Sie sind auf Seite 1von 16

 

Magazine 
Of  
Cardiologist 
 
 
Submitted by:
Rheil John S. Abcede
Submitted to:
Mr. Reil G. Baril
Introduction 
Cardiologists are doctors who specialize in diagnosing and
treating diseases or conditions of the heart and blood
vessels—the cardiovascular system. You might also visit a
cardiologist so you can learn about your risk factors for heart
disease and find out what measures you can take for better heart
health.

Cardiologist 
 
   
 
Nature of Work 
Cardiology
Cardiologists are doctors who diagnose, assess and treat patients
with diseases and defects of the heart and blood vessels (the
cardiovascular system).

Nature of the work


Cardiologists work with adult patients - paediatric cardiology is
a separate specialty.

Cardiologists manage patients with conditions such as:

angina (chest pain caused by narrowing of the coronary arteries)


arrhythmias, eg atrial fibrillation (irregularities heartbeat)
heart murmurs due to heart valve disease
cardiomyopathy (disease of the heart muscle) with heart failure
including pulmonary
oedema (accumulation of fluid)
coronary artery thrombosis or myocardial infarction (heart
attack) often associated with high blood pressure (hypertension)
and high cholesterol
diseases of the arteries (atherosclerosis, arteritis, atheroma)
hole in the heart and other forms of congenital heart disease
within adult lifeincluding transition from paediatric care and
shared care of pregnant women with heart disease
Much of the emphasis is on improving survival rates and quality
of life followingheart attacks, heart failure or heart rhythm
disorders; but cardiologists are also concerned with
understanding disease processes and disease prevention.

The specialty is at the cutting edge of new therapies and


technologies with emergency treatment often required. It also
includes palliative care at the end of life due to heart disease.

Common procedures and interventions


Cardiologists work with adult patients - paediatric cardiology is
a separate specialty.

Cardiologists manage patients with conditions such as:

angina (chest pain caused by narrowing of the coronary arteries)


arrhythmias, eg atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat)
heart murmurs due to heart valve disease
cardiomyopathy (disease of the heart muscle) with heart failure
including pulmonary
oedema (accumulation of fluid)
coronary artery thrombosis or myocardial infarction (heart
attack) often associated with high blood pressure (hypertension)
and high cholesterol
diseases of the arteries (atherosclerosis, arteritis, atheroma)
hole in the heart and other forms of congenital heart disease
within adult life including transition from paediatric care and
shared care of pregnant women with heart disease
Much of the emphasis is on improving survival rates and quality
of life following heart attacks, heart failure or heart rhythm
disorders; but cardiologists are also concerned with
understanding disease processes and disease prevention.

The specialty is at the cutting edge of new therapies and


technologies with emergency treatment often required. It also
includes palliative care at the end of life due to heart disease.

Sub-specialties
The CCT sub-specialty is:

stroke medicine
However, very few cardiologists choose stroke medicine as a
sub-specialty. A few cardiologists continue in unselected
medical take but most concentrate on emergency cardiology on
call. This is In keeping with the move away from the
single-handed general cardiologist model to a more team-based
sub-specialised approach.

Most cardiologists develop sub-specialty interests such as:

interventional cardiology
adult congenital heart disease
cardiac imaging
electrophysiology including ablation
electrical device therapy
heart failure including cardiac transplantation and support
devices
A significant proportion of cardiologists specialise in, or
continue a commitment to academic cardiology thereby
continuing to advance cardiovascular scientific knowledge and
therapeutic options.

There are also increasing new areas of sub-specialisation such as


inherited cardiac conditions, cardio-oncology and interventional
valve therapy
Duties and Responsibilities

This Cardiologist job description template includes the list of


most important Cardiologist 's duties and responsibilities. It is
customizable and ready to post to job boards. Use it to save
time, attract qualified candidates and hire best employees.
Cardiologist job description template

Cardiologist job profile


Cardiologists are doctors specialized in diagnosing, treating and
preventing diseases that mainly affect the heart and blood
vessels. Cardiologists usually work with a range of patients,
from babies and young infants through to the elderly.

In order to attract Cardiologist that best matches your needs, it is


very important to write a clear and precise Cardiologist job
description.

Cardiologist duties and responsibilities


Examine patients and assess their condition
Explain the risks of prohibited activities to patients
Give health advice to patients
Write proper prescriptions to treat chronic cardiovascular
diseases
Diagnose and evaluate patients with heart-related conditions
Perform surgical procedures on patients with heart-related
conditions
Measure and track the improvement of patients' health
Oversee and educate student residents
Command laboratory research
Ensure adherence to relevant laws and regulations
Cardiologist requirements
X years of experience as a cardiologist
Specialization in chronic heart conditions
Hands-on experience with the modern treatment techniques and
technologies trends
Licensed practitioner in the State of [X]
Medical Degree
Friendly attitude and team player
Excellent communication, interpersonal and leadership skills
Good organizational and time-management skills
Working condition 
Cardiologist Skills and Qualifications
Cardiologists should be compassionate and calm with patients, have
strong attention to detail, and be great at problem-solving and
decision-making. Typically, employers will require a bachelor’s
degree and medical degree, along with several years of residency
training and the following abilities:
Attention to detail – a cardiologist’s work is incredibly detailed and
requires precision, both in a surgical sense and when prescribing
treatments to patients. Cardiologists need excellent attention to
detail to spot and treat problems quickly
Dexterity – mistakes can have serious, if not fatal, consequences, so
cardiologists need outstanding hand-eye coordination when working
with sharp tools and equipment
Bedside manner – patients may be scared or upset when visiting a
hospital, so cardiologists need compassion, patience, and a good
bedside manner to put them at ease
Organizational skills – cardiologists deal with complex information,
medications, and confidential data. Keeping concise and
well-organized records is vital from a medical and a business
perspective
Communication skills – cardiologists often relay complex
terminology and conditions to patients with no medical knowledge,
so strong communication skills and the ability to remain polite and
professional is a must
3 Cardiology Employment

The need for coordinated care, lower costs and higher quality has
left all but large physician practices nearly untenable. Cardiologists
have been moving en masse to hospital employment for the last few
years, with a spike about two and a half years ago when their
reimbursement was cut 40 percent. Now that healthcare reform has
been upheld by the Supreme Court, what are some major trends in
cardiologist employment, and how do they affect hospitals?

Jerome Hines, MD, PhD, chair of the American College of


Cardiology's Council on Clinical Practice, says the Supreme Court
decision has not made an impact on cardiologist employment.
"What's affecting that direction more is the change in healthcare
anyway — the pressures on the insurers, the pressure insurers are
putting on patients, physicians and hospitals — that's what's really
affecting what we see in the trenches more than the Affordable Care
Act, which at least at this point, has just guaranteed that more
[people will be] insured; it hasn't impacted what really needs to be
impacted in terms of good reform to hold down costs. " he says.

1. More hospital employment. Cardiologists are continuing to turn


to hospital employment or other hospital relationships rather than
small private practices. A recent ACC report found only 35 percent
of cardiovascular practitioners are in private practice, down from 59
percent in 2007. One of the reasons for this continued trend is
cardiologists' need for capital to acquire the technology needed to
drive higher efficiencies and quality. "The ability to put in place an
electronic health record or an infrastructure that is going to be able
to take advantage of some of the different payment models and
value-based purchasing can really only be afforded by large groups,
either large private practices or large integrated groups with
hospitals or academic medical centers," Dr. Hines says.

2. Business savvy needed. As cardiologists become integrated with


hospitals, they are holding new leadership positions that require
knowledge of business. "The demands of the marketplace are
affecting the way we practice," Dr. Hines says. "Everyone is being
pushed in the same direction to show outcomes, show appropriate
use. More and more, we're being forced to pay attention to the
business aspects of these things."

The demand for business-savvy physicians may drive a change in


medical education. "We're hearing in the college that [training in
business] is something fellows are wanting more and more," Dr.
Hines says. "Fellows should be given more training in the business
aspects of cardiology. We're the ones with the pen, and we're the
ones with the ability to bring down the number of stents per case.
No one else is."

3. Growing demand for mid-level providers. Cardiologists may have


more competition in employment as hospitals turn to mid-level
providers to trim costs. "There will be pressure to replace ourselves
with mid-level providers and not with younger cardiologists.
Fellows coming out of training will face a much more difficult job
market going forward," Dr. Hines says. "There'll be fewer and fewer
opportunities in competitive areas; rural areas will continue to be the
one area [where] potentially jobs will exist, but even in those areas
there'll be pressure to use mid-level providers because of the cost
constraints." To help connect cardiologists and employers, the ACC
recently launched the ACC Cardiology Careers page using
HEALTHeCAREERS Network, according to Dr. Hines. Enhanced
communication between cardiologists and hospitals can help ease
this potential increase in competition for jobs.
Cardiologist Education and Training

Cardiologists are required to have at minimum a bachelor’s degree,


a doctorate degree, and three to seven years of internship and
residency training related to cardiology. No specific major is
required, but students typically complete coursework in biology,
chemistry, physics, math, and English. Additionally, some students
choose to volunteer in local hospitals or clinics to gain hands-on
experience. Some universities offer a combined undergraduate and
medical school program that lasts up to eight years. All states also
require medical professionals to be licensed, but the requirements
for this vary by state. In order to qualify for a license, candidates
must graduate from an accredited medical school and complete
residency training in cardiology.
Cardiologist Salary and Outlook

The median annual salary for cardiologists is nearly $244,000.


Cardiologists in the 10th percentile earn around $75,000 annually,
while the highest paid earn close to $475,000 a year. Bonuses within
this field can reach up to $97,000.

Location is the biggest factor affecting pay for this position,


followed by level of experience. Medical, dental, and vision
insurance is often included as part of the benefits package. The
Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that this sector will grow by 13
percent through 2026
RELATED OCCUPATIONS

● Non-Invasive Cardiologist. …
● Invasive Cardiologist
● Interventional Cardiologist
● Cardiac Surgeon. …
● Electrophysiologist Cardiologist. …
● Other specialist cardiology jobs