You are on page 1of 27

CHILDHOOD APRAXIA OF SPEECH 

FOCUS ON TREATMENT 
 
ISHA ANNUAL CONFERENCE 
February 13, 2009 
 
Presented by: 
Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP 
 
DEFINITION OF CAS 
 
“… a neurological childhood (pediatric) speech sound disorder in which the precision and consistency of 
movements underlying speech are impaired in the absence of neuromuscular deficits (e.g., abnormal reflexes, 
abnormal tone). CAS may occur as a result of known neurological impairment, in association with complex 
neurobehavioral disorders of known or unknown origin, or as an idiopathic neurogenic speech sound disorder.  The 
core impairment in planning and/or programming spatiotemporal parameters of movement sequences results in 
errors in speech sound production and prosody.”   
 
ASHA Ad Hoc Committee on Apraxia of Speech in Children 
 

CHARACTERISTICS HAVING GREATEST PROMISE FOR 
SENSITIVITY AND SPECIFICITY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF CAS 
 
Sensitivity – Characteristic is observed in most kids with CAS 
Specificity – Characteristic is not observed in most kids without CAS 
 

Inconsistent errors in production of consonants and vowels with repeated productions of syllables and 
words; 

Lengthened and disrupted coarticulatory transitions between sounds and syllables; 

Inappropriate prosody, especially in the realization of lexical or phrasal stress. 

ASHA Ad Hoc Committee on Apraxia of Speech in Children 

     
ADDITIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CAS 
 
 Presence of vowel distortions 
 Limited consonant and vowel repertoire 
 Use of simple syllable shapes 
 Greater difficulty as word length or phrase length increase 
 Connected speech more unintelligible than single‐word articulation test might suggest 
 Poor diadochokinesis 
 Limited production of complex word shapes 
 Slow development of Speech‐Language Pathology Services limited speech intelligibility 
 Limited babbling during infancy 
 Groping, struggling to speak 
 Possible soft palate involvement 
 Receptive language (typically) exceeds receptive language 
 Regression or loss of sounds or words 
 
 
EVALUATION 
 
ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF A MOTOR SPEECH EXAM 
 Produce words imitatively and spontaneously 
  Produce words with increasingly complex syllable shapes 
  Repeat test items more than once 
 Execute non‐vocal oral movement 
  Produce phrases and sentences 
  Produce challenging words with the benefit of cueing (visual/auditory/tactile/proprioceptive) 

Note the following: 
 Weakly produced phonemes 

 Groping 

 Resonance differences 

 Prosody differences (intonation, stress) 

 Rate and volume  

FORMAL ASSESSMENT INSTRUMENTS 

KSPT ‐ Kaufman Speech Praxis Test for Children (Kaufman) 

 VMPAC – Verbal Motor Production Assessment for Children (Hayden and Square) 

 
 
 
 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  2 
TREATMENT FOR 
CHILDHOOD APRAXIA OF SPEECH 
TREATMENT CONSIDERATIONS 
 
Principles of Motor Learning 

 Shorter, More Frequent Sessions 
 
 Focus on Phoneme Sequencing – Not Just Sounds 
 
 Encourage Repeated Practice to Build Muscle Memory 
 
 Provide Optimal Reinforcement 

 
Other Treatment Considerations 

 Facilitate Speech Praxis Using Multimodal Cues 
 Focus on Vowels 

 Facilitate Word Approximation as Necessary 

 Move Quickly to Phrases and Sentences 
 Choose Vocabulary Carefully 

 Enhance Motivation 
 Address Speech Prosody 

 Consider Purpose of Oral Motor Activities 
 Consider Relative Contribution of Motor Speech 

 Address Current and “Future” Literacy Needs 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  3 
1. NUMBER OF SESSIONS PER WEEK AND LENGTH OF SESSIONS 
Motor Learning Research indicates: 

• Motor skills are acquired more quickly (in terms of total hours spent within practice sessions) when 
shorter, frequent sessions are used. 

• Motor skill accuracy is better when shorter, frequent practice sessions are implemented. 

• Retention of motor skills is higher for individuals receiving shorter, frequent practice sessions. 

Therefore… 

When possible, incorporate a treatment schedule of shorter, frequent sessions for kids with CAS. 

Ex:  Rather than 2, 45 min. sessions/week, schedule 3 or 4‐ 30 minute sessions 

2. FOCUS ON PHONEME SEQUENCING, NOT JUST SOUNDS 
Motor Learning Research indicates: 

Whole practice is more effective for teaching movement patterns when the component parts of the movement 
are highly related  

Parts practice is more effective in teaching a movement pattern in which the component parts are less related 

Therefore… 

•Since speech movements are highly related to one another and phoneme production is highly dependent on the 
phonemes surrounding it (due to coarticulation), whole practice is preferable to parts practice. 

Suggestions: 

•Begin at least at the syllable level (CV or VC); 

•Move to phrase level as quickly as possible; 

•Make the words meaningful; 

•If CV or VC is too challenging try: 

‐  adjusting the temporal aspects of the word 

‐  adding multimodal cues 

‐  using isolated phonemes that denote meaning – many of which are fun, silly or emotionally charged. 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  4 
PHONEME SEQUENCE HIERARCHY 
 
 C (m, s, z, sh, ch)** 
 
 CV (boy, hi, no, go, moo) 

 VC (up, on, in, off, out, ape) 

 CV‐CV with reduplication (mama, baba, wawa, moo‐moo, boo‐boo) 
 CV‐CV with same C but varied V (mommy, daddy, puppy, cookie, turtle) 

 CV‐CV with varied C and V (bunny, dino, potty, hippo, table) 
 CVC with assimilation (pop, pup, mom, cake, mop, five) 

 CVC without assimilation (cup, pin, bake, fish) 
 CV‐CV‐CV (banana, tomato, potato, bicycle) 

 CV‐CVC (button, chicken, magic, finish) 

 CVC‐CVC (popcorn, cupcake, basket, picnic, football) 
 Blends (spoon, jump, splash, jumps) 

 Multisyllables (motorcycle, alligator, refrigerator, Cinderella, hippopotamus) 

3. ENCOURAGE REPETITION TO BUILD MUSCLE MEMORY 
Motor Learning Research indicates: 
Mass practice (practicing fewer things many times) leads to better accuracy during initial 
learning of motor skill BUT inhibits carryover 
Distributed practice (practicing numerous things fewer times) leads to better 
carryover/habituation BUT increases time to develop a new skill 

Therefore … 
•When teaching new movement patterns, mass practice is recommended 

•When trying to habituate skills, distributed practice is recommended 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  5 
Materials and Activities to Promote Repeated Practice
•Echo microphone  •Colored blocks 

•Puzzles  •Large blocks 

•Sound puzzles  •Markers/crayons/paper 

•String beads/pop beads  •Dot Articulation (Super duper, Inc) 

•Farm toy  •Stickers/stamps 

•Cash register toy  •Familiar characters and accessories 

•Cars, trucks and ramps  •Dollhouse and family characters 

•Train track and trains  •Big truck, airplane 

•Mr. Potato Head/Mr. Potato Head Pals  •Tool toys 

Games for Repetitive Practice (Purchased) – Games should be: 
 Quick 
 Fun 
 Used either as: 
o Reinforcer 
o Selected vocabulary 

Sample games: 

Pop‐Up Pirate  Barnyard Bingo 

Cariboo  Lucky Ducks 

Crocodile Dentist  Milk and Cookies 

Don’t Spill the Beans  Silly Faces 

Silly Six Pins  Colorforms 

Lego Creator  Memory Games 

Mousetrap  Lotto Games 

Animal Buddies  Holiday& Seasonal Gameboards for 
Speech and Language (Super Duper, Inc.)
 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  6 
Quick and Simple Games: 
 
Bowling/Soccer bowling  Earn it now – make it later 

Basketball  Large number dice 

Long jump  Large number spinner 

Picture hop  Magnet chips 

Animal walk  Double dice roll 

Treasure hunt  100 

Mailman  Go Fish 

Block designs  Memory 

Tall tower  Simon Says 

Dominoes  Letter Path 

Stickers & Stamps  Louder/softer/other variations 

Progressive drawing  Hidden puzzle pieces 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  7 
4. PROVIDE OPTIMAL REINFORCEMENT 
 
Types of Feedback: 
 
 Extrinsic Feedback – Sensory information provided by an outside source.  Motor Learning Research 
indicates Extrinsic Feedback is necessary to acquire NEW skills 
o Knowledge of Performance 
o Knowledge of Results 
 Intrinsic Feedback – Sensory information within the learner.  Motor Learning Research indicates 
Intrinsic Feedback is necessary for CARRYOVER of skills 
o Auditory 
o Proprioceptive 
o Tactile 
 
Principles of Reinforcement When Teaching a New Motor Skill 
 
 Provide frequent feedback 
 Provide immediate feedback 
 Provide KNOWLEDGE OF PERFORMANCE 
o Tell what was not correct about the movement 
o Tell what should be done differently 
 Limit the amount of information provided 
 Don’t overload 
 
Principles for Development of Intrinsic Feedback 
 
 Fade extrinsic feedback progressively 
 Begin to use intermittent reinforcement 
 Move to providing KNOWLEDGE OF RESULTS 
 Begin to delay feedback 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  8 
5. FACILITATE SPEECH PRAXIS USING MULTIMODAL CUES 
 
Specific Cueing Techniques (Visual, Auditory, Tactile/Proprioceptive) 
 
 PROMPT (Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic 
Targets) 
 DTTC – Dynamic Temporal and Tactile Cueing (Edythe Strand and 
colleagues) 
 Variation of rate 
 Choral Speaking (simultaneous production) 
 Hand motions/positions 
 Tapping/clapping out phonemes and syllables 
 Blocks or paper/felt squares to denote number of syllables or 
words 
 Written letters and words 
 Sound names 
 Verbal descriptions and specific feedback (knowledge of 
performance) 
 Mouth Pictures 
 Visual – looking at self in mirror or looking at therapists face 
 Pictures to denote syllables or phonemes 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  9 
MULTISENSORY CUEING TECHNIQUES 
Cueing Technique  Visual  Auditory  Tactile 

Dynamic Temporal and Tactile Cueing  X  X  X 

Rate Variations    X   

Choral Speaking/Simultaneous  X  X   
Production 

Direct Imitation (I say it; you say it)  X  X   

Watching Clinician  X  X   

Mime  X     

Mirror  X     

Hand Motions/Gestures  X     

Written Letters/Words  X     

Tapping/Clapping Out Syllables  X  X   

Blocks/Paper Squares to Denote # of  X     
Sounds/Syllables/Words 

Sound Names    X   

Verbal Descriptions of How to Produce    X   
Sounds 

Pictures to Denote Separate Syllables  X     

Mouth Pictures  X     

PROMPT®   X  X  X 

Touch Cues      X 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  10 
 

 
 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  11 
 
 

**Adapted from Clinical Management of Motor Speech Disorders in Children. Caruso, A 
and Strand E.  

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  12 
 
6. VOWELS 
VOWEL DIAGRAM 
 
 
 
 
 
TONGUE POSITION 
Front        Central             Back 

                                  
 
 
High                                 Mid             
                           MANDIBLE HEIGHT 
 
      Low 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  13 
7. PROGRESSIVE APPROXIMATIONS 
 
Sample Approximation Sequence 
For the Word “Dinosaur” 

 
• “dah no” 

• “di no” 

• “di no so” 

• “di no saur” 

Practice Approximations 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  14 
8. PHRASES AND SENTENCES 
Sample Carrier Phrase  Corresponding Language Activity 

It’s a ___________  “Feely box” – place hand inside box, feel what’s inside and tell 
what it is 

_________ in/on/up  Animal characters going on a school bus. 

TV toy characters climb up mountain. 

I got a ___________  Go Fish game or Memory game – tell what you got when you 
turn over a pictures 

I found a _____________  I Spy – using a flashlight, find “hidden” toys 

Big/little ___________  Jack‐o‐lantern picture 

(color word) ___________  Potato head  

I have (a) _________  Describe clothing or physical characteristics of self and other 
person 
You have (a) __________ 

I want (a) _________  Tell what piece you need to complete a sticker picture, block 
structure, or craft project 
I want (a) _______  _______ 

(number word) ________  Counting books 

_________ go  Animals, characters or toy people going down slide or moving in 
vehicle 

More ____________  Bubbles 

Do you have a _________?  Go Fish game 

Bye‐bye ___________  Putting toys away 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  15 
9. CONSIDERATIONS WHEN CHOOSING VOCABULARY 
When choosing target words, take into consideration: 
 Phoneme repertoire 

 Syllable shapes 

 Planes of movement 

 Child’s interests 

 Family routines 

 School routines 

CASE EXAMPLES 
CHILD A 
Age 3 years, 6 months 

Consonants /b, m, d, n/ 

Vowels /o, oo, ah, uh/ 

Syllable shapes – CV, CVCV reduplicated 

Interests – vehicle toys, balls, farm animals 

Consistency – “bah”, “mah” are consistent.  Other combinations achieved using multisensory cues 

CHILD B 
Age 7 years, 10 months 

Consonants /p, b, m, w, t, d, n, h, f, s/ 

Vowels /all, though diphthongs can be difficult at rapid rate 

Syllable Shapes – all except blends, thou inconsistent 

Interests – action heroes, soccer, basketball 

Consistency ‐ difficulty with multisyllabic words.  Omits medial consonants (even at CV‐CVC) unless rate is 
significantly reduced. 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  16 
LESSON PLAN WORKSHEET – Child A 
Name____________________  Date________ 
Syllable  Phoneme(s)  Vocabulary;  Activities; 
Shape(s) 
C and V  Phrase Structures  Materials 

       
 

       

 
 

 
 

 
 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  17 
LESSON PLAN WORKSHEET – Child B 
Name____________________  Date________ 
Syllable  Phoneme(s)  Vocabulary;  Activities; 
Shape(s) 
C and V  Phrase Structures  Materials 

       
 

 
 

 
 

       
 

 
 

 
 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  18 
RESOURCES FOR PICTURES 

 
• Moving Across Syllables 

• Kaufman Speech Praxis Treatment  Kits 

• Word Flips™  

• Picture Express 

• Becoming Verbal and Intelligible 

• Boardmaker™ 

• Google™ Images 

10. ENHANCING MOTIVATION 
MOTIVATION DEVELOPS WHEN CHILDREN: 
• Know they are successful 

o Use clear and concrete reinforcement 

o Use powerful and pragmatic vocabulary 

o When choosing targets, taking into account 

 Phoneme repertoire 

 Syllable shapes 

 Planes of movement 

o Utilize progressive approximations when necessary  

• Understand the power of language 

• Understand how the motor system will affect their ability to communicate 

• Are having fun 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  19 
11. STRESS AND INTONATION 
Children with CAS frequently demonstrate inappropriate stress patterns ‐ excessive equal stress is common 

• Teach exclamations using over exaggeration 

• Count and stop 

• Emphasize key words expressing high levels of emotional content 

• Questions vs. declaratives 

• Statement‐Question‐Response 

• Changing meaning of sentence based on which word is stressed 

• Syllable stress 

 
12. CONSIDERATIONS FOR ORAL MOTOR ACTIVITIES IN CAS 
1. Time 

2. Purpose 

3. Research 

13. RELATIVE CONTRIBUTIONS 
1. Language – comprehension, narrative language, grammar, vocabulary, pragmatics, MLU 

2. Social – reciprocity, Interaction, emotional regulation, play 

3. Dysarthria – speaking rate, muscle weakness, articulatory precision 

4. Phonology – phonological processes 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  20 
14. LITERACY CONSIDERATIONS 
Within the context of treatment, help children to: 
 Recognize that words begin or end with the same sounds 

 Segment words into individual sounds 

 Blend individual syllables or sounds 

 Recognize rhyme patterns 

Do this by: 
 Using written letters as sound cues 

 Writing target words on practice cards 

 Highlighting specific sounds, syllables, words 

o Make the sound/syllable/word larger 

o Use different color 

o Underline 

 Focus attention to the # of sounds/syllables/words 

 Sort target words by 

o Beginning sounds 

o Ending sounds 

o Number of syllables 

o Ending syllables 

o Vowels 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  21 
TREATMENT CONSIDERATIONS FOR CHILDREN WITH 
LITTLE OR NO LANGUAGE 
 

 Cast a wide net 

 Reinforce vocalizations 
 Give meaning to vocalizations 

 Get imitation going 

 Choose toys that reinforce early sound effects and simple exclamations 

 Imitate Child’s movements/sounds 

 Emphasize key words 
 Use small vocabulary set 

 Choose activities with vocabulary containing 
 Model slow, exaggerated articulation 

 Use amplification tools 

 Use motion 
 Use music 

 Use repetitive books and counting books 
 Describe what child is doing with the speech motor system from the start 

 Use consistent terminology 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  22 
Simple books to establish use of sound effects, single words and two­
word phrases 
•Moo, Baa, La La La – Sandra Boynton 
•Blue Hat Green Hat – Sandra Boynton 

•Spot Books – Eric Hill 

•Old Macdonald Had a Farm – various authors 
•Who Says That – Arnold L. Shapiro 

•Brown Bear Brown Bear What Do You See – Bill Martin 
•Open The Barn Door – Christopher Santoro 

•Baby Bop’s Toys – Kimberly Kearns and Marie O’Brien 
•Mommy and Me – Neil Ricklen 

•Kiss the Boo‐Boo – Sue Tarsky 

•Five Little Ducks – Raffi 
•Here Are My Hands ‐ Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault 

•Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed – Eileen Christelow 
•Five Little Monkeys Sitting in a Tree – Eileen Christelow 

•Freight Train – Donald Crews 
•Are You My Mother? – P.D. Eastman 

•Who’s Hat – Margaret Miller 

•Who’s Shoe – Margaret Miller 
•Mary Wore Her Red Dress and Henry Wore His Green Sneakers – Merle Peek 

•City Sounds – Craig Brown 
•Animal Sounds – Aureleuo Battaglia  

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  23 
Books to promote increased sentence length, morphological markers, 
and specific phonemes 
•The Three Bears – Byron Barton 

•The Little Red Hen – various authors 

•The Three Little Pigs – various authors 

•Mr. Gumpy’s Motor Car – John Burningham 

•Mr. Gumpy’s Outing – John Burningham 

•Andrew’s Bath – David McPhail 

•The Very Hungry Caterpillar – Eric Carle 

•The Very Busy Spider – Eric Carle 

•The Mitten – Jan Brett 

•Owl Babies – Martin Waddell 

•Dear Zoo – Rod Campbell 

•The Three Little Pigs – James Marshall (and other authors) 

•It Looked Like Spilt Milk – Charles Shaw 

•Who’s Toes Are Those – Joyce Elias and Cathy Strum 

•King Bidgood’s in the Bathtub – Audrey Wood 

•A Pile of Pigs – Judith Zoss Enderle and Stephanie Gordan Tessler 

•Guess Where You’re Going, Guess What You’ll Do? – A.F. Bauman 

•I Wish I Could Fly – Ron Maris 

•Here Comes a Bus – Harriet Ziefert 

•I Went Walking – Sue Williams 

•A Giraffe and a Half – Shel Silverstein 

•Four Fur Feet – Margaret Wise Brown 

•“Slowly, Slowly, Slowly,” said the Sloth – Eric Carle 

•When Sheep Sleep – Laura Numeroff 

•Here Comes a Bus – Harriet Ziefert 

•A Pile of Pigs – Judith Zoss Enderle and Stephanie Gordan Tessler  

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  24 
Songs to promote speech for children with Apraxia 
•Apples and Bananas – vowel variety 
•Baby Bumblebee – animal sounds, simple word production 

•Down by the Bay – rhyming, simple word production, vowel variety 
•Five Little Ducks – counting, simple word production through sentence completion 

•Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed – counting, simple word production through 
sentence completion 

•Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes – simple word production, vowel variety 
•I Caught a Fish Alive – counting, simple word production through sentence completion 

•If You’re Happy and You Know It – vocal and non‐vocal imitation 
•John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt – complex word production 

London Bridge is Falling Down j‐ simple word production through sentence completion 

•Old Macdonald had a Farm – animal sounds and vowel variety 
•One, Two, Buckle My Shoe – simple word production, counting 

•Pat‐a‐Cake – simple word production (esp. bilabials) 
•Pop goes the Weasel – simple word production, non‐vocal imitation 

•Ring Around the Rosy – simple word production 
•Row, Row, Row, Your Boat – simple word production, early developing vowels /o, i/ 

•The Alphabet Song – vowel variety, production of CV and VC combinations 

•The Wheels on the Bus – simple word production 
•The Itsy Bitsy Spider – simple word production through sentence completion 

•This is the Way We . . . – vocal and non‐vocal imitation, simple word production 
•Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star – simple word production 

• Wibbely Wobbely Woo – complex word production 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  25 
CHILDHOOD APRAXIA BIBLIOGRAPHY 
Professional Books, Articles, Videos and Websites: 
American  Speech‐Language‐Hearing  Association.  (2007).    Childhood  Apraxia  of  Speech  [Technical 
Report].  Available from www.asha.org/policy 
 
Apraxia Kids  Retrieved September 8 , 2007, World Wide Web: http://www.apraxia‐kids.org 
 
Caruso, A. and Strand, E. Clinical Management of Motor Speech Disorders in Children.  New York, NY: 
Thieme, (1999) 
 
Dynamic Remediation Strategies for Children with DVA, Video and Handbook.  Rockville, Maryland: 
ASHA (1998) 
 
Gildersleeve‐Neumann,  C.    Treatment  for  Childhood  Apraxia  of  Speech:  A  Description  of  Integral 
Stimulation and Motor Learning, The ASHA Leader, November 6, 2007 
 
Hall, P., A Letter to the Parent(s) of a Child with Developmental Apraxia of Speech, Language Speech, 
and Hearing Services in the Schools, Vol. 31, 169‐172, (April 2000) 
 
Kilmas,  N.,  Differential  Diagnosis  of  Articulatory  Impairment.    Advance  for  Speech­Language 
Pathologists and Audiologists, Vol. 11, (June, 2001) 
 
Lewis,  B  and  Ekelman,  B.,  Literacy  Problems  Associated  with  Childhood  Apraxia  of  Speech. 
Perspectives on Language, Learning and Education, Vol. 14, 10‐17 (October, 2007) 
 
Magill, R. A., Motor Learning and Control: Concepts and Applications, Seventh Edition.  New York, NY: 
McGraw‐Hill (2004) 
 
Marshalla,  P., Becoming  Verbal  with  Developmental  Apraxia.   Kirkland,  WA,    Marshalla  Speech  and 
Language (2001) 
 
McCauley,  R.  and  Strand,  E.,  A  Review  of  Standardized  Tests  of  Nonverbal  Oral  and  Speech  Motor 
Performance in Children.  American Journal of Speech­Language Pathology, Vol. 17, 81‐91 (February 
2008) 
 
Phonetics:    The  Sounds  of  English  and  Spanish  –  The  University  of  Iowa    Retrieved  September  8  , 
2007, World Wide Web:  http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/phonetics/about.html 
 
Robin,  D.,  Developmental  Apraxia  of  Speech:  Just  Another  Motor  Problem.    American  Journal  of 
Speech Language Pathology, Vol. 1 (May, 1992) 
 
Schmidt,  R.A.  and  Wrisberg,  C.A.,  Motor  Learning  and  Performance:  A  Problem­Based  Learning 
Approach, Third Edition.  Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics (2004) 
 
Shriberg,  L.,  Aram,  D.,  and  Kwiatkowski,  J.,  Developmental  Apraxia  of  Speech:  I.  Descriptive  and 
Theoretical Perspectives.  Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 40, (April, 1997) 
 
Shriberg,  L.,  Aram,  D.,  and  Kwiatkowski,  j.,  Developmental  Apraxia  of  Speech:  II.  Toward  a 
Diagnostic Marker.  Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 40 (April, 1997) 
 
Shriberg, L., Aram, D., and Kwiatkowski, J., Developmental Apraxia of Speech: III. A Subtype Marked 
by Inappropriate Stress.  Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 40 (April, 1997) 
 
Strand, E. and McCauley, R., Differential Diagnosis of Severe Speech Impairment in Young Children. 
The ASHA Leader, Vol 13(10), 10‐13 (2008) 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  26 
 
Strand, E., Treatment of Motor Speech Disorders in Children.  Seminars in Speech and Language, Vol. 
16 (1995) 
 
Strand, E., Principles of Speech Motor Learning.  Workshop presented at 2007 National Conference 
on Childhood Apraxia of Speech, Anaheim, CA, July 12‐14, 2007 
 
The Prompt Institute  Retrieved September 8, 2007, World Wide Web: http://promptinstitute.com 
 
Velleman, S., Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Resource Guide.  Clifton Park, NY: Delmar Learning (2003) 
 
 
Tests, Workbooks and Other Therapy Materials 
 
Barty, N., and Bellamy D. Picture Express, Comox, BC, Canada: Picture Express Software (1998) 
 
Dauer,  K.,  Irwin,  S.  and  Schippits,  S.,  Becoming  Verbal  and  Intelligible:  A  Functional  Motor 
Programming  Approach  for  Children  with  Developmental  Verbal  Apraxia,  Austin,  TX:  Pro‐Ed, 
(1996) 
 
Drake, M. Just for Kids ‐ Apraxia, East Moline, IL: LinguiSystems, Inc.  (1999) 
 
Frimmer, B.  Totally Terrific Arctic Tongue Twisters, Greenville, SC: Super Duper Publications 
 
Granger,  R.,  Word  Flips  TM  for  Learning  Intelligible  Production  of  Speech,  Greenville,  SC:  Super 
Duper Publications (2005) 
 
Hayden,  D.  and  Square,  P.,    Verbal  Motor  Production  Assessment  for  Children,  The  Psychological 
Corporation, (1999) 
 
Kaufman, N. Kaufman Speech Praxis Test for Children, West Bloomfield, Michigan:  Northern Speech 
Services, (1996) 
 
Kaufman, N. Kaufman Speech Praxis Treatment Kit for Children ‐ Basic Level and Kaufman Speech 
Praxis  Treatment  Kit  for  Children  ‐  Advanced  Level.    West  Bloomfield,  MI:  Northern  Speech 
Services, (1998) 
 
Kaufman,  N,  The  Kaufman  Speech  Praxis  Workout  Book.  West  Bloomfield,  MI:  Northern  Speech 
Services, (2005) 
 
Kilpatrick,  J.,  Stohr,  P.,  and  Kimbrough,  D.    Moving  Across  Syllables:  Training  Articulatory  Sound 
Sequences San Antonio, TX: Communication Skill Builders, A division of Psychological Corp., (1990) 
 
O’Bryan,  B.,  Sound  Reps  Workout:  A  Total  Fitness  Program  for  Articulation  Strengthening.  
Youngtown, AZ: ECL Publications (1996) 
 
Strode,  R.  and  Chamberlain,  C.,  The  Source  for  childhood  Apraxia  of  Speech.  East  Moline,  IL: 
LinguiSystems, Inc., (2006) 
 
Strode,  R.  and  Chamberlain,  C.    Easy  Does  It  for  Apraxia  and  Motor  Planning,  East  Moline,  IL: 
LinguiSystems, Inc., (1993)  
 
Strode, R. and Chamberlain, C.  Easy Does It for Apraxia ‐ Preschool, East Moline, IL: LinguiSystems, 
Inc., (1994) 
 
Webber,  M  and  Webber  S.,  168  Seasonal  &  Holiday  Open‐Ended  Artic  Worksheets.  Greenville,  SC: 
Super Duper Publications (1998) 
 

2009 ISHA Annual Conference, February 12­15, 2009 
Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Focus on Treatment, Margaret Fish, M.S., CCC‐SLP . . . . .  27