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for accuracy, fact-checking and fairness.

Fewer people are using online ad blockers these days, according


to a study conducted by the Reuters Institute. Thanks to fake news, people are willing to pay for reliable
news. Facebook has a personal stake in combating fake news. The Reuters study showed public trust in
social media declining in the US and UK, two of the most mature news consuming markets, with
people’s trust in social media only about half the trust in conventional media. People are also
increasingly getting news from personal messaging apps such as Viber instead of social media, according
to the Reuters Institute. In the digital media industry, such a trend, left unchecked, can be irreversible
and spell doom even for industry leaders. An industry giant that fails to keep up and adapt can go
bankrupt virtually overnight. So we believed Brown when she told us, “Our interests in this are all
aligned. This has to be a joint effort.” Technology also makes conventional media vulnerable to fake
news. Everyone makes mistakes; traditional media can also slip. In the ancient days, we called it a bum
steer – nakuryente. Technology has made the risks higher. So journalists and media companies have a
stake in fighting fake news. Around the world, we’re all looking for sustainable business models.
“There’s no silver bullet. There’s no one size fits all,” Brown told us. “But I think journalism has to be in a
healthy place. Social media platforms and traditional media are also partnering to deal with the news
consumption side. This means educating readers and viewers. News literacy was a buzz phrase at the
just concluded GEN summit. The goal is to help people to be discerning about information they read or,
as Brown put it, “to make informed judgments about what they’re reading online.” “We’re just getting
started,” Brown, a journalist for 20 years before joining Facebook, said. The ongoing collaborative
efforts, she said, aim to secure “a future where quality journalism not only survives but also thrives.”
What technology cannot kill is old-fashioned journalism. Regardless of the medium or the platform,
news will still have to be based on what we were taught in journalism school: ha

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for accuracy, fact-checking and fairness. Fewer people are using online ad blockers these days, according
to a study conducted by the Reuters Institute. Thanks to fake news, people are willing to pay for reliable
news. Facebook has a personal stake in combating fake news. The Reuters study showed public trust in
social media declining in the US and UK, two of the most mature news consuming markets, with
people’s trust in social media only about half the trust in conventional media. People are also
increasingly getting news from personal messaging apps such as Viber instead of social media, according
to the Reuters Institute. In the digital media industry, such a trend, left unchecked, can be irreversible
and spell doom even for industry leaders. An industry giant that fails to keep up and adapt can go
bankrupt virtually overnight. So we believed Brown when she told us, “Our interests in this are all
aligned. This has to be a joint effort.” Technology also makes conventional media vulnerable to fake
news. Everyone makes mistakes; traditional media can also slip. In the ancient days, we called it a bum
steer – nakuryente. Technology has made the risks higher. So journalists and media companies have a
stake in fighting fake news. Around the world, we’re all looking for sustainable business models.
“There’s no silver bullet. There’s no one size fits all,” Brown told us. “But I think journalism has to be in a
healthy place. Social media platforms and traditional media are also partnering to deal with the news
consumption side. This means educating readers and viewers. News literacy was a buzz phrase at the
just concluded GEN summit. The goal is to help people to be discerning about information they read or,
as Brown put it, “to make informed judgments about what they’re reading online.” “We’re just getting
started,” Brown, a journalist for 20 years before joining Facebook, said. The ongoing collaborative
efforts, she said, aim to secure “a future where quality journalism not only survives but also thrives.”
What technology cannot kill is old-fashioned journalism. Regardless of the medium or the platform,
news will still have to be based on what we were taught in journalism school: ha

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