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Research Log #1 - Solutionary Project 2020

Date: Feb. 10, 2020


Name: Ho’opili DeSilva
Essential Question: What are the main reasons families and homeless individuals end up or reside on the streets?

Three Points to Prove: #1: A lack of affordable housing.


#2: Many have personal problems that cause them to live on the streets.
#3: State officials and organizations have a hard time combatting against homelessness.

Point that this Source Proves: # 1: A lack of affordable housing.

Excerpts (These should provide insight into the Point to Prove):

In the beginning of the excerpt, it is stated that “Hawai’i has some of the highest housing costs in the country.”

Smaller housing units don’t always remain at a low cost: “affordable housing units are constructed but remain at 30%
for only a few years until they are converted to market value.”

Toward the end of the article, information about how there is a “cost burden of housing and transportation expenses
placed on a typical household.” is also included.

Analysis (How does this source support the Point to Prove?):

This website provides information, data, and reasoning of homelessness in the state of Hawai’i, with
the main cause being financial instability, while looking deeper into the idea that Hawai’i has little affordable
housing. The article starts off by establishing that Hawaii has one of the highest costs of housing in the
United States. Information from HUD (United States Department of Housing and Urban Development) states
that because of the high costs, many residents here who are low, or even middle income have difficulty
paying costs of rent or mortgage, along with transportation and other necessities.
The article also mentions that the State of Hawaii claims things are being done to prevent
houselessness such as building low-income housing, many remain at a low cost for a few years until it is put
up for market value. With that being said, it may appear that the state is providing low-income families with
housing, however, they eventually take that away from these families, and offer that property to a much more
fortunate individual/family for a higher price. However, it is not only the low-income families who have
trouble affording houses but middle income as well. These families especially have trouble affording houses
at market values within the state. Alongside that, the article also mentions that single-family housing is
undesirable in the State of Hawai’i due to the small landmass and could potentially lead to urban sprawl,
therefore making it harder to provide smaller and more affordable housing units.
Finally, the article delves into another reason of why the homeless/houseless or those struggling
financially may stay in urban areas. It talks about how homeless/houseless tend to stay or reside in urban
areas and communities. The article also includes information about how the homeless reside in urban areas
because there is access to more resources. The cost of transportation is also one less factor to worry about
due to public transit and buses. Therefore, they may have an easier time affording their rent/mortgage
without worrying about transportation.
All in all, the article establishes that financial factors play a big role in homelessness/houselessness,
but the biggest financial reason being a lack of affordable housing, and families/individuals not being able to
remain financially stable.

Work Cited (correct MLA format):


“Affordable Housing.” State of Hawaii, 2020, dashboard.hawaii.gov/stat/goals/5xhf-begg/ezet-axai/88dr-z9q5.
Accessed 10 February 2020

This is a reputable and reliable article because it is from the State of Hawaii, which is an official government site.
Research Log #2 - Solutionary Project 2020
Date: Feb. 13, 2020
Name: Ho’opili DeSilva
Essential Question: What are the main reasons families and homeless individuals end up or reside on the streets?

Three Points to Prove: #1: A lack of affordable housing.


#2: Many have personal problems that cause them to live on the streets.
#3: State officials and organizations have a hard time combatting against homelessness.

Point that this Source Proves: #2: Many have personal problems that cause them to live on the streets.

Excerpts (These should provide insight into the Point to Prove):

During the beginning of Pendleton’s speech, he describes that “It took over two weeks for her to develop enough trust and
confidence that this apartment was hers and would not be taken away from her before she would start sleeping in the bed.”

Pendleton then goes on to talk about “the abuse these individuals have had throughout most of their lives, they hardly trust
anybody, and the clean needles and condoms and low-barrier housing was a means to begin to develop a relationship of trust.”

The speaker also talks about how difficult it is to help those with personal problems and how hard it is to find a solution: “We
used to debate up at our university classes which theory of case management was the most effective.”

As Pendleton reaches the middle of his speech, he states that “One of the team members mentioned that eight of the prostitutes
had given birth to 31 children that had become wards of the state…”

When analyzing and explaining his plans to assist homelessness, Pendleton also mentions that people need to recognize “the
complexities of the different factors that can shape a human life. 

Analysis (How does this source support the Point to Prove?):

This source provides information from Lloyd Pendleton, who is a homeless advocate and is the former director
of Utah’s Homeless Task Force. Within his speech, he talks about his experiences trying to get homeless individuals
into permanent housing. He uses one woman as an example when trying to get his point across. He briefly explains
that the woman was very uncomfortable and would not utilize her new living space until she fully understood that she
would be safe, and it would not be taken away from her. Pendleton then connects that back to how the abuse that most
of these individuals have to go throughout their lives, leaves them without trust. He then speaks about how these
homeless turn to unclean needles and condoms, because it’s the only thing they can rely on, which can connect back to
their personal problems.
After Pendleton explained his ideas on how to assist the homeless, he expands more on how difficult it is to
come up with ways to help the homeless because each individual’s situation is so complex. There are so many factors
that play into how they end up in such a life. Therefore, it is very difficult to help these people. Some may feel unsafe
or have underlying reasons as to why they’re on the street. Because there are many different solutions and approaches
to be taken when trying to help a large number of homeless individuals.
Finally, Pendleton then discusses a big reason as to why many of these individuals and families end up on the
streets. Many of these people, especially young women are prostitutes. They are “pimped out” by their husbands, men,
or even their parents to earn money for drug addictions. They are paid more for unprotected sex, which most of the
time, leads to a pregnancy. These children are then born into poor circumstances, and soon enough find themselves
following in the footsteps of their parents. These children have no choice but to grow up and live on the streets. By
Pendleton providing examples of how they end up on the streets, and why it is difficult for them to find a better life,
the audience can get a better understanding of how and why most homeless live the way they do. It opens a window
into most of their of the different, traumatic situations that they experience.

Work Cited (correct MLA format):


Pendleton, Lloyd. Lloyd Pendleton: The Housing First Approach to Homelessness. TED, TEDMED, 2016,
www.ted.com/talks/lloyd_pendleton_the_housing_first_approach_to_homelessness/transcript#t-597716.
Accessed 13 February 2020.

This is a reputable and reliable article because it is from TED Conference LLC, which is an American organization
that post videos of expert speakers (on education, business, science, etc.) who strive to motivate, spread ideas, and
inspire. The speaker, Lloyd Pendleton is a homeless advocate who is also the former director of Utah’s Homeless
Task Force, an organization that provides assistance and strives to improve the situation of homeless individuals
and families.
Research Log #3 - Solutionary Project 2020
Date: February 21 2020
Name: Ho’opili DeSilva
Essential Question: What are the main reasons families and homeless individuals end up or reside on the streets?

Three Points to Prove: #1: A lack of affordable housing.


#2: Many have personal problems that cause them to live on the streets.
#3: State officials and organizations have a hard time combatting against homelessness.

Point that this Source Proves: # State officials and organizations have a hard time combatting against
homelessness.

Excerpts (These should provide insight into the Point to Prove):

State of Hawai’i’s homeless coordinator, Scott Morishige explains that “the city has made progress by focusing on
housing and support services.”

Morishige also talks about housing in the sense that “You don't eliminate homelessness unless you provide housing for
people. More shelters does not do the trick.”

Morishige also delves deeper into how organizations and officials cannot tackle this problem by themselves: "You
cannot do this alone, " he said. "We gotta check the egos. We gotta know that the only way we're going to help those
who are most vulnerable in the larger community is by us all working together."

Chairwoman of Bridging the Gap, Brandee Menino, mentions that "We're expected to be mental health experts,
substance abuse experts, housing experts, immigration experts, judiciary criminal justice experts. But why are we
expected to be those experts when there are other systems that should be addressing these?" toward the end of the
article.

Analysis (How does this source support the Point to Prove?):

Within this news article, information and insight is provided from the State of Hawai’i’s homeless coordinator
Scott Morishige, as well as Chairwoman of Bridging the Gap (Hawai’i homelessness program), Brandee Menino,
about some the things that are being done to tackle the problem of homelessness, and some of the obstacles they face
while doing so. The beginning of the article starts off with some information about how Hawai’i is No. 2 in the country
for the most homelessness per capita, following behind New York. Morishige confesses that things are rough when it
comes to getting a handle on the state’s homelessness problem, but also mentions that there is definitely progress being
made.
When on the topic of shelters and providing housing for the homeless, Morishige provides his insight on how
homelessness cannot be eliminated unless permanent housing is provided for these individuals. Though shelters can be
helpful, it is not a long-term solution when it comes to providing the homeless with a place to stay. The state needs to
start building more affordable, quality long-term housing for these individuals and families to reside in. Not only do
these shelters give them a roof of their own over their heads, but it provides them with the privacy of their own home,
something a shelter wouldn’t necessarily provide.
After covering the topic of shelters and permanent housing, Morishige covers that this problem cannot be
solved by one person or organization alone. Because it is such a complex situation, officials and companies need to
come together to prevent this issue from growing bigger. He explains that it is a challenge to work together, with so
much input, opinions, and ideas. It can be a struggle to cooperate with a mass amount of people to handle this problem,
but it is the only way to resolve the issue.
Finally, the article features some words from Brandee Menino, chairwoman of Bridging the Gap, a homeless
program in Hawai’i. She too goes on about the challenges that are faced when trying to improve the homelessness
problem. She explains that everyone who is trying their best to get a handle on homelessness, but they are expected to
be qualified for so much more than they are. It is presumed that are professionals about mental health, drugs, housing,
immigration, and criminal justice, when really, they are not. They are trying their best to get a handle on the issue with
knowledge and abilities that they have or are in the process of gaining. So many of these complex issues are sometimes
far beyond them, they can only contribute so much. There are so many factors that play into homelessness that experts
from many different fields are needed in order to resolve homelessness. With that, she uses that to connect back to how
everyone needs to come together to solve the homelessness problem.

Work Cited (correct MLA format):


Hurley, Timothy. “Hawaii Drops to No. 2 in Homelessness as Trends Improve, Officials Say.” Honolulu Star
Advertiser, 8 Jan. 2020. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?
direct=true&db=n5h&AN=2W6197449061. Accessed 20 February 2020

This is a reputable and reliable article because it is from the Honolulu Star-Advertiser, which is the largest daily
newspaper in the state.
Research Log #4 - Solutionary Project 2020
Date: February 21 2020
Name: Ho’opili DeSilva
Essential Question: What are the main reasons families and homeless individuals end up or reside on the streets?

Three Points to Prove: #1: A lack of affordable housing.


#2: Many have personal problems that cause them to live on the streets.
#3: State officials and organizations have a hard time combatting against homelessness.

Point that this Source Proves: # Many have personal problems that cause them to live on the streets.

Excerpts (These should provide insight into the Point to Prove):

In the beginning of the interview, Karla explains that “There is a large group of people who think that, oh people are
homeless because they are drug addicts, or they’re lazy or they don’t want a job…it’s really kind of a hand in hand
thing. Most of the drug addicts I know are drug addicts because they don’t wanna sleep. They don’t wanna get raped.
They don’t wanna get mugged. They don’t want their stuff stolen. I mean they’re scared to sleep.”

After Karla talks about some of the reasons most homeless are on drugs, the interviewer mentions that “it’s hard to t
homeless sober. It messes with your spirit.”

Karla states that “Homeless people do not want to be homeless. They do not choose to do drugs over jobs and housing”
after explaining some other reasons there are homeless on the streets.

The homeless experience rough, busy days from start to end; “If you are not the first 15 people in line [at the day
center], you will not get signed up to wash your clothes, take a shower. These are things that every human being with
dignity would want to do.”

Analysis (How does this source support the Point to Prove?):

In this video, founder of nonprofit organization Invisible People, Mark Horvath interviews a homeless woman
named Karla. Karla is homeless and has been living on the streets of San Diego for about 3 years. Though she is
homeless, she spends most of her time brining awareness to the issues of homelessness. She is a bright, intelligent
advocate who has much knowledge about the homelessness situation, and it is very evident that she keeps herself
educated on the topic of homelessness.
Throughout the interview Karla dives into some of the reasons people are homelessness. She starts off by
establishing that the homeless never get a day off. Their days are busy and consist of finding ways to make it another
day. Shortly after that, she clears up the misconception that all homeless are lazy and choose drugs over housing and
jobs. In fact, the reason most of these people are on drugs, especially meth and heroin are to keep themselves awake.
Most homeless are scared to sleep. They fear getting raped, mugged, or getting their belongings stolen. So, they stay
awake, day and night. For most, drugs are often used as a way to survive, rather than a pleasure. To add on to this,
interviewer, Mark Horvath mentions that being sober and homeless can take a toll on one’s spirit and happiness. Many
of these people aren’t emotionally or physically strong enough to survive on the streets, so they unfortunately turn to
drugs.
Not only does this video talk about drugs, but it also gives some day in the life of a homeless person,
specifically in San Diego. Karla starts off by explaining that most are up at 5 in the morning, every day, or else they
will be ticketed for sleeping on the sidewalk. Then, they hurry over to the day center to stand in line for around two
hours just to shower and do laundry. If not the first 15 in line, service will not be given, and they will have to wait until
the next day. At 10 in the morning, the homeless then wait another few hours to get food, and if too late, they may not
receive a plate. The homeless are then able to go to the library, to charge their phone or get access to a computer to
stay in touch with relatives. However, most libraries only limit the access to 45 minutes. At around 4, the day center
closes, and all belongings left in lockers are left on the side of road for others to rummage through. At 6, most
homeless are beginning to find a safe place to sleep and searching for a place to find dinner. They will either stand in
line for another few hours or if lucky enough, someone may give out food. Finally, around 9, they are allowed to set up
tents or sleeping bags and go to sleep.
Some of these situations connect to homeless in Hawai’i. Perhaps many of the homeless in Hawai’i use drugs
for the same reason. With the status of crime and danger within the state at the moment, homeless here may too fear
getting raped, mugged or robbed. Therefore, they unfortunately turn to drugs to stay awake and make sure nothing
happens to them. The day in the life of a homeless person in Hawai’i may also be very similar in terms of their daily
routine. They wait hours to receive food and basic services, and struggle to find something to do for the rest of their
day; and the process/routine continues every single day. Wake up, wait, eat, wait, eat and sleep. There is no vacation
and there is no break. They follow a rough routine each day and every day just to survive.

Work Cited (correct MLA format):

Horvath, Mark, director. Homeless Woman Walks Us Through a Day in the Life on the Streets of San Diego.
YouTube, Invisible People, 27 Mar. 2019, www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpJ9zvULZ-A&t=771s.
Accessed 1 March 2020

This is a reputable and reliable article because it comes from a verified channel on YouTube called Invisible
People. Invisible People is a nonprofit organization dedicated to changing the way people think about homelessness
all around the country.
Research Log #5 - Solutionary Project 2020
Date: March 4, 2020
Name: Ho’opili DeSilva
Essential Question: What are the main reasons families and homeless individuals end up or reside on the streets?

Three Points to Prove: #1: A lack of affordable housing.


#2: Many have personal problems that cause them to live on the streets.
#3: State officials and organizations have a hard time combatting against homelessness.

Point that this Source Proves: # Many have personal problems that cause them to live on the streets.

Excerpts (These should provide insight into the Point to Prove):

In the very beginning of the article, Theodore Walther explains that “some people are homeless only for a
short time, perhaps after a divorce, the loss of a job, a financial disaster, or the death of a loved one.”

Walther goes on about some of the struggles that homeless experience on a daily basis: “You are tied to
whatever community resources you are able to access. You are chained to erratic, often incompetently run
social service programs. You are looked upon as a pariah by most of the people around you, and are treated
even worse, as though you are subhuman, by many charity organizations…”

On the 3rd page, Walther states that “Alcohol and drugs do play a big part in street life.”

Walther then goes more in depth about homelessness complexities. He states that “Each person, each
situation is a different case. That’s the most important thing I've come to understand through all of the years
and different treatments I've been exposed to. Every person I’ve met-whether in the hospital psychiatric ward
after a particularly nasty case of suicidal depression, or in one or another rehab clinic-brings their own set of
problems to the table.”

Analysis (How does this source support the Point to Prove?):

This article includes information and insight from Theodore Walther and his life as a homeless man
living on the streets. Not only does Walther provide information about his experiences and knowledge, he
also mentions some causes and reasons as to why there are people living on the streets. Walther provides
many great examples of some causes. Most importantly, Walther explains that the homelessness issue is so
complex, which can connect back to Point To Prove #2.
In the second paragraph, the author talks about some of the feelings that he and others who are
homeless go through. He mentions that those who live on the streets are tied only to resources that are
available, and it all depends on the community. They are also tied to “incompetent” social programs and
services, that may be more of an obstacle to some, rather than a safety net. Most of all, they are seen as
burdens to society, and treated as if you are less than by those who are far more fortunate. Many
organizations, especially charity companies see them as outcasts. This can often take a toll on many
homeless individuals mental health or wellbeing, especially because they are not being treated as properly, or
receiving the proficient assistance that they should be.
Walther went on to talk about how homeless individuals, including himself, and how they feel about
the support systems around them. But he eventually makes a statement about how alcohol and drugs are
crucial to many when it comes to living and surviving on the streets. Some, such as himself, do their best to
stay away from it, while others unfortunately fall down the dark path, and find themselves in much more
disastrous situations. This can lead to many complications when it comes to trying to assist and provide care
for the homeless.
Lastly, Walther then mentions that every single homeless person has a different situation and
problem. Though some may be experiencing similar problems, there is not a single person that has a problem
that can be totally relatable. Some individuals may have chosen to throw their lives away, or truly tried to
find a way off the streets. Some may be on drugs to stop sleeping at night, or to ease the pain and anxiety, or
maybe even just to get a high. There are multiple reasons as to why so many of these individuals are on the
streets and remaining on the streets.

Work Cited (correct MLA format):


WALTHER, THEODORE. “Homeless in the City.” American Scholar, vol. 83, no. 1, Winter 2014, pp. 48–
55. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=khh&AN=92994455. Accessed 4
March 2020.

This is a reputable and reliable article because it is a journal/article from writer Theodore Walther, a previous
homeless veteran living in Southern California
Research Log #6 - Solutionary Project 2020
Date: March 11, 2020
Name: Ho’opili DeSilva
Essential Question: What are the main reasons families and homeless individuals end up or reside on the streets?

Three Points to Prove: #1: A lack of affordable housing.


#2: Many have personal problems that cause them to live on the streets.
#3: State officials and organizations have a hard time combatting against homelessness.

Point that this Source Proves: # A lack of affordable housing.

Excerpts (These should provide insight into the Point to Prove):

In the beginning of the news segment, reporter Lisa Kubota states that “Hawaii’s ranked the least affordable state in
the nation when it comes to housing.”

Keith Webster from Faith Action Housing Now also explains that the problem is far bigger than we think it is; “You
can see it with the homeless in the streets, but where you don’t see it is all of the people that just- you know- are barely
able to afford or are crowded into housing.”

Housing developer Peter Savio goes on to discuss that “Our real estate prices, our real estate rent is no longer tied to
the local market, local income, local employment. They’re tied to what mainland people will pay, what Asian buyers
will pay” toward the middle of the news segment.

The report then goes back to Webster, where he mentions that even middle income may not be enough to live in the
state of Hawai’i; “People who are making $75000 and less are having a hard time finding housing.”

Analysis (How does this source support the Point to Prove?):

Throughout this news segment from Hawai’i News Now, housing affordability and rent is discussed by many
who have experience in the real estate, banking, or housing development field. In the very beginning, news reporter
Lisa Kubota makes a statement about how Hawai’i is ranked the least affordable place to live in the country. This
statement alone connects back perfectly to the point on how many people become homeless due to not being able to
afford rent or mortgage. The bills are too high, and many are unable to keep up.
Co-chair of Faith Action Housing Now, Keith Webster then adds on too Lisa Kubota’s statement. He mentions
that we see how housing affordability has affected many, the biggest result, people and families on the streets. But the
biggest problem is we don’t see when these families and individuals are on the brink of living on the streets. We aren’t
able to see any problem until they have fully lost their housing and are on the side of the streets. It is until then, we see
who was struggling to keep up financially. Therefore, it is very difficult to see what families are struggling with rent
and mortgage, leaving it difficult to prevent individuals from finding their way on the streets.
After that, housing developer Peter Savio makes a key point toward the middle of the segment. He states that
the biggest reason people are unable to afford housing is because Hawai’i’s real estate prices are all on an international
market. Prices are no longer regulated for locals. Hawai’i’s housing is marketed at such high prices because it is
aiming for mainland and Asian customers who have the money. The real estate prices have completely left the people
of Hawai’i or it’s locals in the dust financially. People are struggling to find something small and are unable to find or
afford something that is reasonable.
Lastly, to add on to Peter Savio’s statement about how housing is tied to an international market, Keith
Webster speaks upon how much a worker should be paid on average in order to afford housing in the state. Webster
mentions that $75000 and less is simply not enough to afford housing in Hawai’i. A person with a $75000 income,
which could be considered middle class, will struggle to find housing.

Work Cited (correct MLA format):


Gutierrez, Ben, director. Topic of a Honolulu Summit: How to Solve Hawaii’s Housing Crisis.
Https://Www.hawaiinewsnow.com, Hawai'i News Now, 23 Sept. 2019,
www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2019/09/22/affordable-housing-summit-draws-packed-crowd/

This is a reputable and reliable article because it is from Hawai’i News Now, a popular news department in
Honolulu, Hawai’i.
Research Log #8 - Solutionary Project 2020
Date: March 27, 2020
Name: Ho’opili DeSilva
Essential Question: What are the main reasons families and homeless individuals end up or reside on the streets?

Three Points to Prove: #1: A lack of affordable housing


#2: Many have personal problems that cause them to live on the streets.
#3: State officials and organizations have a hard time combatting against homelessness.

Point that this Source Proves: #3 State officials and organizations have a hard time combatting against
homelessness.

Excerpts (These should provide insight into the Point to Prove):

Jillian starts off her email by explaining what it is that Catholic Charities of Hawai’i does: “Our programs provide
transitional housing, housing placement, and financial assistance. The goals of our organization is to serve our
community and help those in need who may need an extra push to get by in tough times.”

Answering the second question, Jillian states that “our programs were made to help families get by with added support
in their time of hardship.”

Jillian also mentions that “we do find that the same individuals/families come back for additional assistance and if
eligible again, we will try our best to assist where needed.”

Toward the end of the email, Jillian also says that “We are always in need of extra hands to help bring hope to our
fellow community members. Our organization runs on the generous donations from donors and any amount that can be
provided would help us greatly.”

Analysis (How does this source support the Point to Prove?):

Within this email, division administrator of Catholic Charities Hawai’i, Jillian Okamoto answers some
questions that were sent to her by my partners and me. Our first question was asking how Catholic Charities Hawai’i
assists low income families and individual, as well as some of their goals. Jillian begins to explain what their
organization is about, delving in to how they provide assistance with housing. Catholic Charities Hawai’i provides
transitional housing, housing placement and help those who need help financially. This can connect back to the point
to prove because this type of assistance can be very complex. When it comes to financial and housing matters, it can be
very difficult due to everyone having different problems.
She then answers our second question, in which we ask if the organization helps the same families and
individuals for long periods of time. Jillian explains that that they do not, but they often find the same families or
individuals reapplying for assistance; and if eligible, they try their best to assist them again. This can connect toward
the point to prove because it shows that there are hard decisions to make when choosing who qualifies for assistance,
and whether or not it is fair to further dedicate more time and money into the same families/individuals, when there are
others who also need the assistance.
Jillian then goes in to answering our third question, explaining how the community can help achieve their
organizations goals. She explains that it is very helpful when people volunteer at their organization. Jillian states that
they “are always in need of a helping hand”. She also mentions that donations are a great way to contribute to their
organization. Any type of contribution benefits their company greatly. This too can connect to the point to prove by
showing that organizations, such as Catholic Charities Hawai’i need as much assistance as possible. Because there is
so much to be done when it comes to assisting people in need, it is best to have as many helping hands as possible.
Finally, Jillian closes up the email with letting my partners and I know some things that the community and
younger people should know about their organization or the situation. She addresses that she would like everyone to
know that the individuals and families that are worked with are treated with kindness and compassion, no matter the
situation. They believe that every individual has the right to a prosperous life, and are all deserving of a safe,
successful life.
Work Cited (correct MLA format):

Okamoto, Jillian. “Catholic Charities Hawaii.” Received by Caitlin Idica, Catholic Charities Hawaii, 27 Mar. 2020.

This is a reputable and reliable article because Jillian Okamoto is a division administrator at Catholic Charities
Hawai’I who assists thousands of people financially each year.