Sie sind auf Seite 1von 84

ARCASIA MEMBER INSTITUTES

Institute of Architects Bangladesh (IAB) Pertubuhan Akitek Malaysia (PAM)


House 11 Road 4 4 & 6 Jalan Tangsi
Dhanmondi R/A 50480 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia
Dhaka 1205 Bangladesh T +603 2698 4136
T/F +00 8802 8611454 F +603 2692 8782
E iab@truebd.com E info@pam.org.my
W www.iabnet.org President: Boon Che Wee
President: Mubasshar Hussain
The Union of Mongolian Architects (UMA)
The Architectural Society of China (ASC)
P O Box 59
9 Sanlihe Road Ulaanbataar-210620a
Beijing China 100835 Mongolia
T +00 86 10 8808 2236 T +00 9761 1321 610
F +00 86 10 8808 2222 F +00 9761 1310 638
E asc@mail.cin.gov.cn E uma_gc@magicnet.mn
President: Chunhua Song President: Khurelbaatar Erdenesaikhan

The Hong Kong Institute of Architects (HKIA) The Institute of Architects Pakistan (IAP)
19th Floor One Hysan Avenue ST 1/A Block 2
Causeway Bay Kehkashan Clifton
P O Box 20334 Karachi 75600 Pakistan
Hennessy Road Post Office T +00 9221 588 3865
Hong Kong F +00 9221 588 5060
T +00 852 2511 6323 E info@iap.com.pk
F +00 852 2519 6011 W mail@dgp.com.pk
E hkiasec@hkia.org.hk President: Shahab Ghani Khan
W www.hkia.org.hk
President: Dominic K. K. Lam United Architects of The Philippines (UAP)
53 Scout Rallos
The Indian Institute of Architects (IIA)
Quezon City
Prospect Chambers Annexe 5th Floor 1103 Philippines
Dr D N Road Fort Mumbai T +00 63 2 412 6364
400 001 India F +00 63 2 372 1796
T +00 91 22 204 6972 E uapnational@yahoo.com
F +00 91 22 283 2516 W www.united-architects.org
E iia@vsnl.com President: Ramon Mendoza
W www.iia-india.org
President: Prafulla Karkhanis Singapore Institute of Architects (SIA)
79 Neil Road
Ikatan Arsitek Indonesia (IAI)
Singapore 088904
Kantor Pusat IAI T +65 6226 2668
Gedung Jakarta Design Center Lt 7 F +65 6226 2663
Jalan Jend Gatot Subroto Kav 53 E info@sia.org.sg
Jakarta 10260 Indonesia President: Ashvinkumar s/o Kantilal
T +62 21 5305715
F +62 21 5304722 Sri Lanka Institute of Architects (SLIA)
E iai-nasional@cbn.net.id
120/7 Vidya Mawanta
President: Endy Subijono
Off Wijerama Mawanta
Colombo 7 Sri Lanka
Japan Institute of Architects (JIA)
T +00 94 1 697109 / 691710
Kenchikuka Kaikan F +00 94 1 682757
2-3-18 Jingumae Shibuya-Ku E sliagen@sltnet.lk
Tokyo 150 0001 Japan W www.slia.com
T +00 81 3 3408 7125 President: Ranjan Nadesapillai
F +00 81 3 3408 7129
E myasuda@jia.or.jp The Association of Siamese Architects (ASA)
W www.jia.or.jp
Under Royal Patronage
President: Taro Ashihara
248/1 Soi Rong Rian Yepun
Rama IX Road HuayKwang
Korea Institute of Registered Architects (KIRA)
Bangkok 10320 Thailand
1603-55 Seocho1 dong Seocho-gu T +00 66 2 319 4124
Seoul 137-877 Korea F +00 66 2 319 6419
T +00 82 2 581 5711 E foreign affair@asa.or.th
F +00 82 2 586 8823 W www.asa.or.th
E secretary@kira.or.kr President: Thaweejit Chandrasakha
W www.kira.or.kr
President: Choi Young-jip Vietnam Association of Architects (VAA)
23 Dinh Tien Hoang Street
Architects Association of Macau (AAM)
Hoan Kiem District
Avenida Coronel de Mesquita 2F Hanoi Vietnam
P O Box 3091 T +00 84 4 825 3648
Macau F +00 84 4 934 0262 XXXX House
T +00 853 703 458 E hoiktsvn@hn.vnn.vn by Mount Fuji Architects Studio
F +00 853 704 089 President: Nguyen Tan Van
E macauaam@macau.ctm.net
President: Leong Chong In Society of Nepalese Architects (SONA)
Jung Hem Hirnya Complex Tripureshawor
G P O Box 20461
Kathmandu Nepal
T +00 977 1 426 2252
E sona@htp.com.np
President: Binod Neupane
House in Fukawa
by Suppose Design Studio
a journal of the architects regional council asia (ARCASIA)
which is an international council of presidents of
17 national institutes of architects in the asian region

Front cover
Purple Hill House
IMAGE COURTESY OF IROJE KHM ARCHITECTS

ARCASIA OFFICE BEARERS 2011 THE ARCHITECTURE ASIA TEAM

President Editorial Board


George Kunihiro Lee Chor Wah
Boon Che Wee
Zone A Deputy President Saifuddin Ahmad
Abu Zarim Abu Bakar
Kalim Siddiqui
Adele Chong
Zone B Deputy President
Advisers
Sathirut Nui
Kun-Chang Yi
Dr Tan Loke Mun
Zone C Deputy President
Anna Kwong Editor-in-Chief
Lee Chor Wah
Honorary Secretary
Marco Corbella Projects Editor
Adele Chong
Honorary Treasurer
adele@pam.org.my
Junichi Ito
Designers
Immediate Past President
Imaya Wong
Mubashar Hussain Lin Hsueh Yin
www.grainstudio.asia
Advisers
Corresponding Editors
Kun-Chang Yi
Zakia Rahman – Bangladesh (IAB)
Yolanda Reyes
Wang Xiaojing – China (ASC)
Chairman of Media Resource & Publica-
tion Committee – Hong Kong (HKIA)
CHAIRMEN OF ARCASIA COMMITTEES
Vijay Garg – India (IIA)
Andra Matin – Indonesia (IAI)
Chairman ACPP (professional practice)
Takayuki Matsuura – Japan (JIA)
Balbir Verma Chun G Shin – Korea (KIRA)
Rui Leao – Macau (MAA)
Chairman ACGSA Lee Chor Wah – Malaysia (PAM)
E Purev Erdene E Tuya – Mongolia (UMA)
(green and sustainable architecture)
Bishnu Panthee – Nepal (SONA)
Ashvinkumar Kantilal Arshad Faruqui – Pakistan (IAP)
Michael T Ang – Philippines (UAP)
Chairman, ACAE (architectural education) Ow Chin Cheow – Singapore (SIA)
Prasanna Silva – Sri Lanka (SLIA)
Abu Sayeed
Veerachat (Jop) – Thailand (ASA)
Nguyen Van Tat – Vietnam (VAA)
Chairman Fellowship Committee
Nela De Zoysa

PUBLISHER

Pusat Binaan Sdn Bhd


A wholly-owned company of
Pertubuhan Akitek Malaysia (PAM)
on behalf of ARCASIA
4 & 6 Jalan Tangsi
Architecture Asia is published quarterly. Reproduction Purple Hill House
50480 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia in whole or part without written permission from the
T +603 2693 2843 by IROJE KHM Architects
Publisher is strictly prohibited. Architecture Asia cannot
F +603 2693 2849 be held responsible for any unsolicited submission
E p.binaan@streamyx.com materials. Submission materials (manuscripts, photo-
graphs, drawings, CD’s etc.) will not be returned unless
submitted with a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
Although every effort has been made to ensure accuracy
Printer in the preparation of each publication, the Publisher,
Printer, and editorial staff accept no responsibilities
Percetakan Zanders Sdn Bhd from any effects arising from errors or omissions.
CONTENTS
40 20
ISSUE 1
January / February / March 2011

50

Editorial Projects
74
6 THAILAND
12
Bunker House
VaSLAB Architecture
Events
50
8
Pim’s Guesthouse and Ceramic Studio
Special Report:
all (zone)
14th Asian Congress
of Architects 50
PAKISTAN
Lahore, Pakistan
20
Green KaravanGhar Initiative
The Heritage Foundation
Features 24
KOREA
24
Mediations in an Emergency: 28
The Rise of Disaster Housing Purple Hill House
IROJE KHM Architects

CHINA
Books 34
78 Embedded Project
HHD_FUN

JAPAN
40
Bubbletecture H
Endo Shohei Architect
78
8 54 12 46
Fukuwa House
Suppose Design Studio
74
XXXX House
Mount Fuji Architects Studio

INDONESIA
46
Wisnu House
Djuhara+Djuhara

SRI LANKA
60
Tsunami Housing Development at
Payagalawatta, Kalutara
Sheran Henry Associates

MALAYSIA
66
Sime Darby Idea House
Jason Pomeroy
70
BAKITA Bar
ArchiCentre Sdn Bhd

4 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 contents


34 54

28
EDITOR’S NOTE
shelter

All too often enough, mental images of starchitect-designed edifices are evoked upon
initial mention of a city’s ‘architectural presence’. No doubt, the runaway success of
the Frank Gehry-initiated ‘Bilbao Effect’ left a prolific trail of proclaimed urban land-
marks trailing breathlessly in its wake, with city authorities all over the globe vying
against all odds for their own version of the Guggenheim Bilbao; or more specifically,
a transformative, albeit costly, architectural facelift which could potentially serve to
retrieve an economically-ravaged area from the ashes. The all-too-recent natural dis-
aster on March 11 which propelled the country of Japan into a state of emergency
overnight has, however, emerged as a kind of rude awakening from this previous
preoccupation with large-scale window-dressing, forcing architects and laymen alike
to reassess what exactly it is that architecture means to humankind and how the
medium can potentially serve as a better mediator in the case of circumstances
that come about as a result of environmental, sociological or political shifts in the way
we live.

In this first issue of 2011, we are redirecting our focus to the very basics of architec-
ture: creating shelter. Regardless of whether the task lies in designing a suburban
housing block or devising makeshift dwellings for disaster victims, as in the case of
the resourcefully crafted Green KaravanGhar module in Pakistan, the question remains
as to how architecture can respond more effectively and adequately to heightening
degrees of personalisation with respect to contemporary living environments. What
are the ways in which housing may be customised so that it may be better equipped
to accommodate the immediacy of our needs yet fulfill the diversity of our wants?
Lastly, how can architects strive beyond the confines of dispiriting structures and
cultivate a balance between resourceful strategies and preserving the human aspects
of housing? Indeed, the distinctive projects featured in these following pages give one
the hope that a more thoughtfully crafted future is at least somewhat within reach.

Adele Chong
Projects Editor

Erratum: The India Glynols LTD project was mistakenly accredited to Arcop (Pakistan) on the cover of Issue 3,
2010. The architect responsible for that project is Morphogenesis (India). The editors would like to apologise for any
confusion or misunderstanding arising as a result of this oversight.

6 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 editor’s note


tune the light

Optoelectronics With the emergence of LEDs complex lighting engineering ERCO – tools that integrate
in architectural lighting, one components such as LED mod- innovative optoelectronics,
thing is clear: competence in ules, collimators or Spherolit are differentiated by applica-
the field of optoelectronics – lenses in-house. Furthermore, tion and are systematically
the integration of optical and ERCO’s LED product range is the designed as a full package for
electronic components – will, result of decades of experience your requirements: for creative
in future, define leadership in in architectural lighting and lighting concepts with efficient
the portfolio of tools for light- close cooperation with design- visual comfort.
ing professionals. In recognition ers. In this respect, it is hard to
of this, here at ERCO, we calcu- imagine a more complete range www.erco.com/led
late, design and build our own of LED lighting tools than at

E
EVENTS

SPECIAL REPORT:
14th Asian Congress
of Architects,
Lahore, Pakistan
Background works. The aggravating security situation in the country
Formally founded in 1980, The Architects’ Regional Council, was also a major hindrance. Blasts in Lahore on two oc-
Asia, (ARCASIA) is a vibrant association consisting of casions seriously impinged IAP’s efforts to persuade for-
architects from 17 Asian countries. It is represented on eign delegates, especially concerned parents of visiting
the Council by the presidents of the Institutes of Archi- students, to defy growing resistance against the hosting
tects within each country. The Council meets each year of ACA-14 in Lahore.
at different venues and accompanying the meeting, in
alternate years, are the Asian Congress of Architects and It was no small feat to invite 100 foreign delegates to
the ARCASIA Forum. stay for a week in an environment brimming with fear and
uncertainty, as was reported by foreign media. The suc-
In 2010, The Institute of Architects, Pakistan (IAP) hosted cessful hosting of ACA-14 was indeed a national service
the 14th Asian Congress of Architects (ACA-14) with on the part of IAP who, against all heavy odds, proved to
the theme “Go Green: Architecture of the New Order”. the international audience that life still goes on as usual in
Alongside ACA-14, the 31st ARCASIA Council Meet- Pakistan. This, truly, was a tribute to the resilience of the
ing and other related meetings as well as the ARCASIA Pakistani people.
Architectural Students’ Jamboree were held in Lahore
from 25 to 29 October. The new EXPO and Convention ARCASIA MEETINGS & STUDENTS’ JAMBOREE
Centre in Johar Town, Lahore, designed by Ar. Nayyar Ali October 25, 2010
Dada, was the venue of the ACA-14 as well as the Building The first day began with the ARCASIA Golf Championship
Products’ Exhibition, where the 2008-09 ARCASIA Awards held at Lahore Gymkhana Golf Club and saw the enthusi-
for Architectural Excellence and an exhibition of the astic participation of foreign and Pakistani architects.
ARCASIA Students’ Design Competition 2010 was held.
An international jury comprising Ar. Rita Soh of Singapore,
CONGRESS ORGANIZING COMMITTEE (COC) Ar. Jayantha Perera of Sri Lanka, Ar. Dr. Chalay Kuna-
The Congress Organizing Committee (COC) is headed by wong of Thailand and Ar. Syed Akeel Bilgrami from Paki-
its convener Ar. Kalim A. Siddiqui. The Students’ Jam- stan, as Chairman, met in the morning to select winners
boree Organization Committee comprised of Ar. Syed of the ARCASIA Students’ Design Competition-2010. 16
Akeel Bilgrami as Convener while Prof. Dr. Yusuf Awan entries emerged from eight ARCASIA countries. The first
was appointed as Deputy Convener. Prof. Fauzia Qureshi, prize was jointly awarded to entries from Sri Lanka and
Ar./Plnr. Sadia Fazli and Prof. Tauseef Ahmed acted as Bangladesh while the third prize was also awarded to
members. Bangladesh.

In planning the event, the COC faced a number of no- The ARCASIA Office Bearers’ meeting was convened
table challenges: ongoing economic recession had very in the afternoon by Chairman ARCASIA, Ar. Mubasshar
severely hit the construction industry, affecting the situa- Hussain from Bangladesh. This was followed by parallel
tion of necessary sponsorship for hosting a large number meetings of ARCASIA Committee on Professional Practice
of foreign delegates for seven nights in Lahore. Group (ACPP) chaired by Ar. Balbir Verma from India (in
absence of Ar. Edric Florentino from Philippines) and AR-
The floods further eroded the ability of potential sponsors CASIA Committee on Green and Sustainable Architecture
as they diverted, their entire marketing budgets for relief (ACGSA) convened by Ar. Chandana Edirisuriya from Sri

8 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 events


As we pursue the goal of Green
Architecture we shall work toward
the day when the prefix ‘Green’ will
no longer be necessary.
clockwise from top left
Lanka (in the absence of Ar. Kazuo Iwamura from Japan). Prof. Sajjad Kausara gave a slide presentation of the
Ar. Rafiq Azam from
Bangladesh presenting Ar. Balbir Verma of India was elected the Convenor of Walled City of Lahore and briefed on a Workshop that
his paper; Ar. Bashirul ACPP for 2011-12 and Ar. Ashvinkumar from Singapore was to take place in the Walled City the next day.
Haq from Bangladesh
presenting his paper; was elected the new Convenor of ACGSA.
A group photograph October 27, 2010
of the ARCASIA Council
Meeting participants;
In the evening, the ARACSIA Students Jamboree Inaugu- The ARCASIA Council Meeting continued for the whole
Ar. Karan Grover from ration Ceremony took place in the Sports Complex Audi- day. Ar. Kalim A. Siddiqui was elected unopposed as Vice
India presenting his torium at UET campus. President of ARCASIA representing Zone A comprising
Keynote address at the
Inaugration of the ACA- India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Pakistan, Ar.
14, 2010; Ar. Shariah October 26, 2010 Sathirut Nui Tandanand from Thailand was elected Vice
Hosseini from Iran
presenting her paper The 31st ARCASIA Council Meeting was held under the President, Zone B and Ar. Anna Kwong Sum Yee from
chairmanship of Ar. Mubasshar Hussain and attended by Hong Kong was elected Vice President from Zone C. Ar.
official delegates from 14 of the 17 member countries. Nela DeZoysa from Sri Lanka was elected Convenor of
Country Reports and progress reports on various AR- the ARCASIA Fellowship.
CASIA projects were presented to the Council. Later, all
participants joined the rescheduled ARCASIA Fellowship Indonesia won the bid against Hong Kong to host the
meeting convened by Ar. Rabiul Hussain of Bangladesh. 33rd ARCASIA Council Meeting and ACA-15 in Bali in
2012. The 32nd ARCASIA Council Meeting and Forum-16
In the afternoon, the ARCASIA Committee for Architec- on the theme “Asian Cities in the 21st Century”, will take
tural Education (ACAE) chaired by Dy. Convenor, ACAE, place in Danang, Vietnam, 15 to 20 August 2011.
Prof. Dr. Chalay Kunawong from Thailand. Country Re-
ports on architectural education were presented and In the morning schedule of the Jamboree, assigned stu-
progress on specific ACAE projects was discussed. A dent group were dropped at a different gateways to the
briefing and update was given on the ongoing Students Walled City where they followed the route chalked out
Jamboree. Prof. Abu Sayeed M. Ahmed of Bangladesh for them. Documenting various aspects of the inner city,
was elected the new Convenor of ACAE and Prof. Dr. the students returned with thousands of photographs,
Chalay Kunawong, the Deputy Convenor. sketches, video and sound recordings. Members of each
group also used the data to create their own story of Lahore.
At the UET, the Jamboree programme commenced in the
morning with presentations by official student delegates October 28, 2010
on the theme of the Jamboree, “Dynamism in Architec- All the foreign delegates moved to UET Sports Complex
ture – The Asian Spirit”. In the afternoon, they participat- in the morning for a ceremony at which trees were plant-
ed in an exciting and most informative architectural quiz ed on behalf of each of the 17 ARCASIA member coun-
competition organized by Ar. Gita Balakrishnan of ETHOS tries. Powerpoint presentations on their ‘Story of Lahore’
India, who came especially for this event. The three-hour were then made by the six student groups before a large
marathon concluded with the two-member team from audience. The Jamboree events led to fruitful interactions
National College of Arts, Lahore declared as the winners, and an important bonding experience between students
the team from Indus Valley School of Art & Architecture, of different countries, cultures and languages. It was the
Karachi, as runners up and the National University of Sin- first time students of different institutions within Pakistan
gapore team in third position. met in such large numbers.
14TH ASIAN CONGRESS OF ARCHITECTS (ACA-14) October 29, 2010
October 27, 2010 The morning session began with a very memorable pres-
The ACA-14 Inaugural Ceremony was held on the evening entation by Ar. Indika Samarasinghe from Sri Lanka. He
of October 27 at the new Convention Centre, Johar Town, was followed by Ar. Qazi Azizul Mowla from Bangladesh.
Lahore. Inaugurated by Syed Yousuf Raza Gilani, Prime A highly inspiring paper presented by Dr. Ajantha Perera,
Minister of Pakistan, the ceremony was attended by over an activist and environmentalist from Sri Lanka, received
900 architects and students representing 20 countries a standing ovation from the large audience. Focused on
including all of the ARCASIA countries plus Austria, Aus- the rehabilitation of flood victims, papers were also read
tralia, Canada and Nepal. Participants from within Paki- by Ar. Bashirul Haq from Bangladesh, Ar. George Kuni-
stan originated from Jamshoro, Peshawar, Multan, Kara- hiro from Japan, Ar. Mishal Abidi from Canada, Ar. Hajjah
chi, Faisalabad, Gujranwala, Abbottabad and Islamabad. Noorzehan from Malaysia, Ar. Sharriah Hosseini from Iran
and Ar. Rafiq Azam from Bangladesh. The last paper in-
In his welcome address, Ar./Plnr. Kalim. A. Siddiqui, the cluded some delightful, environmentally friendly projects.
Convener ACA-14, briefly touched on the background of
the conference and its theme, “Go Green: Architecture of The technical sessions were concluded in the evening
the New Order”. Upon his request, the guests observed by Prof. Dr. Gulzar Haider who summed up the proceed-
a minute’s silence for those who lost their lives in the ings. A resolution drafted by him together with Ar. Ejaz
devastating floods. A short video presentation was also Ahed, Ar. Arif Belgaumi and Ar. Syed Akeel Bilgrami was
made on the floods and IAP’s relief efforts. In his address, adopted unanimously. Ar. Kalim Siddiqui then formally
Ar. Shahab Ghani Khan, President IAP, traced IAP’s histo- presented the resolution as stated below, at the Awards
ry and its links with international organizations as well as Ceremony and Farewell Banquet.
its role in dealing with national calamities. IAP’s efforts to-
wards sustainable and green architecture and its propos- RESOLUTION
al of forming a National Rehabilitation Authority (NARA) The 14th Asian Congress of Architects assembled in
were highlighted. In his address, the Prime Minister lent Lahore, Pakistan hereby resolves:
the support of his government towards sustainability and • That as we pursue the goal of ‘Green Architecture’ we
promised to consider the rehabilitation proposals put for- shall work towards the day when the prefix ‘Green’ will no
ward by IAP. He announced the lease of Bradlaugh Hall, longer be necessary.
a heritage building, to IAP for restoration and use of the
Lahore Chapter as its Secretariat. • That the ideas of ‘Green Architecture’ should be intro-
duced in early education in schools and that the ARCA-
The Prime Minister later inaugurated the building material SIA professional architectural institutes will offer outreach
and products exhibition and other exhibitions at the EXPO programmes in their countries to promote ‘Green’ con-
Centre and mixed freely with all the foreign delegates. cepts in schools.

The ACA-14 inaugural session included the keynote • That the curricula in architectural educational institu-
speech of Ar. Karan Grover of India, entitled “The Com- tions will be developed to introduce ‘Green’ concepts
plex Green” a powerful, 40-minute presentation promot- from the first year of architectural degree programmes.
ing the value of natural resources.
• That the ARCASIA professional architectural institutes
October 28, 2010 will develop and maintain continuing education pro-
The first technical session began in the afternoon, after grammes to disseminate ‘Green’ concepts to profession-
the return of the delegates from UET. The first speaker als in the field.
was from Pakistan, Dr. Naumana Anjum, followed by Aga
Khan Award Winner, Ar. Dr. Anna Heringer of Austria who • That the national governments of ARCASIA countries
is currently residing in Bangladesh. Heringer presented should develop policies to provide incentives to develop
her sustainable projects, including the award winning and adapt sustainable building materials and manufac-
Community Centre. Her presentation was followed by turing processes.
that of Martin Rauch, an Austrian ceramist who utilised
compressed earth blocks for building construction in his • That the ARCASIA professional architectural institutes
home country. will identify ‘Green Leaders’ from amongst professionals,
educators and members of the construction and materi-
A friendship night was later hosted at the Punjab Gover- als industries in their respective countries, who may be
nor’s House which saw all the foreign delegates and host recognized by ARCASIA with a special ARCASIA award.
organisers being received by Governor Salman Taseer
and given a tour of the historic building. He also briefly • That there should be productive collaboration between
joined the audience to watch cultural performances by the governments, construction materials industry, educa-
delegates and students from different countries. tional institutions and professionals in the development of

10 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 events


clockwise from top left
‘Green’ building materials, so that research and develop- CONCLUSION
Audience applauding
ment effort can be sustained without public funding. The success of ACA-14 and the related events can be Dr. Ajantha Perera;
gauged by the warm comments received by the Presi- Dr. Ajantha Perera from
Sri Lanka presenting her
• That the ARCASIA professional architectural institutes dent, IAP from delegates and attendees including Ar. paper; Syed Yusuf Raza
shall advocate to their respective governments, pro- Mubasshar Hussain, Chairman ARCASIA and Ar. George Gilani, Prime Minister of
Pakistan, declaring
Green policies at the macro level, especially the planned Kunihiro, Chairman-Elect. ACA-14 open; The COC
‘Green’ human settlements. with other committee
Regarding the event, Ar. Hussain remarked: “I hope for members; Ar. Mishaal
Abidi receving shield
Awards Ceremony and Farewell Banquet other member institutes interested to host such ARCASIA from Ar. Sohail Abbasi;
The last event of the Congress was the Awards Ceremony events in the future, the 31st Council Meeting, ACA-14 Ar. Hajjah Noorzehan
from Malaysia receiving
and Farewell Banquet, held at the State Guest House. At and Student Jamboree will serve as a source of inspi- shield from Dr. Gulzar
the event, the Chief Minister Punjab, Mian Mohammad ration. Please convey my special thanks to the student Haider; Dr. Gulzar Haider
giving away shield to
Shahbaz Sharif, as Guest of Honour, presided over the volunteers for their dedication and interest in the activities Ar. George Kunihiro
ARCASIA Awards 2008-09. The Mehdi Ali Mirza Awards of IAP and ARCASIA. They are the future of ARCASIA.” from Japan
2009, conferred to the top student from each accredited
institution and the IAP Graduate Awards 2009 for the “I am sure that all of us will have fond memories of the
most outstanding thesis projects were awarded. week spent in a city that is functioning well as any other
cities around the world. We shall work together to take
Two graduates from the Indus Valley School of Art & ARCASIA to another level to become more involved in the
Architecture and one from NCA, Lahore received IAP global network.” maintained Kunihiro.
Graduate Awards. Winners of the ARCASIA Architectural
Students’ Design Competition were also acknowledged The event was attended by a total of over 260 architects
and prizes were given for the best stalls at the exhibition. and faculty members and 550 architecture students from
In addition, a video documentary on the historical build- all over the country. More than 100 architects from 20
ings of Lahore, produced by Ar. Prof. Sajjad Kausar, was countries and 17 foreign students acted as participants
screened on the occasion. while over 100 representatives of the building materials
industry were also present.
October 30, 2010
As part of the city outings arranged by Ar. Prof. Sajjad (This article is based on the report submitted by Ar. Kalim A. Siddiqui,
convener ACA-14)
Kausar, the foreign delegates were taken on a guided tour
through the Walled City of Lahore, Badshahi Mosque, the
Lahore Fort, the Museum and the Lawrence Gardens
on the last day of the festivities and treated to tea and a
cricket match at the Gymkhana Cricket pavilion.

A very interesting programme was also organized by Dr.


Afshan Siddiqui for the non-architect spouses who ac-
companied the foreign delegates. They were taken to an
exciting polo match and after participating in a meeting of
the International Women’s Club the next day, took in other
The ARCASIA professional architectural
attractions within the following two days. institutes will develop and maintain
continuing education programmes
to disseminate ‘Green’ concepts to
professionals in the field.
Architect VaSLab Architecture
Thailand

Bunker House

Built by young Thai studio, VaSLab the iconic Bunker House manages to hold
its own against the stoic military backdrop of Thailand’s Lopburi province.
a matter PROJECTS

of security
PROJECTS
BUNKER HOUSE VASLAB ARCHITECTURE

Inspired by bunker architecture built and abandoned along the coast of France during
World War II, Bangkok-based architects VaSLab Architecture took advantage of their
client’s partiality to concrete as well as the specific context of the site to create a
structure which taints the space of domestic life with the feeling of something a little
less civilian. The location, a province home to the largest Thai military camp in the
country, also lays claim to Cholasit Dam, the biggest reservoir in Central Thailand. The
dam’s profound structure and exposed concrete appearance made a strong impact
on both the architects and the client with respect to the aesthetic decision to use
cast-in-place concrete as the house’s shell.

Aside from being influenced by its characteristic surroundings, the house is curiously
defined by its contradicting sensibility, notably that of being both a hidden and visible
space. The challenge to harmoniously fuse together these conflicting elements was
one which was deliberately posed by the client for whom a private, secure, yet open,
home was a priority. The architects, thus drew their concept from the sophisticatedly
crafted French defense system, attracted by its ability to maintain a hidden, placid
presence while allowing inhabitants to keep on guard at all times from within. The
unorthodox approach to designing the house also meant an unconventional layout:
the asymmetrical ‘ H ’ shaped floor plan of the house gives rise to two inner courts.
Separated by a corridor that links the main living space and guest room, these inner
courts can be utilised as outdoor living areas in both the morning and afternoon.

In response to a compact budget, the idea of incorporating concrete was also cost-
effective, aside from being a strong aesthetic factor. Reinforced concrete posts and
beam structures were chosen as economical options for the framework of the house.
Aside from the implementation of cast-in-place concrete as the principal material,
industrial materials include metal sheet siding, used for the overhang shading situated
above the walkway, and aluminum louvres on the west façade to alleviate the effects
of the strong afternoon sun. Green-tinted glass and black aluminum frames were im-
plemented in the case of voids and openings while the use of warm timber around the
stairs, terraces, ceilings and roof deck help create a contrast with the raw surface of
the concrete. An aspect of the house that remains particularly evocative of authentic
bunker design is the slot opening embedded in the balcony of the master bedroom
wherein one can experience a view of the site’s lush green surroundings, canal and
nearby highway.
clockwise from top left
Approaching the main
entrance with aluminum
louvre as shading
element; recreational
sky deck with access
from master bedroom

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 15


PROJECTS
from left
BUNKER HOUSE VASLAB ARCHITECTURE View of patio towards
car port, view of covered
terrace with cantilevered
steel structure above for
shading

16 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


The dam’s profound structure
and exposed concrete
appearance made a strong
impact on both the architects
and the client with respect
to the aesthetic decision to
use cast-in-place concrete
as the shell of the house.

architecture
architecture
asia october
asia january
/ november
/ february
/ december
/ march 2011
2010 projects 17
15
The roof terrace
connects to the
master bedroom

18 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS
BUNKER HOUSE VASLAB ARCHITECTURE

Principal Architects Structure 1 11


CAR PORT BATHROOM
Vasu Virajsilp Cast-in-place concrete 2 12
Boonlert Deeyuen Max Height

IN
PATIO SCULPTURE COURT

TE
Project Architect 7.6 m 3 13

RN
LIVING INNER COURT

AL
Ratthaphon Sujatanonda Landscape Area

RO
4 14

AD
Client 507sqm DINING POND
Siriwan Tiensuwan Parking Lot 5 15
PANTRY MASTER BEDROOM
CANAL
7
Location 2 cars 6 16
Lopburi Thailand Exterior Finish STORAGE WALK-IN CLOSET
Site Area Bare concrete 7 17
KITCHEN MASTER BATHROOM
800 sqm Year of Completion 8 18
Bldg Area 2009 CORRIDOR PLANT BALCONY
293 sqm Structural Engineer 9 19
GUEST ROOM ROOF TERRACE
PARK Gross Floor Area Konpoj Jittijaroonglarp 10 20
360 sqm Contractor STORAGE OPEN
Bldg Coverage Ratio Polpaiboon Limited
37 percent Partnership
Gross Floor Ratio Photography
45 percent Spaceshift Studio
Bldg Scale
SITE PLAN Two stories above ground

SECTION A SECTION B
0 1 2 5 10m

12 17
7 18
9

14 16
6
8 18
11 19
5
6 2 15

14
4
14
1

13
3 20

LOWER LEVEL PLAN UPPER LEVEL PLAN


0 1 2 5 10m
PHOTOGRAPHY BY AR. MARIYAM NIZAM

in the face of
disaster
Architect The Heritage Foundation
Pakistan

Green KaravanGhar (GKG)

Defined by its inventive employment of traditional and modern techniques, the


Green KaravanGhar initiative is aptly evocative of the ingenuity and resilience
of both its designers and the community it was designed to house.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY AR. MARIYAM NIZAM
PROJECTS
GREEN KARAVANGHAR (GKG) THE HERITAGE FOUNDATION

Seven million people were reportedly displaced when the recent floods in Pakistan left
the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa in ruins, prompting the Heritage Foundation to
extend the combined architectural expertise of its project team. As the first phase of a
three-part disaster outreach programme, relief packages of food and non-food items
were sent to 500 families in the district of Swat. Phase Two entailed the construction of
transient shelters or nucleus houses known as Green KaravanGhar.

Finding the most resourceful means of building a hardy structure was initially a chief
concern for the architects. Using lime-mud mortar, and wood and stone retrieved from
the debris of the devastated houses and corrugated galvanized iron sheets for roofs,
some 1200 units, were constructed in 75 hamlets within Hazara. A traditional cross-
bracing technique locally known as ‘dhijji’ which survived the effects of the earthquake
was crucially incorporated as a supporting element within the design. Tying methods
and bolting techniques were also researched and implemented in the case of wooden
posts and bracings. Later, the galvanized iron roofs were replaced with timber joists
and purlins carried on cross-braced timber structure. Mixes of mud and lime, inspired
by mud-lime mortars traditionally used in medieval Pakistani architecture, were used as
mortar and plaster, resulting in a high level of insulation.
from left
Split bamboo planking
used for roofing; Taliban insurgence in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa in early 2009 led to the internal displace-
household member
finishing walls with ment of local communities, inducing the need for easily fabricated housing and com-
mud/lime plaster munity facilities. While a mud-brick community kitchen was initially designed, excess
costs and time constraints prevented the actual utilisation of the design. A quicker
alternative involving bamboo posts, beams and matting with stone, mud and lime was
later devised by Yasmeen Lari, a local architect renowned for her work in emergency
housing. Requiring a completion period of just three days, the bamboo matting, walls,
completed with mud-lime plaster, allowed for a 10-degree temperature variance be-
tween internal and external temperatures.

Keeping in line with the objective of creating a ‘green’ module, bamboo was imple-
mented in the roofing system. Dhijji filling with stone was also used for the first time. By
July 2010, the objective of achieving a ‘green’ low cost construction methodology was
realised with a circular structure that was to be used as a Women’s Centre. This unit
utilised materials that were both indigenous and renewable, incorporating a traditional
construction technique that had been tested against every extreme natural element,
including earthquakes. At the advent of the floods in August 2010, a lightweight, easily
fabricated and sustainable Green KaravanGhar was ready to be deployed.

A Green KaravanGhar demonstration unit was completed in Marghazar, Swat in Sep-


tember 2010, one month after the onslaught of the floods. A workshop/warehouse was
consequently established to prepare a ‘kit’ for each house. Artisans made the foun-
dation, plinths, frames and roofs. Each household broke their own stones, made infill
walls, and plastered the inside of the walls and floors, with assistance from the artisans’
team. A unit, consisting of a room, a veranda, kitchen, bath and WC, was completed
at the cost of just USD500, employing the use of bamboo posts and beams, bamboo
matting, stone, mud and lime. Plinth was made with stone while masonry walls sup-
ported by a bamboo cross-braced structure with stone infill or other materials derived
from the area. Both the walls and floors were finished with mud/lime plaster while the
roofs consisted of bamboo ring beams and joists, with a polythene sheet waterproof
layer sandwiched between thick mud/lime layers, edged with grass to keep in line with
local practice.

The structures incorporated easily transportable prefabricated doors and windows.


Initially, a split bamboo planking that was diagonally fixed onto the beams was used,

PHOTOGRAPHY BY AR. SALEEM BUKHARI


taking almost three days to complete. It was later replaced with a strengthened bamboo
matting that was interwoven for increased strength. This matting was made available
in prefabricated panels, taking up no more than mere minutes to secure. The stand-
ard GKG proved ultimately advantageous due to its capacity to be customised in
accordance to the various temperatures and climatic constraints of different regions of
Pakistan, rendering the module a versatile emergency shelter.

In all, the Green KaravanGhar initiative involved four primary groups of people: the
skilled artisans’ team, the local artisan trainees, student volunteers and the local com-
munity and household members. The success of the module can be measured by not
only the effectiveness of construction materials and techniques it utilised but also by
the number of trained artisans produced through the process and the job opportunities
that it presented to the devastated locals. The involvement of college and university
students was fundamental with respect to making the Green KaravanGhar module a
success. Household owners and community members were also urged to participate in
the construction process, including the excavation of foundations, general help around
the site and the finishing of the mud/lime plaster. The construction of 266 houses was
completed in under six months, enabling affected families to inhabit their houses before
the onset of winter. The units, insulated with three to four inch-thick walls, proved sturdy
enough to withstand extreme conditions, including snow loads of up to four feet as well
as the heavy rains that preceded the snow.

Crediting much of the initiative’s success to the close co-operation of local administra-
tion and the Pakistan Army who provided logistics and facilitated security within Swat
PHOTOGRAPHY BY NAHEEM SHAH
in the aftermath of the disaster, the Heritage Foundation is currently involved in Phase
Three of the Post-Disaster Rehabilitation.

This unit utilised materials that were both


indigenous and renewable, incorporating
a traditional construction technique that
had been tested against every extreme
natural element, including earthquakes.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY NAHEEM SHAH

22 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS
Location
(Villages in Swat district Khyber GREEN KARAVANGHAR (GKG) THE HERITAGE FOUNDATION
Pakhtunkhwa province Pakistan)
Biha
Buklaria
Charma
Chatikal
Chuprial
Ditpani
Fazal Banda
Gawalrai
Islampur
Koray
Labat BAMBOO DOOR MUD PLASTER
Mandaldag
Marghazar
Nalkot
Pishtunai
Roringar
Sedara
Serai
Shingaltan
Site Area
Estimated over 3000 sqm
(Plot sizes of each
GKG dependant on land ELEVATION
holdings available)
Client
Community
Project Team
(The Heritage Foundation)
Yasmeen Lari
(Sitara-I Imtaiz Honorary
Project Director Chair and CE)
Naheem Shan
(Project Manager)
Mariyam Nizam
(Project Coordinator)
Wajiha Siddiqui
(Architectural Drawings)
Civil and Structural Engineer
Amin Tariq
(Amin Tariq and Associates)
Quantity Surveyor
Heritage Foundation

SECTION

1
BASE
2
VERANDAH
3
KITCHEN
4
BATH
5
W.C
6
6 ROOM

2 3

from top
Fixing bamboo matting 1
for walls; completed unit
with beneficiary family;
completed unit, Biha,
PLAN
Swat 0 1 2 3 4 5m
FEATURE Mediations in
an Emergency:
The Rise of
Text by Adele Chong Disaster Housing

For many, the on-the-ground reports that really struck a beyond their means to achieve the seemingly impos-
nerve following the March 11 disaster in Japan did not sible is how thoroughly these actions - brought about
come via CNN, the BBC or any other major news agency by a revived consciousness of our collective mortality -
for that matter. The most compelling accounts of the divulge the resilience of the human spirit, irrespective of
tragedy, significantly, managed to trickle their way the kind of future that awaits us all. It is a sentiment that
through the news feeds of social networking sites such one, in an ideal world, likes to imagine designers of all
as Twitter and Facebook. While successive tweets, emergency housing bearing in mind, particularly in the
status updates and uploaded images quickly became generation of structures which not only serve their initial
indicators of life for anxious family members and friends purpose of temporarily sheltering displaced victims but
awaiting news from suddenly displaced loved ones, also function as a psychological respite from the trau-
the civilian commentary that surfaced also offered the matic effects of the disaster.
international community a deeper, more intimate
glimpse into the situation at large as well as the severe According to Cameron Sinclair, co-founder of Architec-
impact of the earthquake-cum-tsunami on the Japanese ture for Humanity (AFH), an NGO which has garnered
urban environment. A short video posted on YouTube, critical acclaim for the pro bono design services it
for instance, depicted the hair-rising effects of the tre- offers to communities in need, the commonly accepted
mours as the anonymous filmmaker himself remained idea of architect-as-pure aesthete, in these situations,
crouched beneath a table within the crumbling interiors is automatically delegated to the backdrop. “Ego gets
of the Sendai Mediatheque, a highly publicised building you inches but it doesn’t get you impact,” maintains
designed by Toyo Ito. Watching the walls and ceiling Sinclair. “A true architect is not an artist but an optimistic
shudder violently from side-to-side as if the structure realist.” 1
itself were composed entirely of foam, one can’t help
but be left aghast at the disclosed fragility of such out- That said, being an ‘optimistic realist’ in Sinclair’s
wardly robust architecture - and of the human condition books doesn’t mean deferring to poorly devised and
- in the face of Mother Nature’s wrath. cheaply manufactured structures that give little or even
no thought at all to the mental and physical plight of
Without a doubt, the last decade marks an ominous disaster victims. On the contrary, he emphasises that
period in the history of modern civilisation; the Japanese there is a need for architects to better comprehend
catastrophe comes as the latest in a string of natural the intricate workings of the situation they are helping
disasters that have continued to strain global commu- to resolve in order to ‘create a beautiful yet tangible
nities in the past few years, ranging from a destructive solution that is loved by others and the community at
earthquake in Haiti in 2009 to the recent floods in Paki- large’. In Sinclair’s opinion, a generic solution simply
stan which displaced as many as seven million people. often doesn’t suffice in these circumstances. Concerns
But while the wary among us might be inclined to inter- and needs of housing have to be addressed in direct
pret these events as the beginning of the end, what can relation to the affected community in question in order
at least be said about the ensuing process of rebuilding to achieve the desired impact; it is a matter of integra-
communities and cases of affected individuals striving tion vs. imposition. So while the at-times overshadowing
In an age rampant with natural disasters, can publicity and
smart branding strategies help call attention to the pressing
need for intelligent, sustainable shelters which house the body
as well as the soul? What can this mean for the future of
architecture in general?

persona of the author-architect may be diminished, the an avalanche of media coverage beyond one’s wildest
need for intelligent design, for him, remains more perti- expectations. Good intentions aside, the collaborative
nent than ever before. efforts harnessed in support of the Make It Right initia-
tive amounted to the kind of publicity that is very nearly
But it’s not to say that getting your cause plugged by a impossible to buy. More crucially, it so happens that
larger-than-life personality exactly hinders things either. the domain of public perception, of all domains, is one
Acknowledged in the past as architecture’s potentially which Pitt finds himself faring rather well in.
most important patron,2 American actor Brad Pitt has
been lending his star appeal to the profession since the The actor wisely took the opportunity to drum up at-
he reportedly ‘interned’ at Frank Gehry’s office sub- tention to the dire circumstances surrounding the dis-
sequent to being bitten by the architecture bug a few placed residents of the Lower Ninth Ward, promoting
years ago. Call it what one will but Pitt’s steadfast de- his cause on every well-watched media programme
votion to furthering the reaches of humanitarian design from The Charlie Rose Show to Entertainment Tonight,
to where it’s most needed is turning the heads of some with a trail of picture-hungry paparazzi thrown in as a
of the hardiest cynics around and proving to the public perpetual given. Implementing an idea of Pitt’s to fill a
that he’s not just exercising his celebrity right to nurture few blocks of the Lower Ninth Ward with bright pink
a very expensive hobby. canvas houses initially meant to be replaced with digital
renderings of where future homes would stand, Make It
After chairing an architecture competition to rebuild a Right threw a symbolic bent on the idea of sponsoring
block in New Orleans, Pitt made the leap and founded a house. Photo-op moments at the launch of the pos-
his own organisation, Make It Right, collaborating with turing actor with the houses as a memorably graphic
a Los Angeles based architecture firm, Graft and a backdrop gave the cause something of a trademark
Green consultant. Devised as a means of reconstructing identity, aptly and officially affirming the merger be-
the Lower Ninth Ward district of New Orleans, one of tween architecture and Brand Brad.
the areas in the city reportedly most affected by Hur-
ricane Katrina, the initiative was launched in 2007, with What is also important to note about the predictably
the objective of building 150 affordable ‘high-quality overblown hoopla around Make It Right is the fact that
design homes’. A total of 13 architects, including high- it was all completely part of the big picture which was,
profile personalities such as Thom Mayne, MVRDV and inevitably, to draw attention to the scale of the physical
Shigeru Ban were enlisted to contribute to the project, and psychological damage that was wrought by Katrina.
working for severely reduced design fees or for nothing The main message of the entire initiative was communi-
at all. cation, whether one is looking at the deft way in which
the publicity machine was wielded or at the actual ar-
But really, money isn’t the main issue here. The re- chitecture itself; examples of the development include
spective star power of each big-name architect within a poetically crafted dwelling by Thom Mayne which is
global architecture circles, combined with Pitt’s own being supported by two pylons meant to anchor the
movie star clout, not surprisingly, served to generate house in place like a boat should future floods ensue.

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 feature 25


IMAGES COURTESY OF SHIGERU BAN ARCHITECTS

What can at least be said about the ensuing process of


rebuilding communities and cases of affected individuals
striving beyond their means to achieve the seemingly
impossible is how thoroughly these actions – brought
about by a revived consciousness of our collective
mortality - divulge the resilience of the human spirit,
irrespective of the kind of future that awaits us all.
IMAGE COURTESY OF MVRDV
FEATURE

Japanese architect Kengo Kuma asserts


that design can only really ‘speak’ to
inhabitants when due respect is given
to the original context of an area.
There is also a controversial addition by MVRDV which alone but also on a global scale. Long renowned for cham-
offers a twist on the conventional shotgun house by pioning the virtues of local materials and techniques,
drastically folding the structure in the centre and form- Kuma implored architects and planners to overcome
ing a ‘V’ in mid-air while the floors remain level. The the powerful influence of ‘Tokyo cool’ and the temp-
latter was deemed controversial by critics due to its in- tation to submit to trends that have become so read-
direct allusion to actual houses which were tossed and ily associated with the big-city glamour of the nation’s
mangled during the disaster. capital, particularly when designing for local regions
whose culture and traditions are vastly estranged from
Although Pitt received a great deal of praise for his ef- popular urban design elements.
forts internationally and managed to raise enough funds
to build over 50 houses for 200 occupants in the Lower “Now we must rethink how we design buildings for
Ninth Ward to date, there are those who do continue particular locations,” he states. “Each place has its own
to question the discrepancy between the architects’ history, culture and - potential risk. Each place must
newfangled contemporary designs and the original adopt a design that is adapted to the specific risks of
structure of the traditional shotgun houses that were an area.”
formerly situated in the area as well as how successful-
ly inhabitants are able to adapt to the drastic change in While Kuma’s perspective on the futility of creating en-
housing typology. Shelter is one thing but can so-called vironments based on a city-centric mindset is not ex-
highly designed architecture help to rehabilitate a com- actly unheard of, the timeliness of his statement lends
munity of disaster survivors in a truly social sense? an invigorated validity to the real meaning of designing
in accordance to context. Bearing this in mind, the ex-
Japanese architect Kengo Kuma asserts that design ample of disaster housing should not be perceived as
can only really ‘speak’ to inhabitants when due respect an isolated domain; ensuing developments in the field
is given to the original context of an area. In a recent are destined to modify the way in which we live, dis-
commentary in the Financial Times published shortly aster or no disaster. With so many architects already
after the latest disaster in Japan, Kuma criticised the paying heed by employing a more sensitive approach
country’s government and wealthy elite for shunning to projects in accommodating cultural, social and envi-
the relevance of Japan’s rural areas and failing to ac- ronmental factors, it’s a clear sign that perplexing chal-
knowledge the problematic gap that continues to exist lenges as well as an important new beginning await
between the poor and the rich. For him, the fact that architecture.
nuclear power stations are generally shuttled away to
the innermost corners of rural outskirts - with local gov-
ernments being paid generous subsidies to turn a blind 1 Conversation with Cameron Sinclair, The Atlantic, March 21, 2011
eye to the risks of hosting such a facility - is revela- http://technologyforgood.info/2011/04/11/a-conversation-with-
tory of the blatant neglect that many authorities living in cameron-sinclair-ceo-of-architecture-for-humanity-—-by-daniel-
fromson-of-the-atlantic-and-sinclair’s-ted-talk/
cosmopolitan areas are guilty of.3 According to Kuma, 2 Andrew Blum, “Saint Brad,” Metropolis Magazine, March 19, 2008
it is a fact that was left mostly unacknowledged until http://www.metropolismag.com/story/20080319/saint-brad
recent widespread fears of leaked radiation emerged 3 Kengo Kuma, “Tokyo “cool” has swayed Japan for too long,”
Financial Times, April 5, 2011
as an aftermath of the disaster, threatening to have a http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/30c411f0-5fb8-11e0-a718-00144
critical impact not only within the vicinity of the country feab49a.html

clockwise from left


Shigeru Ban’s paper structures temporarily shelter
the displaced in a gymnasium in East Japan;
Dutch firm MVRDV’s controversial take on the
traditional shotgun house for Make It Right;
recent examples of disaster housing in Sri Lanka
and Pakistan
architecture asia january / february / march 2011 feature 27
Architect IROJE KHM Architects
Korea

Purple Hill House

For South Korean firm IROJE KHM Architects, the problem of insufficient natural
light gives way to an ingeniously designed house fraught with idiosyncrasies.
PROJECTS

structured
outlook
Devising an innovative
design, the designers kept
the coveted view of the
mountain intact by concocting
a way of making the most out
of light originating from both
the south and east side of
the structure.
PROJECTS
PURPLE HILL HOUSE IROJE KHM ARCHITECTS

Sited in a scenic residential area near Gwanggyo Mountain, the Purple Hill House is sur-
rounded by the lush greenery of a sprawling natural environment. While being situated
next to a picturesque mountain meant being able to enjoy access to spectacular views
of the landscape, the northwestern positioning of the site also alludes to a lack of natu-
ral sunlight emanating from the south. Thus emerged the dilemma that plagued IROJE
KHM Architects when the South Korean firm first took on the task of building the house
in question. For principal architect HyoMan Kim, it seemed ironic that the outlook of the
structure would prove to be such an issue given the panoramic locale; in order to fully
partake in the breathtaking beauty of the mountain, inhabitants would literally be forced
to remain largely in the dark due to insufficient natural light.

Devising an innovative design, the designers kept the coveted view of the mountain in-
tact by concocting a way of making the most out of light originating from both the south
and east side of the structure. The resulting ‘floating glass garden’ features a complex
clustering of ‘glass boxes’ which meander through the interior space, facilitating the
presence of sunlight on various levels. By lining the boxes with a combination of various
plant life, the designers essentially created a garden specifically for each room, literally
bringing the outside, inside. Strategically positioned directly over the main living area
throughout the defining three floors, the floating boxes generate a distinctive identity for
the house with respect to a exuding a dynamic that alludes to movement whichever way
one choose to view the entire structure.

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 31


SITE PLAN

Principal Architect 1 20
MAIN GATE STAND DECK
HyoMan Kim 2 21
Design Team SUB GATE BALCONY
KyeongJin Jung 3 22
ENTRANCE STUDY ROOM
JiWon Ym 4 23
EunHae Park ENTRANCE COURT BEDROOM
FRONT ELEVATION 5 24
Structural Designer
PARKING MASTER BEDROOM
MOA 6 25
SungYeong Oh ROAD MASTER BATHROOM
Contractor 7 26
STAIR WAY DRESS ROOM
JEHYO 8 27
Location SUNKEN COURT GARDEN
Gyeounggi-do Korea 9 28
MECHANICAL ROOM MASTER GARDEN
Site Area 10 29
554 sqm LIVING ROOM REAR GARDEN
Bldg Area 11 30
DINING ROOM FLOWER GARDEN
110 sqm 12 31
Gross Floor Area DINING GARDEN ROOF GARDEN
291 sqm 13
KITCHEN
Structure 14
Concrete Rahmen UTILITY
Exterior Finishing 15
LIVING DECK
Aluminium Sheet 16
Exposed Concrete POND
Interior Finishing 17
WATER FALL
Exposed Concrete 18
LEFT SIDE ELEVATION
0 1 3 5m
Lacquer SERVICE YARD
Photographer 19
STAIR DECK
JongOh Kim

32 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS
PURPLE HILL HOUSE IROJE KHM ARCHITECTS

31 31
30 31
31
24 30 26 25

23

22
18 23
13 3 18 14
23

9 9
6 2

SECTION 1 SECTION 2
0 1 3 5m

31 21
23
30 30 30

30

22

20
26
24
28

THIRD FLOOR PLAN SECOND FLOOR PLAN

3 27
5
29

23
30 7
10 7

23
15 4
22 8

19
11 1
14 9
13
16 27
18

17
12

6
2

FIRST FLOOR PLAN BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN


0 1 3 5m
An unusual temporary project by HHD_FUN introduces visitors to a new way of
observing urban change.
asymmetrical PROJECTS

shifts
Architect HHD_FUN
China

Embedded Project
PROJECTS
EMBEDDED PROJECT HHD_FUN

Based on the concept of ‘complex systems’, young Beijing-based firm HHD_FUN, in


collaboration with artist Aaajioa (Xu Wenkai), dreamt up a temporary, interactive instal-
lation designed to observe, perceive and research our living world, society and biol-
ogy. The structure housing the installation was inspired by a triangular fractal pattern.
Each triangle has been sub-divided or ‘cracked’ again and again, resulting in a unique
cube-like enclosure wrapped with a three-dimensional, surface pattern. The element
that clearly sets the structure apart is most certainly in its jettisoning of traditional
architectural design methodology in favour of a computational algorithm. For the de-
signers, the appeal was in the creation of an organic structure through combining the
logic of the algorithm with the physicality of architecture.

Within the internal space of the installation, virtual architecture is embedded into vari-
ous cities and regions within the mapping programme Google Earth and projected
onto the floor. To further enhance the connection between the computational design
and realised architecture, the generated digital data or three-dimensional architectural
models of the external structure have been embedded into the Google Earth pro-
jections. The movement of visitors entering the space is tracked by motion sensors
which then forward the resulting input to corresponding projectors. As visitors move
throughout the space, the displacement of their bodies triggers subsequent changes
in the projected scene. Hence audiences play a direct role in generating unusual per-
spectives from which to view the globe, the city, open fields as well as the algorithmic
architectures embedded into the Google Earth projection. Through the Embedded
Project, the designers ultimately hope to place emphasis on the dynamic that exists
between the movement of people, visual experience and what they term, ‘urban mes-
sages’. In short, the idea is that one may be able to experience the simulation of shifts
occurring within our urban environment through the projection.

36 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


Through the Embedded
Project, the designers
The Embedded Project
is wrapped in a skin ultimately hope to place
emphasis on the dynamic
inspired by a triangular
fractal pattern

that exists between the


movement of people, visual
experience and what they
term, ‘urban messages’.
38 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects
PROJECTS
EMBEDDED PROJECT HHD_FUN

Location
Beijing
Site area
100 sqm
Date of Completion
2009

Project team
Zhenfei Wang
Luming Wang
Collaborator
Aaajiao (Xu Wenkai)
Materials
Steel and wood
Client
E- Arts
Curator
Xiaodong Yan
Project Cost
20 0000 RMB

ELEVATION

An interactive projection
is housed within the
interior space

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 39


Architect Shuhei Endo Architect Institute
Japan

Bubbletecture H

Based on the idea of circulation, the new bubble-shaped environmental


institution by Japanese firm Shuhei Endo Architect Institute, draws inspiration
directly from functions inherent to the structure itself.

40 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS

a tribute to
nature

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 41


PHOTOGRAPHY BY MR. YOSHIHARU MATSUMURA
PROJECTS
BUBBLETECTURE H SHUHEI ENDO ARCHITECT INSTITUTE

Bubbletecture H by Shuhei Endo Architect Institute is a recently built structure sited


on a steep slope along the north side of a forest in Japan’s Hyogo Prefecture. While
its overall construction may appear a tad out of the ordinary, its situated context is
certainly appropriate with respect to the nature of its intended function; the client’s
brief called for an architectural space which could be utilised as a point of contact
with respect to the surrounding nature. The main objective was in the creation of a
place which could foster local and widespread interest in global environmental issues.
Bearing this in mind, the Japanese firm based their unusual design on the notion of
‘circulation’.

The design of Bubbletecture H, at the request of the client, revolved around three
main functions with two being arranged on flat land due to the existence of an old
road used for commuting to the old town nearby. The third function was coordinated
in conjunction with the natural slope of the site so that it could ‘float’ alongside the
same level as the two corresponding functions. The rationale behind the correlation of
all structural functions lay in a few key factors: to maximise the use of the limited flat
land and landform and to minimise the damaging effects of construction on the natu-
ral environment. The form of the building thus, unveils the naturally generated shape
which arose from connecting all three functions.

In the case of the superstructure, the designers chose to use Japanese cypress thin-
ning wood log with the intention of promoting localised building materials. Accord-
ing to the architects, Japanese wood was used also in an attempt to neutralise C02
emissions. The emphasis on materiality extended to other aspects such as the roof
and wall which features 1.2mm thick weather-resistant steel board. The ultimate ad-
vantage of using the steel board lies in the ready presence of initial rust which sta-
bilises the material and prevents further rusting from occurring. But while the low
maintenance feature of the steel board was considerably beneficial what remained
of foremost interest to the design team was the evolving form of the material which
achieved a clear correlation with the ever-changing mode of nature itself.

The part of the building that achieves direct contact with the earth consists of RC
structure and composite underground beam while the part of the building that ‘floats’
above ground uses SRC structure in conjunction with a steel frame. The floating part,
propped with an underground beam, is supported by the building frame of RC which
also doubles as a water tank for fire prevention. The superstructure itself boasts a
single-layered, three-dimensional truss structure made out of Japanese cedar thin-
IMAGE COURTESY OF ENDO SHUHEI ARCHITECT INSTITUTE

ning wood log and ready-made hardware. The truss, made of out several logs, was
assembled on site and connected by hand in each of the three main spaces within the
building, giving way to spaces such as a waiting room or an office.

42 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


The main objective was in
the creation of a place which
could foster local and wide-
from top
The structure is sited
along a foresty slope;
spread interest in global
Bubbletecture H as
seen from above
environmental issues. Bearing
this in mind, the Japanese
firm based their unusual
design on the notion of
‘circulation’.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY MR. YOSHIHARU MATSUMURA
PHOTOGRAPHY BY MR. YOSHIHARU MATSUMURA

Architect Period of Construction for Truss


Shuhei Endo Structure (Lower Part)
Architect Institute May 2007 to July 2007
Location Period of Construction for Roof
Sayo cho September 2007 to
Hyogo Prefecture, Japan December 2007
Date of Completion Design Duration
February 2008 May 2005 to March 2006
Principal Use Period of Construction
Environmental institution and November 2006 to February 2008
exhibition space
Height of Structure
One storey
Site Area
5000 sqm
Building Area
968 sqm
Total Floor Area
995 sqm
Period of Construction for Truss
Structure (Upper Part)
44 architecture asia october
january // february
november/ march
/ december
2011 projects
2010 projects August 2007 to September 2007
PROJECTS
top
These main spaces BUBBLETECTURE H SHUHEI ENDO ARCHITECT INSTITUTE
within the structure are
connected by way of a
hand-assembled truss

a
1
a

4 11
1
14
13

14

NORTH ELEVATION
SECTION A

b
1

2 11
8 5
14 12

WEST ELEVATION
SECTION B
0 5 10m

2
9

10

1
11
6
10
10
8
7

4
5

PLAN
0 5 10m

1 8
ENTRANCE STORAGE
2 9
THEATRE ROOM OPERATING SPACE
3 FOR THEATRE ROOM
STAGE 10
4 LAVATORY
LIBRARY AND 11
INFORMATION AREA COURTYARD
5 12
WORKSHOP ROOM MACHINE ROOM
6 13
OFFICE FIRE TANK
SITE PLAN
7 14
WAITING ROOM TANK OF RAINWATER
FOR REUSE

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 45


PROJECTS

Architect Djuhara + Djuhara


Indonesia

Wisnu House

Energy-efficient and cleverly designed, the Wisnu House in Pondok Gede,


Indonesia by Djuhara + Djuhara promotes a very human way of
living while adhering to the constraints of a modest budget.

ad-hocism
46 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects

at its best
PROJECTS
WISNU HOUSE DJUHARA+DJUHARA

Nugroho Wisnu and Tri Sundari, the then soon-to-be owners of the Wisnu House
knew what they were looking for when they consulted Indonesian firm Djuhara +
Djuhara about building their dream property. The client initially purchased the land
that he had been living on in a tiny 26-metre house. Measuring 78-metres within a
high-density housing area in a Jakarta suburb, the originally acquired land eventually
grew to encompass a total of 250 sqm after Wisnu managed to buy up the remaining
land behind his house. After investing a great deal of capital on the land, a limited
budget was left when it came time to renovate the actual house. Ahmad Djuhara,
principal of the Djuhara + Djuhara, had been earning accolades for his work on the low
budget Sugiharto Steel House. As Wisnu’s initial preference for the architect in charge
of the project, Djuhara appeared to be the perfect choice.

The concept was at once simple and unconventional: build a floating box as a means
of sheltering an open space on the ground floor, bringing to mind a modern interpreta-
tion of the traditional rumah panggung or platform house. The open-air concept of the
living room also promotes natural ventilation, encouraging the inhabitants to minimise
the use of air-conditioning. The living and dining area have been situated on the first
level while the bedrooms, a sitting room and study are housed on the second floor for
ample privacy. The feeling of open space further extends outwards into the house’s
surrounds; the main front gate serves as an adjustable barrier, opening up to create
a spacious connection between the house, communal garden and badminton court.

Still bearing in mind the restraints of the budget, Djuhara chose to employ the use of
concrete columns, beams and slabs as main components of the basic structure - at
the time of construction, concrete structure was reportedly cheaper than its steel
counterpart. The challenge of creating a lightweight structure was overcome by craft-
ing the second floor out of a lightweight steel framing and metal deck roof. To shield
Location
Pondok Gede, Bekasi, Indonesia the house from the effects of the hot sun, a screen composed of reclaimed wood was
Architect purposefully implemented on the front facade of the box.
Ahmad Djuhara (Djuhara + Djuhara)
Interior Designer
Ahmad Djuhara (Djuhara + Djuhara) Other repercussions arising from the natural elements were also considered. In order
Project Team
M Lukman Hidayat to keep the rain at bay while simultaneously facilitating the presence of sunlight, the
Imron Yusuf project team created a 600 mm gap which would allow excess rainwater to flow directly
3D Illustration
Imron Yusof into the gutter, preventing any leakage concerns. The design also took into considera-
Structure tion the well-being of the inhabitants, including the servants living in-house. Eschew-
Eduard Sirait
Contractors ing a layout typical to most houses of its like in Indonesia, the designers opted to
Eduard Sirait locate the servants’ quarters in the front of the house. This pragmatic restructuring of
Alex Gandung
Andi Linardi typology not only grants the servants easier access to the general space, it also allows
Ujang them to enjoy ample sunlight and ventilation while fulfilling their daily domestic duties
Nurhayat
Supri within the home.
Built Area
215 sqm
Site Area
242 sqm
Project Duration
2005 to 2007
Cost of Project
RP 200 0000 000
Client
Nugroho Wisnu and Tri Sundari
architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 47
The concept was at once simple and from top
The design achieves a

unconventional: build a floating box as gentle transition from


inside to outside; the
cleverly devised layout

a means of sheltering an open space on makes the most out of


the limited site area

the ground floor, bringing to mind a


modern interpretation of the traditional
rumah panggung or platform house.

48 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS
WISNU HOUSE DJUHARA+DJUHARA

FRONT ELEVATION SIDE ELEVATION


0 5

SECTION 1

ROOF

MASTER BEDROOM BEDROOM BEDROOM SITTING ROOM

SECTION 2

LEVEL 1

SECTION 3

MAID ROOM

LIVING ROOM
PARKING DINING ROOM

SECTION 4 SECTION 5
0 5

GROUND LEVEL GARDEN


0 5

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 49


PROJECTS

a house
reborned

Architect all (zone)


Thailand

Pim’s Guesthouse and Ceramic Studio

The resourceful renovation and transformation of a small 70-year old wooden


house in Bangkok by local firm all (zone) fittingly reiterates the idea that less
is more.

50 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS
PIM’S GUESTHOUSE AND CERAMIC STUDIO ALL (ZONE)

Originally built as a family house on a large plot of land measuring about 1600 sqm,
the structure in question was initially sited in an area that was previously considered
a faraway suburb of Bangkok. Over time as the plot evolved into a middle class resi-
dential development, the house, having been converted into maid’s quarters and a
space for storage, was well on its way to complete deterioration. The family’s decision
to keep the original structure and renovate the house was reinforced by their desire to
retain a sense of the authenticity in a neighbourhood that was fast becoming gentri-
fied by the emergence of expensive condominiums.

A critical part of the design strategy revolved around minimising the usage of new ma-
terials. Opting to re-use and reassemble much of the original structure, the designers’
intention was to allocate a larger portion of the overall budget to labour costs in an
effort to benefit the low-waged builders who worked on the project. The restructuring
of the dissembled materials also meant that the design and building process had to
amalgamate as virtually nothing could be planned out beforehand in the architects’
drawings. Hence all (zone) found themselves working quite intensely with both the
contractor, carpenters and owners in order to arrive at the end result.

After ‘dismantling’ the house into parts, a main structure, reinforced with steel, was
initially erected as the framework for the reassembled pieces. While the second storey
of the house more or less retained its shape, the first storey was stripped of walls,
doors and windows and transformed into a traditional open air living space or sala,
alleviating the need to return the building to a time when houses were naturally venti-
lated. Layers of paint peeling off the surface of the structure were deliberately left as
is to serve as an aesthetic reminder of the house’s history.

Leftover materials from the renovation such as the wooden planks, door and window
frames were enterprisingly used in the construction of a small open-air ceramic studio
located in the compound’s garden. Like the adjoining house, the studio’s main struc-
ture is composed of steel which serves as a connective element with respect to reas-
sembling the salvaged materials. In enlisting the skills of local carpenters, the sensi-
bility typical of vernacular Thai buildings was cultivated throughout the entire project,
once again placing emphasis on the extensive history behind the original house.

Moving beyond budget concerns, the resourceful execution of the project more sig-
nificantly arose out of a need to achieve several planned objectives: to minimise the
impact on the environment by re-using and recycling materials, to create a naturally
ventilated home that would stand in stark contrast to the air-conditioned spaces which
have become the norm in the city, and finally, to endow the realisation of the project
with a sense of social responsibility by drawing attention to the plight of underpaid
workers in Thailand.

all images
The house and studio
combine the best of
the past and present

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 51


In enlisting the skills of local
carpenters, the sensibility A ceramic studio was

typical of vernacular Thai created out of materials


leftover from the
renovaion of the house

buildings was cultivated


throughout the entire project,
once again placing emphasis
on the extensive history
behind the original house.
PROJECTS
PIM’S GUESTHOUSE AND CERAMIC STUDIO ALL (ZONE)

STUDIO

HOUSE
Project Team WORKING
Rachaporn Choochuey
Sorawit Klaimak
Isara Chanpoldee MULTIPURPOSE
Namkhang Anomasiri AREA
Total site Area
1600 sqm
Total Floor Area
215 sqm
SITE PLAN Budget HOUSE SECTION 1
0 40m

USD60 000
Engineer
CM One Co Ltd -
Somnuk Chatayanoon
Somchai Kadpudpong
Contractor
Terdsak Tassayarn
Duration of Project TERRACE FOYER
June 2007 to June 2008
Client
Sudhikam Family
MULTIPURPOSE AREA WC MULTIPURPOSE AREA

A B C D E
7 6 5 4

3 2 1
STUDIO SECTION
0 2m
HOUSE SECTION 2
0 2m

A B C D E
WORKING BEDROOM

STORAGE OVEN
1

FOYER TERRACE
WC

2
WORKING AREA

HOUSE SECOND FLOOR PLAN

MULTIPURPOSE AREA

MULTIPURPOSE AREA

WC

UP

STUDIO PLAN
0 2m

HOUSE GROUND FLOOR PLAN


0 2m

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 53


Designed by Makoto Tanijiri of the young Japanese practice, Suppose Design
Studio, a thoughtfully crafted suburban residence channels the feeling of living
in a more organic environment.

skewed
perspectives
54 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects
PROJECTS

Architect Suppose Design Studio


Japan

House in Fukawa

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 55


PROJECTS
HOUSE IN FUKAWA SUPPOSE DESIGN STUDIO

Situated in the suburbs of Hiroshima, Suppose Design Studio’s recently built House in
Fukawa was designed specifically to accommodate a family of four. Due to the abun-
dance of traffic around the site, the main challenge was in creating a residence which
could function successfully as both a closed and open space. Bearing this objective in
mind, the architects reasoned that in order for the house to maintain an internal sense
of spaciousness while remaining walled-off from the chaos of the outside world, an
illusion of infinite space had to be conveyed through the design of the interiors.

Working with a limited site area, each space had to be carefully devised so that it
could act as a catalyst for the one situated next to it. A staircase stands at the heart
of the house, surrounded by walls and built up towards the ceiling. In the narrative
of the design, it is clear that its role is that of a main character, the pivotal focus of
the entire structure itself. Spaces are randomly located at various levels and angles,
reinforcing the perception that every room appears to have been fashioned using the
pillar as a point of origin. The unusual structuring of the interiors allude to spaces at
the top of each room which harbour the potential to be utilised as multiple ‘terraces’,
giving inhabitants additional points of engagement.

Non-standardised clusters of spaces – two entwined rooms, two entwined terraces,


and a room combined with a terrace – contribute greatly to the dynamic sensibility of
the house. Aside from enlarging the perspectives of the interiors through the layering
of the rooms, the architects had also hoped to simulate the peaceful experience of
residing within a more natural environment; the organic nature of the interior layout
was inspired by the sublime act of lingering beneath a leafy tree and gazing upwards
to attain a sense of eternity.

The unusual structuring of the


interiors allude to spaces at
the top of each room which
harbour the potential to be
utilised as multiple ‘terraces’,
giving inhabitants additional
points of engagement.
56 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects
Makoto Tanijiri’s unusual
design breaks up the
conventional layout of the
Japanese family house
all images
Intimate alcoves are
created out of the non-
standardised clustering
of rooms

58 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS
HOUSE IN FUKAWA SUPPOSE DESIGN STUDIO

12

3-2F FLOOR PLAN

SOUTH ELEVATION
0 1 2 3m

14

1
ENTRANCE
11 16
2
LIVING
3
DINING
4
10 KITCHEN
5
BEDROOM
6
STOCK
7
BATHROOM
8
3-1F FLOOR PLAN WC
9
TERRACE 01
10
TERRACE 02
11
LOFT 01
13
12
LOFT 02
EAST ELEVATION 9 13
CLOAK 01
14
15
CLOAK 02
15
KIDSROOM 01
16
KIDSROOM 02

Designer and principal


2F FLOOR PLAN Makoto Tanijiri
Client
Kenta Kubo
Location
Hiroshima Japan
8 Built Area
12 114 sqm
4
Date of Completion
6 7 May 2010
9 Photographer
11 3 Yano Toshiyuki
1
5
10
2

3 2 1

SECTION 1F FLOOR PLAN


0 1 2 3m

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 59


housing hope

Architect Sheran Henry Associates


Sri Lanka

Tsunami Housing Development at


Payagalawatta, Kalutara

60 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS

A social housing scheme devised for low-income families in a Tsunami-


devastated area of Sri Lanka came as a much-needed respite for displaced
inhabitants.

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 61


PROJECTS
TSUNAMI HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AT PAYAGALAWATTA, KALUTARA SHERAN HENRY ASSOCIATES

Realised by Sri Lankan architect Sheran Henry, the scheme for the Tsunami Hous-
ing Development at Payagalawatta, Kalutara consists of 18 housing units located on
10 perches. The task at hand was to generate a low-cost housing scheme for low-
income families who happened to be victims of a tsunami that ravaged the area. The
objective was to study the lifestyles of this unique group of people and devise a series
of feasible spaces based on the research. The resulting development facilitates social
interactions by incorporating pockets of communal gathering spaces within the hous-
ing clusters. The scheme is part of a proposed village master plan consisting of 150
houses. The master plan simultaneously incorporates recreational areas, commercial
activities, community and religious activities.

The cluster of 18 houses is set along a linear pedestrian pathway, forming pockets of
community gathering spaces, including two shophouses. Each unit is made up of a
large verandah space, two bedrooms, a kitchen and a toilet. The kitchen, recognised
as the domain of the women folk, was located closer to the garden to allow mothers
to watch over their children as they played outside. The bedrooms have been tucked
in for more privacy while a covered toilet can be accessed from the outside in keeping
with traditional planning practices. Consideration was also given to the possible ex-
pansion of the houses by extended families by positioning the houses along an edge
of the site for ample garden space.

Concrete grills along the façade allow for the house to be ventilated via natural means.
In addition to the grills, the roof promotes ventilation through gaps between the raft-
ers, purposefully left uncovered to enable the passage of air. Most walls, finished with
a rough plaster, have been outfitted with coconut vertical sections in order to enhance
cross-ventilation. A simple single pitch roof composed of coconut timber rafters is
clad with Calicut tiles. Another significant aspect of each unit is in the lighting of the
interiors. Flooded with ample daylight, the use of electricity is minimised. The over-
all design of these simple houses bears in mind the importance of inner and outer
spaces in a traditional context, existing as an apt architectural response to the vast
paddy field and rubber estates that surround this scheme.

62 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


The objective was to study the all images
The development

lifestyles of this unique group of incorporates a cluster


of 18 houses set along
a linear pedestrian

people and devise a series of pathway

feasible spaces based on the


research. The resulting development
facilitates social interactions by
incorporating pockets of communal
gathering spaces within the
housing clusters.
64 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects
PROJECTS
TSUNAMI HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AT PAYAGALAWATTA, KALUTARA SHERAN HENRY ASSOCIATES

SITE PLAN
0 15 30 50 150m

LAYOUT PLAN

FRONT ELEVATION REAR ELEVATION SECTION


0 5m

Location
Pepiliyawatta Sri Lanka
Dates of Construction
September 2006
Principal Architect
Sheran Henry
Structural Engineer
K P Piyasena
Architectural Assistant
Thanushka Wijayapala
Write-up Research
Dilini Mapagunaratne
Land area
10 perches per house
Floor area
61 sqm per house
Cost
Rs 12 500 000
Client
The Lion Brewery Ceylon Limited-
Rehabilitation programme

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


0 5m
Architect Jason Pomeroy
Malaysia

The Sime Darby Idea House

Designed by architect Jason Pomeroy, The Sime Darby Idea House is conceived
as a test bed for new ideas, showcasing the latest in sustainable architecture in
its designer’s quest to devise the first carbon zero residence in South East Asia.

66 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS

eco-living
redefined

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 67


An understanding of the needs of the Malaysian demographic, coupled with due re-
spect of the expansion and contraction of the family nucleus, finds its expression in
the Idea House as a fully adaptable dwelling. Void spaces can be transformed into
additional living or sleeping spaces as the family expands. These spaces can even be
removed as the children grow up and leave home. An open-plan living format allows
for a more flexible lifestyle, promoting the internal / external adaptation of spaces to
suit the families’ requirements in terms of work, play and everyday life.

The environmental agenda is rigorously pursued with the installation of innovative


active systems which include BIPV cells, rainwater harvesters, ‘grey water’ manage-
ment system and low energy appliances. Ultimately, a back-to-basics approach to
the environmental strategy underpins the design; the building is carefully orientated
to minimise heat gain and enhance cross ventilation while deep overhangs have been
installed to provide shade and respite from the sun and tropical showers.

Such social and environmental responses also contribute to the building’s economic
efficiency. By using a modern method of construction (prefabrication and modulari-
sation), a speedier construction process is enabled, saving time and alleviating the
financial / resource burden. The modular frame and construction also allows the de-
velopment, if necessary, to be demounted at any point to preserve the terrain for
future generations and / or future development.

The promotion of clean renewable energies in the scheme also mitigates the reliance
on artificial / mechanical means of lighting and cooling, reducing energy costs. The
commitment to keep the design green even extends to often underlooked areas such
as the driveway and parking spaces: instead of conventionally applying asphalt or
concrete tiles in this areas, a lightweight, recyclable plastic grid structure – specially
designed to stabilise and support soil and turf – is installed.

To increase the wireless integration of the community, and hence the impact of trans-
port requirements, the Idea House incoporates Cisco’s Smart+Connected solutions.
The solutions involve communities in real-time information exchange while facilitating
interactions and access to virtual resources that help spur on social, economic and
environmental sustainability efforts. For example, the safety and security system, ac-
cessible from any display device, heightens situational awareness of the occupants,
while the unified communication system functions as a single communication infra-
structure to serve multiple needs for information access, communication or even as a
lighting control panel, hence enabling reusability and sustainability.

An Integrated Building Management System (IBMS) has also been implemented to


enable inhabitants control over the systems within Idea House in the case of security,
HVAC, kitchen appliances and telecommunication. Furthermore, the IBMS doubles as
an environmental dashboard for the management of running costs, energy consump-
tion and generation (via BIPV), water consumption and comfort levels within the Idea
House.

Overall, the Idea House demonstrates the importance of having a sustainable process
in place in order to deliver a truly sustainable product. The structure draws upon the
combined expertise of some of the world’s leading technology and solutions provid-
ers, specifically, architects, engineers, landscape designers, urbanists, contractors
and suppliers, culminating in a design that reinterprets the Malay Kampung house in
its ability to respond to the tropical context whilst embracing clean technologies with
the impetus of achieving carbon neutrality.

68 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS
THE SIME DARBY IDEA HOUSE JASON POMEROY

1 13
ENTRANCE FOYER CAR PORCH
2 14
23 GUEST BEDROOM / TP STAIRS
ROOM 15
21 3 MASTER BEDROOM
22
GUEST BATH 16
4 MASTER BATH
20 LIVING AREA 17
19
5 FAMILY AREA
DINING AREA 18
6 FUTURE EXPANSION
void
DRY KITCHEN 19
18 7 BEDROOM
WET KITCHEN 20
8 BATH 2
17 BATH 1 21
9 BATH 3
15 STORAGE 22
16 10 ROOF GARDEN (FUTURE
UTILITY ROOM EXPANSION)
11 23
14 OUTDOOR DECK BALCONY
12
POWER ROOM

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

Architect
Jason Pomeroy
Architect of Record
Alizar Architect
Typology
Eco-friendly bungalow
13 02 03 Rooms
3 +1 (expandable to 5 +1)
12 bedrooms 5 bathrooms
Site Location
04
Denai Alam Shah Alam Selangor
01 Lot Area
05 3431 sqm
Gross Floor Area
710 sqm
06
07
Net Floor Area
11
08 586 sqm
09 Construction method
10
MMC (Modern Method of
Construction)
09 Client
Sime Darby Property Berhad
Civil & Structural
Mohd Asbi & Associates
Mechanical & Electrical Consultant
Perunding Eagles Engineer
GROUND FLOOR PLAN
0 5m 10m Landscape Architect
Clouston Design
Planner
Mohd Asbi & Associates
ESD Consultant
Aurecon Singapore
Main Contractor
Shimizu Corporation
Branding and Digital
Communication
Thinkscape Group

An open-plan living format allows


for a more flexible lifestyle,
promoting the internal / external
adaptation of spaces to suit the
families’ requirements in terms of
work, play and everyday life.
a refreshed
take

The newly installed BAKITA bar-lounge and restaurant in one of Kuala Lumpur’s
most happening areas by local firm, ArchiCentre Sdn Bhd makes the most out
of a run-down, historic structure.

70 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects


PROJECTS

Architect ArchiCentre Sdn Bhd


Malaysia

BAKITA Bar

Façade, corner view: The outer fencing


wall mimics the building envelope,
allowing visual transparency yet shielding
the Forecourt.

architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 71


Emerging from the remnants of a dilapidated 1950’s shophouse, the recently built
BAKITA makes a much-welcomed addition to the Changkat Bukit Bintang neighbour-
hood, the most bustling nightspot in Kuala Lumpur. The name, BAKITA literally trans-
lates as ‘our own bar’, having come about as a combination of the words ‘bar’ and
‘kita’, a Malay word for ‘our’ or ‘us’.

Located on a corner lot just off the main strip, the ArchiCentre-designed bar-lounge
and restaurant’s strategic locale and expansion towards adjacent streets allow for
a clear linkage to be created between the enclave it resides in and Changkat Bukit
Bintang. The corner lot location also affords BAKITA two sides of elevation and an all-
encompassing 20-foot strip of forecourt which was subsequently transformed into a
timber-decked outdoor beer garden on the ground level.The brief called for a relaxed
and eclectic space which could simultaneously accommodate a combination of both
male and female guests while allowing for gender-specific ‘refuge points’ wherein
men or women could retreat to. Consequently, three disparate spaces were derived
from these specifications: a ‘masculine’ bar on the ground level, a ‘feminine’ cocktail
lounge on the first floor and an alfresco dining/drinking area. The unique ambiance
associated with each space, ranging from the tropical sensibility of the forecourt,
the Neo-Industrial feel of the beer bar to the cosmopolitan sleekness of the cocktail
lounge, is directly indicative of the establishment’s multifaceted nature and aesthetic.

Upon first glance, BAKITA’s façade remains one of the most striking elements of the
overall design. Expanded metal used to envelop the existing balcony on the first floor
became something of a reiterated motif throughout, framed by rhythmic repetitions of
triangulated panels. Though seemingly random in placement, the sheets’ formation
came about as a strategic way of reducing material wastage while metal was utilised
as a way of filtering glare and creating a voyeuristic feel. Existing aspects of the build-
ing such as the original soldier-bond balcony balustrade and masonary ventilation
grilles above doorways were retained to establish a connection with the past and
present. Steel columns mounted on individual footings and buttressed against the
existing structure play multiple functions, supporting the expanded metal envelope
and new eave overhang and bar equipment loading on the balcony and acting as an
encasement for piped rain water during rainy periods.

The presence of nature is heightened in the alfresco forecourt, an area leveled by two
large planar surfaces to correspond with the fluctuating levels of the road on the front
and side. Rain trees lean towards the building envelope, offering a foliaged canopy
over the forecourt and creating a visual synergy with the outdoor chengal wood furni-
ture. To generate additional seating area, the brick fencing wall surrounding the fore-
court was lowered to open up the previously cloistered space, giving way to seating
ledges between the posts. Large openings surrounding the industrial-themed beer
bar entice passing visitors. This area is complemented with a 18m-long bar finished
in black granite and polished chrome workmen stools which strike up a contrast with
the bar and rectilinear workbench steel tables.

The masculine vibe of the beer bar also stands in stark juxtaposition with the cocktail
lounge which has been envisioned as a communal living room, enabling casual inter-
actions. Anointed with a sharp colour palette, the space is laden with shades of grey
that permeate the ceiling, raw cement rendered columns and polished cement floor.
The grey is punctuated with a scarlet wall which defines the rear as an intimate nook
for small parties or gatherings. The lounge features a well-blended mix of modern
and classical with respect to furniture and interior fittings. Strip windows along the
two elevations welcome a panoramic view of the urban landscape. Peripheral seating
facing the view outside redefines the spatial experience of the central area, enhanced
by a drop ceiling which facilitates essential cooling, ventilation and lighting. As a apt
finishing touch, a glass-encased lightwell sets the mood with its diffusing of natural
daylight and reflective play on the stainless steel mosaic-clad bar counter, generating
a multi-chromatic experience for all.
PROJECTS
BAKITA BAR ARCHICENTRE SDN BJD

1
BEER GARDEN
7 9
2
BEER BAR
3
BEER MACHINE
4
TOILETS 18
5
KITCHEN
B 20 B
6
OUTDOOR KITCHEN
7
STORAGE 18
19
8
LIQUOR STORAGE
9
LIGHT WELL 18
10
STAIR CASE
11 A
PRIVATE LOUNGE
ELEVATION 12 ROOF PLAN
OFFICE
13
TOILETS
14
LOUNGE AREA
15
RAISED PLATFORM
16
BAR
17 17
DJ CONSOLE 12 9
18
FLAT ROOF
19
CAVE EXTENSION 13 14 15 16
20
METAL DARK ROOF

B 11 B
10

18

18

SECTION FIRST FLOOR PLAN


1m 2m 3m

from top Client


Raised timber platform WishWonder Sdn Bhd
of the cocktail lounge Architect/ Interior
bar; nature and built Designer
form converse: the urban ArchiCentre Sdn Bhd
raintrees interact with the Project Team 9
3
building, leaning towards Ar Dexter Koh
the envelope, offering a Esther Lau 1
natural foliaged canopy Andrew Yit
over the forecourt; Contractor 5 4 2
clusters of eclectically TK Woon Construction
mixed modern and Date of Completion B 10 8 B
classical furniture, June 2010
cocktail Lounge Photo Credits 6
H Lin Ho Photography
1
7

Expanded metal used A

to envelop the existing


GROUND FLOOR PLAN
1m 2m 3m

balcony on the first


floor became something
of a reiterated motif
throughout, framed by architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 73

rhythmic repetitions of
triangulated panels.
in top form

Young Japanese firm Mount Fuji Architects Studio turned typically limiting
budget constraints into a winning factor with the XXXX House by side-stepping
a few conventions with respect to structure and process.
PROJECTS

Architect Mount Fuji Architects Studio


JAPAN

XXXX House
Much like the design rationale behind the work itself, the initial coming to being of the
XXXX House came about in a rather roundabout way: instead of opting to buy a Toy-
ota sedan for his business, the client decided on a less pragmatic use for his money
- an atelier which could serve as a gallery for his ceramic art collection. A mere 1.5 mil-
lion yen - the amount needed to purchase the car - however, didn’t exactly leave much
room for options when it came to building architecture of a conventional scale. Yet for
the architects faced with the project, the sum was still considered substantial enough
to create an everyday object that could enhance one’s life. In this instance, could a
compromise be properly achieved? Tasked with this challenge, Mount Fuji Architects
Studio found themselves reinventing the architectural rules and putting their capacity
for resourceful-thinking to the ultimate test.

A drastically scaled-down budget also meant that contractors were exempted from
the picture altogether, requiring the architects to take on the actual building process
on their own, with the exception of a few more complex procedures whereby the
expertise of specialised technicians was sought. To minimise costs, the client, who
stemmed from a ship- and boat-building background, even pitched in to help con-
struct the structure. A total of three days were allocated for the design and construc-
tion of the project. Essentially, the team was given a short amount of time to source
for the most inexpensive material and devise a way to create a fully functional space
using the most effective means possible.

With respect to material, structural plywood was utilised for the main framework; as
a highly distributed dimensional lumber in japan, it proved to be the perfect choice.
The building process primarily involved gluing four to five sheets of plywood together
to create a panel while maintaining a width of 900mm, culminating in a main structure
consisting of pillar, beam and brace. For the floor, wall and ceiling, the finishing mate-
rial included insulation, roof truss and material. By inclining even frames to the left
and odd frames to the right, the framework was joined to form an X-shaped structure
wherein an astylar tubular space was achieved with punctuated triangle-shaped slits
that facilitate natural lighting. The repetitive X-shaped unit also bore an appeal because
of the enhanced possibility to expand the structure in the future; one merely needs to
add on yet another frame. Monocoque construction was purposefully implemented to
simultaneously reduce costs and minimise the building process, reinforcing the value
of the design. Finally, the presence of sunlight and natural breeze renders the structure
fully whole by adding a metaphysical dimension to the final form, endowing both inte-
rior and exterior with an otherworldly ambiance.

By inclining even frames to


the left and odd frames to
the right, the framework
was joined to form an X-
shaped structure wherein
an astylar tubular space was
achieved with punctuated
triangle-shaped slits that
facilitate natural lighting.
PROJECTS
Location
Yaizu Shizuoka XXXX HOUSE MOUNT FUJI ARCHITECTS STUDIO
Japan
Site Area
503 sqm
Building Area
22 sqm
Total Floor Area
17 sqm
Number of
Stories
1
Building Height
3m
Structural
System
Wood Panels
Major Materials
Structural
Plywood
(Exterior and
interior)

SECTION L FRAME (#2.4.6.8) SECTION R FRAME (#1.3.5.7)

0 1m 2m 5m

NATURAL PARK

FIRST CONSTRUCTION SECOND CONSTRUCTION

OLIVE TREE

FRAME 8
900

WORKING TERRACE
8 KILN
FRAME 7
900

FRAME 6
900

FRAME 5
900

ATELIER
7200

FRAME 4
900

GALLERY
4
900

FRAME 3
4500

3
900

FRAME 2
2

FRAME 1
900

1
ENTRANCE
500

(GL+50) (GL±0)

2000 1210 1210 1380


2420

a b c

AREA FOR EXPANSION

PLAN
0 1m 2m 3m 4m 5m 10m

A ‘gallery’ for the client’s


ceramic art collection
was created by putting
the architects’ penchant
to resourceful thinking to
the test
architecture asia january / february / march 2011 projects 77
BOOKS Contemporary
Architecture
in China:
Buildings and
Projects
2000 – 2020
Author Christian Dubrau
Publisher Page One

Without a doubt, modern China Contemporary Architecture in


continues to remain a stark point China enables one a thorough
of fascination for architecture insight into the country’s ongoing
enthusiasts all over the world. building boom. Simultaneously,
Its seemingly relentless pace the volume raises questions as
of urbanisation, initially kick- to how China’s present
started by the 2008 Beijing developments might affect the
Olympic games and consequently global community at large over
perpetuated by the 2010 the foreseeable future. Over 30 of
Shanghai Expo, have contributed China’s most successful projects
to so-called ‘mega-cities’ which realised by Chinese as well as
hark back to the industrialisation international architects are richly
age of North America and Europe portrayed throughout the book’s
in the 19th century. pages, making it a lavish feast
for the eyes in addition to ample
Featuring thought-provoking fodder for thought.
essays by Arno Sighart Schmid,
author Christian Dubrau and
Brigitta Hahn-Melcher,

78 architecture asia january / february / march 2011 books


Traditional
Japanese
Japan’s carefully cultivated
aesthetic sensibility has long
growth with respect to building.
What is made apparent through
Architecture:
sustained its international
reputation as one of the foremost
producers of elegant design. Its
Locher’s writings is the concept
of an underlying narrative within
each element of Japanese archi-
An Exploration
penchant for referencing classic
traditions while bracing itself
against the changing zeitgeist
tecture; every part of a building
tells its own story regardless of
function and size. A thoughtful
of Elements
throughout the ages has
particularly served the country
well as far as nurturing its
foreword by Japanese architect
Kengo Kuma touches on the
importance of wood throughout
and Forms
contemporary developments in the country’s architectural history,
Author Mira Locher
architecture. reinforcing Japan’s long-term
fascination with the potential of Photograhy Ben Simmons
Author Mira Locher’s well-informed materiality – an aspect which is Publisher Tuttle Publishing
volume, Traditional Japanese meticulously examined within
Architecture: An Exploration of Lochner’s writings.
Elements and Forms, pays tribute
to the age-old practices that Available in all leading bookstores
have significantly contributed to for USD39.95.
Japan’s cultural and aesthetic
‘datum’,
–noun plural data. See also data.
1 a piece of information. an assumption or premise from
which inferences may be drawn.
2 a fixed starting point of a scale or operation.

JULY 2011
Its been quite a ride…

DATUM:KL, which started in 2003, will now be the name of an exciting and ambitious new PAM
initiative, the 2011 Kuala Lumpur Architecture Festival. Having grown over the years and now in
its ninth year, Datum:KL is restructured and up-cycled as a month long multi-programme
platform to be held throughout July 2011.

The Festival aims to bring forth wider cultural aspects of the discipline onto the public domain and
to invigorate the city of Kuala Lumpur into new and purposeful dialogues. For the month of July,
Datum:KL will frame a moment of architectural intensity, propositions and conversations. A
comprehensive series of conferences, exhibitions, workshops, forums, events, etc., has been
planned with your participation in mind. Watch this space...

Ang Chee Cheong


Datum:KL Curator

www.datumkl.my
(from 20 May onwards)

DATUM:KL & NOW IS ORGANISED BY KUALA LUMPUR


ARCHITECTURE
FESTIVAL IS
SUPPORTED BY
www.facebook.com/datumkl2011 www.twitter.com/datumkl2011

Dewan Bandaraya
Kuala Lumpur