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CHAPTER-I

INTRODUCTION
1.1 INDUSTRY PROFILE

Indian Two-Wheeler Industry: A Perspective


Automobile is one of the largest industries in global market. Being the leader in
product and process technologies in the manufacturing sector, it has been recognised as
one of the drivers of economic growth. During the last decade, well¬-directed efforts
have been made to provide a new look to the automobile policy for realising the sector's
full potential for the economy. Steps like abolition of licensing, removal of quantitative
restrictions and initiatives to bring the policy framework in consonance with WTO
requirements have set the industry in a progressive track. Removal of the restrictive
environment has helped restructuring, and enabled industry to absorb new technologies,
aligning itself with the global development and also to realise its potential in the country.
The liberalisation policies have led to continuous increase in competition which has
ultimately resulted in modernisation in line with the global standards as well as in
substantial cut in prices. Aggressive marketing by the auto finance companies have also
played a significant role in boosting automobile demand, especially from the population
in the middle income group.

Evolution of Two-wheeler Industry in India


Two-wheeler segment is one of the most important components of the automobile
sector that has undergone significant changes due to shift in policy environment. The
two-wheeler industry has been in existence in the country since 1955. It consists of three
segments viz. scooters, motorcycles and mopeds. According to the figures published by
SIAM, the share of two-wheelers in automobile sector in terms of units sold was about 80
per cent during 2003-¬04. This high figure itself is suggestive of the importance of the
sector. In the initial years, entry of firms, capacity expansion, choice of products
including capacity mix and technology, all critical areas of functioning of an industry,
were effectively controlled by the State machinery. The lapses in the system had invited
fresh policy options that came into being in late sixties. Amongst these policies,

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Monopolies and Restrictive Trade Practices (MRTP) and Foreign Exchange Regulation
Act (FERA) were aimed at regulating monopoly and foreign investment respectively.
This controlling mechanism over the industry resulted in: (a) several firms operating
below minimum scale of efficiency; (b) under-utilisation of capacity; and (c) usage of
outdated technology. Recognition of the damaging effects of licensing and fettering
policies led to initiation of reforms, which ultimately took a more prominent shape with
the introduction of the New Economic Policy (NEP) in 1985.
However, the major set of reforms was launched in the year 1991 in response to
the major macroeconomic crisis faced by the economy. The industrial policies shifted
from a regime of regulation and tight control to a more liberalised and competitive era.
Two major results of policy changes during these years in two-wheeler industry were that
the, weaker players died out giving way to the new entrants and superior products and a
sizeable increase in number of brands entered the market that compelled the firms to
compete on the basis of product attributes. Finally, the two-¬wheeler industry in the
country has been able to witness a proliferation of brands with introduction of new
technology as well as increase in number of players. However, with various policy
measures undertaken in order to increase the competition, though the degree of
concentration has been lessened over time, deregulation of the industry has not really
resulted in higher level of competition

MARKET CHARACTERISTICS

Demand

Segmental Classification and Characteristics


The three main product segments in the two-wheeler category are scooters, motorcycles
and mopeds. However, in response to evolving demographics and various other factors,
other subsegments emerged, viz. scooterettes, gearless scooters, and 4-stroke scooters.
While the first two emerged as a response to demographic changes, the introduction of 4-
stroke scooters has followed the imposition of stringent pollution control norms in the
early 2000. Besides, these prominent sub-segments, product groups within these sub-
segments have gained importance in the recent years. Examples include 125cc

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motorcycles, 100-125 cc gearless scooters, etc. The characteristics of each of the three
broad segments are discussed in Table.

Two-Wheelers: Comparative Characteristics

Scooter Motorcycle Moped

Price*(Rs. as in January
> 22,000 > 30,000 > 12,000
2005)

2-stroke, 4-
Stroke Mainly 4-stroke 2-stroke
stroke

Engine Capacity (cc) 90-150 100, 125, > 125 50, 60

Ignition Kick/Electronic Kick/Electronic Kick/Electronic

Engine Power (bhp) 6.5-9 7-8 and above 2-3

Weight (kg) 90-100 > 100 60-70

Fuel Efficiency (kms


50-75 50-80+ 70-80
per litre)

Load Carrying High Highest Low

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Segmental Market Share

The Indian two-wheeler industry has undergone a significant change over the past 10
years with the preference changing from scooters and mopeds to motorcycles. The
scooters segment was the largest till FY1998, accounting for around 42% of the two-
wheeler sales (motorcycles and mopeds accounted for 37% and 21 % of the market
respectively, that year). However, the motorcycles segment that had witnessed high
growth (since FY1994) became larger than the scooter segment in terms of market share
for the first time in FY1999. Between FY1996 and 9MFY2005, the motorcycles segment
more than doubled its share of the two-wheeler industry to 79% even as the market shares
of scooters and mopeds stood lower at 16% and 5%, respectively.

Trends in Segmental Share in Industry Sales (FY1996-


9MFY2005)

While scooter sales declined sharply by 28% in FY2001, motorcycle sales reported a
healthy growth of 20%, indicating a clear shift in consumer preference. This shift, which
continues, has been prompted by two major factors: change in the country's demographic
profile, and technological advancements.

Over the past 10-15 years the demographic profile of the typical two-wheeler customer
has changed. The customer is likely to be salaried and in the first job. With a younger

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audience, the attributes that are sought of a two-wheeler have also changed. Following
the opening up of the economy and the increasing exposure levels of this new target
audience, power and styling are now as important as comfort and utility.

The marketing pitch of scooters has typically emphasised reliability, price, comfort and
utility across various applications. Motorcycles, on the other hand, have been
traditionally positioned as vehicles of power and style, which are rugged and more
durable. These features have now been complemented by the availability of new designs
and technological innovations. Moreover, higher mileage offered by the executive and
entry-level models has also attracted interest of two-wheeler customer. Given this market
positioning of scooters and motorcycles, it is not surprising that the new set of customers
has preferred motorcycles to scooters. With better ground clearance, larger wheels and
better suspension offered by motorcycles, they are well positioned to capture the rising
demand in rural areas where these characteristics matter most.

Scooters are perceived to be family vehicles, which offer more functional value such as
broader seat, bigger storage space and easier ride. However, with the second-hand car
market developing, a preference for used cars to new two-wheelers among vehicle buyers
cannot be ruled out. Nevertheless, the past few years have witnessed a shift in preference
towards gearless scooters (that are popular among women) within the scooters segment.
Motorcycles, offer higher fuel efficiency, greater acceleration and more environment-
friendliness. Given the declining difference in prices of scooters and motorcycles in the
past few years, the preference has shifted towards motorcycles. Besides a change in
demographic profile, technology and reduction in the price difference between
motorcycles and scooters, another factor that has weighed in favour of motorcycles is the
high re-sale value they offer. Thus, the customer is willing to pay an up-front premium
while purchasing a motorcycle in exchange for lower maintenance and a relatively higher
resale value.

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Supply
Manufacturers
As the following graph indicates, the Indian two-wheeler industry is highly concentrated,
with three players-Hero Honda Motors Ltd (HHML), Bajaj Auto Ltd (Bajaj Auto) and
TVS Motor Company Ltd (TVS) - accounting for over 80% of the industry sales as in
9MFY2005. The other key players in the two-wheeler industry are Kinetic Motor
Company Ltd (KMCL), Kinetic Engineering Ltd (KEL), LML Ltd (LML), Yamaha
Motors India Ltd (Yamaha), Majestic Auto Ltd (Majestic Auto), Royal Enfield Ltd
(REL) and Honda Motorcycle & Scooter India (P) Ltd (HMSI).

Shares of Two-Wheeler Manufacturers in Industry Sales (FY2000-


9MFY2005)

Although the three players have dominated the market for a relative long period of time,
their individual market shares have undergone a major change. Bajaj Auto was the
undisputed market leader till FY2000, accounting for 32% of the two-wheeler industry
volumes in the country that year. Bajaj Auto dominance arose from its complete hold
over the scooter market. However, as the demand started shifting towards motorcycles,
the company witnessed a gradual erosion of its market share. HHML, which had
concentrated on the motorcycle segment, was the main beneficiary, and almost doubled
its market share from 20% in FY2000 to 40% in 9MFY2005 to emerge as the market
leader. TVS, on the other hand, witnessed an overall decline in market share from 22% in

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FY2000 to 18% in 9MFY2005. The share of TVS in industry sales fluctuated on a year
on year basis till FY2003 as it changed its product mix but has declined since then.

Technology
Hitherto, technology transfer to the Indian two-wheeler industry took place mainly
through: licensing and technical collaboration (as in the case of Bajaj Auto and LML);
and joint ventures (HHML).

A third form - that is, the 100% owned subsidiary route - found favour in the early 2000s.
A case in point is HMSI, a 100% subsidiary of Honda, Japan. Table 2 details the alliances
of some major two-wheeler manufacturers in India.

Technological tie-ups of Select Players

Nature of Alliance Company Product

Bajaj Technological tie-up Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd, Motorcycles


Auto Japan

Technological tie-up Tokya R&D Co Ltd, Japan Two-wheelers

Technological tie-up Kubota Corp, Japan Diesel Engines

HHML Joint Venture Honda Motor Co, Japan Motorcycles

KEL Technological tie-up Hyosung Motors & Machinery Inc Motorcycles

KEL Tie up for Italjet, Italy Scooters


manufacturing
and distribution

LML Technological tie-up Daelim Motor Co Ltd Motorcycles

With the two-wheeler market, especially the motorcycle market, becoming extremely
competitive and the life cycle of products getting shorter, the ability to offer new models
to meet fast changing customer preferences has become imperative. In this context, the

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ability to deliver newer products calls for sound technological backing and this has
become one of the critical differentiating factor among companies in the domestic
market. Thus, the players have increased their focus on research and development with
some having indigenously developed new models as well as improved technologies to
cater to the domestic market. Further, with exports being one of the thrust areas for some
Indian two-wheeler companies, the Indian original equipment manufacturers (OEMs)
have realised the need to upgrade their technical capabilities. These relate to three main
areas: fuel economy, environmental compliance, and performance. In India, because of
the cost-sensitive nature of the market, fuel efficiency had been an interest area for
manufacturers.

It is not only that the OEMs are increasing their focus on in-house R&D, they also
provide support to the vendors to upgrade the technology and also assist them striking
technological alliances.

1.2 COMPANY PROFILE

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TVS Group
TVS group was established in 1911 as a bus service in Madurai by Late Shri. TVS
Sundram Iyangar. After some years of services they started automobile company with
limited capital TVS motors is a gusty performer. It is declared a splendid result for
quality for the financial year 2002. It is the first year post separation with Suzuki but the
company just surprised its critics though its excellent performance.
DEVELOPMENT AND IMPACT
Name Changed To TVS Motor
After the exit of Suzuki from the joint venture, selling its 25.97% stake at Rs.15 per
share to sundaram claylon, the board in November decided to change the name of the
company to TVS motors Ltd.
Early End to Licensing Agreement
In December 2001, TVS sought an early end to its licensing agreement with Suzuki
by giving the mandatory 120 days prior notice. Accordingly the licensing agreement has
came to an end in April. TVS can now launch products under its own brand name .
Victory with Victory
In the end at 2001, the company had launched indigenously developed 110cc bike the
victor in the executive segment. Priced at around 41,200. (ex- show room Chennai) the
company had invested to 70 crosses on the project and has been amply rewarded. The
products has been a huge hit given its high mileage and competitive pricing coupled with
a higher cc engine for its class.

TVS Motors Opening a Plant in Indonesia

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TVS motors is considering opening up a manufacturing plant in the South Eastern
Asian Country of Indonesia and they would be finalizing the plans within a month itself.
They are planning to start production within 15 months and the estimated investment is
expected to be in the region of USD 50 million.
The company would be launching a series of motor cycles in the Indonesian market to
compliments sales in the local industry. Some of the variants of their popular models like
victor and start are expected to make entry in to the Indonesian market.
TVS motors plans to sell more than a million bikes this year and want to capture at
least 15% of the market share in the Indian sector.
The motor bike market grew by around 20% last year through TVS itself saw a 5%
drop in sales figures. Much of it can be blamed on the entry of the Honda as an
independent unit in the market.
The company’s latest product centra trough technically quite advance has failed to
generate any fire on the sales chart. They are also planning to enter the three – wheeler
market next year with a planned investment of around Rs.100 Crores for a plant at
Mysore.
Sachin to Promote TVS
TVS has roped in Sachin Tendulkar as the brand ambassador. The contract entered
for an undisclosed sum would be for a period of three years. The company would be
spending 50 crores on building the TVS brand as a whole rather than spending on
advertising on products.
To end Royalty Payment
TVS will no longer have to pay royalty to Suzuki on its motor cycles after the end of
the licensing agreement.
To Increase Research and Development
The company will be increasing its research and development from 1.8% of sales to
3.6% of sales in the next year.

To Invest 200 Crores for Expansion

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The company has announced plans to invest Rs.200 crores to increase the capacity up
to 1.2 million units a year no meet the increasing demand for its motor cycles.
In the export front TVS motor company recorded its highest ever exports of 11,008
units in august 2007, at a growth of 71% compared to the same period last year.
Achievement of TVS Motor Company
• TVS motor company records 28% growth in motor cycles.
• TVS motors company report turnover of Rs.939.62 crores record 26%
growth.
• TVS motor company sales up by 23%
• TVS bike sales up by 53%
Market Launches of TVS Group
• India’s first 2 seated 50cc moped, TVS 50 in August 1980.
• Introduced 100cc indo – Japanese motorcycle in September 1984
• Introduced first indigenous scooter (Sub – 100 cc variomatic scooters),
TVS scooty in June 1994.
• First catalytic converter enabled motor cycles, the 110 cc shogun in
December 1996.
• Launched India’s first 5 speed motor cycles the Shaolin in October 1997.
• Launched TVS victor, 4 stoke 110 cc motor cycle, in august 2001. India’s
first indigenously designed and manufactured motor cycle.
• Launched TVS centra in January 2004, a world class 4 stoke 100 cc motor
cycle with the revolutionary VT-I engines for best in-class mileage
• Introduced TVS star in September 2004, a 100 cc motor cycle with is ideal
for rough terrain.
• Launched TVS Flame in March 2008, a 125 cc motor cycle with a twin
spark plug.
Acknowledged by the Japanese for Quality
• TVS motor company have been awarded the prestigious and converted
Deming prize, institute by Jose. (Japanese union of scientists and engineers).

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• TVS motors was also awarded the prestigious TPM excellence award first
category by Japanese institute of plant maintenance, rated as the bench mark in
TPM excellence in India.
Asian Network for Quality Award 2004
• TVS Scooty Pep won the prestigious outstanding design excellence award
from business world and national institute of design.
• Star of Asia award to Mr. Venu Srivasan, CMD TVS motor company by
business week international.
• Venu Srinivasan, chairman and managing director, TVS motor company
was honored with doctorate in science by university of Warwick United
Kingdom.
Present Condition of The Company
• Largest and automotive components group in India.
• Diversified into consumer durables, computer peripherals and two
wheelers
• Joint venture with world leaders.
• Sales turnover of Rs.75000 Crores.
TVS Motor Company Ltd has 0 positive reviews and 0 negative reviews.
TVS Motor Company Limited is the flagship company of TVS Group, the USD 4 billion
group. The Group is the third largest two-wheeler manufacturer in India and globally
among the top ten, with an annual turnover of over USD 650 million. Currently, the
group has more than 30 companies and employs over 40,000 people worldwide. With
steady growth, expansion and diversification, it commands a strong presence in the
manufacturing of two-wheelers, auto components and computer peripherals. They also
have vibrant businesses in the distribution of heavy commercial vehicles (HCV)
passenger cars, finance and insurance.

1980 was the milestone year for TVS when India’s first two-seater moped rolled out. It
ushered in an era of affordable personal transportation. Globally, TVS Motor Company is
the first two-wheeler manufacturer to be honoured with the hallmark of Japanese Quality
– The Deming Prize for Total Quality Management.

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The company has 4 plants – located at Hosur and Mysore in South India, in Himachal
Pradesh, North India and one at Indonesia. The company has a production capacity of
300 thousand units a year.

"Inspiration In Motion"
TVS Motor is the third largest two-wheeler manufacturer in India and ranks among the
top ten globally. It is the first company in the world to be honoured with The Deming
Prize for Total Quality Management. The company was the first in India to launch 2-
seater 50cc moped and 100cc Indo-Japanese motorcycles. At present TVS Apache, TVS
Victor, TVS Scooty, TVS Centra and TVS Fiero are the popular bikes in Indian market.

Quick Facts

Founder T V Sundaram Iyengar

Country India

Year of Establishment August 1980 (TVS Group in 1911)

Industry Manufacturing of two-wheelers and auto components

Business Group TVS Group

Listings & its codes NSE


TVS - Suzuki Ltd: TVSSUZUKI
TVS Motor Company Limited: TVSMOTOR
TVS Motor Company Limited: TVS-SUZUKI
BSE
TVS Motor Company Ltd.: 532343

Head Office TVS Motor Company


Jayalakshmi Estates V Floor
8, Haddows Road, Chennai - 600006
Tel.: +(91)-(44)-28272233
Fax: +(91)-(44)-28257121

Factory Post Box No. 4


Harita, Hosur - 635 109
Tel.: +(91)-(4344)-276780

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Fax: +(91)-(4344)-276878

Post Box No.1


Byathahalli Village, Kadakola Post
Mysore - 571 311
Tel.: +(91)-(821)-2596561
Fax: +(91)-(821)-2596550/ 2596553

Website www.tvsmotor.in

Segment and Brands


TVS Apache

TVS Apache RTR FI 160

TVS Centra

TVS Fiero FX

TVS Flame

TVS Scooty

TVS Star

TVS Victor

TVS Victor GLX 125

TVS XL Super

TVS 180 RTR Menace New

Milestones of TVS Motor

1980 India's first 2 seater 50cc Moped TVS 50, launched in Aug.

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1984 First Indian Company to introduce 100cc Indo-Japanese motorcycles in
Sept.

1994 Launched first indigenous Scooterette (sub-100 cc variomatic


scooters), TVS Scooty in June.

1996 Introduced first catalytic converter enabled motorcycle, the 110cc


Shogun in Dec.

1997 Launched India's first 5-speed motorcycle, the Shaolin in Oct.

2000 Launched TVS Fiero, India's first 150 cc, 4 stroke motorcycle in April.

2001 Launched TVS Victor, 4-stroke 110 cc motorcycle, in August, India's


first fully indigenously designed and manufactured motorcycle.

2004 Launched TVS Centra in January, a world-class 4-stroke 100 cc


motorcycle with the revolutionary VT-i Engines for best-in-class
mileage.

Launched TVS Star in Sept, a 100 cc motorcycle which is ideal for


rough terrain.

Company Flashback

TVS Motor Company Limited is the flagship company of TVS Group, the USD 2.2
billion group. The Group is the third largest two-wheeler manufacturer in India and
globally among the top ten, with an annual turnover of overUS650million.

Currently, the group has more than 30 companies and employs over 40,000 people
worldwide. With steady growth, expansion and diversification, it commands a strong
presence in the manufacturing of two-wheelers, auto components and computer
peripherals. They also have vibrant businesses in the distribution of heavy commercial
vehicles (HCV) passenger cars, finance and insurance.

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1980 is the red letter year for TVS when India's first two-seater moped rolled out. It
ushered in an era of affordable personal transportation.

Globally, TVS Motor Company is the first two-wheeler manufacturer to be honoured


with the hallmark of Japanese Quality - The Deming Prize for Total Quality
Management.

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1.3ABOUT THE STUDY

In this competitive modern age, where different qualities and types of goods exist,
branding is of special importance in the business world, branding not only gives separate
identify and easy recognition of the product but also creates a special brand preference.
Consumers are aware and prefer particular brand when it is available for purchase.

The competition among the bike makers is growing day-to-day. The Indian auto
industry is also subject to tremendous, changes, with the opening up to the domestic
corporation to meet challenges vehicle productivity, entrance market orientation loyalty.
For knowing consumer taste and preferences, consumer oriented survey place an
important role in the entire market.

In modern day, vehicle is a necessary one from every family to keep the prestige
of holding them in the society.

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1.3.1 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

Primary Objective:
To find out the factors behind the customer preference to TVS two wheelers

Secondary Objectives:
• To know the awareness about TVS vehicles among the vehicles
users.
• To find out the opinion of the respondents SHOWING TVS
vehicles, like cost price, mileage, and maintenance cost and gear opinion
of their vehicles.
• To study the importance criteria the consumer looks for the
product performance.
• To analyze the service rendered and level of consumer satisfaction
through delivery process.

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1.3.2 SCOPE OF THE STUDY

• The present scenario of business is facing a hard challenge it is must to uphold the
existing customer and to serve them as our best.
• From this study the preference of the customer can be analyzed and helps the
organization to fulfill that scenario.
• The study helps to know the factors that influence the customer to buy the
products at their convenience.
• The study helps to know the necessary services required by the customers to
overcome the problem in the products and provides various insights into customer
attitudes and satisfactions.
• The study helps to maintain the better relationship with customer by the company

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1.3.3 LIMITATION OF THE STUDY

• This study is limited to Udhagamandalam. The Nilgiris and therefore the findings

of the study cannot be extended to other areas.

• The samples have been collected from the limited number of respondents.

• The project was completed within 30 days. Time achieve is considered inadequate

to conduct such survey.

• The result of the study may not be generalized to all.

• Some of the respondents were non co-operative.

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CHAPTER - II
RESEARCH METHEDOLOGY

Definition

REDMAN and MORY define research as “a systematical effort to gain new

knowledge”.

Meaning of Research

Research is common parlance refers to a search for knowledge. Once can also define

research as a scientific and systematic search for pertinent information on a specific topic.

In fact research is an art of science investigation.

Research Design

The research design is the determination and statement of general research approach

of strategy adopted for the particular product. It is the heart of the planning which the

design adheres to the research objected which will ensure that the needs will be served.

Area of the Study

The area of the study is TVS two wheeler vehicles users in Udhagamandalam.The

Nilgiris.

Methods of Data Collection

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A questionnaire is used as data collection tool where the researcher interviews the

respondents.

Primary Data

The primary data has been collected by conducting direct interview using structured

questionnaire.

Secondary Data

The secondary data are collected from books, journals, company records and

internet.

Analysis

Analysis is done on the basis of sample Percentage analysis.

Sampling Technique

There are two sampling techniques. They are probability sampling and non

probability sampling. In this study the research had adopted convenient sampling.

Sampling Size

Sampling size taken from the study is 100 respondents.

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Statistical Tools Used

Simple Percentage Analysis

The Percentage method is used for comparing certain feature. The collected data

represented in the form of tables and graphs in order to give effective visualization of

comparison made.

Actual population

X
Simple Percentage = x 100
Sample size

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CHAPTER - III
ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION

Table no -3. 1

Table showing the age group of the respondents

Age No. of respondents Percentage


20-30 45 45

30-40 28 28

40-50 18 18

50-60 09 09
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table and chart shows the age group of respondents that 45% of the

respondents are between the age group of 20-30, 28% are 30-40, 18% are 40-50 and the

remaining 9% are in the age group 50-60.

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CHART NO -3.1

Chart showing the age group of the respondents

No. of respondents

20-30
30-40
40-50
50-60

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Table no -3. 2

Table showing the occupation of the respondents

Occupation No. of respondents Percentage


Private employee 40 40

Government employee 15 15

Business man 20 20

Students 18 18

Others 07 07
Total 100 100

Interpretation

From the above table it can be analyzed that above 40% of the respondents are

occupied in private employment, 20% are business people, 18% are students, 15% are

government employees and the remaining 7% are from other category.

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Chart No -3. 2.

Chart showing the occupation of the respondents

No. of respondents

Private employee

Government
employee
Business man

Students

Others

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Table no -3. 3

Table showing the number of family members

Family members No. of respondents Percentage


1-2 15 15

2-4 48 48

4-6 25 25

6 and above 12 12
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 48% of the respondents lies under 2-4 family

members category, 25% are in 4-6 category, 15% are in 1-2 category and the remaining

12% lies in 6and above category.

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Chart no-3 3

Chart showing the number of family members

No. of respondents

2-Jan
4-Feb
6-Apr
6 and above

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Table No -3. 4

Table showing the monthly income of the respondents.

Income No. of respondents Percentage


4000-6000 46 46

6001-8000 28 28

8001-10000 15 15

10000 above 11 11
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 46% of the respondents have a monthly income 4000-

6000, 28 % are in 6001-8000, 15% are in 8001-10000 and the remaining 11% are earning

above 10000.

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Chart No –3. 4

Chart showing the monthly income of the respondents

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Table No -3. 5

Table showing the most preferred model in TVS by the respondents

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


TVS apache 41 41

TVS victor 26 26

TVS star city 21 21

TVS MAX R100 12 12


Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 41% of the respondents prefer TVS apache, 26%

prefer TVS Victor, 21% prefer Star City and the remaining 12% prefer TVS MAXR 100.

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Chart No –3. 5

Chart showing the most preferred model in TVS by the respondents

No. of respondents

TVS apache
TVS victor
TVS star city
TVS MAX R100

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Table No -3.6

Table showing the mode of purchase by the respondents

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


Loan 58 58

Cash 24 24

Credit 13 13

Mortgage 5 5

Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 58% of the respondents have resorted to loan, 24%

have paid cash, 13% have purchased in credit, and 5% have done it with mortgage.

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Chart No –3. 6

Chart showing mode of purchase by the respondents.

No. of respondents

Loan
Cash
Credit
Mortgage

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Table no -3. 7

Table showing the mileage performance of the vehicle used by the respondents.

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


30-40 18 18

40-50 27 27

50-60 40 40

60 and above 15 15
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows about 40%of the respondents are getting a mileage in the

range 50-60 kilometers, 27% are getting 40-50 kms, 18% are getting 30-40 kms and 15%

above 60 kms.

Chart No –3.7

Chart showing the mileage performance of the vehicle used by the respondents

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No. of respondents

30-40
40-50
50-60
60 and above

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Table No -3. 8

Table showing. the type of media preferred by the respondents

Particular No of respondents Percentage


Television 46 46

Newspaper 28 28

Magazine 15 15

Banners 11 11
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows about 46% of the respondents have come to know TVS

vehicles through advertisement on Television, 28% through Newspaper, 15% through

Magazine and 11% through banners.

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Chart No –3. 8

Chart showing the type of media preferred by the respondents

No of respondents

Television
Newspaper
Magazine
Banners

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Table No -3. 9

Table showing the maintenance cost by the respondents per month.

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


400 63 63

500 22 22

700 09 09

1000 and above 06 06


Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table indicated that about 63% of the respondents are incurring maintenance

cost of Rs. 400, 22% incurring Rs.500, 9% incurring Rs.700 and only 6% incurring more

that Rs.1000.

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Chart No –3. 9

Chart showing the maintenance cost by the respondents per month

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Table No -3. 10

Table showing the purpose of the vehicle used by the respondents.

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage

Official 45 45

Personal 55 55
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 55% of the respondents are using the vehicle for

personnel use and the rest 45% are for official use.

42
Chart No –3.10

Chart showing the purpose of the vehicle used by the respondents

No. of respondents

Official
Personal

43
Table No -3. 11

Table showing the usage of the vehicle by the respondents in years.

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


0-1 years 13 13

1-2 years 20 20

2-3 years 28 28

3 years & above 39 39


Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 39% of the respondents are using the vehicle for 3

years and above, 28% are in the category of 2-3 years, 20% are in 1-2 years and the

remaining 13% are below one year.

44
Chart No –3. 11

Chart showing the usage of the vehicle by the respondents in years.

No. of respondents

0-1 years
1-2 years
2-3 years
3 years & above

45
Table No -3. 12

Table showing the gear opinion of the respondents.

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


Excellent 22 22

Good 54 54

Modification 18 18

Poor 06 06
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 54% of the respondents opinion about the gear system

is good, 22% responded to be excellent, 18% were in need of modification and the

remaining 6% reported to be poor.

46
Chart No -3.12

Chart showing gear opinion of the respondents

No. of respondents

Excellent
Good
Modification
Poor

47
Table No 3. 13

Table showing the reason for purchase of the model

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


Comfort 45 45

Style 23 23

Mileage 29 29

Advertisement 03 03
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 45% of the respondents feel that comport is the reason

for purchase of the selected model, 29% prefer to its mileage, 23% to its style and 3%

just by the advertisement.

48
Chart No -3.13

Chart showing the reason for purchase of the model

No. of respondents

Comfort
Style
Mileage
Advertisement

49
Table No -3. 14

Table showing the cost of vehicle

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage

High 29 29

Moderate 50 50

Low 21 21
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table indicates that 50% of the respondents feel that the cost of vehicle

is moderate, 29% feel it is high and 21% feel it is low.

50
Chart No -3.14

Chart showing cost of the vehicle

No. of respondents

High
Moderate
Low

51
Table No -3. 15

Table showing the warranty period

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage

Yes 87 87

No 13 13
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table we can inter that about 87% of the respondents are feeling that

the warranty period is helpful and the remaining few i.e 13% say it is not useful.

Chart No -3. 15

52
Chart showing the warranty period

No. of respondents

Yes
No

53
Table No -3. 16

Table showing the use of vehicle for hours per day

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


0-1 hour 09 09

1-2 hour 21 21

2-3 hour 43 43

more than 3 hours 27 27


Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 43% of the respondents are using the vehicle for 2-3

hours per day, 27% use more than three hours, 21% use 1-2 hours and 9% use below one

hour .

54
Chart No –3. 16

Chart showing the use of vehicle for how many hours per day

No. of respondents

0-1 hour
1-2 hour
2-3 hour
more than 3 hours

55
Table No -3. 17

Table showing the spare parts availability with the local dealers

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


Satisfied 80 80

Dissatisfied 20 20
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above the table shows that 80% of the respondents are satisfied with the spare

parts availability with the local dealers and 20% are not satisfied with the same.

56
Chart No -3.17

Chart showing the spare parts availability with the local dealers

No. of respondents

Satisfied
Dissatisfied

57
Table No -3. 18

Table showing the level of satisfaction of the respondent with sales and service

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


Highly satisfied 58 58

Satisfied 30 30

Dis-satisfied 07 07

Highly dis-satisfied 05 05
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 58% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the

sales and service, 30% are satisfied, 7% are dissatisfied and 5% are highly dissatisfied.

Chart No -3.18

Chart showing the level of satisfaction of the respondent with after sales and service.

58
No. of respondents

Highly satisfied
Satisfied
Dis-satisfied
Highly dis-satisfied

59
Table No -3. 19

Table showing the problem faced by the respondents.

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


Starting trouble 20 20

Pick up 52 52

Mileage problem 28 28

Battery problem 0 0
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 52% respondents faced pick up problem, 28% face

Mileage problem and 20% face starting trouble where none faced battery problem.

Chart No -3. 19

Chart showing the problem faced by the respondents

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No. of respondents

Starting trouble
Pick up
Mileage problem
Battery problem

61
Table No -3. 20

Table showing the respondents opinion about long riding of the vehicle

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


Wonderful 13 13

Excellent 21 21

Good 51 51

Poor 15 15
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 51 % report good, 21% report excellent, 15

percentage report poor and the remaining 13% report Wonderful.

Chart No –3. 20

Chart showing the respondents opinion about the long riding of this vehicle

62
No. of respondents

Wonderful
Excellent
Good
Poor

63
Table No -3. 21

Table showing the respondents plan for changing their vehicles

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


Yes 28 28
No 72 72
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 72 % of the respondents have no idea to change the

vehicle and the remaining 28% say yes.

Chart No –3. 21

Chart showing the respondents plan for changing their vehicles

64
No. of respondents

Yes
No

65
Table No -3. 22

Table showing the respondents alternative preference

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


Honda 10 10

Hero Honda 46 46

Bajaj 30 30

Yamaha 14 14
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 46 % of the respondent’s alternative preference of the

vehicle is Hero Honda, 30% to Bajaj, 14% to Yamaha and the rest 10% to Honda .

Chart No-3.22

Chart showing the respondents alternative preference

66
No. of respondents

Honda
Hero Honda
Bajaj
Yamaha

67
Table No -3. 23

Table showing the overall performance of the vehicle used by the respondents

Particulars No. of respondents Percentage


Highly satisfied 46 46

Satisfied 24 24

Moderate 20 20

Dissatisfied 10 10
Total 100 100

Interpretation

The above table shows that 46% of the respondents feel that they are highly

satisfied with the overall performance, 24% are satisfied, 20% are Moderately satisfied

and 10% are not satified.

68
Chart No -3.23

Chart showing the overall performance of the vehicle used by the respondents

No. of respondents

Highly satisfied
Satisfied
Moderate
Dissatisfied

69
CHAPTER - IV
FINDINGS & INFERENCE

• 45% of the respondents are between the age group of 20-30.

• 40% of the respondents are occupied in private employee.

• 48% of the respondents have a family member 2-4.

• 46% of the respondents have a monthly income up to 4001-6000.

• 41% of the respondents prefer TVS Apache.

• 58% of the respondents have resorted to loan

• 40% of the respondents are getting a mileage 50-60.

• 46% of the respondents have seen the TVS Vehicles advertisement on

Television.

• 63% of the respondents are incurring maintenance cost of Rs. 400.

• 55% of the respondents are using the vehicle for personnel use.

• 39% of the respondents are using the vehicle for 3 years and above.

• 54% of the respondents feel good for the gear system.

• 50% of the respondents feel that the cost of changed for the vehicle is

moderate.

• 87% of the respondents are feeling that the warranty period is helpful.

• 45% of the respondents feel that comfort is the reason for purchasing the

model.

• 43% of the respondents are using the vehicle for a day 2-3 years.

• 80% of the respondents are satisfied with the spare parts availability.

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• 58% of the respondent’s people are highly satisfied with after sales service

offered by the company.

• 52% of the respondents are facing problem while pick-up.

• 51% of the respondents are long riding is good.

• 72% of the respondents have no idea to changing the vehicle.

• 46% of the respondent’s alternative preference of vehicle is hero Honda.

• 46% of the respondents feel that they are highly satisfied by the overall

performance of the vehicle.

71
CHAPTER - V
RECOMMENDATIONS

• The company should maintain the awareness among TVS vehicle users.

• The company should maintain the long riding reduces the cost and

increase the mileage and pick-up.

• The company should provide alternative media message.

• Spare parts are made available of reasonable price, it has to be maintained

• It should improve the style and comfortable the TVS vehicle.

• Produce the vehicle at international standard and average technology.

• The company should provide resorted to loan

• The company should provide long term warranty

• The company should improve its marketing strategy to suit middle class

falimy.

72
CHAPTER - VI
CONCLUSION

This study was conducts in Udghamandalam with a broad objective of consumer

preference of two wheelers in TVS vehicle for this purpose. 100 customers were selected

and obtained the various responses based on the questionnaire method.

The data was collected and consolidated using simple Percentage method, and chi-

square analysis, Graphic and charts, tables were used for representation to achieve the

objective of the study.

By and large it was found that most of the consumer are choose on TVS vehicles

because of its low maintenance cost, good model and good long riding etc. It’s

maintained in awareness of the vehicles and improving the satisfaction level and

advertisement. This study can survey helped in TVS jasmine motors company to improve

their sales and service.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

73
BOOKS

1. BALU.V,Dr (2001) : “MARKETING RESEARCH OF CONSUMER”

BEHAVIOUR”2nd EDITION, SRI

VENKADESWARAN PUBLICATIONS.

2.KOTHARI. C.R (2003) : “RESEARCH METHODOLOGY” 2nd EDITION,

WISHAWAV PRAKASHAN.

3.PHILIP KOTLER(2003) : “MARKETING MANAGEMENT”

MILLENNIUM EDITION PRENTICE TALL OF

INDIA PRIVATE LIMITED, 2001,

10th EDITION.

4.PILLAI .R.S.N : “MODERN MARKETING” 2nd EDITION

SULTHAN CHAND BHAGAVATHY AND

SONS.

WEB SITE:

www.tvsmotors.in
www.google.com
www.managementparadise.com

APPENDICES

74
A STUDY ON END-USER PREFERENCE OF TVS MOTORVECHILE WITH
SPECIAL REFERENCE TO JASMINE MOTORS, UDHAGAMANDALAM, THE
NILGIRIS.

QUESTIONARIE

1. Name :

2. Address :

3. Age

a) 20-30 b) 30 -40

c) 40-50 d) 50-60.

4. Occupation

a) Private employee b) Government employee

c) Business man d) Professional e) Others.

5. Number of family members:

a) 1-2 b) 2-4

c) 4-6 d) 6 and above

6. Family income (Per month)

a) 4000– 6000 b) 6001 – 8000

c) 8001 – 10000 d) 10000 and above

7. Which you preferred in TVS bike model

a) TVS MAX R100 b) TVS Victor

c) TVS Star city d) TVS Apache.

75
8. State the mode of purchase:

a) Loan b) Cash

c) Credit d) Hypothecation

9. What is the mileage?

a) 30- 40 b) 40-50

c) 50-60 d) 60 and above

10. What is the media in which you have seen the advertisement of TVS

a) Television b) Newspaper

c) Magazine d) Banners

11. What is the maintenance cost (per month)

a)400 b) 500

c) 700 d) 1000 and below.

12. For what purpose the vehicle is used?

a) Official b) Personal

13 How long you owned the vehicle

a) 0- 1 year b) 1-2 year

c) 2-3 year d) 3 year and above

14. What is your opinion about the gear system?

a) Excellent b) Good

c) Modification d) Poor

15. State the reason for purchasing the mode?

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a) Comfort b) Style

c) Mileage d) Advertisement

16. What do you feel about the cost of the vehicle?

a) High b) Moderate c) Low.

17. Did you get any warranty period?

a) Yes b) No

18. If you use Bike, how many hours a day?

a) 0-1 hours b) 1-2 hours

c) 2-3 hours d) More than 3 hours.

19. Are you satisfied with the spare parts available with local dealer?

a) Satisfied b) Dissatisfied

20. Are you satisfied with after sales and service?

a) Highly satisfied b) Satisfied

c) Highly dissatisfied d) Dis-satisfied

21. What problem you come across while using the vehicle?

a) Starting trouble b) Pick up

c) Mileage problem d) Battery problem.

22. What is your opinion about the long riding of this vehicle?

a) Wonderful b) Excellent

c) Good d) Poor

23. Do you have any idea to change the vehicle?

77
a) Yes b) No.

24. If yes, mention the brand

a) Honda b) Hero Honda

c) Bajaj d) Yamaha

25. How do you feel about the overall performance of this vehicle?

a) Highly satisfied b) Satisfied c) Moderate d) Dis-satisfied.

78