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Output in

ICT
Submitted to:
Mr. Protacio Dela Cuesta III
Submitted by:
Jenny Babes Vigo
Formula Errors
##### error | #NAME? error | #VALUE! error | #DIV/0! error | #REF! error
When your cell contains this error code, the column isn't wide enough to display the value.

1. Click on the right border of the column A header and increase the column width.

Tip: double click the right border of the column A header to automatically fit the widest entry in column A.

#NAME? error
The #NAME? error occurs when Excel does not recognize text in a formula.

1. Simply correct SU to SUM.


#VALUE! error
Excel displays the #VALUE! error when a formula has the wrong type of argument.

1a. Change the value of cell A3 to a number.


1b. Use a function to ignore cells that contain text.

#DIV/0! error
Excel displays the #DIV/0! error when a formula tries to divide a number by 0 or an empty cell.

1a. Change the value of cell A2 to a value that is not equal to 0.


1b. Prevent the error from being displayed by using the logical function IF.

Explanation: if cell A2 equals 0, an empty string ("") is displayed. If not, the result of the formula A1/A2 is
displayed.
#REF! error
Excel displays the #REF! error when a formula refers to a cell that is not valid.

1. Cell C1 references cell A1 and cell B1.

2. Delete column B. To achieve this, right click the column B header and click Delete.

3. Select cell B1. The reference to cell B1 is not valid anymore.

4. To fix this error, you can either delete +#REF! in the formula of cell B1 or you can undo your action by
pressing CTRL + z

Sumif
Sumif with Numeric Criteria
You can use the SUMIF function in Excel to sum cells based on numbers that meet specific criteria.

1. For example, the SUMIF function below (two arguments) sums values in the range A1:A5 that are less than
or equal to 10.
2. The following SUMIF function gives the exact same result. The & operator joins the 'less than or equal
to' symbol and the value in cell C1.

3. The SUMIF function below (three arguments, last argument is the range to sum) sums values in the
range B1:B5 if the corresponding cells in the range A1:A5 contain the value 25.

4. The following SUMIF function gives the exact same result (second argument refers to cell D1).

Standard Deviation
Standard deviation is a number that tells you how far numbers are from their mean.

1. For example, the numbers below have a mean (average) of 10.


Explanation: the numbers are all the same which means there's no variation. As a result, the numbers have
a standard deviation of zero. The STDEV function is an old function. Microsoft Excel recommends using
the new STEDV.S function which produces the exact same result.

 2. The numbers below also have a mean (average) of 10.

Explanation: the numbers are close to the mean. As a result, the numbers have a low standard deviation.

3. The numbers below also have a mean (average) of 10.

Explanation: the numbers are spread out. As a result, the numbers have a high standard deviation.

COUNTIF and COUNTIFS


For conditional counts, the COUNTIF function can apply one criteria. The COUNTIFS
function can apply multiple criteria at the same time:

=COUNTIF(C5:C12,"red") // count red


=COUNTIF(F5:F12,">50") // count total > 50
=COUNTIFS(C5:C12,"red",D5:D12,"TX") // red and tx
=COUNTIFS(C5:C12,"blue",F5:F12,">50") // blue > 50
SUM, SUMIF, SUMIFS
To sum everything, use the SUM function. To sum conditionally, use SUMIF or
SUMIFS. Following the same pattern as the counting functions,
the SUMIF function can apply only one criteria while the SUMIFS function can apply
multiple criteria.

=SUM(F5:F12) // everything
=SUMIF(C5:C12,"red",F5:F12) // red only
=SUMIF(F5:F12,">50") // over 50
=SUMIFS(F5:F12,C5:C12,"red",D5:D12,"tx") // red & tx
=SUMIFS(F5:F12,C5:C12,"blue",F5:F12,">50") // blue & >50

SUMIFS Function

SUMIFS is a function to sum cells that meet multiple criteria. SUMIFS can be used to
sum values when adjacent cells meet criteria based on dates, numbers, and text. SUMIFS
supports logical operators (>,<,<>,=) and wildcards (*,?) for partial matching.
Purpose 
 Sum cells that match multiple criteria

Return value 

 The sum of the cells that meet all criteria

Syntax 

 =SUMIFS (sum_range, range1, criteria1, [range2], [criteria2], ...)

Arguments 

 sum_range - The range to be summed.


 range1 - The first range to evaulate.
 criteria1 - The criteria to use on range1.
 range2 - [optional] The second range to evaluate.
 criteria2 - [optional] The criteria to use on range2.

Usage notes 
Excel's SUMIFS function sums cells in a range using supplied criteria. Unlike the SUMIF
function, SUMIFS can apply more than one set of criteria, with more than one range. The
first range is the range to be summed. The criteria are supplied in pairs (range/criteria)
and only the first pair is required. For additional criteria, supply an additional
range/criteria pair. Up to 127 range/criteria pairs are allowed.

Examples
In the first example (I5), SUMIFS is configured to sum values in column F when the color in
column C is "red". In the second example (I6), SUMIFS is set to sum values in column F only
when the color is "red" and the state is Texas (TX).

=SUMIFS(F5:F11,C5:C11,"red") // sum if red


=SUMIFS(F5:F11,C5:C11,"red",D5:D11,"TX") // sum if red and TX
Statistical Functions
Average | Averageif | Median | Mode | Standard Deviation | Min | Max |
Average
To calculate the average of a group of numbers, use the AVERAGE function.

Averageif
To average cells based on one criteria, use the AVERAGEIF function. For example, to
calculate the average excluding zeros.

Median
To find the median (or middle number), use the MEDIAN function.

Check:
Mode
To find the most frequently occurring number, use the
v MODE function.

Standard Deviation
To calculate the standard deviation, use the STEDV function.

Note: standard deviation is a number that tells you how far numbers are from their mean.
Learn more about this topic on our page about standard deviation.

Min
To find the minimum value, use the MIN function.

Max
To find the maximum value, use the MAX function.
AVERAGE, AVERAGEIF, and AVERAGEIFS
Following the same pattern, you can calculate an average
with AVERAGE, AVERAGEIF, and AVERAGEIFS.

=AVERAGE(F5:F12) // all
=AVERAGEIF(C5:C12,"red",F5:F12) // red only
=AVERAGEIFS(F5:F12,C5:C12,"red",D5:D12,"tx") // red and tx

AND Function

The Excel AND function is a logical function used to require more than one condition
at the same time. AND returns either TRUE or FALSE. To test if a number in A1 is greater
than zero and less than 10, use =AND(A1>0,A1<10). The AND function can be used as the
logical test inside the IF function to avoid extra nested IFs, and can be combined with the
OR function.
Purpose 

 Test multiple conditions with AND

Return value 

 TRUE if all arguments evaluate TRUE; FALSE if not

Syntax 

 =AND (logical1, [logical2], ...)

Arguments 

 logical1 - The first condition or logical value to evaluate.


 logical2 - [optional] The second condition or logical value to evaluate.
Usage notes 

The AND function is used to apply more than one condition at the same time, up to
255 conditions. Each logical condition (logical1, logical2, etc.) must return TRUE or
FALSE, or be arrays or references that contain logical values.

Examples

To test if the value in A1 is greater than 0 and less than 5, use the following formula:

=AND(A1>0,A1<5)
You can embed the AND function inside the the IF function. Using the above example, you
can supply AND as the logical_test for the IF function like so:

=IF(AND(A1>0,A1<5), "Approved", "Denied")


This formula will return "Approved" only if the value in A1 is greater than 0 and less than 5.

You can combine the AND function with the OR function. The formula below returns TRUE
when A1 > 100 and B1 is "complete" or "pending":

=AND(A1>100,OR(B1="complete",B1="pending"))