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Designation: F 2444 – 04

Standard Practice for


Damage Prevention of Bearings, and Bearing Components
Through Proper Handling Techniques1
This standard is issued under the fixed designation F 2444; the number immediately following the designation indicates the year of
original adoption or, in the case of revision, the year of last revision. A number in parentheses indicates the year of last reapproval. A
superscript epsilon (e) indicates an editorial change since the last revision or reapproval.

1. Scope 4. Significance and Use


1.1 This practice covers requirements for the handling of all 4.1 This practice covers bearings and bearing components
bearings and bearing components. of all material compositions and grades. It may be used to
1.2 This is a general practice. The individual bearing han- develop a process for adequately handling bearings.
dling requirements shall be as specified herein or as specified 4.2 Unless the proper conditions of an adequate facility,
in the contract or purchase order. In the event of any conflict equipment, and trained personnel are available, it may be better
between requirements of this practice and the individual not to inspect the bearings in-house. The danger of contami-
bearing requirements of an OEM drawing, procurement speci- nating and damaging the bearings may be much greater than
fication, or other specification, the latter shall govern. Many the possibility of receiving bearings that will not function.
companies, organizations, and bearing users have excellent 4.3 Bearings are easily damaged at the customers’ receiving
facilities, equipment, and knowledgeable personnel for han- and test areas. In most cases, bearings should be accepted
dling bearings. The thrust of this practice is for users that do based on the bearing manufacturer’s certification. Certificates
not have this knowledge of bearings. of quality (conformance) supplied by the bearing manufacturer
1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the may be furnished in lieu of actual performance of such testing
safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the by the receiving activity of the bearings. The certificate shall
responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appro- include the name of the purchaser, contract number/PO num-
priate safety and health practices and determine the applica- ber, name of the manufacturer or supplier, item identification,
bility of regulatory limitations prior to use. name of the material, lot number, lot size, sample size, date of
testing, test method, individual test results, and the specifica-
2. Referenced Documents tion requirements.
2.1 ABMA Standard:2 4.4 This practice does not cover clean room requirements of
ABMA 1 Terminology miniature and instrument precision bearings. These bearings
2.2 ISO Standards:3 require clean room environments in accordance with ISO
ISO 14644-1 Cleanrooms and Associated Controlled 14644-1 and ISO 14644-2.
Environments—Part 1: Classification of Air Cleanliness
(DOD Adopted) 5. Reasons for Not Handling Bearings
ISO 14644-2 Cleanrooms and Associated Controlled 5.1 When bearings are received, the following questions
Environments—Part 2: Specifications for Testing and must be asked:
Monitoring to Prove Continued Compliance with ISO 5.1.1 What amount of inspection checks will be performed
14644-1 on the bearings? Do we need to do any checks?
ISO 9001 Quality Management Systems—Requirements 5.1.2 What will it cost to establish and maintain equipment
and facilities to inspect and test bearings?
3. Terminology 5.1.3 What is the established history of the bearing? If there
3.1 Definitions—For definitions of terms used in this prac- has never been a rejection, is inspection warranted?
tice, refer to ABMA 1. 5.1.4 What type of test is required and how detailed is it?
5.1.4.1 Rough spin,
1
5.1.4.2 Destructive,
This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee F34 on Rolling
Element Bearings and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee F34.03 on
5.1.4.3 Nondestructive (NDT),
Preservation, Cleaning, and Packaging. 5.1.4.4 Disassembly,
Current edition approved Nov. 1, 2004. Published November 2004. 5.1.4.5 Test requires recleaning, relubrication, and repack-
2
Available from American Bearing Manufacturers Association (ABMA), 2025 aging of the bearings,
M Street, NW Suite 800 Washington, DC 20036.
3
Available from American National Standards Institute (ANSI), 25 W. 43rd St., 5.1.4.6 Test requires a clean room environment,
4th Floor, New York, NY 10036. 5.1.4.7 Dimensional, or

Copyright © ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, PO Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA 19428-2959, United States.

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5.1.4.8 Performance. 8. General Handling Rules (Recommended Precautions)
5.1.5 What type of documentation is required? 8.1 Never touch bearings with the bare hands. Acid mois-
5.1.6 Are trained personnel available? ture deposited by fingers will corrode bearings, and particles of
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5.1.7 Are adequate equipment and facilities available? skin on the surface of the bearings are very hard to remove.
5.1.8 Do we have knowledge of the bearing manufacturer’s Use tweezers, tongs, powder free rubber gloves, and finger
quality system? cots.
8.2 A bearing should never be placed directly on a contami-
6. Equipment and Facilities nated surface.
6.1 The list below provides some conditions that must be 8.3 The use of headgear or hairnets is recommended to
considered by the bearing user. The bearing user must deter- protect the bearings from hair contamination.
mine if they have the necessary in-house capability to perform 8.4 Personnel handling bearings should change their per-
inspections and tests of bearings. sonal clothing when it becomes soiled or contaminated by solid
6.2 It is recommended that the bearing areas have a con- or liquid materials.
trolled environment. 8.5 Personnel should wear shoes or boots that are free of dirt
6.3 The construction of the bearing handling areas should be or other contamination. Shoe brushes may be provided in these
made of materials that do not lend themselves to accumulating areas so that footgear can be cleaned.
dust. It is recommended that plastic materials or other non- 8.6 Personal items such as jackets, sweaters, papers, food,
shedding materials be used for walls and ceilings. The floors or drinks should not be in areas of close proximity to the
should be of a material that will not require waxing, has very bearings.
few seams if any, and a non-abrasive surface. 8.7 Lint-free rags and cloths should be used when cleaning
6.4 Bearing handling areas should be away from doors and bearings
windows to prevent dust from entering the area when the doors 8.8 No smoking is allowed in any inspection, test, or
or windows are opened. assembly area where bearings are handled.
6.5 The room must be well-lit. 8.9 No paper should be allowed to touch bearings because
6.6 Containers with covers are recommended for use during of possible contamination from paper lint. Some paper is also
inspection and tests of bearings. Racks, trays, and handling acidic and could cause corrosion. The use of non-shedding
containers should be made of glass, solvent resistant plastic, or paper is desirable for making notes and recording data. Plastic
non-magnetic materials. document protectors may be used to enclose paper documen-
6.7 Tweezers and tongs should have blunt points and tation such as routing tickets, labels, etc.
rounded edges, and be made of non-magnetic stainless steel. 8.10 No erasers or rubber bands should be permitted around
Other suitable materials may be used. bearings. These items are a source of particulate contamina-
6.8 Compressed air, if any is used in the room for gauging, tion.
cleaning, or drying bearings, should be filtered and dehydrated. 8.11 Personnel should use ballpoint pens.
6.9 Inspection equipment required would depend on what 8.12 Personnel handling bearings should wash and dry
and how much inspection is to be performed. It could consist hands frequently, especially after eating or smoking.
of microscopes for visual inspection, air gages for checking 8.13 Do not carry tweezers or other working equipment in
bores and outside diameters, electronic or mechanical gages for pockets. Pockets are a large source of contamination. Garments
checking width, and special gages for checking radial play, without pockets are desirable.
torque, axial play, and preload. Not all of these gages are used 8.14 Clean all gages and working equipment before using.
on all bearings. Many of these tests can only be performed at 8.15 Use only clean containers for holding bearings. Be
the manufacturer’s facility. Many dimensions can only be careful not to use a container that may have held bearings with
checked as component parts. These are made before the a different lubricant.
bearings are assembled. 8.16 The use of abrasive paper around bearings is not
recommended.
7. Training of Bearing Personnel 8.17 Table tops and workbenches should be cleaned with
7.1 All personnel handling bearings shall be trained and lint free cloths or sponges and appropriate cleaner.
must demonstrate the ability to perform visual inspections of 8.18 Dust-proof cabinets may be used for storing bearings.
bearings. This training shall be documented on the employee No paper products should be allowed in the dust cabinets.
training record. Inkpads and stamps should not be placed in dust cabinets.
7.2 The training may be divided into two parts. Classroom 8.19 Fans should not be permitted in areas where bearings
training may be Part I and performance training may be Part II. are handled.
7.3 Personnel must complete all of the training require- 8.20 Appropriate hand lotions containing moisturizers may
ments. be used in any of the bearing handling areas.
7.4 The bearing supplier is responsible for performance of 8.21 Areas should be kept neat and orderly. There should be
all of the testing and inspection requirements. The receiving covered trash containers available for disposal of waste prod-
activity may use assigned certified personnel and equipment or ucts.
any other suitable facility with trained personnel in the 8.22 Bearings and components released by machines must
performance of the acceptance tests or inspections. be controlled to prevent damage.

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8.23 If components or bearings drop on the floor, they must The demagnification should be verified with a gaussmeter. A
be inspected. maximum of 5 gauss is recommended.
8.24 When emptying components into another container,
prevent sharp hitting. 10. Sampling
8.25 Components and bearings must be handled with care 10.1 Sampling for visual and dimensional testing of bear-
during measurements. ings and bearing components shall be done in accordance with
8.26 When removing components from tumblers, do not the purchase order or contract. The unit of product for sampling
pour or drop components. purposes shall be one bearing as applicable. Acceptance
8.27 Place components gently into containers between ma- number shall be zero for all sample series unless otherwise
chining operations. specified.
8.28 Components segregated for regrind are to be handled 10.2 Remember that “each” handling operation detracts
just as acceptable items. from the quality of the bearing. The benefits to be obtained
8.29 Do not shake, drop, or move containers abruptly. from sampling are: less damage to the bearings caused by
8.30 Place components and bearings in baskets by layering handling, reduction of inspection errors caused by fatigue and
with dividers. a reduced inspection time. Personnel performing the inspection
8.31 During operations that may generate agitation, use and testing shall meet the specific training requirements of the
caution to avoid part movement. organization.
8.32 During placement and removal of containers from carts 11. Receiving Inspection
and wagons, handle gently.
8.33 Items subject to corrosion during fabrication or storage 11.1 Handling of all bearing components and bearing as-
require special processing. semblies requires care, patience, knowledge, and common
8.34 Preserve and package items in controlled areas as sense.
required. 11.2 Use clean, burr-free tools that are designed for the job.
8.35 Ensure that all bearings and components are properly The tools should not be painted or metal-plated. Use non-
identified at all times. magnetic tools for miniature and instrument bearings.
11.3 Bearings should not be removed from the original
packaging until they are ready for inspection, test, or use.
9. Preparation for Inspection
11.4 Protect unwrapped bearings by keeping them covered
9.1 Bearings are easily damaged at the customer’s receiving and dry at all times.
inspection or test area. The damage is usually caused by the 11.5 Miniature bearings, miniature precision bearings, and
lack of training on how to properly handle bearings. instrument bearings must be handled in a clean room environ-
9.2 Bearings should be brought into a suitable inspection ment.
area in the smallest unit container that has the complete 11.6 Containers used for components and assemblies should
marking and identification information. be designed to avoid dents, nicks, and part-to-part impact. Size,
9.3 Shipping and intermediate containers, if applicable, type, and weight are important considerations when selecting
should be removed before the bearings are brought to the containers for storage and movement of parts.
inspection area. 11.7 Assembled bearings shall be handled individually at
9.4 Do not open more vials or packages than are required to receiving. Packaged bearings shall be removed from the
obtain the inspection sample. packaging and placed in tote bins for inspection. Bearings shall
9.5 Care should be taken so that plastic particles are not a be moved to other areas in the tote bins or may be individually
source of contamination when vials must be cut open with placed in bags, vials, or racks. Bulk handling may be suitable
razor blades, knives, or other sharp-edged instruments. for bearings 30 mm or less in diameter. All larger bearings shall
9.6 All bearing packages should be thoroughly cleaned on be individually handled.

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the outside to remove contamination. Cut plastic bags contain- 11.8 Inspect bearings using the unaided eye. Higher magni-
ing bearings with a razor blade or scissors. fication is normally allowed to evaluate defects.
9.7 When bearings are serialized, care must be taken to 11.9 Plated, coated, and dry-film lubricated parts such as
prevent any mix up. The same care needs to be taken on rings, retainers, and cages may require special handling. The
bearings that are coded or classified in any manner. manufacturer does not have these manufacturing processes
9.8 When separable bearings are being inspected, care in-house very often. Typically, the process supplier shall return
should be taken not to interchange the inner and outer races, as the parts in the same containers that they received them in.
they are usually matched. If the races become mixed, the Consideration must be given to the vibration the parts will
bearings must be scrapped. receive from transport and handling. After inspection, the parts
9.9 One of the first operations in preparing for inspection of shall be returned to the appropriate packing to prevent un-
bearings should be demagnetization. Magnetized bearings are wanted part-to-part contact.
highly susceptible to contamination. The manufacturer will
demagnetize the bearings before shipping, but they will pick up 12. Dimensional Inspection and Performance Tests
magnetism en route. There are several types of demagnetizers 12.1 Personnel performing the dimensional inspection and
available, but precautions should be taken in their proper use to performance testing shall meet the training requirements of the
insure the operator does not actually magnetize the bearings. organization.

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12.2 The facility and environment conditions must be de- 14. Assembly
termined prior to performing measurements and other tests. 14.1 Properly trained personnel should be used for assembly
12.3 Segregate acceptable bearings from non-acceptable of bearings.
bearings and mark or tag accordingly. 14.2 Use proper assembly presses and heat in techniques to
12.4 All bearings and bearing components that are rejected assemble bearings. Never use hammers, and avoid sharp blows
must have disposition such as: return to vendor, rework, repair, to the bearings.
scrap, or other. 14.3 Make sure that bearing rings are started evenly on
12.5 Certain bearings have extremely thin radial ring sec- shafts or in housings to prevent cocking and distortion. This
tions that can be easily be deformed by testing gage loads. A can damage the inspection equipment, bearings, and equip-

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maximum gage pressure must be established for all mechanical ment.
gage measurements. The user is strongly advised to obtain 14.4 Apply force only to the ring being press fitted. Never
specific correlation with each bearing supplier when using a strike the outer ring to force the inner ring onto the shaft.
gage load. Unusual force may cause brinelling that results in high torque,
12.6 Bearings should never be hammered or forced on test noisy operation, and shortened bearing life.
arbors or test fixtures. This can produce brinelling, race 14.5 Assemble only clean parts that are free of burrs and
cracking, and damage to retainers. raised metal.
12.7 All bearings being tested should be lubricated to 14.6 When installing bearings, clean the surrounding sur-
prevent damage. faces first. Inspect the bearings carefully for damage before
12.8 Extreme caution should be used any time a bearing has installing.
a load placed on it on a test fixture. Any loading of a bearing 14.7 Bonded molded rubber seals shall be inspected before
that is cocked on the fixture will tend to produce brinelling in installation to insure that there is no binding and distortion of
the races. the rubber.
12.9 Caution should be used any time a bearing is placed on 14.8 Bearings moved to the assembly area shall be placed in
or removed from the test fixture to prevent scratches in any the original packaging or in plastic vials, plastic bags, or a
critical areas. similar container that will not cause damage.
12.10 If the proper conditions of facility, equipment and
trained personnel are not available, it may be better to not 15. Cleaning
inspect the bearings. The danger of contamination and damag- 15.1 Bearings must be cleaned by a controlled process.
ing the bearings may be greater than the possibility of receiving Bearings shall be demagnetized before cleaning to remove
defective bearings. small steel particles that may adhere to the bearing surface.
15.2 Never use chlorinated solvents such as carbon tetra-
13. Disassembly chloride or chloroform as cleaners.
13.1 Properly trained personnel should be used for disas- 15.3 Do not spin the assembled bearings during cleaning to
sembly of bearings. avoid bearing damage. Also, caution should be taken in using
13.2 Use proper disassembly puller tools for removal of ultrasonic cleaning to avoid bearing damage.
bearings from shafts and housings. Never use hammers, and 15.4 After cleaning, corrosion prevention shall be required
avoid sharp blows to the bearings. for all corrosive-type materials because the protective oil has
13.3 Make sure that bearing rings are removed evenly from been removed.
shafts and housings to prevent cocking and distortion. This can 15.5 The following rules are recommended:
damage the bearings or the assembly. 15.5.1 Do not wash more bearings or bearing components
13.4 When removing bearings, clean the surrounding sur- than can be processed within 30 min.
faces first. Isolate the used bearings and inspect them carefully 15.5.2 Do not handle product with bare hands. Use twee-
before being reused or reprocessed. Make sure that bearings zers, powder free latex gloves, or finger cots.
are free of heavy dirt and foreign contamination before placing 15.5.3 Dip the bearings and bearing components in protec-
them into containers. tive lubricant at completion of inspection or test.
13.5 Bearing containers will be provided in the disassembly 15.5.4 All parts reprocessed through wash must be relubri-
area to keep bearings identified and segregated, and also to cated or preserved within 30 min of wash.
keep them from falling or hitting each other, causing additional 15.5.5 Never leave parts dry for more than 30 min.
damage. 15.6 Stamped metal parts such as retainers, shields, seals,
13.6 Matched sets of bearings should be identified by and wires that are susceptible to shape, flatness, roundness, or
tagging to keep bearings as a matched set. straightness problems should be cleaned by a process that will
13.7 Rolling elements such as balls, rollers, needles, and so not cause damage to the components.
forth shall be placed in plastic vials, plastic bags, cardboard
boxes, or a similar container that will not cause damage 16. Lubrication
because of part-to-part contact. The large rolling elements are 16.1 Lubrication of bearings is very critical. It would be
extremely sensitive to bulk transfers and storage and must be preferred to purchase the bearings already lubricated to speci-
suitably segregated from each other to prevent damage. Plastic fication by the manufacturers who have the proper equipment
mesh should be used if the components are layered. and trained personnel.

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16.2 Lubricants should be filtered. This must be done with 18.2 It is recommended to issue the bearings with the oldest
caution to prevent removal of some of the important additives date first. This minimizes the possibility of corrosion and the
in the lubrication such as oil lubricants. aging of the lubricant while in storage.
16.3 Use bearing quality lubricants. Keep the bearings clean 18.3 Bearings that have long-term storage without being
during lubricating operations and covered between operations cleaned or relubricated should have a lubrication shelf life
and after fully lubricated. established to determine when the bearings will need to be
17. Packaging and Package Marking cleaned and relubricated. In some cases, it may be advisable to
17.1 The bearings shall be cleaned, dried, preserved and return the bearings to the manufacturer for cleaning and
packaged in accordance with a controlled process. The level of relubrication.
preservation and packaging shall protect the bearings until the 18.4 Plated, coated and dry-film lubricated parts such as
next process or operation. rings, retainers, and cages may require special storage. The size
17.2 The number of bearings or bearing components per and weight of the parts is important to determine the appro-
unit container shall be in accordance with the customer priate container that will be used. The parts may be individu-
requirement. ally wrapped, placed in plastic mesh or sleeves, placed in
17.3 In addition to any special identification marking re- plastic tubes, placed in plastic totes with compartments, packed
quired by the customer, each unit pack, intermediate, and in sealed poly bags, or layered with dividers and filler material
exterior container should be marked in accordance with the to prevent damage.
best commercial practice.
18. Bearing Storage 19. Keywords
18.1 Bearings which are to be stored after inspection, 19.1 ball bearing; bearing rolling elements; plain bearing;
waiting to be issued to production, must be stored in a suitable roller bearing
area.

APPENDIX

(Nonmandatory Information)

X1. HANDLING CHECKLIST

X1.1 This appendix is intended for guidance only. Check- X1.3 To assist the user in quickly finding the specific topic
lists of this nature cannot be prepared that will cover all of interest, the following subject index is provided:
operations in all facilities in a comprehensive manner. Ele-
ments should be added or deleted from the checklist to reflect Subject
the actual control requirements in a given facility.
Management Page 6
X1.2 The checklist is structured such that “YES” is the Training Page 6
Engineering Page 6
preferred answer; however, “YES” may not be appropriate in Procurement Page 6
all areas. Judgment must be exercised to establish the specific Receiving Area Page 7
requirements. Storage Area Page 7
Work Areas Page 7
Shipping Area Page 7
Intra-Plant and Inner-Plant Page 8
Inspection Stations Page 8
Quality Functions Page 8

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F 2444 – 04
TABLE X1.2 Handling Checklist

MANAGEMENT
1. Does the organization have a bearing and bearing components handling policy? YES NO
2. Is there a plan that encompasses specific areas and processes? YES NO
3. Does it assign responsibility for implementation? YES NO
4. Are formal audits provided for in the policy? (Formal) (Informal) (Other) YES NO
5. Is it part of the policy that bearings still be protected after they are inspected? YES NO
6. Is the document in agreement with ISO 9001 or other Quality System? YES NO
7. Does the policy provide for flow down to suppliers and subcontractors? YES NO
8. Are audits conducted at suppliers and subcontractors? YES NO
9. Are the auditors properly trained? YES NO
10. Is there a designated individual whose responsibility is to ensure procedures are followed? YES NO
11. Is there a committee to resolve any questions? YES NO
12. Does the committee have the support of senior management? YES NO
13. Is there a feedback plan that allows the committee to know when a problem is resolved? YES NO
14. Are provisions made to train personnel in handling requirements? YES NO
15. Are supervisors required to be trained? YES NO
16. Are personnel trained to identify the different types and degree of damage? YES NO
17. Is the use of food, drink, smoking, and personal items prohibited in the work areas? YES NO
18. Are there controls for temperature and contamination in handling areas? YES NO
19. Are there procedures that explain what to do if temperature and contamination is not maintained? YES NO
20. Are there provisions for recurring training for employees? YES NO
21. Who determines which employees will receive training? (Mgt) (Process Eng) (Supervisor) (Other) YES NO
22. Do custodial personnel need any training? YES NO
23. Are damaged items protected to prevent further damage to the part? Complicates analysis if not. YES NO

TRAINING
1. Is there a training plan for handling of products? YES NO
2. Do all personnel receive training on handling of parts and assemblies? YES NO
3. Is the training course adequate? YES NO
4. How often is the course scheduled? Is this adequate? YES NO
5. Is someone responsible to determine when people should receive training? YES NO
6. Is there an oral or written examination given? YES NO
7. Are training records maintained and available for inspection? YES NO
8. Is training provided for the people who perform the following functions?
a. Supervise and manage personnel YES NO
b. Purchasing YES NO
c. Design and process engineering YES NO
d. Receiving Inspection YES NO
e. Manufacturing work areas YES NO
f. Inspection and test YES NO
g. Assembly YES NO
h. Rework of assemblies and components YES NO
i. Removal and installation of bearings YES NO
j. Field service personnel YES NO
k. Maintenance personnel YES NO
l. Cleaning, lubrication, packaging and storage YES NO
m. Other YES NO
9. Is someone responsible for the handling training course? YES NO
10. Are people who satisfactorily complete this training documented by some records? YES NO
11. When people make related mistakes is there a requirement for refresher training? YES NO
12. Is training designed for the different needs of different areas and personnel skills? YES NO
13. Does the training explain what to do with parts that are improperly handled? YES NO
14. Does the training explain procedures in event parts are suspected of being damaged? YES NO
15. Does the training explain use of handling tools and techniques to prevent damage? YES NO
16. Does the training explain what to do or who to see if the procedure is in error or incomplete? YES NO
17. Are custodial personnel getting any training? YES NO

ENGINEERING
1. Are all engineering personnel trained in handling awareness? YES NO
2. Have all components in the bearing design been selected for analysis to prevent damage? YES NO
3. Was the analysis performed to verify adequacy of the preventive handling measures? YES NO
4. Do drawings provide precautionary procedures and identify sensitive finishes and dimensions? YES NO
5. Have tests been conducted to prove the effectiveness of handling measures? YES NO
6. Do engineers assist in failure analysis and implementing corrective action? YES NO
7. Are engineering procedures reviewed to see that they are (current) (adequate) (in-use)? YES NO
8. Does engineering review the adequacy of personnel training and damage prevention measures? YES NO
9. Have all of the technical requirements for handling been identified? YES NO

PROCUREMENT
1. Are handling damage prevention requirements defined by a procedure, instruction or other? YES NO
2. Have personnel who procure items and services been trained in handling awareness? YES NO
3. Do handling requirements exist for inclusion in procurement documentation? YES NO
4. Are pre-award and in-process audits performed on subcontractors on handling procedures? YES NO
5. Are there lists of suitable and unsuitable subcontractors and suppliers? YES NO
6. Are handling requirements incorporated in procurement documents? YES NO

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TABLE X1.2 Continued


7. Are subcontractors and suppliers required to certify that items are handled using controls? YES NO
8. Do suppliers and subcontractors have corrective action programs? YES NO
9. Is purchasing included on distribution of deficiency reports concerning damaged items? YES NO
10. Are audits performed to insure procedures are (current), (adequate), and (in-use)? YES NO

RECEIVING
1. Are handling damage prevention requirements defined by a procedure, instruction, or other? YES NO
2. Are receiving personnel able to identify items sensitive to handling damage? YES NO
3. Are all intermediate and in process shipping containers inspected for damage? YES NO
4. Are there procedures to explain:
a. How to handle items that are improperly packaged? YES NO
b. How to handle items that are improperly labeled? YES NO
c. What to do with items being worked on at the end of a shift and at breaks? YES NO
5. Are parts properly packaged inside a protective container? YES NO
6. Are items checked to see that they were properly protected during shipments? YES NO
7. When parts are removed from protective containers, is it done in a suitable work area? YES NO
8. After items are inspected, are they repackaged in protective material prior to leaving area? YES NO
9. Does the work area have special requirements?
a. Apparel: aprons, gloves, finger cots, shoe covers, hoods, masks, coveralls, other? YES NO
b. Cleaning: cleaning systems, drying systems, abrasives, air guns, equipment, other? YES NO
c. Supplies: swabs, moisturizers, plastic bags, cleaning solutions, packaging, tags, other? YES NO
d. Equipment: cabinets, dispensers, tools, microscopes, heaters, ovens, pumps, other? YES NO
e. Monitoring Equipment: analyzers, sensors, pressure gages, cleanliness measurement? YES NO
f. Furniture: non-shedding benches, cabinets, floors, lockers, racks, stools, chairs, other? YES NO
10. Are drinking, eating, smoking, and personal products prohibited in the work areas? YES NO
11. Are audits performed to insure procedures are (current), (adequate), and (in-use)? YES NO
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12. Have damage-handling controls been properly implemented? YES NO

STORAGE AREA
1. Are handling damage prevention requirements defined by a procedure, instruction or other? YES NO
2. Are all items received with adequate protection? YES NO
3. Are there procedures to explain?
a. How to handle items that are improperly packaged? YES NO
b. How to handle items that are improperly labeled? YES NO
c. What to do with items being worked on at the end of a shift and at breaks? YES NO
4. Are items marked so they are readily recognized to prevent the need to open the protective pack? YES NO
5. Is a record maintained of any discrepancy found and corrective action taken? YES NO
6. Is the work area adequate? (See Receiving par 9 above for special requirements) YES NO
7. Are drinking, eating, smoking, and personal products prohibited in the work areas? YES NO
8. Are items maintained in protective covering when they are handled and moved? YES NO
9. Are partial issues maintained in protective covering? YES NO
10. Are items kitted in a suitable area? YES NO
11. Are audits performed to insure procedures are (current), (adequate), and (in-use)? YES NO
12. Have damage-handling controls been properly implemented? YES NO

WORK AREAS
1. Are handling damage prevention requirements defined by a procedure, instruction, or other? YES NO
2. Are all items received with adequate protection? YES NO
3. Are there procedures to explain?
a. How to handle items that are improperly packaged? YES NO
b. How to handle items that are improperly labeled? YES NO
c. What to do with items being worked on at the end of a shift and at breaks? YES NO
4. Are drinking, eating, smoking, and personal products prohibited in the work areas? YES NO
5. Does the work area have special requirements?
a. Apparel: aprons, gloves, finger cots, shoe covers, hoods, masks, coveralls, other? YES NO
b. Cleaning: cleaning systems, drying systems, abrasives, air guns, equipment, other? YES NO
c. Supplies: swabs, moisturizers, plastic bags, cleaning solutions, packaging, tags, other? YES NO
d. Equipment: cabinets, dispensers, tools, microscopes, heaters, ovens, pumps, other? YES NO
e. Monitoring Equipment: analyzers, sensors, pressure gages, cleanliness measurement? YES NO
f. Furniture: non-shedding benches, cabinets, floors, lockers, racks, stools, chairs, other? YES NO
6. Are proper handling tools required and properly used? YES NO
7. Has everyone in the work area been trained in handling precautions? YES NO
8. Are untrained personnel restricted from entering some work areas? YES NO
9. Is a record maintained of any discrepancy found and corrective action taken? YES NO
10. Are items received in this area properly protected? YES NO
11. Are items maintained in protective covering except when being handled? YES NO
12. Are items protected throughout the entire workstation process? YES NO
13. Is there the same protection for failed items? YES NO
14. Are audits performed to insure procedures are current, adequate, and in-use? YES NO
15. Have damage-handling controls been properly implemented? YES NO

SHIPPING AREA
1. Are handling damage prevention requirements defined by a procedure, instruction, or other? YES NO
2. Are all items received with adequate protection? YES NO
3. Are there procedures to explain?
a. How to handle items that are improperly protected? YES NO

Copyright ASTM International 7


Reproduced by IHS under license with ASTM Licensee=Instituto Mexicano Del Petroleo/3139900100
No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale, 01/05/2005 07:54:37 MST
F 2444 – 04

TABLE X1.2 Continued


b. How to handle items that are improperly labeled? YES NO
c. What to do with items being worked on at the end of a shift and at breaks? YES NO
4. Are drinking, eating, smoking, and personal products prohibited in the shipping areas? YES NO
5. Are items maintained in protective covering at all time? YES NO
6. Does the packaging provide protection from vibration, brinelling, dropping, or contamination? YES NO
7. Are the handling workstations adequate in the shipping area? YES NO
8. Are special tools, equipment and materials required and available? YES NO
9. Is the lighting, air quality, and facilities adequate in the shipping area? YES NO
10. Is action is taken when the work area is deemed unsuitable? YES NO
11. Are audits performed to insure procedures are (current), (adequate), and (in-use)? YES NO
12. Have damage-handling controls been properly implemented? YES NO
13. Is a record maintained of any discrepancy found and corrective action taken? YES NO

IN PLANT AND INTER-PLANT MOVEMENT


1. Is there a document that explains how items will be handled while being moved from area to area? YES NO
2. Does the document explain the difference in “inter” and “intra” plant movement? YES NO
3. Does the document explain how the items will be protected and labeled to prevent damage? YES NO
4. Are there procedures to explain?
a. How to handle items that are improperly protected? YES NO
b. How to handle items that are improperly labeled? YES NO
c. What to do with items being worked on at the end of a shift and at breaks? YES NO
5. Are all items protected during transportation in the plant and outside the plant? YES NO
6. Is someone responsible to check the protective covering prior to movement? YES NO
7. Are audits performed to insure procedures are current, adequate, and in-use? YES NO
8. Have damage-handling controls been properly implemented? YES NO
9. Is a record maintained of any discrepancy found and corrective action taken? YES NO
10. Are subcontractors and suppliers properly trained in the movement of items to prevent damage? YES NO

INSPECTION STATIONS
1. Are handling damage prevention requirements defined by a written procedure? YES NO
2. Are all items received at the inspection area with adequate protection? YES NO
3. Are there procedures to explain?
a. How to handle items that are improperly packaged? YES NO
b. How to handle items that are improperly labeled? YES NO
c. What to do with items being worked on at the end of a shift and at breaks? YES NO
4. Are drinking, eating, smoking and personal products prohibited in the inspection areas? YES NO
5. Does the inspection area have special requirements?
a. Apparel: aprons, gloves, finger cots, shoe covers, hoods, masks, coveralls, other? YES NO
b. Cleaning: cleaning systems, drying systems, abrasives, air guns, equipment, other? YES NO
c. Supplies: swabs, moisturizers, plastic bags, cleaning solutions, packaging, tags, other? YES NO
d. Equipment: cabinets, dispensers, tools, microscopes, heaters, ovens, pumps, other? YES NO
e. Monitoring Equipment: analyzers, sensors, pressure gages, cleanliness measurement? YES NO
f. Furniture: non-shedding benches, cabinets, floors, lockers, racks, stools, chairs, other? YES NO
6. Are proper handling tools required and properly used? YES NO
7. Has everyone in the inspection area been trained in handling precautions? YES NO
8. Are untrained personnel restricted from entering some inspection areas? YES NO
9. Is a record maintained of any discrepancy found and corrective action taken? YES NO
10. Are items received in this area properly protected? YES NO
11. Are items maintained in protective covering except when being handled? YES NO
12. Are items protected throughout the entire inspection station process? YES NO
13. Is there the same protection for failed items? YES NO
14. Are audits performed to insure procedures are current, adequate, and in-use? YES NO
15. Have damage-handling controls been properly implemented? YES NO

QUALITY FUNCTION
1. Are handling damage prevention requirements defined by quality procedure, instruction or other? YES NO
2. Are all quality control personnel able to identify items sensitive to handling damage? YES NO
3. Are there quality procedures to explain:
a. How to handle items that are improperly packaged? YES NO
b. How to handle items that are improperly labeled? YES NO
c. What to do with items being worked on at the end of a shift and at breaks? YES NO
4. Do quality control personnel inspect handling operations in the work areas? YES NO
5. Do quality control personnel determine that customer requirements are being met? YES NO
6. Do quality personnel participate in pre-award and post-award surveys at the:
a. Contractors? YES NO
b. Subcontractors? YES NO
c. Suppliers? YES NO
8. Do quality personnel perform handling audits at the:
a. Contractors? YES NO
b. Subcontractors? YES NO
c. Suppliers? YES NO
9. Are audits performed to insure procedures are current, adequate, and in-use? YES NO
10. Are drinking, eating, smoking, and personal products prohibited in the inspection areas? YES NO
11. Have damage-handling controls been properly implemented? YES NO
12. Does quality control ensure all handling failures are documented? YES NO
13. Does quality control maintain a data bank of the causes, trends, and corrective action for all handling failures? YES NO

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Copyright ASTM International 8


Reproduced by IHS under license with ASTM Licensee=Instituto Mexicano Del Petroleo/3139900100
No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale, 01/05/2005 07:54:37 MST
F 2444 – 04

TABLE X1.2 Continued


14. Does the inspection area have special requirements?
a. Apparel: aprons, gloves, finger cots, shoe covers, hoods, masks, coveralls, other? YES NO
b. Cleaning: cleaning systems, drying systems, abrasives, air guns, equipment, other? YES NO
c. Supplies: swabs, moisturizers, plastic bags, cleaning solutions, packaging, tags, other? YES NO
d. Equipment: cabinets, dispensers, tools, microscopes, heaters, ovens, pumps, other? YES NO
e. Monitoring Equipment: analyzers, sensors, pressure gages, cleanliness measurement? YES NO
f. Furniture: non-shedding benches, cabinets, floors, lockers, racks, stools, chairs, other? YES NO

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Copyright ASTM International 9


Reproduced by IHS under license with ASTM Licensee=Instituto Mexicano Del Petroleo/3139900100
No reproduction or networking permitted without license from IHS Not for Resale, 01/05/2005 07:54:37 MST