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I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advise.

I believe the Carol Rhodes may be stating that she witnessed the Michigan Courts
and Friend of the Court engage in criminal racketeering.

She said:

"And the judges are definitely benefiting by larger child support collections"

...

"When we had individuals that knew their constitutional rights


that were coming into the courtroom the agency would warn the judge and say
'we have a father's rights advocate coming in today, a father's right's
individual.
They might be dangerous. I think we might need a few more deputies in the
courtroom.'"

"And so just at that alone the judge would be alerted that this is an individual
that
we are going to vent the full power and vengeance of the law on this individual
who dares to challenge
our authority."

"And as Dr. Sanjari said, often times those who stand up for their constitutional
rights
completely taken from them. They loose all parental rights. They don't see their
children
sometimes for 20 years."

- Carol Rhodes, Former Friend of the Court Collections Officer, and author of
"Friend of the Court Enemy of the Family", speaking on "Ronald Smith's Radio Show:
Dr. Baskerville, Dr. Sanjari & Carol Rhodes",
starting at time 19:00, Oct 28, 2007,
http://daddy.typepad.com/daddyblog/2007/10/ronald-smiths-r.html

Making a custody decision based on punishing people, rather than the best
interests of the child, and permanently separating a parent and a child, may be
kidnapping.

And kidnapping for money, or conspiring to kidnap for money, is racketeering.

Also, in theory creating an unjust child support burden, the consequence of which
is an unjust imprisonment for the payer, could also be kidnapping.

From US Code TITLE 18 > PART I > CHAPTER 95 > § 1959:

(a) Whoever, as consideration for the receipt of, or as consideration for a


promise or agreement to pay, anything of pecuniary value from an enterprise
engaged in racketeering activity, or for the purpose of gaining entrance to or
maintaining or increasing position in an enterprise engaged in racketeering
activity, murders, kidnaps, maims, assaults with a dangerous weapon, commits
assault resulting in serious bodily injury upon, or threatens to commit a crime of
violence against any individual in violation of the laws of any State or the
United States, or attempts or conspires so to do, shall be punished—
(1) for murder, by death or life imprisonment, or a fine under this title, or
both; and for kidnapping, by imprisonment for any term of years or for life, or a
fine under this title, or both;
....
(5) for attempting or conspiring to commit murder or kidnapping, by imprisonment
for not more than ten years or a fine under this title, or both; and

http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode18/usc_sec_18_00001959----000-.html

Also, handling a monetary transaction from criminally derived property (e.g. from
a CS obligation obtained by an unlawful racket which removed custody from a parent
unlawfully), is also a federal crime:

(a) Whoever, in any of the circumstances set forth in subsection (d), knowingly
engages or attempts to engage in a monetary transaction in criminally derived
property of a value greater than $10,000 and is derived from specified unlawful
activity, shall be punished as provided in subsection (b).

http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode18/usc_sec_18_00001957----000-.html

Sure, you can go to http://tips.fbi.gov/ and report.

I think that a few people have tried this and received a big *yawn* go away now.

However, victims of a racket can sue in federal courts, I think. See US Code
TITLE 18 > PART I > CHAPTER 96 > § 1964:

(a) The district courts of the United States shall have jurisdiction to prevent
and restrain violations of section 1962 of this chapter by issuing appropriate
orders...
....
(c) Any person injured in his business or property by reason of a violation of
section 1962 of this chapter may sue therefor in any appropriate United States
district court ...

http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode18/usc_sec_18_00001964----000-.html

It seems the first step in doing something like this is to talk to a lawyer who's
in the federal bar association. Also, I would think that a willing witness, such
as a whistleblower, for example a retired person with direct knowledge of the case
at hand, would be best. Finally, while I'm not a lawyer, I think that a victim of
a racket isn't the only victim, and it would be a lot better to join forces before
proceeding.