando  Alvarez  Arnal,  "Acceso  de  PYMES  al  Mercado  de  Valores,"  
Bolsa  Boliviana  de  Valores  S.A.,  October  2002.  (original  source:  Estado  de  Situación  
de  la  Competitividad  en  Bolivia,  varios  autores,  Sistema  Boliviano  de  Productividad  
y  Competitivida),  
http://www.iimv.org/actividades2/Bolivia2002/ponenciasjornada/armandoalvare
z.ppt  (accessed  on  June  21,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mexico    
*Agency:  Instituto  Nacional  de  Estadística  Geografía  e  Informática.    
 
Legal  definition:    
N/A  
   
Interpretation:    
 
Micro:  0-­‐10  persons  employed    
Small:  11-­‐50  persons  employed    
Medium  51-­‐250  persons  employed    
 
Agency:  N/A  
   
Legal  definition:  N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
 
Defining  SMEs  in  Mexico.  
 

 
   
Source:  Axel  Mittelstädt,  “SMEs  in  Mexico:  issues  and  policies,”  Organization  for  
Economic  Co-­‐operation  and  Development,  2007,  p.  13.    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mozambique    
Agency:  Instituto  Nacional  de  Estatística.    
 
Legal  definition:  N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
Small  enterprise:  1-­‐9  employee/s    
Medium  enterprise:  10-­‐99  employees1  
 
Agency:  Ministry  of  Agriculture.    
 
Legal  definition:  N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
Micro  enterprise:  1-­‐5  employee/s    
Small  enterprise:  6-­‐25  employees    
Medium  enterprise:  26-­‐100  employees.2  
 
Agency:  Gabinete  de  Consultoria  e  Apoio  a  Pequena  Industria.    
 
Legal  definition:  N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
Micro  enterprise:  1-­‐9  employee/s    
Small  enterprise:  10-­‐50  employees    
Medium  enterprise:  50-­‐100  employees.2  
 
Agency:  Ministry  of  Commerce  and  Industry.    
 
Legal  definition:  N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
Micro  enterprise:  1-­‐25  employee/s    
Small  enterprise:  25-­‐124  employees    
Medium  enterprise:  125-­‐249  employees.  
 
Source  1:  CEMPRE,  Instituto  Nacional  de  Estatística,  2004,  (QUADRO  18.  NÚMERO  DE  EMPRESAS,  
NÚMERO  DE  PESSOAS  AO  SERVIÇO  E  VOLUME  DE  NEGÓCIOS,  POR  TAMANHO),  
http://www.ine.gov.mz/censos_dir/cempre/resultadoscempre.pdf  accessed  on  July  20,  2010.    
 
Source  2:  Bruno  Nhancale,  Sosdito  Mananze,  Nazira  Dista,  Isilda  Nhantumbo  and  Duncan  Macqueen,  
“S_m_a_l_l_  _a_n_d_  _m_e_d_i_u_m_  _f_o_r_e_s_t_  _e_n_t_e_r_p_r_i_s_e_s_  _i_n_  _M_o_z_a_m_b_i_q_u_e_”  
_IIED  Small  and  Medium  Forest  Enterprise  Series  No.  25,  Centro  Terra  Viva  and  International  
Institute  for  Environment  and  Development,  p.  9,  
http://www.kent.ac.uk/dice/publications/Nhancale_09_SMEF_Mozambique.pdf  (accessed  on  July  
20,  2010).      
 
South  Africa    
Agency:  President’s  Office/National  Legislature.    
 
Legal  Definition:    
PRESIDENT'S  OFFICE    
….    
Definitions    
….    
(xv)  "small  business"  means  a  separate  and  distinct  business  entity,  including  
cooperative  enterprises  and  non-­‐governmental  organizations,  managed  by  one  
owner  or  more  which,  including  its  branches  or  subsidiaries,  if  any,  is  
predominantly  carried  on  in  any  sector  or  subsector  of  the  economy  mentioned  in  
column  I  of  the  Schedule  and  which  can  be  classified  as  a  micro-­‐,  a  very  small,  a  
small  or  a  medium  enterprise  by  satisfying  the  criteria  mentioned  in  columns  3,  4  
and  5  of  the  Schedule  opposite  the  smallest  relevant  size  or  class  as  mentioned  in  
column  2  of  the  Schedule;  (vii)    
(xvi)  "small  business  organization"  means  any  entity,  whether  or  not  incorporated  
or  registered  under  any  law,  which  consists  mainly  of  persons  carrying  on  small  
business  concerns  in  any  economic  sector,  or  which  has  been  established  for  the  
purpose  of  promoting  the  interests  of  or  representing  small  business  concerns,  and  
includes  any  federation  consisting  wholly  or  partly  of  such  association,  and  also  any  
branch  of  such  organization;  (viii)1  
 
NATIONAL  SMALL  BUSINESS  AMENDMENT  ACT    
 
To  amend  the  National  Small  Business  Act,  1996,  so  as  to  repeal  all  provisions  
pertaining  to  Ntsika  Enterprise  Promotion  Agency;  to  provide  for  the  establishment  
of  the  Small  Enterprise  Development  Agency;  to  make  provision  for  the  
incorporation  of  the  Ntsika  Enterprise  Promotion  Agency,  the  National  
Manufacturing  Advisory  Centre  and  any  other  designated  institution  into  the  Agency  
to  be  established;  to  provide  for  the  necessary  transitional  arrangements  to  this  
effect;  and  to  provide  for  matters  connected  therewith.    
BE  IT  ENACTED  by  the  Parliament  of  the  Republic  of  South  Africa,  as  follows:—    
Amendment  of  section  1  of  Act  102  of  1996,  as  amended  by  section  1  of  Act  26  of  
2003    
(e)  by  the  substitution  for  the  definition  of  ‘‘small  business’’  of  the  following  
definition:    
‘‘  ‘small  *business+  enterprise’  means  a  separate  and  distinct  business  entity,  
together  with  its  branches  or  subsidiaries,  if  any,  including  co-­‐operative  enterprises  
[and  non-­‐governmental  organizations],  managed  by  one  owner  or  more  [which,  
including  its  branches  or  subsidiaries,  if  any,  is]  predominantly  carried  on  in  any  
sector  or  subsector  of  the  economy  mentioned  in  column  1  of  the  Schedule  and  
[which  can  be]  classified  as  a  micro-­‐,  a  very  small,  a  small  or  a  medium  enterprise  by  
satisfying  the  criteria  mentioned  in  columns  3,  4  and  5  of  the  Schedule  [opposite  the  
smallest  relevant  size  or  class  as  mentioned  in  column  2  of  the  Schedule];’’;    
(f)  by  the  substitution  for  the  definition  of  ‘‘small  business  organization’’  of  the  
following  definition:    
‘‘  ‘small  *business+  enterprise  organization’  means  any  entity,  whether  or  not  
incorporated  or  registered  under  any  law,  [which  consists]  consisting  mainly  of  
persons  carrying  on  small  [business]  enterprise  concerns  in  any  economic  sector[,  
or  which  has  been]  and  established  for  the  purpose  of  promoting  the  interests  of  or  
representing  small  [business]  enterprise  concerns,  and  includes  any  federation  
consisting  wholly  or  partly  of  such  association,  and  [also]  any  branch  of  such  
organisation;’’2  
 
 
 
Interpretation:    
N/A    
 
Source  1:  “NO.  102  OF  1996:  NATIONAL  SMALL  BUSINESS  ACT,  1996,”  the  
Department  of  Trade  and  Industry/Small,  Medium  &  Micro  Enterprise,  
http://www.thedti.gov.za/smme/act.pdf  (accessed  on  June  11,  2010).  
 
Source  2:  “National  Small  Business  Amendment  Act,  2004”  the  Department  of  Trade  
and  Industry/Small,  Medium  &  Micro  Enterprise,  
http://www.thedti.gov.za/smme/amendment04.pdf  (accessed  on  June  14,  2010).    
 
Source  3:  “NATIONAL  SMALL  BUSINESS  AMENDMENT  BILL,  2003”  the  Department  
of  Trade  and  Industry/Small,  Medium  &  Micro  Enterprise,  
http://www.thedti.gov.za/smme/ammendment03.pdf,  (accessed  on  June  17,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
United  States    
Agency:  Small  Business  Administration.    
The  Small  Business  Act  of  July  30,  1953  created  Small  business  Administration,  
which  shall  be  under  the  general  direction  and  supervision  of  the  President  and  
shall  not  be  affiliated  with  or  be  within  any  other  agency  or  department  of  the  
Federal  Government.1  
 
Legal  definition:    
"SMALL  BUSINESS  ACT  (Public  Law  85-­‐536,  as  amended)    
 
This  compilation  includes    
 
PL  110-­‐246,  approved  6/18/08:    
 
§  3     (a)     (1)     For  the  purposes  of  this  Act,  a  small  business  concern,  
including  but  not  limited  to  enterprises  that  are  engaged  in  the  business  of  
production  of  food  and  fiber,  ranching  and  raising  of  livestock,  aquaculture,  and  all  
other  farming  and  agricultural  related  industries,  shall  be  deemed  to  be  one  which  is  
independently  owned  and  operated  and  which  is  not  dominant  in  its  field  of  
operation:  Provided,  That  notwithstanding  any  other  provision  of  law,  an  
agricultural  enterprise  shall  be  deemed  to  be  a  small  business  concern  if  it  
(including  its  affiliates)  has  annual  receipts  not  in  excess  of  $750,000.    
  (2)     ESTABLISHMENT  OF  SIZE  STANDARDS.—    
    (A)     IN  GENERAL.—In  addition  to  the  criteria  specified  in  
paragraph  (1),  the  Administrator  may  specify  detailed  definitions  or  standards  by  
which  a  business  concern  may  be  determined  to  be  a  small  business  concern  for  the  
purposes  of  this  Act  or  any  other  Act.    
    (B)     ADDITIONAL  CRITERIA.—The  standards  described  in  
paragraph  (1)  may  utilize  number  of  employees,  dollar  volume  of  business,  net  
worth,  net  income,  a  combination  thereof,  or  other  appropriate  factors.    
    (C)     REQUIREMENTS.—Unless  specifically  authorized  by  statute,  
no  Federal  department  or  agency  may  prescribe  a  size  standard  for  categorizing  a  
business  concern  as  a  small  business  concern,  unless  such  proposed  size  standard—    
      (i)  is  proposed  after  an  opportunity  for  public  notice  and  
comment;    
      (ii)  provides  for  determining—    
        (I)  the  size  of  a  manufacturing  concern  as  measured  by  
the  manufacturing  concern's  average  employment  based  upon  employment  during  
each  of  the  manufacturing  concern's  pay  periods  for  the  preceding  12  months;  127  
Companion  Note  for  the  MSME  Country  Indicators    
        (II)  the  size  of  a  business  concern  providing  services  on  
the  basis  of  the  annual  average  gross  receipts  of  the  business  concern  over  a  period  
of  not  less  than  3  years;    
        (III)  the  size  of  other  business  concerns  on  the  basis  of  
data  over  a  period  of  not  less  than  3  years;  or    
        (IV)  other  appropriate  factors;  and    
      (iii)     is  approved  by  the  Administrator.    
  (3)     When  establishing  or  approving  any  size  standard  pursuant  to  
paragraph  (2),  the  Administrator  shall  ensure  that  the  size  standard  varies  from  
industry  to  industry  to  the  extent  necessary  to  reflect  the  differing  characteristics  of  
the  various  industries  and  consider  other  factors  deemed  to  be  relevant  by  the  
Administrator.”1  
 
Interpretation:    
“Summary  of  Size  Standards  by  Industry  To  qualify  as  a  small  business  concern  for  most  SBA  programs,  
small  business  size  standards  define  the  maximum  size  that  a  firm,  including  all  of  its  affiliates,  may  be.  
A  size  standard  is  usually  stated  in  number  of  employees  or  average  annual  receipts.  SBA  has  
established  two  widely  used  size  standards—500  employees  for  most  manufacturing  and  mining  
industries,  and  $7  million  in  average  annual  receipts  for  most  nonmanufacturing  industries.  While  there  
are  many  exceptions,  these  are  the  primary  size  standards  by  industry.    
 
   
 
Source  1:  Small  Business  Act,  Public  Law  85-­‐536,  as  amended,  PL  110-­‐246,  
approved  6/18/08,  p.  19,  
http://www.sba.gov/idc/groups/public/documents/sba_homepage/tool_serv_sbac
t.pdf  (accessed  May  13,  2010).    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Canada    
Agency  1:  Industry  Canada  (Government)  
 
Legal  Definition:    
N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
“In  some  instances,  Industry  Canada  has  used  a  definition  based  on  the  number  of  
employees,  which  varies  according  to  the  sector  —goods-­‐producing  firms  are  
considered  “small”  if  they  have  fewer  than  100  employees,  whereas  for  service-­‐
producing  firms  the  cut-­‐off  point  is  50  employees.  Above  that  size,  and  up  to  499  
employees,  a  firm  is  considered  medium-­‐sized.  The  smallest  of  small  businesses  are  
called  micro-­‐enterprises,  most  often  defined  as  having  fewer  than  five  employees.  
The  term  “SME”  (for  small  and  medium-­‐sized  enterprise)  refers  to  all  businesses  
with  fewer  than  500  employees,  whereas  firms  with  500  or  more  employees  are  
classified  as  “large”  businesses.”1  
 
Legal  Definition:  N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
For  the  purposes  of  Canada  Small  Business  Financing  Program.    
 
Small  business:  “A  business  being  carried  on  in  Canada  for  gain  or  profit,  with  
estimated  gross  annual  revenue  of  not  more  than  $5  million.  It  does  not  include  the  
business  of  farming  or  a  business  having  as  its  principal  object,  the  furtherance  of  a  
charitable  or  religious  purpose.”2  
 
Agency  2:  Canadian  Bankers  Association.    
 
Legal  Definition:  N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
“Classifies  a  company  as  “small”  if  it  qualifies  for  a  loan  authorization  of  less  than  
$250  000.”3  
 
Agency  3:  Export  Development  Corporation.    
 
Legal  Definition:  N/A    
 
Interpretation:    
“Small  or  “emerging”  exporters  are  firms  with  export  sales  under  $1  million.”4  
 
Source  1:  “Key  Small  Business  Statistics,”  Industry  Canada,  Small  Business  and  
Tourism  Branch,  January  2010,  p.  5,  http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/sbrp-­‐
rppe.nsf/vwapj/KSBS-­‐PSRPE_Jan2010_eng.pdf/$FILE/KSBS-­‐
PSRPE_Jan2010_eng.pdf  (accessed  on  May  12,  2010).    
Source  2:  “Canada  Small  Business  Financing  Program,”  Guidelines  SECTION  D:  
Annex,  Forms  and  Glossary,    
http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/csbfp-­‐pfpec.nsf/eng/la02891.html#smallbus  
(accessed  on  May  12,  2010).    
Source  3:  Op.  cit,  “Key  Small  Business  Statistics,”  Industry  Canada.    
Source  4:    Ibid.    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nigeria    
Agency:  USAID/Chemonics  Inc.    
 
Legal  definition:  See  below.    
 
Interpretation:    
 
Micro  enterprise:  1-­‐5  employees    
Small  enterprise:  6-­‐20  employees    
Medium  enterprise:  21-­‐50  employees.1  
   
Agency:  National  Council  on  Industry.    
 
Legal  definition:  was  adopted  at  13th  Council  meeting  of  the  National  Council  on  
Industry  held  in  July,  2001.    
 
Interpretation:    
 
•  Micro/Cottage  Industry    
An  industry  with  a  labor  size  of  not  more  than  10  workers,  or  total  cost  of  not  more  
than  N1.50  million,  including  working  capital  but  excluding  cost  of  land.    
•  Small-­‐Scale  Industry    
An  industry  with  a  labor  size  of  11-­‐100  workers  or  a  total  cost  of  not  more  thanN50  
million,  including  working  capital  but  excluding  cost  of  land.    
•  Medium  Scale  Industry:    
An  industry  with  a  labor  size  of  between  101-­‐300  workers  or  a  total  cost  of  over  
N50  million  but  not  more  than  N200  million,  including  working  capital  but  
excluding  cost  of  land.”2  
 
 Source  1:  "Assessment  of  The  Micro,  Small  and  Medium  Enterprise  (MSME)  Sector  
in  Nigeria,"  Volume  1:  MSME  Assessment,  PRISMS:  Promoting  Improved  Sustainable  
Microfinance  Services,  Contract  No.  620-­‐C-­‐00-­‐04-­‐00037-­‐00,  Submitted  to:  U.S.  
Agency  for  International  Development/Nigeria,  by:  Chemonics  International  Inc.,  p  
v-­‐vi,  
http://www.usaid.gov/ng/downloads/reforms/assessmentofthemsmesectorinnige
ria.pdf  (accessed  on  June  24,  2010).    
 
Source  2:  Fred.  N.  Udechukwu,  “SURVEY  OF  SMALL  AND  MEDIUM  SCALE  
INDUSTRIES  AND  THEIR  POTENTIALS  IN  NIGERIA,”  in  publications  for  the  
SEMINAR  ON  SMALL  AND  MEDIUM  INDUSTRIES  EQUITY  INVESTMENTS  SCHEME  
(SMIEIS),    
NO.  4,  Central  Bank  of  Nigeria  (CBN),  2003,  
http://www.cenbank.org/out/Publications/guidelines/dfd/2004/smieis.pdf  
(accessed  on  June  24,  2010).