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Coffee Break German

Lesson 11
Study Notes

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 1 of 20


LESSON NOTES

FÜR MEINE FRAU EIN KAFFEE MIT SAHNE


It’s finally time to start ordering drinks in the café, so in this lesson of
Coffee Break German we’ll learn various words and phrases to help
you cope in a café situation. There’s more information about verbs
from Kirsten, our Grammar Guru, and Julia tells us about the coffee
culture in German-speaking areas.

DRINKS VOCABULARY
The lesson began with an introduction of new vocabulary related to
the topic of drinks in a café or bar. As with all new vocabulary, try to
learn the words with the definite article so that you know the gender
of the word.

der Kaffee
the coffee

As we already know, the word der is the definite article (the word for
“the”) for masculine words in the nominative case. The indefinite
article for masculine words in the nominative case is ein so if you
want “a coffee” you can ask for:

ein Kaffee
a coffee

We also learned some variations:

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 2 of 20


ein Kaffee mit Sahne
a coffee with cream

ein Kaffee mit Milch


a coffee with milk (milk on the side)

ein Milchkaffee
a coffee with milk (“white coffee”)

Note the difference between ein Kaffee mit Milch, where the milk
is likely to come in a small jug on the side, and ein Milchkaffee
where the milk is already in the coffee.

ein Espresso
an espresso

der Tee
the tea

ein Tee
a tea

ein Tee mit Milch


a tea with milk

ein Tee mit Zitrone


a tea with lemon

ein Zitronentee
a lemon tea

Ein Tee mit Zitrone is a tea (any kind of tea) with lemon, for
example a slice of lemon, whereas ein Zitronentee is a lemon-

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 3 of 20


flavoured fruit tea.

die heiße Schokolade


the hot chocolate

eine heiße Schokolade


a hot chocolate

Note that heiße Schokolade is feminine so it uses the feminine


definite article die and indefinite article eine.

eine heiße Schokolade mit Sahne


a hot chocolate with cream

die/eine Limonade
lemonade

der/ein Saft
juice

ein Orangensaft
an orange juice

ein Apfelsaft
an apple juice

das Wasser
the water

ein Wasser
a water

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The word Wasser is neuter. It uses the definite article das and the
indefinite article ein. See below for the full table of definite and
indefinite articles in the nominative case:

MASCULINE FEMININE NEUTER

DEFINITE (THE) der die das

INDEFINITE (A) ein eine ein

ein Wasser mit Kohlensäure


a sparkling water

Ein Wasser mit Kohlensäure is literally “a water with carbonic


acid”. Despite the scientific-sounding phrase, it is commonly used to
ask for a “sparkling water” in German. If you would like a still water,
you can use one of the following phrases:

ein Wasser ohne Kohlensäure


a still water (literally “a water without carbonic acid”!)

ein stilles Wasser


a still water

das/ein Bier
beer

der/ein Wein
wine

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 5 of 20


der/ein Weißwein
white wine

der/ein Rotwein
red wine

der/ein Rosé(wein)
rosé wine

If you would like to ask for “a glass of wine” you can use:

ein Glas Weißwein


a glass of white wine

Note that there is no word for “of” in this expression: ein Glas
Weißwein or ein Glas Rotwein is used.

ein Glas Wasser


a glass of water

ein Glas Bier


a glass of beer

ein Glas Limonade


a glass of lemonade

die/eine Flasche
a bottle

Just as with ein Glas Weißwein, there is no word for “of” when you
ask for “a bottle of lemonade”:

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 6 of 20


eine Flasche Limonade
a bottle of lemonade

eine Flasche Rotwein


a bottle of red wine

eine Flasche Bier


a bottle of beer

die/eine Tasse
a cup

eine Tasse Zitronentee


a cup of lemon tee

eine Tasse Kaffee


a cup of coffee

ORDERING DRINKS
As in most languages, there are a number of ways to order drinks and
ask for things in German. One very common expression is:

ich möchte ...


I would like ...

We have actually seen this expression already in the phrase ich


möchte gern mehr Deutsch lernen which was in the bonus
vocabulary for lesson 9. It meant “I would like to learn more
German”.

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Ich möchte can be combined with drinks as follows:

ich möchte ein Glas Limonade


I would like a glass of lemonade

WARNING! Note that ich möchte has to be followed by the


accusative so if the drink which comes after is masculine, then you
have to change ein to einen. Don’t worry about this just now: we’ll
be covering it in the next lesson in more detail.

An alternative way to order drinks - and one which avoids the


accusative form of the drinks words! - is to use the word für,
meaning “for”:

für mich ...


for me ...

für meinen Vater


for my father

für meinen Sohn


for my son

für meine Frau


for my wife

für meine Schwester


for my sister

You may have noticed that für itself needs an accusative, so “for my
father” is für meinen Vater. Even so, the drink words - or whatever
is ordered - can be in the nominative case!

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TRANSLATION QUIZ
Thomas tested Mark on his understanding of the content of this
lesson so far with some translation challenges:

für meinen Vater eine Tasse Kaffee


for my father a cup of coffee

für meine Tochter ein Glas stilles Wasser


for my daughter a glass of still water

Using the alternative Wasser ohne Kohlensäure, the above


answer would be:

für meine Tochter ein Glas Wasser ohne


Kohlensäure
for my daughter a glass of still water

Note also that it is possible to change the order of the sentence


around:

ein Glas Wasser ohne Kohlensäure für meine


Tochter
“For my father a cup of coffee”

The final translation sentence was:

ich möchte eine Flasche Bier


I would like a bottle of beer

für mich eine Flasche Bier

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 9 of 20


for me a bottle of beer

SETTLING THE BILL


We have previously learned the word die Rechnung for “the bill” /
“the check”. An alternative way of asking for the bill uses the word
zahlen. You may remember die Zahlen used as a noun, meaning
“the numbers”. When it is used as a verb zahlen means “to pay”.

zahlen, bitte
the bill, please / can we pay, please?

können wir gleich zahlen?


can we pay straight away please?

A CONVERSATION
Let’s now put some of this new language into practice in a
conversation. In this dialogue, Thomas is playing the part of the
waiter and Mark is the customer ordering drinks for his family.

Thomas: Guten Tag. Was möchten Sie?


Mark: Für mich ein Milchkaffee bitte. Für meine Frau ein
Zitronentee. Für meinen Sohn eine heiße Schokolade
und für meine Tochter ein Apfelsaft.
Thomas: Also, ein Milchkaffee, ein Zitronentee, ein Apfelsaft und
eine heiße Schokolade mit oder ohne Sahne?
Mark: Ohne Sahne, bitte.
Thomas: Kommt sofort.

Thomas: Also, der Milchkaffee ist für ... ?


Mark: Für mich. Der Zitronentee is für meine Frau.

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 10 of 20


Thomas: Die heiße Schokolade ohne Sahne für das Fräulein, und
der Apfelsaft für den jungen Mann.
Mark: Nein, die heiße Schokolade ist für meinen Sohn, unde
der Apfelsaft is für meine Tochter.
Thomas: Ah, tut mir Leid. Alles in Ordnung?
Mark: Ja, danke schön. Können wir gleich zahlen, bitte?
Thomas: Ja, natürlich. Das macht neun sechzig, bitte.
Mark: Elf, stimmt so.
Thomas: Danke.

Use the notes below to help you understand the conversation fully.

was möchten Sie?


what would you like? This is the Sie form of the phrase ich
möchte ... , “I would like ...”.

mit oder ohne Sahne?


with or without cream?

kommt sofort
straight away. Literally this means “comes at once”. It is common
to hear a waiter saying this as he goes off to prepare the order.

das Fräulein
the young lady

der jungen Mann


the young man. In the context of the conversation, den jungen
Mann is in the accusative case after the preposition für, just as as
we have seen with für meinen Vater and so on.

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 11 of 20


tut mir Leid
I’m sorry

alles in Ordnung?
is everything ok

das macht ...


that makes ...

neun sechzig (€9,60)


nine euros sixty

elf, stimmt so
eleven, that’s fine. This is a common way to give a tip in German,
by rounding up and stating the amount you wish to pay.

GRAMMAR GURU
In this episode’s Grammar Guru segment, Kirsten returns to the topic
of verbs and discusses the plural forms of verbs in the present tense.

Hallo - it’s your Grammar Guru here again


and today I’m going to be fulfilling the
promise I made to you a couple of lessons
ago. I’m going to be teaching you the plural
verb endings so that you will then be able to
talk to - or about - more than one person.
So, let’s start with those plural endings, using
the same verb as we did last time, kommen.
You’ll remember that the verb as it appears in
this form is called the infinitive and that the
first step to conjugation is to take off the -en ending which leaves
us with the stem. Now we add our endings to this stem.

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 12 of 20


The first person plural is the wir form: “we”. The ending is -en, so
for “we come” we have wir kommen. You may well be asking
yourself why we took -en off the infinitive and then added it back
on for the wir form! I’ll just say that it helps to think of forming
verbs in this way, and as you move forward with more German
grammar, you’ll thank me!
Then we come to the second person plurals. Just like the singular
du and Sie for informal and formal, there are also two forms in
the plural, again an informal one and a formal one. The formal
one is the same as the singular: Sie kommen means “you are
coming” or “you come”, if you are addressing one or more people
that you don’t know. The informal one is ihr and it’s like a plural
form of du - where you’re talking to more than one person that
you know well. The ending for ihr is -t, so we get ihr kommt.
Finally the third person plural - the German for “they” - is also
sie, so the verb form is sie kommen. It sounds exactly the same
as the formal second person forms, but remember that the formal
Sie is written with a capital S and sie as in “they” is written with
a lower case s.
So there we have the plural verb endings: wir kommen, ihr
kommt, Sie kommen, sie kommen.
Let’s now conjugate the whole of the verb kommen with the
singular and plural forms:

SINGULAR PLURAL

1ST ich komme wir kommen

2ND (INFORMAL) du kommst ihr kommt

2ND (FORMAL) Sie kommen Sie kommen

3RD er/sie/es kommt sie kommen

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So there you have it: you can now conjugate a whole verb in
German! Many verbs follow the same pattern as kommen in the
present tense, for example zahlen, “to pay”. We take off the -en of
the infinitive and add the same endings, giving ich zahle, du
zahlst, Sie zahlen, er/sie/es zahlt, wir zahlen, ihr zahlt,
Sie zahlen, sie zahlen.
Don’t worry about these verbs: as you proceed through the Coffee
Break German course and become more familiar with German
grammar you’ll begin to use the verbs naturally and know what to
say when you need to say it!

CULTURAL CORRESPONDENT
In this lesson’s Cultural Correspondent feature, Julia talks about
coffee culture in the German-speaking parts of
the world.

Hallo Mark, servus Thomas, und guten Tag


an alle unsere Coffee Break German Zuhörer!

Ich bin’s, Julia, eure Kulturreporterin, und


heute werde ich über Kaffee und Tee
sprechen. Did you get that? I’m going to be
speaking about coffee and tea. See, you’re
beginning to understand German perfectly!

In general Germany is a coffee-drinking nation. It starts in the


morning at home, continues with a coffee-to-go on the commute to
work, and we actually say “Coffee-to-go”, rather than ein Kaffee
zum mitnehmen. Then it continues with a coffee mid-morning,
and by the time it gets to mid afternoon, you’re already thinking
about Kaffeetrinken, that special time of the afternoon, when
you sit down with a cup of coffee and a cake, Kaffee und
Kuchen.

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In fact Kaffeetrinken is almost seen as the fourth meal of the
day, in addition to breakfast, Frühstück, lunch, Mittag and
dinner, Abendbrot. The fact is that at this fourth meal of the day
you don’t even need to have a coffee as such, but the coffee culture
is so engrained in our society that it makes sense for this meal or
snack to be named after it.

But it’s not all about coffee, because in German-speaking parts of


the world, tea is almost just as important. Be careful: when I say
“tea” I don’t necessarily mean a cup of English tea with milk. This
would be Schwarzer Tee (“black tea”). Everything that comes in
what looks like a tea bag we call tea, even if it doesn’t contain tea
leaves. For example you’ll find a vast selection of herbal and fruit
teas, everything from apple, raspberry, peppermint to fennel,
caramel, vanilla or nettle tea. So in a café, if you say:

ich möchte einen Tee


“I would like a tea”

the waiter will offer you a full range of teas and you can choose
whichever flavour you fancy.

So now you know a little more about what to ask for in a café in a
German-speaking country. Oh, I’ve just noticed, it’s coming up to
half past three, so I’m off to Kaffeetrinken with my friends! Bis
später!

DAS REICHT FÜR HEUTE

Ready for more? Turn the page to continue with the


bonus materials for this lesson.

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 15 of 20


CORE VOCABULARY
der Kaffee
a coffee

ein Kaffee mit Sahne


a coffee with cream

ein Kaffee mit Milch


a coffee with milk (milk on the side)

ein Milchkaffee
a coffee with milk (“white coffee”)

ein Espresso
an espresso

der Tee
the tea

ein Tee mit Milch


a tea with milk

ein Tee mit Zitrone


a tea with lemon

ein Zitronentee
a lemon tea

die heiße Schokolade


the hot chocolate

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 16 of 20


eine heiße Schokolade mit Sahne
a hot chocolate with cream

die/eine Limonade
lemonade

der/ein Saft
juice

ein Orangensaft
an orange juice

ein Apfelsaft
an apple juice

das/ein Wasser
water

ein Wasser mit Kohlensäure


a sparkling water

ein Wasser ohne Kohlensäure


a still water (literally “a water without carbonic acid”!)

ein stilles Wasser


a still water

das/ein Bier
beer

der/ein Wein
wine

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 17 of 20


der/ein Weißwein
white wine

der/ein Rotwein
red wine

der/ein Rosé(wein)
rosé wine

das Glas
the glass

ein Glas Weißwein


a glass of white wine

ein Glas Wasser


a glass of water

ein Glas Bier


a glass of beer

ein Glas Limonade


a glass of lemonade

die/eine Flasche
a bottle

eine Flasche Limonade


a bottle of lemonade

eine Flasche Rotwein


a bottle of red wine

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 18 of 20


eine Flasche Bier
a bottle of beer

die/eine Tasse
a cup

eine Tasse Zitronentee


a cup of lemon tee

eine Tasse Kaffee


a cup of coffee

ich möchte ...


I would like ...

für mich ...


for me ...

für meinen Vater


for my father

für meinen Sohn


for my son

für meine Frau


for my wife

für meine Schwester


for my sister

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 19 of 20


BONUS VOCABULARY
die Cola
cola

die Apfelschorle
fizzy apple juice

das Radler
shandy

der Whisky
whisky

der Schwarztee
black tea

der Früchtetee
fruit tea

der Grüntee
green tea

der Schnaps
schnapps

der Eiswürfel
ice cube

die Eiswürfel
ice cubes

Coffee Break German: Lesson 11 - Notes page 20 of 20