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Two and two are four.

Two and two


are rather blue.
AP English Literature
& Composition

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction To Poetry ......................................................................................................................................................................... 3


Abandoned Farmhouse ........................................................................................................................................................................ 5
The Accident .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 6
anyone lived in a pretty how town .................................................................................................................................................. 7
Meeting at Night....................................................................................................................................................................................... 8
Living in Sin ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
I taste liquor never brewed ............................................................................................................................................................. 10
Metaphors................................................................................................................................................................................................ 11
Barbie Doll ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 12
The Chimney Sweeper ....................................................................................................................................................................... 13
The History Teacher ........................................................................................................................................................................... 14
My Last Duchess ................................................................................................................................................................................... 15
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time ........................................................................................................................................ 17
The Author to Her Book .................................................................................................................................................................... 18
When You Are Old ................................................................................................................................................................................ 19
Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening .................................................................................................................................. 20
Old Ladies’ Home .................................................................................................................................................................................. 21
Had I the Choice .................................................................................................................................................................................... 22
How Do I Love Thee? .......................................................................................................................................................................... 23
Joy Sonnet in a Random Universe ................................................................................................................................................. 24
Sonnet ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 25
In Medias Res ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 26
My Own Epitaph ................................................................................................................................................................................... 27
Ozymandias ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 28
On His Blindness ................................................................................................................................................................................... 29
Journey of the Magi ............................................................................................................................................................................. 30
The Bible is an Antique Volume ..................................................................................................................................................... 31
A Kumquat for John Keats ................................................................................................................................................................ 32
Our God, Our Help ................................................................................................................................................................................ 35
Stop All the Clocks................................................................................................................................................................................ 36
Do Not Go Gentle Into that Good Night ....................................................................................................................................... 37
Ballad of Billy the Kid ......................................................................................................................................................................... 38
Traffic Jam ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 39
Dover Beach ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 40
Harlem....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 41
London ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42
To His Coy Mistress ............................................................................................................................................................................. 43
Mother-in-Law....................................................................................................................................................................................... 44
Father and Son....................................................................................................................................................................................... 46
Cats in the Cradle.................................................................................................................................................................................. 47
Landslide .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 49
Forever Young ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 50
Just the Two of Us ................................................................................................................................................................................ 51
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Introduction To Poetry
Billy Collins

1. I ask them to take a poem


2. and hold it up to the light
3. like a color slide

4. or press an ear against its hive.

5. say drop a mouse into a poem


6. and watch him probe his way out,

7. or walk inside the poem's room


8. and feel the walls for a light switch.

9. I want them to waterski


10. across the surface of a poem
11. waving at the author's name on the shore.

12. But all they want to do


13. is tie the poem to a chair with rope
14. and torture a confession out of it.

15. They begin beating it with a hose


16. to find out what it really means.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Strategy for Reading Poetry for Understanding

Stage 1:
Three crucial first steps:
1. Read the entire poem, beginning to end.
2. Read to the end of each sentence.
3. Read to the end of each line.

Next write your reaction, how you emotionally respond to the poem and why.

Next write about your understanding of the poem and explain why you think what
you do and what you are still unclear about.

Stage 2:
Now you are ready to read closely and methodically for clarification and deeper
understanding by carefully focusing on the following:

 Word choice
 Any words you don’t know? Look them up.
 Identify key words or phrases.
 positive, negative, or neutral tone
 cumulative effect of dominant tone
 possible change of tone
 Syntax
 Words or phrases emphasized by placement
 Unexpected partnerships or juxtapositions
 Imagery and Visual effects
 Meaning created by choice of particular literary devices
 Cumulative effect of devices’ meanings
 Sound devices
 Create meaning
 Reinforce meaning
 Point of View
 Who is the persona?
 What is the poet’s attitude toward the subject?
 Is there a changing point?
 Form
 How does structure create meaning?
 How does structure reinforce meaning?

Return to your initial emotional response. What has changed, how has it changed
and why?

Return to your initial understanding of the poem. What has changed, how has it
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changed and why?


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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Abandoned Farmhouse
Ted Kooser from Flying at Night

1. He was a big man, says the size of his shoes


2. on a pile of broken dishes by the house;
3. a tall man too, says the length of the bed
4. in an upstairs room; and a good, God-fearing man,
5. says the Bible with a broken back
6. on the floor below the window, dusty with sun;
7. but not a man for farming, say the field
8. cluttered with boulders and the leaky barn.

9. A woman lived with him, says the bedroom wall


10. papered with lilacs and the kitchen shelves
11. covered with oilcloth, and they had a child,
12. says the sandbox made from a tractor tire.
13. Money was scarce, say the jars of plum preserves
14. and canned tomatoes sealed in the cellar hole.
15. And the winters cold, say the rags in the window frames.
16. It was lonely here, says the narrow country road.

17. Something went wrong, says the empty house


18. in the weed-choked yard. Stones in the fields
19. say he was not a farmer; the still-sealed jars
20. in the cellar say she left in a nervous haste.
21. And the child? Its toys are strewn in the yard
22. like branches after a storm-a rubber cow,
23. a rusty tractor with a broken plow,
24. a doll in overalls. Something went wrong, they say.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

The Accident
Erica Funkhouser

1. She heard the hasty scraping of sole and heel


2. against the clipped turf of the doormat;
3. then the neighbor rushed in,
4. just back from the hospital,
5. where everything was fine, she said.
6. Fine. Her son had to spend the night
7. for observation, that was all.
8. He had been grazed by a delivery van
9. while crossing the street on his bike.
10. A few bruises, a superficial wound
11. above one knee. Incredible luck.
12. The neighbor was still wearing
13. her jogging cloths-pale blue
14. ripstop nylon, the same blue flame
15. along the instep of her running shoes.
16. She slid a chair from underneath
17. the kitchen table and sat down,
18. her long legs straight in front of her
19. like a ladder to a different world.
20. It was when the neighbor answered "yes"
21. to a question the women's husband
22. had not yet asked
23. that the woman finally understood
24. Her husband had not even mentioned eggs,
25. but the neighbor knew he was going to cook for her.
26. How many times had they eaten together,
27. the woman watching wondered. Enough.
28. Her husband worked slowly,
29. strolling back and forth between the stove,
30. the coffee maker, and the table
31. where his wife and the still-flushed neighbor
32. leaned on their elbows discussing
33. the hazards of dusk.
34. On the counter, the eggs
35. developed little caps of moisture.
36. Her husband put lots of butter
37. in the pan and popped the toaster manually
38. before the toast could burn.
39. At long last he broke the eggs.
40. She had never seen him
41. do it like this before, two-handed.
42. He always liked to show off
43. by breaking the eggs with one hand.
44. This evening
45. his hands were trembling
46. as he cracked the eggs
47. on the skillet's rim, hurrying to slide
48. the whole brimming mess into the pan
49. to quiet the sizzling fat.
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

anyone lived in a pretty how town


e.e. cummings from 100 selected poems

1. anyone lived in a pretty how town


2. (with up so floating many bells down)
3. spring summer autumn winter
4. he sang his didn't he danced his did

5. Women and men(both little and small)


6. cared for anyone not at all
7. they sowed their isn't they reaped their same
8. sun moon stars rain

9. children guessed(but only a few


10. and down they forgot as up they grew
11. autumn winter spring summer)
12. that noone loved him more by more

13. when by now and tree by leaf


14. she laughed his joy she cried his grief
15. bird by snow and stir by still
16. anyone's any was all to her

17. someones married their everyones


18. laughed their cryings and did their dance
19. (sleep wake hope and then)they
20. said their nevers they slept their dream

21. stars rain sun moon


22. (and only the snow can begin to explain
23. how children are apt to forget to remember
24. with up so floating many bells down)

25. one day anyone died i guess


26. (and noone stooped to kiss his face)
27. busy folk buried them side by side
28. little by little and was by was

29. all by all and deep by deep


30. and more by more they dream their sleep
31. noone and anyone earth by april
32. wish by spirit and if by yes.

33. Women and men(both dong and ding)


34. summer autumn winter spring
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35. reaped their sowing and went their came


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36. sun moon stars rain

AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Meeting at Night
Robert Browning

1. The grey sea and the long black land;


2. And the yellow half-moon large and low;
3. And the startled little waves that leap
4. In fiery ringlets from their sleep,
5. As I gain the cove with pushing prow,
6. And quench its speed i' the slushy sand.

7. Then a mile of warm sea-scented beach;


8. Three fields to cross till a farm appears;
9. A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch
10. And blue spurt of a lighted match,
11. And a voice less loud, thro' its joys and fears,
12. Than the two hearts beating each to each!

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Living in Sin
Adrienne Rich

1. She had thought the studio would keep itself;


2. no dust upon the furniture of love.
3. Half heresy, to wish the taps less vocal,
4. the panes relieved of grime. A plate of pears,
5. a piano with a Persian shawl, a cat
6. stalking the picturesque amusing mouse
7. had risen at his urging.
8. Not that at five each separate stair would writhe
9. under the milkman's tramp; that morning light
10. so coldly would delineate the scraps
11. of last night's cheese and three sepulchral bottles;
12. that on the kitchen shelf among the saucers
13. a pair of beetle-eyes would fix her own---
14. envoy from some village in the moldings . . .
15. Meanwhile, he, with a yawn,
16. sounded a dozen notes upon the keyboard,
17. declared it out of tune, shrugged at the mirror,
18. rubbed at his beard, went out for cigarettes;
19. while she, jeered by the minor demons,
20. pulled back the sheets and made the bed and found
21. a towel to dust the table-top,
22. and let the coffee-pot boil over on the stove.
23. By evening she was back in love again,
24. though not so wholly but throughout the night
25. she woke sometimes to feel the daylight coming
26. like a relentless milkman up the stairs.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

I taste liquor never brewed


Emily Dickinson

1. I taste a liquor never brewed,


2. From tankards scooped in pearl;
3. Not all the vats upon the Rhine
4. Yield such an alcohol!

5. Inebriate of air am I,
6. And debauchee of dew,
7. Reeling, through endless summer days,
8. From inns of molten blue.

9. When landlords turn the drunken bee


10. Out of the foxglove's door,
11. When butterflies renounce their drams,
12. I shall but drink the more!

13. Till seraphs swing their snowy hats,


14. And saints to windows run,
15. To see the little tippler
16. Leaning against the sun!

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Metaphors
Sylvia Plath

1. I'm a riddle in nine syllables,


2. An elephant, a ponderous house,
3. A melon strolling on two tendrils.
4. O red fruit, ivory, fine timbers!
5. This loaf's big with its yeasty rising.
6. Money's new-minted in this fat purse.
7. I'm a means, a stage, a cow in calf.
8. I've eaten a bag of green apples,
9. Boarded the train there's no getting off.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Barbie Doll
Marge Piercy

1. This girlchild was born as usual


2. and presented dolls that did pee-pee
3. and miniature GE stoves and irons
4. and wee lipsticks the color of cherry candy.
5. Then in the magic of puberty, a classmate said:
6. You have a great big nose and fat legs.

7. She was healthy, tested intelligent,


8. possessed strong arms and back,
9. abundant sexual drive and manual dexterity.
10. She went to and fro apologizing.
11. Everyone saw a fat nose on thick legs.

12. She was advised to play coy,


13. exhorted to come on hearty,
14. exercise, diet, smile and wheedle.
15. Her good nature wore out
16. like a fan belt.
17. So she cut off her nose and her legs
18. and offered them up.

19. In the casket displayed on satin she lay


20. with the undertaker's cosmetics painted on,
21. a turned-up putty nose,
22. dressed in a pink and white nightie.
23. Doesn't she look pretty? everyone said.
24. Consummation at last.
25. To every woman a happy ending.
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

The Chimney Sweeper


William Blake

1. When my mother died I was very young,


2. And my father sold me while yet my tongue
3. Could scarcely cry " 'weep! 'weep! 'weep! 'weep!"
4. So your chimneys I sweep & in soot I sleep.

5. There's little Tom Dacre, who cried when his head


6. That curled like a lamb's back, was shaved, so I said,
7. "Hush, Tom! never mind it, for when your head's bare,
8. You know that the soot cannot spoil your white hair."

9. And so he was quiet, & that very night,


10. As Tom was a-sleeping he had such a sight!
11. That thousands of sweepers, Dick, Joe, Ned, & Jack,
12. Were all of them locked up in coffins of black;

13. And by came an Angel who had a bright key,


14. And he opened the coffins & set them all free;
15. Then down a green plain, leaping, laughing they run,
16. And wash in a river and shine in the Sun.

17. Then naked & white, all their bags left behind,
18. They rise upon clouds, and sport in the wind.
19. And the Angel told Tom, if he'd be a good boy,
20. He'd have God for his father & never want joy.

21. And so Tom awoke; and we rose in the dark


22. And got with our bags & our brushes to work.
23. Though the morning was cold, Tom was happy & warm;
24. So if all do their duty, they need not fear harm. 13
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

The History Teacher


Billy Collins

1. He tried to protect the purity his students still contained


2. By saying the Ice Age was renamed the Chilly Age
3. A time where sweaters were the only choice of attire.

4. He told them that the Stone Age could also be known as the Gravel Age,
5. To represent the long driveways present in that era.

6. The Spanish Inquisition was really just


7. A sequence of questions, like
8. “Do churros really need to be eaten ‘con chocolate?”
9. “How do you say, ‘the bathroom’ in Spanish?”

10. The War of the Roses occurred in a rose garden,


11. And the atomic bomb on Japan was really just the Enola Gay dropping one tiny
atom.

12. When the children left this place of lies,


13. They would run for the playground to bully the frail
14. And the intelligent,
15. Messing up their hair and breaking their spectacles,

16. Gathering up his notes and walking home


17. Past white picket fences and flower beds,
18. He wondered if his students were naïve enough to believe that the soldiers’
19. Strategy in the Boer War was telling long, rambling stories
20. Designed to make the enemy fall asleep from boredom.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

My Last Duchess
Robert Browning

1. That’s my last Duchess painted on the wall,


2. Looking as if she were alive. I call
3. That piece a wonder, now; Fra Pandolf’s hands
4. Worked busily a day, and there she stands.
5. Will’t please you sit and look at her? I said
6. “Fra Pandolf” by design, for never read
7. Strangers like you that pictured countenance,
8. The depth and passion of its earnest glance,
9. But to myself they turned (since none puts by
10. The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)
11. And seemed as they would ask me, if they durst,
12. How such a glance came there; so, not the first
13. Are you to turn and ask thus. Sir, ’twas not
14. Her husband’s presence only, called that spot
15. Of joy into the Duchess’ cheek; perhaps
16. Fra Pandolf chanced to say, “Her mantle laps
17. Over my lady’s wrist too much,” or “Paint
18. Must never hope to reproduce the faint
19. Half-flush that dies along her throat.” Such stuff
20. Was courtesy, she thought, and cause enough
21. For calling up that spot of joy. She had
22. A heart—how shall I say?— too soon made glad,
23. Too easily impressed; she liked whate’er
24. She looked on, and her looks went everywhere.
25. Sir, ’twas all one! My favour at her breast,
26. The dropping of the daylight in the West,
27. The bough of cherries some officious fool
28. Broke in the orchard for her, the white mule
29. She rode with round the terrace—all and each
30. Would draw from her alike the approving speech,
31. Or blush, at least. She thanked men—good! but thanked
32. Somehow—I know not how—as if she ranked
33. My gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name
34. With anybody’s gift. Who’d stoop to blame
35. This sort of trifling? Even had you skill
36. In speech—which I have not—to make your will
37. Quite clear to such an one, and say, “Just this
38. Or that in you disgusts me; here you miss,
39. Or there exceed the mark”—and if she let
40. Herself be lessoned so, nor plainly set
41. Her wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse—
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42. E’en then would be some stooping; and I choose


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43. Never to stoop. Oh, sir, she smiled, no doubt,

AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

44. Whene’er I passed her; but who passed without


45. Much the same smile? This grew; I gave commands;
46. Then all smiles stopped together. There she stands
47. As if alive. Will’t please you rise? We’ll meet
48. The company below, then. I repeat,
49. The Count your master’s known munificence
50. Is ample warrant that no just pretense
51. Of mine for dowry will be disallowed;
52. Though his fair daughter’s self, as I avowed
53. At starting, is my object. Nay, we’ll go
54. Together down, sir. Notice Neptune, though,
55. Taming a sea-horse, thought a rarity,
56. Which Claus of Innsbruck cast in bronze for me!

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time


Robert Herrick

1. Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,


2. Old Time is still a-flying;
3. And this same flower that smiles today
4. Tomorrow will be dying.

5. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,


6. The higher he’s a-getting,
7. The sooner will his race be run,
8. And nearer he’s to setting.

9. That age is best which is the first,


10. When youth and blood are warmer;
11. But being spent, the worse, and worst
12. Times still succeed the former.

13. Then be not coy, but use your time,


14. And while ye may, go marry;
15. For having lost but once your prime,
16. You may forever tarry.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

The Author to Her Book


Anne Bradstreet

1. Thou ill-form’d offspring of my feeble brain,


2. Who after birth didst by my side remain,
3. Till snatched from thence by friends, less wise than true,
4. Who thee abroad, expos’d to publick view,
5. Made thee in raggs, halting to th’ press to trudge,
6. Where errors were not lessened (all may judg).
7. At thy return my blushing was not small,
8. My rambling brat (in print) should mother call,
9. I cast thee by as one unfit for light,
10. Thy Visage was so irksome in my sight;
11. Yet being mine own, at length affection would
12. Thy blemishes amend, if so I could:
13. I wash’d thy face, but more defects I saw,
14. And rubbing off a spot, still made a flaw.
15. I stretched thy joynts to make thee even feet,
16. Yet still thou run’st more hobling then is meet;
17. In better dress to trim thee was my mind,
18. But nought save home-spun Cloth, i’ th’ house I find.
19. In this array ’mongst Vulgars mayst thou roam.
20. In Criticks hands, beware thou dost not come;
21. And take thy way where yet thou art not known,
22. If for thy Father askt, say, thou hadst none:
23. And for thy Mother, she alas is poor,
24. Which caus’d her thus to send thee out of door.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

When You Are Old


William Butler Yeats

1. When you are old and grey and full of sleep,


2. And nodding by the fire, take down this book,
3. And slowly read, and dream of the soft look
4. Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep;

5. How many loved your moments of glad grace,


6. And loved your beauty with love false or true,
7. But one man loved the pilgrim soul in you,
8. And loved the sorrows of your changing face;

9. And bending down beside the glowing bars,


10. Murmur, a little sadly, how Love fled
11. And paced upon the mountains overhead
12. And hid his face amid a crowd of stars.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening


Robert Frost

1. Whose woods these are I think I know.


2. His house is in the village though;
3. He will not see me stopping here
4. To watch his woods fill up with snow.

5. My little horse must think it queer


6. To stop without a farmhouse near
7. Between the woods and frozen lake
8. The darkest evening of the year.

9. He gives his harness bells a shake


10. To ask if there is some mistake.
11. The only other sound’s the sweep
12. Of easy wind and downy flake.

13. The woods are lovely, dark and deep.


14. But I have promises to keep,
15. And miles to go before I sleep,
16. And miles to go before I sleep.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Old Ladies’ Home


Sylvia Path

1. Sharded in black, like beetles,


2. Frail as antique earthenwear
3. One breath might shiver to bits,
4. The old women creep out here
5. To sun on the rocks or prop
6. Themselves up against the wall
7. Whose stones keep a little heat.

8. Needles knit in a bird-beaked


9. Counterpoint to their voices:
10. Sons, daughters, daughters and sons,
11. Distant and cold as photos,
12. Grandchildren nobody knows.
13. Age wears the best black fabric
14. Rust-red or green as lichens.

15. At owl-call the old ghosts flock


16. To hustle them off the lawn.
17. From beds boxed-in like coffins
18. The bonneted ladies grin.
19. And Death, that bald-head buzzard,
20. Stalls in halls where the lamp wick
21. Shortens with each breath drawn.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Had I the Choice


Walt Whitman

1. Had I the choice to tally greatest bards,


2. To limn their portraits, stately, beautiful, and emulate at will,
3. Homer with all his wars and warriors--Hector, Achilles, Ajax,
4. Or Shakespeare's woe-entangled Hamlet, Lear, Othello--Tennyson's fair ladies,
5. Meter or wit the best, or choice conceit to weild in perfect rhyme, delight of
singers;
6. These, these, O sea, all these I'd gladly barter,
7. Would you the undulation of one wave, its trick to me transfer,
8. Or breathe one breath of yours upon my verse,
9. And leave its odor there.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

How Do I Love Thee?


Elizabeth Barrett-Browning

1. How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.


2. I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
3. My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
4. For the ends of being and ideal grace.
5. I love thee to the level of every day’s
6. Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.
7. I love thee freely, as men strive for right;
8. I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.
9. I love thee with the passion put to use
10. In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
11. I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
12. With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,
13. Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,
14. I shall but love thee better after death.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Joy Sonnet in a Random Universe


Helen Chasin

1. Sometimes I'm happy: la la la la la la la


2. la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la
3. la la la la. Tum tum ti tum. La la la la la
4. la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la.
5. Hey nonny nonny. La la la la la la la la
6. la la la la la la la la la la la. Vo do di o do.
7. Poo poo pi doo. la la la la la la la la la la
8. la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la
9. la la. Whack a do. La la la la la la la la. Sh-
10. boom, sh-boom. La la la la la la la la la la
11. la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la
12. la la. Dum di dum. La la la la la la la la.
13. la la la la la la la la. Tra la la. Tra la la
14. la la la la la la la la la la. Yeah yeah yeah.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Sonnet
Billy Collins

1. All we need is fourteen lines, well, thirteen now,


2. and after this one just a dozen
3. to launch a little ship on love's storm-tossed seas,
4. then only ten more left like rows of beans.
5. How easily it goes unless you get Elizabethan
6. and insist the iambic bongos must be played
7. and rhymes positioned at the ends of lines,
8. one for every station of the cross.
9. But hang on here while we make the turn
10. into the final six where all will be resolved,
11. where longing and heartache will find an end,
12. where Laura will tell Petrarch to put down his pen,
13. take off those crazy medieval tights,
14. blow out the lights, and come at last to bed.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

In Medias Res
Michael McFee

1. His waist,
2. like the plot,
3. thickens, wedding
4. pants now breathtaking,
5. belt no longer the cinch
6. it once was, belly's cambium
7. expanding to match each birthday,
8. his body a wad of anonymous tissue
9. swung in the same centrifuge of years
10. that separates a house from its foundation,
11. undermining sidewalks grim with joggers
12. and loose-filled graves and families
13. and stars collapsing on themselves,
14. no preservation society capable
15. of plugging entropy's dike,
16. under the zipper's sneer
17. a belly hibernation-
18. soft, ready for
19. the kill.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

My Own Epitaph
John Gay

1. Life is a jest; and all things show it.


2. I thought so once; but now I know it.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Ozymandias
Percy Bysshe Shelley

1. I met a traveller from an antique land,


2. Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
3. Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand,
4. Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
5. And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
6. Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
7. Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
8. The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
9. And on the pedestal, these words appear:
10. My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;
11. Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!
12. Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
13. Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare
14. The lone and level sands stretch far away.”

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

On His Blindness
John Milton

1. When I consider how my light is spent


2. Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
3. And that one talent which is death to hide
4. Lodg'd with me useless, though my soul more bent
5. To serve therewith my Maker, and present
6. My true account, lest he returning chide,
7. "Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?"
8. I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent
9. That murmur, soon replies: "God doth not need
10. Either man's work or his own gifts: who best
11. Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
12. Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed
13. And post o'er land and ocean without rest:
14. They also serve who only stand and wait."

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Journey of the Magi


T.S. Eliot

1. "A cold coming we had of it,


2. Just the worst time of the year
3. For a journey, and such a long journey:
4. The was deep and the weather sharp,
5. The very dead of winter."
6. And the camels galled, sore-footed, refractory,
7. Lying down in the melting snow.
8. There were times we regretted
9. The summer palaces on slopes, the terraces,
10. And the silken girls bringing sherbet.
11. Then the camel men cursing and grumbling
12. And running away, and wanting their liquor and women,
13. And the night-fires gong out, and the lack of shelters,
14. And the cities hostile and the towns unfriendly
15. And the villages dirty, and charging high prices.:
16. A hard time we had of it.
17. At the end we preferred to travel all night,
18. Sleeping in snatches,
19. With the voices singing in our ears, saying
20. That this was all folly.

21. Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley,


22. Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation;
23. With a running stream and a water-mill beating the darkness,
24. And three trees on the low sky,
25. And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow.
26. Then we came to a tavern with vine-leaves over the lintel,
27. Six hands at an open door dicing for pieces of silver,
28. And feet kicking the empty wine-skins.
29. But there was no information, and so we continued
30. And arrived at evening, not a moment too soon
31. Finding the place; it was (you may say) satisfactory.

32. All this was a long time ago, I remember,


33. And I would do it again, but set down
34. This set down
35. This: were we lead all that way for
36. Birth or Death? There was a Birth, certainly,
37. We had evidence and no doubt. I have seen birth and death,
38. But had thought they were different; this Birth was
39. Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death.
40. We returned to our places, these Kingdoms,
41. But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation,
42. With an alien people clutching their gods.
30

43. I should be glad of another death.


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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

The Bible is an Antique Volume


Emily Dickinson

1. The Bible is an antique Volume—


2. Written by faded men
3. At the suggestion of Holy Spectres—
4. Subjects—Bethlehem—
5. Eden—the ancient Homestead—
6. Satan—the Brigadier—
7. Judas—the Great Defaulter—
8. David—the Troubadour—
9. Sin—a distinguished Precipice
10. Others must resist—
11. Boys that "believe" are very lonesome—
12. Other Boys are "lost"—
13. Had but the Tale a warbling Teller—
14. All the Boys would come—
15. Orpheus' Sermon captivated—
16. It did not condemn—

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

A Kumquat for John Keats


Tony Harrison

1. Today I found the right fruit for my prime,


2. not orange, not tangelo, and not lime,
3. nor moon-like globes of grapefruit that now hang
4. outside our bedroom, nor tart lemon's tang
5. (though last year full of bile and self-defeat
6. I wanted to believe no life was sweet)
7. nor the tangible sunshine of the tangerine,
8. and no incongruous citrus ever seen
9. at greengrocers' in Newcastle or Leeds
10. mis-spelt by the spuds and mud-caked swedes,
11. a fruit an older poet might substitute
12. for the grape John Keats thought fit to be Joy's fruit,
13. when, two years before he died, he tried to write
14. how Melancholy dwelled inside Delight,
15. and if he'd known the citrus that I mean
16. that's not orange, lemon, lime, or tangerine,
17. I'm pretty sure that Keats, though he had heard
18. 'of candied apple, quince and plum and gourd'
19. instead of 'grape against the palate fine'
20. would have, if he'd known it, plumped for mine,
21. this Eastern citrus scarcely cherry size
22. he'd bite just once and then apostrophize
23. and pen one stanza how the fruit had all
24. the qualities of fruit before the Fall,
25. but in the next few lines be forced to write
26. how Eve's apple tasted at the second bite,
27. and if John Keats had only lived to be,
28. because of extra years, in need like me,
29. at 42 he'd help me celebrate
30. that Micanopy kumquat that I ate
31. whole, straight off the tree, sweet pulp and sour skin-
32. or was it sweet outside, and sour within?
33. For however many kumquats that I eat
34. I'm not sure if it's flesh or rind that's sweet,
35. and being a man of doubt at life's mid-way
36. I'd offer Keats some kumquats and I'd say:

37. You'll find that one part's sweet and one part's tart:
38. say where the sweetness or the sourness start.
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AP English Literature
& Composition

39. I find I can't, as if one couldn't say


40. exactly where the night became the day,
41. which makes for me the kumquat taken whole
42. best fruit, and metaphor, to fit the soul
43. of one in Florida at 42 with Keats
44. crunching kumquats, thinking, as he eats
45. the flesh, the juice, the pith, the pips, the peel,
46. that this is how a full life ought to feel,
47. its perishable relish prick the tongue,
48. when the man who savours life 's no longer young,
49. the fruits that were his futures far behind.
50. Then it's the kumquat fruit expresses best
51. how days have darkness round them like a rind,
52. life has a skin of death that keeps its zest.

53. History, a life, the heart, the brain


54. flow to the taste buds and flow back again.
55. That decade or more past Keats's span
56. makes me an older not a wiser man,
57. who knows that it's too late for dying young,
58. but since youth leaves some sweetnesses unsung,
59. he's granted days and kumquats to express
60. Man's Being ripened by his Nothingness.
61. And it isn't just the gap of sixteen years,
62. a bigger crop of terrors, hopes and fears,
63. but a century of history on this earth
64. between John Keats's death and my own birth-
65. years like an open crater, gory, grim,
66. with bloody bubbles leering at the rim;
67. a thing no bigger than an urn explodes
68. and ravishes all silence, and all odes,
69. Flora asphyxiated by foul air
70. unknown to either Keats or Lemprière,
71. dehydrated Naiads, Dryad amputees
72. dragging themselves through slagscapes with no trees,
73. a shirt of Nessus fire that gnaws and eats
74. children half the age of dying Keats . . .

75. Now were you twenty five or six years old


76. when that fevered brow at last grew cold?
77. I've got no books to hand to check the dates.
78. My grudging but glad spirit celebrates
79. that all I've got to hand 's the kumquats, John,
80. the fruit I'd love to have your verdict on,
33

81. but dead men don't eat kumquats, or drink wine,


82. they shiver in the arms of Prosperine,
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AP English Literature
& Composition

83. not warm in bed beside their Fanny Brawne,


84. nor watch her pick ripe grapefruit in the dawn
85. as I did, waking, when I saw her twist,
86. with one deft movement of a sunburnt wrist,
87. the moon, that feebly lit our last night's walk
88. past alligator swampland, off its stalk.
89. I thought of moon-juice juleps when I saw,
90. as if I'd never seen the moon before,
91. the planet glow among the fruit, and its pale light
92. make each citrus on the tree its satellite.

93. Each evening when I reach to draw the blind


94. stars seem the light zest squeezed through night's black rind;
95. the night's peeled fruit the sun, juiced of its rays,
96. first stains, then streaks, then floods the world with days,
97. days, when the very sunlight made me weep,
98. days, spent like the nights in deep, drugged sleep,
99. days in Newcastle by my daughter's bed,
100. wondering if she, or I, weren't better dead,
101. days in Leeds, grey days, my first dark suit,
102. my mother's wreaths stacked next to Christmas fruit,
103. and days, like this in Micanopy. Days!

104. As strong sun burns away the dawn's grey haze


105. I pick a kumquat and the branches spray
106. cold dew in my face to start the day.
107. The dawn's molasses make the citrus gleam
108. still in the orchards of the groves of dream.

109. The limes, like Galway after weeks of rain,


110. glow with a greenness that is close to pain,
111. the dew-cooled surfaces of fruit that spent
112. all last night flaming in the firmament.
113. The new day dawns. O days! My spirit greets
114. the kumquat with the spirit of John Keats.
115. kumquat, comfort for not dying young,
116. both sweet and bitter, bless the poet's tongue!
117. I burst the whole fruit chilled by morning dew
118. against my palate. Fine, for 42!

119. I search for buzzards as the air grows clear


120. and see them ride fresh thermals overhead.
121. Their bleak cries were the first sound I could hear
122. when I stepped at the start of sunrise out of doors,
34

123. and a noise like last night's bedsprings on our bed


124. from Mr Fowler sharpening farmers' saws.
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Our God, Our Help


Isaac Watts

1. Our God, our help in ages past,


2. Our hope for years to come,
3. Our shelter from the stormy blast,
4. And our eternal home.

5. Under the shadow of Thy throne


6. Thy saints have dwelt secure;
7. Sufficient is Thine arm alone,
8. And our defense is sure.

9. Before the hills in order stood,


10. Or earth received her frame,
11. From everlasting Thou art God,
12. To endless years the same.

13. Thy Word commands our flesh to dust,


14. “Return, ye sons of men:”
15. All nations rose from earth at first,
16. And turn to earth again.

17. A thousand ages in Thy sight


18. Are like an evening gone;
19. Short as the watch that ends the night
20. Before the rising sun.

21. The busy tribes of flesh and blood,


22. With all their lives and cares,
23. Are carried downwards by the flood,
24. And lost in following years.

25. Time, like an ever rolling stream,


26. Bears all its sons away;
27. They fly, forgotten, as a dream
28. Dies at the opening day.

29. Like flowery fields the nations stand


30. Pleased with the morning light;
31. The flowers beneath the mower’s hand
32. Lie withering ere ‘tis night.

33. Our God, our help in ages past,


35

34. Our hope for years to come,


35. Be Thou our guard while troubles last,
Page

36. And our eternal home.

AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Stop All the Clocks


W.H. Auden

1. Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,


2. Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
3. Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
4. Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

5. Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead


6. Scribbling on the sky the message He Is Dead,
7. Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
8. Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

9. He was my North, my South, my East and West,


10. My working week and my Sunday rest,
11. My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
12. I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.

13. The stars are not wanted now: put out every one;
14. Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
15. Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood.
16. For nothing now can ever come to any good.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Do Not Go Gentle Into that Good Night


Dylan Thomas

1. Do not go gentle into that good night,


2. Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
3. Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

4. Though wise men at their end know dark is right,


5. Because their words had forked no lightning they
6. Do not go gentle into that good night.

7. Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright


8. Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
9. Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

10. Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
11. And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
12. Do not go gentle into that good night.

13. Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
14. Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
15. Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

16. And you, my father, there on the sad height,


17. Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
18. Do not go gentle into that good night.
19. Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Ballad of Billy the Kid


Billy Joel

1. From a town known as Wheeling, West Virginia


2. Rode a boy with a six-gun in his hand
3. And his daring life of crime
4. Made him a legend in his time
5. East and west of the Rio Grande

6. Well, he started with a bank in Colorado


7. In the pocket of his vest, a Colt he hid
8. And his age and his size
9. Took the teller by surprise
10. And the word spread of Billy the Kid

11. Well, he never traveled heavy


12. Yes, he always rode alone
13. And he soon put many older guns to shame
14. And he never had a sweetheart
15. And he never had a home
16. But the cowboy and the rancher knew his name

17. Well, he robbed his way from Utah to Oklahoma


18. And the law just could not seem to track him down
19. And it served his legend well
20. For the folks, they'd love to tell
21. 'Bout when Billy the Kid came to town

22. Well, one cold day a posse captured Billy


23. And the judge said, "String 'im up for what he did!"
24. And the cowboys and their kin
25. Like the sea came pourin' in
26. To watch the hangin' of Billy the Kid

27. Well, he never traveled heavy


28. Yes, he always rode alone
29. And he soon put many older guns to shame
30. And he never had a sweetheart
31. But he finally found a home
32. Underneath the boothill grave that bears his name

33. From a town known as Oyster Bay, Long Island


34. Rode a boy with a six-pack in his hand
35. And his daring life of crime
38

36. Made him a legend in his time


Page

37. East and west of the Rio Grande

AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Traffic Jam
James Taylor

1. Damn this traffic jam


2. How I hate to be late
3. It hurts my motor to go so slow
4. Damn this traffic jam
5. Time I get home my supper'll be cold
6. Damn this traffic jam

7. Well I left my job about 5 o'clock


8. It took fifteen minutes go three blocks
9. Just in time to stand in line
10. With a freeway looking like a parking lot

11. Now I almost had a heart attack


12. Looking in my rear view mirror
13. I saw myself the next car back
14. Looking in the rear view mirror
15. 'Bout to have a heart attack
16. I said

17. Now when I die I don't want no coffin


18. I thought about it all too often
19. Just strap me in behind the wheel
20. And bury me with my automobile

21. Damn...

22. Now I used to think that I was cool


23. Running around on fossil fuel
24. Until I saw what I was doing
25. Was driving down the road to ruin 39
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Dover Beach
Matthew Arnold

1. The sea is calm tonight,


2. The tide is full, the moon lies fair
3. Upon the straits; on the French coast the light
4. Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand,
5. Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.
6. Come to the window, sweet is the night air!

7. Only, from the long line of spray


8. Where the sea meets the moon-blanched land,
9. Listen! you hear the grating roar
10. Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,
11. At their return, up the high strand,
12. Begin, and cease, and then again begin,
13. With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
14. The eternal note of sadness in.

15. Sophocles long ago


16. Heard it on the Agean, and it brought
17. Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow
18. Of human misery; we
19. Find also in the sound a thought,
20. Hearing it by this distant northern sea.

21. The Sea of Faith


22. Was once, too, at the full, and round earth's shore
23. Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled.
24. But now I only hear
25. Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
26. Retreating, to the breath
27. Of the night wind, down the vast edges drear
28. And naked shingles of the world.

29. Ah, love, let us be true


30. To one another! for the world, which seems
31. To lie before us like a land of dreams,
32. So various, so beautiful, so new,
33. Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
34. Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
35. And we are here as on a darkling plain
36. Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
37. Where ignorant armies clash by night.
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Harlem
Langston Hughes

1. What happens to a dream deferred?

2. Does it dry up
3. like a raisin in the sun?
4. Or fester like a sore—
5. And then run?
6. Does it stink like rotten meat?
7. Or crust and sugar over—
8. like a syrupy sweet?

9. Maybe it just sags


10. like a heavy load.

11. Or does it explode?

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

London
William Blake

1. I wander thro' each charter'd street,


2. Near where the charter'd Thames does flow.
3. And mark in every face I meet
4. Marks of weakness, marks of woe.

5. In every cry of every Man,


6. In every Infants cry of fear,
7. In every voice: in every ban,
8. The mind-forg'd manacles I hear

9. How the Chimney-sweepers cry


10. Every blackning Church appalls,
11. And the hapless Soldiers sigh
12. Runs in blood down Palace walls

13. But most thro' midnight streets I hear


14. How the youthful Harlots curse
15. Blasts the new-born Infants tear
16. And blights with plagues the Marriage hearse

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

To His Coy Mistress


Andrew Marvel

1. Had we but world enough and time,


2. This coyness, lady, were no crime.
3. We would sit down, and think which way
4. To walk, and pass our long love’s day.
5. Thou by the Indian Ganges’ side
6. Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide
7. Of Humber would complain. I would
8. Love you ten years before the flood,
9. And you should, if you please, refuse
10. Till the conversion of the Jews.
11. My vegetable love should grow
12. Vaster than empires and more slow;
13. An hundred years should go to praise
14. Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze;
15. Two hundred to adore each breast,
16. But thirty thousand to the rest;
17. An age at least to every part,
18. And the last age should show your heart.
19. For, lady, you deserve this state,
20. Nor would I love at lower rate.
21. But at my back I always hear
22. Time’s wingèd chariot hurrying near;
23. And yonder all before us lie
24. Deserts of vast eternity.
25. Thy beauty shall no more be found;
26. Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound
27. My echoing song; then worms shall try
28. That long-preserved virginity,
29. And your quaint honour turn to dust,
30. And into ashes all my lust;
31. The grave’s a fine and private place,
32. But none, I think, do there embrace.
33. Now therefore, while the youthful hue
34. Sits on thy skin like morning dew,
35. And while thy willing soul transpires
36. At every pore with instant fires,
37. Now let us sport us while we may,
38. And now, like amorous birds of prey,
39. Rather at once our time devour
40. Than languish in his slow-chapped power.
41. Let us roll all our strength and all
42. Our sweetness up into one ball,
43. And tear our pleasures with rough strife
44. Thorough the iron gates of life:
43

45. Thus, though we cannot make our sun


46. Stand still, yet we will make him run.
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Mother-in-Law
Adrienne Rich

1. Tell me something
2. you say
3. Not: What are you working on now, is there anyone special,
4. how is the job
5. do you mind coming back to an empty house
6. what do you do on Sundays
7. Tell me something…
8. Some secret
9. we both know and have never spoken?
10. Some sentence that could flood with light
11. your life, mine?
12. Tell me what daughters tell their mothers
13. everywhere in the world, and I and only I
14. even have to ask…
15. Tell me something.
16. Lately, I hear it: Tell me something true,
17. daughter-in-law before we part,
18. tell me something true before I die
19. And time was when I tried.
20. You married my son, and so
21. strange as you are, you are my daughter
22. Tell me…
23. I’ve been trying to tell you, mother-in-law
24. that I think I’m breaking in two
25. and half doesn’t even want to love
26. I can polish this table to satin because I don’t care
27. I am trying to tell you, I envy
28. the people in mental hospitals their freedom
29. and I can’t live on placebos
30. or Valium, like you
31. A cut lemon scours the smell of fish away
32. You’ll feel better when the children are in school
33. I would try to tell you, mother-in-law
34. but my anger takes fire from yours and in the oven
35. the meal bursts into flames
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AP English Literature
& Composition

36. Daughter-in-law, before we part


37. tell me something true
38. I polished the table, mother-in-law
39. and scrubbed the knives with half a lemon
40. the way you showed me to do
41. I wish I could tell you-
42. Tell me
43. They think I’m weak and hold
44. things back from me. I agreed to years ago
45. Daughter-in-law, strange as you are,
46. tell me something true
47. tell me something
48. Your son is dead
49. ten years, I am a lesbian,
50. my children are themselves.
51. Mother-in-law, before we part
52. shall we try again? Strange as I am,
53. strange as you are? What do mothers
54. ask their own daughters, everywhere in the world?
55. Is there a question?
56. Ask me something.

45
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Father and Son


Cat Stevens

1. It's not time to make a change,


2. Just relax, take it easy.
3. You're still young, that's your fault,
4. There's so much you have to know.
5. Find a girl, settle down,
6. If you want you can marry.
7. Look at me, I am old, but I'm happy.

8. I was once like you are now, and I know that it's not easy,
9. To be calm when you've found something going on.
10. But take your time, think a lot,
11. Why, think of everything you've got.
12. For you will still be here tomorrow, but your dreams may not.

13. How can I try to explain, cause when I do it turns away again.
14. It's always been the same, same old story.
15. From the moment I could talk I was ordered to listen.
16. Now there's a way and I know that I have to go away.
17. I know I have to go.

18. It's not time to make a change,


19. Just sit down, take it slowly.
20. You're still young, that's your fault,
21. There's so much you have to go through.
22. Find a girl, settle down,
23. if you want, you can marry.
24. Look at me, I am old, but I'm happy.

25. All the times that I cried, keeping all the things I knew inside,
26. It's hard, but it's harder to ignore it.
27. If they were right, I'd agree, but it's them they know not me.
28. Now there's a way and I know that I have to go away.
29. I know I have to go.
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Cats in the Cradle


Harry Chapin

1. My child arrived just the other day


2. He came to the world in the usual way
3. But there were planes to catch and bills to pay
4. He learned to walk while I was away
5. And he was talkin' 'fore I knew it, and as he grew
6. He'd say "I'm gonna be like you dad
7. You know I'm gonna be like you"

8. And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon


9. Little boy blue and the man on the moon
10. When you comin' home dad?
11. I don't know when, but we'll get together then son
12. You know we'll have a good time then

13. My son turned ten just the other day


14. He said, "Thanks for the ball, Dad, come on let's play
15. Can you teach me to throw", I said "Not today
16. I got a lot to do", he said, "That's ok"
17. And he walked away but his smile never dimmed
18. And said, "I'm gonna be like him, yeah
19. You know I'm gonna be like him"

20. And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon
21. Little boy blue and the man on the moon
22. When you comin' home son?
23. I don't know when, but we'll get together then son
24. You know we'll have a good time then

25. Well, he came home from college just the other day
26. So much like a man I just had to say
27. "Son, I'm proud of you, can you sit for a while?"
28. He shook his head and said with a smile
29. "What I'd really like, Dad, is to borrow the car keys
30. See you later, can I have them please?"

31. And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon
32. Little boy blue and the man on the moon
33. When you comin' home son?
34. I don't know when, but we'll get together then son
35. You know we'll have a good time then
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

36. I've long since retired, my son's moved away


37. I called him up just the other day
38. I said, "I'd like to see you if you don't mind"
39. He said, "I'd love to, Dad, if I can find the time
40. You see my new job's a hassle and kids have the flu
41. But it's sure nice talking to you, Dad
42. It's been sure nice talking to you"

43. And as I hung up the phone it occurred to me


44. He'd grown up just like me
45. My boy was just like me

46. And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon
47. Little boy blue and the man on the moon
48. When you comin' home son?
49. I don't know when, but we'll get together then son
50. You know we'll have a good time then

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Landslide
Stevie Nicks

1. Landslide
2. I took my love and I took it down
3. I climbed a mountain and I turned around
4. And I saw my reflection in the snow covered hills
5. 'Till the landslide brought me down

6. Oh mirror in the sky, what is love?


7. Can the child within my heart rise above?
8. Can I sail through the changing ocean tides
9. Can I handle the seasons of my life?
10. Mmm mmm I don’t know
11. Mmm mmm Mmm mmm

12. Well I’ve been afraid of changing ‘cause I


13. Built my life around you.
14. But time makes you bolder
15. Children get older and I’m getting older too

16. I’ve been afraid of changing ‘cause I


17. I built my life around you
18. But time makes you bolder, even children get older
19. and I’m getting older too
20. I’m getting older too
21. So, take this love, take it down.
22. Oh, if you climb a mountain and you turn around
23. If you see my reflection in the snow covered hills
24. Well the landslide will bring it down, down
25. And if you see my reflection in the snow covered hills,
26. Well maybe, the landslide ‘ill bring it down.
27. Well, well the landslide with bring it down.
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Forever Young
Bob Dylan

1. May God bless and keep you always


2. May your wishes all come true
3. May you always do for others
4. And let others do for you
5. May you build a ladder to the stars
6. And climb on every rung
7. May you stay forever young
8. Forever young, forever young
9. May you stay forever young.

10. May you grow up to be righteous


11. May you grow up to be true
12. May you always know the truth
13. And see the lights surrounding you
14. May you always be courageous
15. Stand upright and be strong
16. May you stay forever young
17. Forever young, forever young
18. May you stay forever young.

19. May your hands always be busy


20. May your feet always be swift
21. May you have a strong foundation
22. When the winds of changes shift
23. May your heart always be joyful
24. And may your song always be sung
25. May you stay forever young
26. Forever young, forever young
27. May you stay forever young. 50
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Just the Two of Us


Will Smith

1. Just the two of us, yeah


2. Just the two of us
3. Just the two of us

4. From the first time the doctor placed you in my arms


5. I knew I'd meet death 'fore I'd let you meet harm
6. Although questions arose in my mind, would I be man enough?
7. Against wrong, choose right and be standin' up
8. From the hospital that first night
9. Took a hour just ta get the car seat in right
10. People drivin' all fast, got me kinda upset
11. Got you home safe, placed you in your basinette

12. That night I don't think one wink I slept


13. As I slipped out my bed, to your crib I crept
14. Touched your head gently, felt my heart melt
15. 'Cause I know I loved you more than life itself

16. Then to my knees, and I begged the Lord please


17. Let me be a good daddy, all he needs
18. Love, knowledge, discipline too
19. I pledge my life to you, uh

20. Just the two of us, we can make it if we try


21. Just the two of us
22. Just the two of us, building castles in the sky
23. Just the two of us, you and I

24. Five years old, bringing comedy


25. Everytime I look at you I think man a little me just like me
26. Wait an see gonna be tall makes me laugh 'cause
27. You got your dads ears an all
28. Sometimes I wonder, what you gonna be?
29. A General, a Doctor, maybe a MC
30. Haha, I wanna kiss you all the time
31. But I will test that butt when you cut outta line
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

32. Trudat uh uh uh why you do dat?


33. I try to be a tough dad, but you be makin' me laugh
34. Crazy joy, when I see the eyes of my baby boy
35. I pledge to you, I will always do
36. Everything I can show you how to be a man
37. Dignity, integrity, honor an' I don't mind if you lose
38. Long as you came with it an' you can cry, ain't no shame it it

39. It didn't work out with me an your mom


40. But yo, push come to shove you was conceived in love
41. So if the world attacks, and you slide off track
42. Remember one fact, I got your back

43. Just the two of us, we can make it if we try


44. Just the two of us
45. Just the two of us, building castles in the sky
46. Just the two of us, you and I

47. It's a full time job to be a good dad


48. You got so much more stuff than I had
49. I gotta study just to keep with the changin' times
50. 101 Dalmations on your CD-ROM
51. See me, I'm tryin to pretend I know
52. On my PC where that CD go

53. But yo, ain't nuthin' promised, one day I'll be gone
54. Feel the strife, but trust life does go wrong
55. But just in case, it's my place to impart
56. One day some girl's gonna break your heart
57. And ooh ain't no pain like from the opposite sex
58. Gonna hurt bad, but don't take it out on the next son

59. Throughout life people will make you mad


60. Disrespect you and treat you bad
61. Let God deal with the things they do
62. 'Cause hate in your heart will consume you too
63. Always tell the truth, say your prayers
64. Hold doors, pull out chairs, easy on the swears
65. You're living proof that dreams come true
66. I love you and I'm here for you, uh
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

67. Just the two of us, we can make it if we try


68. Just the two of us
69. Just the two of us, building castles in the sky
70. Just the two of us, you and I

71. Just the two of us


72. Just the two of us, building castles in the sky
73. Just the two of us, you and I

74. Just the two of us, I'm always here for you
75. Whatever you need just call on me
76. Whatever you need I'll be there for anytime
77. You and I

78. Just the two of us


79. Just the two of us, building castles in the sky
80. You and I, just the two of us

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Sonnet 138
William Shakespeare

1. When my love swears that she is made of truth


2. I do believe her, though I know she lies,
3. That she might think me some untutor'd youth,
4. Unlearned in the world's false subtleties.
5. Thus vainly thinking that she thinks me young,
6. Although she knows my days are past the best,
7. Simply I credit her false speaking tongue:
8. On both sides thus is simple truth suppress'd.
9. But wherefore says she not she is unjust?
10. And wherefore say not I that I am old?
11. O, love's best habit is in seeming trust,
12. And age in love loves not to have years told:
13. Therefore I lie with her and she with me,
14. And in our faults by lies we flatter'd be.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Sonnet 292
Francesco Petrarch

1. The eyes I spoke of once in words that burn,


2. the arms and hands and feet and lovely face
3. that took me from myself for such a space
4. of time, and marked me out from other men;
5. the waving hair of unmixed gold that shone,
6. the smile that flashed with the angelic rays b
7. that used to make this earth a paradise,
8. are now a little dust, all feeling gone.
9. And yet I live, hence grief and rage for me,
10. left where the light I cherished never shows,
11. in fragile bark on the tempestuous sea.
12. Here let my loving song come to a close,
13. the vein of my accustomed art is dry,
14. and this, my lyre, turned at last to tears.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Sonnet 30
Edmund Spenser

1. My love is like to ice, and I to fire:


2. How comes it then that this her cold so great
3. Is not dissolved through my so hot desire,
4. But harder grows the more I her entreat?
5. Or how comes it that my exceeding heat
6. Is not allayed by her heart-frozen cold,
7. But that I burn much more in boiling sweat,
8. And feel my flames augmented manifold?
9. What more miraculous thing may be told,
10. That fire, which all things melts, should harden ice,
11. And ice, which is congeal's with senseless cold,
12. Should kindle fire by wonderful device?
13. Such is the power of love in gentle mind,
14. That it can alter all the course of kind.

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Wrecking Ball
Miley Cyrus

1. We clawed, we chained our hearts in vain


2. We jumped, never asking why
3. We kissed, I fell under your spell
4. A love no one could deny

5. Don’t you ever say I just walked away


6. I will always want you
7. I can’t live a lie, running for my life
8. I will always want you

9. I came in like a wrecking ball


10. never hit so hard in love
11. All I wanted was to break your walls
12. All you ever did was wreck me
13. Yeah, you wreck me

14. I put you high up in the sky


15. And now, you’re not coming down
16. It slowly turned, you let me burn
17. And now, we’re ashes on the ground

18. Don’t you ever say I just walked away


19. I will always want you
20. I can’t live a lie, running for my life
21. I will always want you

22. I came in like a wrecking ball


23. I never hit so hard in love
24. All I wanted was to break your walls
25. All you ever did was wreck me

26. I came in like a wrecking ball


27. Yeah, I just closed my eyes and swung
28. Left me crouching in a blaze and fall
29. All you ever did was wreck me
30. Yeah, you wreck me

31. I never meant to start a war


32. I just wanted you to let me in
33. And instead of using force
34. I guess I should’ve let you in
35. I never meant to start a war
36. I just wanted you to let me in
37. I guess I should’ve let you in
57

38. Don’t you ever say I just walked away


39. I will always want you
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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

40. I came in like a wrecking ball


41. I never hit so hard in love
42. All I wanted was to break your walls
43. All you ever did was wreck me
44. I came in like a wrecking ball
45. Yeah, I just closed my eyes and swung
46. Left me crouching in a blaze and fall
47. All you ever did was wreck me
48. Yeah, you wreck me

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum


AP English Literature
& Composition

Sonnet 30
Edmund Spenser

Poem Hunter – http://poemhunter.com


Poetry Foundation - http://www.poetryfoundation.org
Song Lyrics - http://www.metrolyrics.com

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AP English Literature and Composition | Ms. Mae Malanum