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PART ONE

ZANZIBAR UNIVERSITY – AN OVERVIEW


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1.1 Introduction

Zanzibar University (ZU) is one of the many private Universities in Tanzania. The University
was founded in 1995 under the sponsorship of Darul Iman Charitable Association (DICA), a
Saudi Arabian based NGO. The University obtained it official registration as an institution of
higher learning in 1998 and started its operations in 1998. Zanzibar University become a fully
registered University on 4th May 2000 after receiving a Certificate of Full Registration from the
then Higher Education Accreditation Council of Tanzania (HEAC), currently known as the
Tanzania Commission for Universities (TCU). Among its distinctions are: the first ever
established University in Zanzibar; the first teaching a combination of Law and Sharia; the first
Islamic Finance and Banking School; the first in Zanzibar to have foreign students from African
countries (including Kenya, Uganda, Zambia, Somalia, Eritrea, Rwanda, Burundi and Malawi) at
the very start of its establishment. As one of the country’s institutions of higher learning,
Zanzibar University has also consistently initiated advancements in teaching and research.

1.2 Faculties and Institutes

Zanzibar University has currently three Faculties and two Institutes.

Faculties

Faculty of Business Administration (FBA)


The Faculty runs three undergraduate degree programmes namely, the BBA (Accounting &
Finance), BBA (Marketing), and BBIT (Business Information Technology). It will host the ZU
MBA Degree Programme.

Faculty of Law and Sharia (FLS)


The Faculty currently runs undergraduate degree programme namely, Bachelor of Law and
Sharia (LL.B) and one postgraduate degree programme namely, Master of Laws (LL.M) in
Comparative Laws.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)


The faculty runs two undergraduate degree programmes namely, Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Public
Administration and Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Economics

Institutes

There are two Institutes at the Zanzibar University: Institute of Postgraduate Studies and
Research (IPSR) and Institute of Continuing Education (ICE).
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1.3 Present Academic Programmes

Zanzibar University currently offers both undergraduate and postgraduate academic


programmes.

Undergraduate Programmes
Zanzibar University currently runs the flowing undergraduate programmes:
Degree Programmes
1. Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) in Accounting and Finance
2. Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) in Marketing
3. Bachelor of Business Information Technology (BBIT)
4. Bachelor of Law and Sharia (LL.B)
5. Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Public Administration
6. Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Economics

Diploma Programmes
1. Diploma in Criminal Justice
2. Diploma in Islamic Banking and Finance
3. Diploma in Project Planning & Execution
4. Diploma in Procurement & Logistic Management
5. Diploma in Business Information Technology

Certificates
1. Certificate in Management
2. Certificate in Computer Applications
3. Certificate in Law and Sharia
4. Certificate in Human Resource Management
5. Certificate in Journalism
6. Certificate in Journalism

Postgraduate Programme

1. Master of Laws (LL.M) in Comparative Laws

1.4 Mission and Vision of the University

Zanzibar University Mission

The Zanzibar University mission is essentially to promote discovery and application of


knowledge, the acquisition of skills, and the development of intellect in East African region with
a view to prepare students to contribute effectively and morally to the developmental processes
of their countries as good citizens of a rapidly changing world denominated by technological
advancement. The mission is currently achieved through high quality undergraduate and
postgraduate academic programmes which are designed to make graduating students capable of
employing themselves and others as well.
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Zanzibar University Vision

The Zanzibar University is a place for excellence and is expected to increase its role in the
acquisition and dissemination of knowledge in the areas of computer engineering, social and
management sciences through training, research and consultancy with the view to catch the
wider markets within Tanzania and beyond by the year 2020.

1.5 Institute of Postgraduate Studies & Research (IPSR)

Zanzibar University has established the Institute of Postgraduate Studies and Research as one of
the departments under the Deputy Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs with the following
objectives in mind:

a) To design full-time postgraduate study programmes intended to satisfy the needs of


the first degree holders who wish to continue with further studies.

b) To satisfy the needs of business, legal and civil service institutions at the national
level as well as international level in terms of high quality skills and knowledge.

The main functions of the Institute are to design, coordinate, facilitate and provide guidelines
for Postgraduate Studies and Research activities at the Zanzibar University.

This Institute, therefore, is providing the requisite environment for a newly introduced
Programme of Master of Business Administration (MBA) at Zanzibar University.

1.6 Faculty of Business Administration (FBA)

The Faculty of Business Administration of Zanzibar University shall offer the Master of
Business Administration (MBA); a specialized programme aiming at imparting advanced
knowledge of the chosen specializations of Accounting, Finance, Marketing and Human
Resource & Organizational Management through firm theoretical grounding and more intensive
research.

This Faculty is overall responsible for the entire management and day to day running of the
programme.
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PART TWO
______________________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION TO ZU MBA PROGRAMME


2.1 Preamble

The MBA is a programme designed with the needs of the business world and the student in
mind. The business world requires enterprising men and women who can take stock of the
changing competitive business environment and make critical decisions for effective and
efficient strategy formulation and implementation. The ZU MBA Programme is structured to
equip the students with the necessary analytical and decision making tools to meet the ever
growing complexities and competition in the business world. This MBA Programme offers a
range of benefits for the successful students, including:

Business Management Knowledge and Skills


The MBA programme and business provides the student with a knowledge-base about business
and all its related aspects. The student learns about business strategies and concepts, not just on
paper, but the training and internship required in the MBA course, teaches the student how to use
these skills in practical life and in day to day business operations.

Leadership Abilities
ZU MBA degree involves rigorous training, assignments, reports, presentations, and group
projects, all of which give the student the necessary abilities to handle real-life business
situations. This helps to set the student apart from those who do not have such expertise and can
make the student a leader in his/her chosen field of specialization. The four areas of
concentration offered by the ZU MBA Programme, Accounting, Finance, Marketing, and Human
Resource and Organizational Management provides the students with an in-depth knowledge and
specialized challenging experience in these areas.

Zanzibar University spirit in offering the MBA Programme rests on the training of competent
corporate business executives, middle level managers, entrepreneurs and business people who
will be capable of offering meaningful contributions the nation’s economy and the wellbeing of
the people.

2.2 Programme Rationale and Uniqueness

Programme Rationale
Zanzibar University is certainly not the first University to offer an MBA Programme in the
country. It is also not going to be the sole university offering this programme. Despite the fact
that a number of universities (private and public universities) are offering the Masters Degree in
Business Administration, the need and market for MBA graduates is far from being satisfied.
Attainment of the country’s development goals as articulated in the National Development
Vision, NTD 2025 depends, among other things, on the availability of a sufficient number
competent and committed in business management. The ZU MBA Programme will certainly
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offer a significant contribution towards this goal. Trained MBA graduates at the Zanzibar
University will be well positioned not only to work corporate business executives and middle
level managers, but also as entrepreneurs and people who can run their own businesses. Their
contribution to the development of the nation’s economy is likely to be very vivid
Uniqueness of the ZU MBA Programme

ZU MBA Programme distinguishes itself from Masters Degree Programmes offered at other
institutes of higher learning in Tanzania in two principle aspects: Programme Mode of Delivery
and Programme Structure & Content. ZU MBA distinguishes itself with real case studies and
problem solving orientation designed in almost each course. A great emphasis shall be placed on
teamwork and entrepreneurship development. The courses are aimed not simply to provide
knowledge and skills that will assist in the analysis of situations in a disciplined way, but to
enhance managerial judgment by helping to modify or reinforce what has been learnt from
experience. ZU MBA programme is structured to lead the ambitious manager gain a high quality
MBA - one that will count in the real market place of employment.

2.3 Objectives and Expected Learning Outcomes

Programme Objectives

The universal mission of MBA programmes at the Zanzibar University is to deliver an applied
business education aiming at improving students' decision-making capabilities by providing a
functional business foundation while enhancing their analytical, communication and
technological skills. Specifically, the programme intends to attain the following objectives:

(a) To equip candidates with an understanding of modern financial, marketing, management


skills necessary for sound business management and to enable them take advantage of the
continuously changing environment in which businesses operate

(b) To equip candidates with sound human resource management, entrepreneurship,


marketing, strategic and operations management skills required by leaders in professional
business management.

(c) To equip candidates with leadership and communication skills required for good
entrepreneurs to lead and sustain new business operations; and to build market share
through effective communication with customers, clients and colleagues. This will be
founded on the strong foundation of ethical praxis and outlook.

(d) To equip students with skills in Information Management and Communication


Technology as an integral part of the MBA curriculum.

(e) Develop student’ ability to think strategically, and to lead, motivate teams in business
organizations.

(f) To provide students with quantitative and qualitative tools to identify business
opportunities and solve business problems.
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(g) Enhance students’ appreciation of the values of social responsibility, legal and ethical
principles, and corporate governance through the analysis and discussion of pertinent
articles and real business cases

(h) To prepare students for higher degrees in business administration and career
opportunities in research institutions.

Expected Learning Outcomes of the MBA Programme


The overall purpose of the MBA to be offered at the Zanzibar University is to create skilful,
upright and wise business leaders who add value to the business community and the society in
general. Upon successful completion of the MBA, graduates should be able to:

(a) Apply analytical skills learnt to analyse business environment and conceive appropriate
managerial decisions.

(b) Identify theories, models and concepts appropriate for solving business problems faced
by business firms.

(c) Conceptualize, organize, and resolve complex business problems or issues by using the
resources available under their discretion.

(d) Apply the perspective of their chosen concentrated area of study to develop fully-
reasoned opinions on such contemporary issues as the need for innovation, integrity,
leading and managing change, globalization, and technology management.

2.4 Target Beneficiaries of the MBA Programme

The target beneficiaries of the MBA are all stakeholders in the business sector in particular and
the economy in general. In ascending order of importance the stakeholders include: The Private
Sector, The Public Sector and other Actors and Participants in the Business Sector.

The Private Sector


This is the principal stakeholder of the ZU MBA Programme. The current Tanzanian business
sector is dominated by the private sector. Stakeholders in the private sector include business
firms (domestic and foreign).

The Public Sector


Though the public sector is currently participating marginally in the business sector, it is yet
another important stakeholder as it is concerned with the creation of conducive business
environment to ensure effective participation of the private sector in business. The public sector
beneficiaries in this context include the central government, local governments as well as
government agencies and authorities.

Other Actors and Contributors in the Business Sector


Stakeholders in the category include non-Governmental Organisations (domestic and foreign),
academia and academic institutions.
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2.5 Programme Delivery and Duration

Programme Delivery Methodology


The MBA Programme shall be conducted through lecture sessions and seminar presentations in
addition to assigned group works, term papers and individual study.

Programme Delivery Methodology


The MBA Programme shall be conducted through lecture sessions and seminar presentations in
addition to assigned group works, term papers and individual study.

Programme Duration and Schedule


The ZU MBA is a four semester structured two year programme. The taught component of the
programme has 18 course units and requires three semesters while the dissertation is to be
completed in the fourth semester. A semester shall comprise 16 weeks of lecture sessions and
seminars. Students are to complete six units per semester. Each course unit is allocated 48
contact hours. Table 1 depicts the programme duration and schedule of proposed activity
timings.

Table 1: Programme Duration and Activity Scheduling

ACTIVITY ITEM DURATION TIMING


YEAR I: FIRST SEMESTER 16 Weeks 1st Week of October
6 Course Units [48 Contact Hour per Course Unit] to
4th Week of January

Semester Examinations 2nd and 3rd Weeks of


February
YEAR I: SECOND SEMESTER 16 Weeks 1st Week of March
6 Course Units [48 Contact Hour per Course Unit] to
1st Week of June

Semester Examinations 3rd and 4th Weeks of June


YEAR TWO: FIRST SEMESTER 16 Weeks 2nd Week of July
6 Course Units [48 Contact Hour per Course Unit] to
2nd Week of October

4th Week of October


Semester Examinations and
1st Week of November
3rd Week of November
INTERNSHIP 2 Months To
3rd Week of January
YEAR TWO: SECOND SEMESTER 1st Week of February
Dissertation 6 Months to
4th Week of July
-
Viva-Voce September
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PART THREE
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GENERAL REGULATIONS & GUIDELINES FOR THE
MBA PROGRAMME
3.1 Entry Requirements

ZU MBA Programme candidates shall be selected on the basis of their academic qualifications
maturity and industrial experience. To be admitted to the programme, the applicant must fulfil
any of the following conditions:

1. Hold a good undergraduate degree of the Zanzibar University in any discipline, or its
equivalent from any approved University or accredited institution of higher learning.
Zanzibar University shall usually require a cumulative GPA of 3.0. Any post graduate
degree increases chances of being provided a place to study the programme.

2. Posses a Postgraduate Diploma in Business Studies or related fields. A candidate with


working experience of at least 3 years in a business organization after graduation shall
have an added advantage.

3. Hold an Advanced Diploma from an accredited institution of higher learning, with a


minimum of a second class, upper division and at least two years of working experience.

4. Hold an internationally recognized professional qualification, such as CPA, ACCA, CA,


and CSP plus two years or more of working experience.

3.2 Application Procedures

To be enrolled to the MBA Programme applicants should meet all procedural requirements in
particular application timing and documents.

Application Methods
Applicants shall apply in one of the two ways:

 Complete a Zanzibar University Postgraduate application form and return it return it to:
Director, IPSR, P.O. Box 2440, Zanzibar University, Tanzania. Application forms are to
be obtained from the IPSR or downloaded at the University Website:
http://www.zanvarsity.ac.tz.
 Complete an online application form at http://www.zanvarsity.ac.tz and e-mail it to
info@zanvarsity.ac.tz or pgs@zanvarsity.ac.tz

Application Time and Deadline


Applications for the MBA Degree Programme shall be submitted at any time during the
preceding nine months i.e. applicants shall submit their applications from January of every
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calendar year. Deadline for application shall be in June of each calendar year. Zanzibar
University shall reserve the right to close to new applications beyond June.

Documents Required on Application


Upon application, applicants shall be required to bring the following along with their application
form:

 Official Transcripts and Certificates


 Two letters of references

3.3 Programme Fee Structure

The tuition fee for the full time MBA by Coursework & Dissertation shall be US$2000 payable
to the University in two installments. Other costs payable to the University amount US$1,990.
Recommended fee payable directly to the student shall be US$5,560. The fee is subject to
revision as deemed necessary by the University and up to date information on fees shall always
be accessible at the University website. Foreign students shall make their fee payments in US
Dollars while local students will pay the equivalent amount in Tanzanian Shillings. (for details
see in Appendix 6).

3.4 Academic Policies

3.4.1 Assessment, Grading System and Re-grading

Assessment Policy and Structure


The assessment will be based on course work (to be built up through class tests, assignment,
contribution to class seminars/workshops etc.) and final examination. The course work will carry
50% of the total mark while the final examination will weigh 50%. This assessment criterion will
apply to all courses. Table 2 below summarises the assessment criterion.

Table 2: Assessment of Courses

S/NO. ASSESSMENT ITEM % TOTAL


1 COURSE WORK 50%
2 FINAL EXAMINATION 50%
3 TOTAL 100%

Grading System
ZU MBA course is graded on a traditional letter grade system of A through E. the letter graded
carry the point values: A = 5; B+ = 4; B = 3; C = 2, D = 1; and E = 0. The corresponding
percentage ranges are as depicted in Table 3 below:

Table 3: MBA Grading System

Letter Grade A B+ B C D E
Point Value 5 4 3 2 1 0
Percentage Range 70 -100 60 - 69 50 - 59 40 - 49 30 -39 0 - 29
REMARKS PASS FAIL
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The D and E grades do not earn credit toward graduation and when student receives either of the
two in any course he/she will be required to re-enroll in the course and obtain passing grade in
order to graduate unless an alternative remedy is deemed appropriate by the Faculty.

Re-grade Requests
Students who believe that there are errors in the grading of an assignment, test, exam or any
other course component may request that their instructor re-grade that component. These
requests should be made as soon as possible and must comply with the requirements and time
limits set by the course instructor.

3.4.2 Graduation Requirements

For MBA students studying at the Zanzibar University, the graduation requirements for Master
of Business Administration degree will be:

Table 4: MBA Courses & Graduate Credit Units

Courses Graduate Credit Units


Analytical Foundation Courses [4 Courses] 4
Core Business Fundamental Courses 10
Specialized Courses [Majors] 4
Dissertation 6
Total Graduate Credit Units Required 24

The MBA Programme is designed for a two-year full-time residency consisting of four academic
semesters. It is not possible to graduate in less time.

3.4.3 Examination Policies

Examinations in ZU MBA courses are to be governed by the University policies on


examinations. Students with documentable special circumstances such as time conflicts between
multiple examinations, illness, or grave personal difficulties such as death in the family, should
petition with MBA Programme Office – (proposed to be established), which will work with the
Faculty in appropriate cases to find a resolution. Students should never approach their instructors
with requests to reschedule examinations or to make special accommodations.

Classification of Final Awards and Academic Honors


Zanzibar University will make use of a five point system in classifying final MBA awards. The
MBA award is classified into five classes:
(i) First Class
(ii) Upper Second Class
(iii)Lower Second Class
(iv) Pass and
(v) Fail
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The academic award classes are determined on the basis the Grade Point Average (GPA). The
GPA is determined by assigning numerical weights to the letter grades received in the MBA
courses: A = 5 points; B+ = 4 points; B = 3 points; C = 2 points, D = 1 point and F = 0 points.
The MBA class and GPA ranges are as depicted in Table 5 below:

Table 5: MBA Class and GPA Ranges


CLASS LETTER GRADE GPA RANGE
First Class A 4.4 – 5.0
Upper Second Class B+ 4.0 – 4.3
Lower Second Class B 3.0 – 3.9
Pass C 2.0 – 2.9
Fail D 1.0 – 1.9
Absolute Fail E 0 – 0.9

The MBA Degree will be awarded in February. In order to be awarded the MBA Degree, a
student must complete all requirements by the last day of the preceding final examination period.

The MBA Academic Honors


Zanzibar University will recognize outstanding academic performance in the MBA Programme.
Academic honors are determined on the basis of the GPA. The ranking for Graduation with
Honors is based on the cumulative GPA earned during the programme. Students with cumulative
GPA of 4.0 or above will be awarded Graduation with Honors. The students who have
supplemented examination(s) shall be ineligible for academic honors.

3.4.4 Incompletes, Supplementary Examinations, and Dismissal

Incomplete Grades

Grades of incompletes are given at the discretion of the instructor when, on the basis of work
completed, the student is doing passing work, but some requirements of the course (e.g.
examination) are not completed. All incomplete grades not removed from the student’s records
by the end of the following regular semester will be converted automatically to E. For instance,
incompletes earned in the First Semester must be removed by the end of the Second Semester
during the year of study. Grades of Incomplete are changed to permanent grades by the
instructor, who submits the change- of – grade upon completion of the course requirements.

Supplementary Examinations
A candidate fails secure a pass grade in any examination shall be required to sit for a
supplementary examination. The maximum number of failed courses in a semester for a
candidate to qualify for supplementary examinations shall not exceed three. A candidate who
fails in not more than two courses during the supplementary examinations shall be allowed to sit
for extended supplementary examination during the supplementary examination session of the
following academic year.

Dismissal

A student shall be dismissed from the MBA Programme upon receiving three grades of E in any
semester. A student who is dismissed from the programme for academics or other reasons may
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appeal the decision by writing to the Chairman of the Senate within 30 days of receiving the
dismissal letter. Upon receipt of the request the Faculty will convene a hearing and give the
student seven days advance notice. The student may appear in person or submit a written appeal.
If the student wishes to appear, but cannot, the hearing will still be held. Except where an error is
made, only those grades initially reported by instructors will be considered in determining
whether a student is subject to dismissal or not. All Senate decisions are final. There will be no
further appellate body.

3.4.5 Course Attendance

Attendance is an important aspect of studying at the Zanzibar University. MBA students are
admitted in part because of the experiences they bring to the community and what they can add
to class discussions. Without attending, learning as a collaborative process cannot exist.
Accordingly, absences are only appropriate in cases of personal emergency. In addition late
arrival is disruptive to the learning environment and MBA students are expected to be prompt.
All taught courses shall meet twice a week during the day. The Faculty shall have attendance
requirements and shall also require attendance in a minimum number of sessions to remain
enrolled in the course.

3.4.6 Leaves of Absence

A student who needs to interrupt the normal two-year course of study in the MBA Programme
shall request a leave of absence by writing a letter to the Director, IPSR, stating the reasons for
the request and the length of the expected absence. Depending on the circumstances, a leave of
absence may be granted for up to one year. The Faculty shall grant leaves to students in good
academic standing. The Faculty shall handle requests for extension of the leave on a case-by-
case basis. The maximum duration for a leave of absence from the MBA Programme shall be
three years.

3.4.7 Transcripts

Students shall obtain their MBA transcripts by completing a Transcript Request Form of by
submitting a request in writing to:

Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic)


Zanzibar University
P.O. Box 2440
Zanzibar – Tanzania

All requests for transcripts should be made through the Dean of Faculty of Business
Administration. Transcript requests by email, fax or phone are not acceptable. The University
will not release transcripts and/or grades if the student has not fulfilled all financial obligations to
the University. Academic transcripts which are submitted by students for admission to Zanzibar
University shall become a part of students’ permanent academic record and shall not be returned
to the students.
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PART FOUR
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STRUCTURE OF THE MBA PROGRAMME
4.1 Introduction

The MBA Programme is structured as a progressive model enabling students to gain a broad
base of management and leadership skills and an in depth understanding of the functional
components before moving into areas of specialization. The Analytical Foundation Courses
focus on the operational and analytical aspects of business decision making within key functional
areas of organizations. Students acquire the necessary background and insight into the principal
aspects of the internal and external business environments. In addition, the analytical foundation
courses provide knowledge and understanding in the application of information analysis and
presentation. The Analytical Foundation Courses are taught in the First Year of the MBA
Programme, two courses in each semester. The Core Business Fundamental Courses ensure
that students have a common grounding in the main functional areas of business. They are the
heart of the ZU MBA Programme. They are in total 10 courses, 8 being taught in the First Year
and 2 in the Second Year of study. Students shall be obliged to have three semesters of
instructions and one semester for dissertation work. A semester comprises 16 weeks of lecture
sessions and seminars. Six course units are to be taught in each semester. A course unit counts
for three credit hours. The Specialized Courses provide the opportunity to students to have an in-
depth study of an aspect of business management. The specialized courses develop knowledge
gained in the core fundamental courses by building on their content to gain more advanced
understanding. All specialized courses are taught in the Second Semester. Students take four
optional courses from a diverse choice that enables them to focus on a particular interest by
deepening and broadening understanding in a range of areas. This feature of the ZU MBA
Programme enables students to customize their MBA according to their own career aspirations.
Students may specialize in one of the following business areas: (i) Accounting (ii) Finance (iii)
Marketing or (iv) Human Resource and Organizational Management. The ZU MBA Programme
requires that a student completes a dissertation, which is an independent scientific research work
scheduled in the second semester of the Second Year of study.

4.2 The MBA Programme Majors and Concentrations


All MBA students are required to fulfil the programme requirement of one major. The
programme offers 4 MBA majors as outlined below:

4.2.1 Accounting Concentration


The concentration in Accounting provides students with the skills to measure and communicate
an organization’s economic activities. The accounting major at the Zanzibar University focuses
on the user of accounting data. Students are exposed to accounting techniques and analytical
tools necessary for planning and control of business operations. The alternative accounting
specializations are preparing students for careers in which accounting data are used extensively.
They include specializations in Financial Accounting and Reporting, Cost and Managerial
Accounting, and Taxation.
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4.2.2 Finance Concentration

The concentration on Finance is designed to provide students with a rigorous training in the
various key areas of the finance field. Students are to be imparted with both theoretical and
practical skills and expertise necessary for the analysis and solving of practical business financial
issues. Alternative finance specializations include: Investment Management and Valuation,
Banking and Financial Institutions, and Islamic Banking, Insurance and Finance.

4.2.3 Marketing Concentration

The concentration in Marketing is targeting to enable students to build deep competency in the
art and science of: (1) choosing which customers to serve, and (2) getting, keeping and growing
them through delivering superior customer value. Marketing majors will gain a proficiency in the
latest methods and concepts for understanding customer behavior and for devising effective
marketing strategies. Students can choose among three marketing specializations: Marketing
Management, Marketing Planning and Control, and Service-Marketing and Customer Care.

4.2.4 Human Resource and Organizational Management Concentration

The concentration in Human Resource and Organizational Management is designed to educate


students in the leading edge of theory and practice associated with the management of employees
and the design of organizations. It spans topics from understanding the behavior of individuals
and groups to designing management systems and structures to support business strategy.
Specializations that fall within this area of concentration are: Human Resource Management and
Organizational Management

4.3 The MBA Course Codes

MBA course codes will start with four letters which define the area of specialization to which the
specific course relates except for the Analytical Foundation Courses and the General MBA
Courses. The four letters are then followed by three digits, the first two digits being 60. The four
letters are as detailed below:

ALYF: Analytical Foundation Courses


MBGM: General MBA Courses
ACCT: Accounting Courses
FANC: Finance Courses
MKTG: Marketing Courses
HROM: Human Resource and Organizational Management

4.4 First Year Courses

FIRST SEMESTER
Analytical Foundation Courses
S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 ALYF 601 Managerial Economics 1
2 ALYF 602 Statistical Analysis for Management 1
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Core Business Fundamental Courses


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 ACCT 601 Managerial Accounting 1
2 MKTG 601 Marketing Management Strategy 1
3 MBGM 601 Management Communication 1
4 MBGM 602 Governmental and Legal Environment of Business 1
Total Semester Units 6

SECOND SEMESTER

Analytical Foundation Courses


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 ALYF 604 Decision Models and Uncertainty 1
2 HROM 601 Management of People at Work 1

Core Business Fundamental Courses


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 FANC 601 Advanced Corporate Finance 1
2 MBGM 603 Global Strategic Management 1
3 MBGM 604 Business Research Methods 1
4 MBGM 605 Operations Management: Quality, Productivity & Supply 1
Chain Mgt.
Total Semester Units 6
TOTAL YEAR I UNITS 12

4.5 Second Year Courses

FIRST SEMESTER

Core Business Fundamental Courses


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 MBGM 606 Entrepreneurship and Business Development 1
2 MBGM 607 Business Ethics and Responsibility 1
- - Specialization Subjects [4 Subjects] 4
- - Total Semester Units 6

SECOND SEMESTER

MBA Dissertation
S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 MBGM 666 MBA DISSERTATION 6
TOTAL YEAR II UNITS 12
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4.6 MBA Majors: Specialized Courses

ACCOUNTING
Financial Accounting and Reporting
S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 ACCT 602 Advanced Financial Accounting 1
2 ACCT 603 Tax Planning and Administration 1
3 ACCT 604 Auditing and Investigation 1
4 ACCT 605 Problems in Financial Reporting 1

Cost and Managerial Accounting


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 ACCT 606 Advanced Cost Accounting 1
2 ACCT 603 Tax Planning and Administration 1
3 ACCT 604 Auditing and Investigation 1
4 ACCT 607 Managerial Accounting in Multinationals 1

Taxation
S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 ACCT 608 Taxes and Business Strategy 1
2 ACCT 603 Tax Planning and Administration 1
3 ACCT 604 Auditing and Investigation 1
4 ACCT 602 Advanced Financial Accounting 1

FINANCE

Investment Management and Valuation


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 FANC 602 Investment Management 1
2 FANC 603 Corporate Valuation 1
3 FANC 604 International Corporate Finance 1
4 FANC 605 Fixed Income Securities 1

Banking and Financial Institutions


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 FANC 606 International Banking 1
2 FANC 607 International Financial Markets 1
3 FANC 604 International Corporate Finance 1
4 FANC 608 Financial Institutions Management 1

Islamic Banking, Insurance and Finance


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 FANC 609 Islamic Banking and Finance 1
2 FANC 604 International Corporate Finance 1
3 FANC 610 Islamic Insurance 1
4 FANC 608 Financial Institutions Management 1
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MARKETING
Marketing Management
S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 MKTG 602 Marketing Research 1
2 MKTG 603 Entrepreneurial Marketing 1
3 MKTG 604 Marketing Mgt: Programme Design & Strategy 1
4 MKTG 605 International Marketing Management 1

Marketing Planning and Control


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 MKTG 602 Marketing Research 1
2 MKTG 603 Entrepreneurial Marketing 1
3 MKTG 606 Sales Force Management and Customer Care 1
4 MKTG 607 Marketing Communications 1

Service Marketing and Customer Care


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 MKTG 602 Marketing Research 1
2 MKTG 603 Entrepreneurial Marketing 1
3 MKTG 608 New Product Development 1
4 MKTG 609 Service Marketing and Management 1

HUMAN RESOURCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT

Human Resource Management


S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 HROM 602 Strategic Management of Human Assets 1
2 HROM 603 Human Resource Training and Development 1
3 HROM 604 Labour Law and Employment Relations 1
4 HROM 605 Procurement of Human Resources 1

Organizational Management
S/NO. COURSE CODE COURSE NAME UNITS
1 HROM 602 Strategic Management of Human Assets 1
2 HROM 606 Corporate Governance and the Board 1
3 HROM 607 Foundation of Teamwork and Leadership 1
4 HROM 608 Managing Organizational Change 1

4.7 Dissertation for the MBA Programme

4.7.1 The MBA Dissertation: Description

MBA Candidates are required to complete a dissertation upon successful completion of the
taught component of the programme. The dissertation is an independent scientific research work,
which carries 6 degree units. It is equivalent to completion of 6 course units. Candidates are
required to submit a dissertation in partial fulfilment of the MBA.
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4.7.2 Objectives of the Dissertation

The dissertation is designed to provide opportunity for students to undertake a substantial piece
of research in the area of specialization. The Dissertation is designed to give students the
opportunity to demonstrate synthesis of knowledge and skills developed through the taught
component of the MBA Programme. Detailed policy and general guidelines dissertation
production shall be issued by the Faculty. The research topic should be sufficiently well focused
to facilitate an in-depth study, but broad enough to develop an informed overview of the topic
area. Candidates my choose one of the following research orientations:

 Application of management techniques and tools to address one or more issues/problems


in business organizations.

 Empirical testing of existing or newly developed managerial models and techniques using
primary and/or secondary data.

 Insightful and critical survey of existing literature on a specialized area and/or


development of new business management techniques for solving managerial problems
or addressing controversial business management issues.

4.7.3 Assessment Strategy

The dissertation has two principal parts, for assessment purposes: Written Part and Defence Part.
Candidates will have to pass both parts before they are allowed to graduate. The Written Part
shall be assessed by both an Internal Examiner (Supervisor) and external Examiners. Candidates
will be required to present and defend their research works to a panel of not less than four (4)
experts in the field of research. The required length of the dissertation shall be 15,000 – 20,000
words, exclusive of title and contents page, figures, tables, quotations, appendices and
bibliography.

4.8 The MBA Internships

The MBA internship is a non-examinable component of the ZU MBA Programme. It is designed


in recognition of the fact that practical business insights and skills can be acquired only through
internships and not through the classroom. The internship programme shall assist MBA students
gaining “hands-on” experience by applying acquired classroom knowledge and skills to the
assigned job of the sponsoring employer. The internship programme shall be scheduled after the
first semester of the second year of study and before commencement of the MBA dissertation
work. The duration of the internship programme shall be two months.
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PART FIVE
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CURRICULUM OF THE MBA PROGRAMME
5.1 MBA Curriculum Description

Table 6: The MBA Curriculum

MBA CURRICULUM

FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER
Analytical Foundations Analytical Foundations
SUBJECT SUBJECT
Managerial Economics Decision Models and Uncertainty
Statistical Analysis for Management Management of People at Work
Core Business Fundamentals Core Business Fundamentals
Managerial Accounting Advanced Corporate Finance
Marketing Management Strategy Global Strategic Management
Management Communication Business Research Methods
Governmental and Legal Environment Operations Management: Quality,
of Business Productivity & Supply Chain Mgt.
SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER
Core Business Fundamentals
SUBJECT
Entrepreneurship and Business Development
Business Ethics and Responsibility

MBA Areas of Concentration


ACCOUNTING CONCENTRATION
Advanced Financial Accounting
Financial Accounting and Reporting Tax Planning and Administration
Auditing and Investigation
Problems in Financial Reporting
Advanced Cost Accounting
Cost and Managerial Accounting Tax Planning and Administration
Auditing and Investigation
Management Accounting for Multinational Cos.
Taxes and Business Strategy
Taxation Tax Planning and Administration
Auditing and Investigation
Advanced Financial Accounting
FINANCE CONCENTRATION
Investment Management
Investment Management and Valuation Corporate Valuation
International Corporate Finance
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Fixed Income Securities


International Banking
Banking and Financial Institutions International Financial Markets
International Corporate Finance
Financial Institutions Management
Islamic Banking and Finance
Islamic Banking, Insurance and Finance International Corporate Finance
Islamic Insurance
Financial Institutions Management
MARKETING CONCENTRATION
Marketing Research
Marketing Management Entrepreneurial Marketing
Marketing Mgt: Programme Design & Strategy
International Marketing Management
Marketing Research
Marketing Planning and Control Entrepreneurial Marketing
New Product Development
Marketing Communications
Marketing Research
Service Marketing and Customer Care Entrepreneurial Marketing
Sales Force Management and Customer Care
Service Marketing and Management

HUMAN RESOURCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL


MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION
Strategic Management of Human Assets
Human Resource Management Human Resource Training and Development
Labour Law and Employment Relations
Procurement of Human Resources
Strategic Management of Human Assets
Organizational Management Corporate Governance and the Board
Foundation of Teamwork and Leadership
Managing Organizational Change

5.2 Analytical Foundation Courses

ALYF 601: Managerial Economics

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course deals with applying microeconomic theory to the management of the firm in markets
where the firm possesses market/monopoly power. The course will concentrate on the way that
microeconomics may be utilized to enhance decision making within the manager’s organization.
The student will develop an understanding of the economic environment in which the firm
operates and how to think strategically within it.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Understand the economic tools of analysis relevant to managerial decision making
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 Appreciate the macroeconomic environment in which business firms operate.


 Apply microeconomic principles to solving business related problems

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Fundamentals of Managerial Economics
 Market Forces: Demand and Supply
 Theory of Individual Behavior
 Production Process and Costs
 Organization of the Firm
 Market Structures and Pricing
 The Economics of Information

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, class tests, and final examination.

Required Readings
Perloft Jeffrey, 2006, Microeconomics, 4th Edition: Addison Wesley.

Pindyck,Robert S., Rubinfeld, Daniel L., Mehta, Prem L.,2005, Micro Economics, 6th Edition.

Gupta, G.S. 2004, Managerial Economics: TATA- McGraw Hill

Dwivedi, D.N., 2004, Managerial Economics, 6th Edition: VIKAS

Edwin Mansfield W. Bruce Allen, Neila Doherty Keith Weigelt, 2002, Managerial Economics –
Theory, Application and Cases 5th Edition: Norton.

Stights, Joseph E., Walsh, Carl E., 2002, Economics 3rd Edition: NORTON

Recommended Readings
Hubbard R. O’Brien, Antony, 2006, Economics: Prentice Hall

Pancer, David, Nellis, Joseph, 2006, Principles of Business Economics, 2nd Edition Financial
Times/Prentice-Hall.

Parkin, Michael, 2006, Essential Foundations of Economics, 3rd Edition: Addison Mosley.

Stights, Joseph E., Walsh, Carl E., 2002 , Economics 3rd Edition: Norton.

ALYF 602: Statistical Analysis for Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces statistical ideas as they apply to managers. Two key ideas dominate the
material: (i) summarizing and describing data, and (ii) modeling variability and randomness
using probability models. The focus of the presentation is on understanding the rationale for
22 | P a g e

modern statistical methods and developing critical judgment in the use of these methods. This
course also explores the use of the key statistical methodology known as regression analysis in
solving business problems. Regression analysis permeates most of applied statistics. This course
considers the application of regression in various contexts, such as the prediction of future sales
and the response of the market to price changes. The use of regression diagnostics and various
graphical displays supplement the basic numerical summaries and provides insight into the
validity of the models.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Understand statistical techniques necessary for analysis of business related issues and
problems
 Understand statistical tools of analysis relevant to research and managerial decision
making
 Apply statistical principles to solving business related problems.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Randomness and variability
 Graphical summarization
 Quality control
 Probability, sampling and estimation
 Confidence intervals and hypothesis tests
 Least squares estimation, residuals and outliers
 Correlation and autocorrelation
 Collinearity, and randomization.

Course Format
Class room lectures and discussion, assigned and graded individual and group exercises, data
analysis project, and a final examination.

Required Readings
Levin, E.R. and Rubin, D.S. (2007), Statistics for Management, 7th Edition, Prentice Hall (India).

Arora, P. N. and Arora, S. (2009), Statistics for Management, S. CHAND.


Arora, P. N. and Arora, S. (2009), Statistics for Management, S. CHAND.

Levin, I. R and Rubin, D. S. (2007), Statistics for Management, 7th Edition: Prentice Hall (India).

Aczel, Amir D., Jayavel Sounder Pandian, (2006), Complete Business Statistics, 6th Edition:
TATA McGraw Hill.

Francis, A., 2004, Business Mathematics and Statistics 6th Edition: Thomson

Ziegel, E. R. (2004), Data Analysis for Managers with Microsoft Excel, 2nd Edition,
Brooks/Cole.
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Recommended Readings
Stephen, D. Krehbiel, T. C.. and Berenson M. L. (1997), Statistics for Managers Using Microsoft
Excel (International Edition), Prentice Hall.

ALYF 603: Decision Models and Uncertainty

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The applicability and use of management science models have increased dramatically in recent
years due to the extraordinary improvements in computer, information, and communication
technologies. The emphasis is on models that are widely used in diverse industries and functional
area, including finance, operations, accounting and marketing. This course necessarily imparts
knowledge to that effect.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Understand and appreciate the role played by quantitative techniques in managerial
decision making
 Acquire knowledge of models and ideas that provide powerful (and oftentimes
surprising) qualitative insights about a large spectrum of managerial problems.
 Understand the kinds of problems that can be tackled quantitatively, the methods and
software available for doing so and the difficulties involved in gathering the relevant
data.
 Pursue advanced works in business and economics

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Regression and Forecasting Models
 Linear and integer Programming
 Time Series Models
 Decision making under Uncertainty
 Decision Making Theory
 Simulation.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, with occasional case studies and problem assignments
(including several using computer packages) and final examination.

Required Readings
Waters Donald, 2006, Quantitative Methods for Business: Financial Times/Prentice-Hall.

Buglear, John, 2005, Quantitative Methods for Business – The A-Z of QM: Butterworth
Heinemann.

Anderson D. R., et al (2005), Quantitative Methods for BusinessDecision Making, South –


Western.
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Anderson D. R., Sweeney D. J. and Williams T. A. (2004), An Introduction to Management


Science: Quantitative Approaches to Decision Making, Thomson South – Western.

Mik, Wisniewski, 2002, Quantitative Methods for Decision Markers, 3rd Edition: Prentice Hall

Stair, Ralph, Hanna, Michael, Render Barry, 2000, Quantitative Analysis for Management:
Prentice-Hall.

Recommended Readings
Tuttle, Michael, Graves Virginia, Rouche Nelda, 2005 Business Mathematics, 9th Edition:
Prentice Hall.

Baradyara, Joseph S., Ame, Ahmed M., 2005, Quantitative Techniques for Business Decisions
– Mkuki na Nyota Publications.

John Curwin and Roger Slater, 2003, Quantitative Methods for Business Decisions, 5th Editions:
Thomson.

Stair, Ralph, Hanna, Michael, Render Barry, 2000, Quantitative Analysis for Management:
Prentice-Hall.

HROM 601: Management of People at Work

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Work is a dominant theme in the lives of most people. The way people are managed at work
affects the quality of their lives as individuals, the effectiveness of organizations, and the
competitiveness of nations.This course will analyze many of the processes and practices required
to effectively conduct a range of people management responsibilities.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Understand the basic techniques of management of people at work places
 Appreciate the role of psychology of individual behavior and work groups in the success
of business organizations.
 Understand alternative systems/models of managing people at work.
 Develop new skills for managing people in contemporary organizations.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:

 Human Resource Management and Employee/Workplace Relations Management - The


Link to Organizational Strategies.
 Establishing Human Resource Management Cost Effectiveness
 Psychology of individual behavior or of work groups
 Motivation and job satisfaction
 Design of jobs and employee empowerment
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 Group behavior and teamwork (including arrangements such as quality of work life
programme)
 Leadership in People Management
 Alternative models or systems of managing employees – for example, the dominant
Japanese employment system as contrasted with Tanzanian practices.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, with case studies and problem assignments and final
examination.

Required Readings
Griffin, R. W. and Moorhead, G. (2010), Organizational Behaviour: Managing People and
Organizations, 9th Edition, South Western, (USA)

Beckstrom, R. & Brafman, O. (2006), The Starfish and the Spider: The Unstoppable Power of
Leaderless Organizations. Penguin, (USA).

Tony, W. (2006), Organizing and Managing Work, 2nd Edition, Pearson Education Limited.

Brafman O. & Beckson R. A. M. (2006), The Starfish and the Spider: The unstoppable Power of
Leaderless Organization, Penguin (USA).

John E. Delery, Jason D. Shaw (2001), The Strategic Management of People in Work
Organizations: Review, Synthesis, and Extension, in (ed.) (Research in Personnel and Human
Resources Management, Volume 20), Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Shamil Naoum (2001), People and Organizational Management in Construction, Thomas


Telford Publishing, London.

Recommended Readings
Armstrong, M. (2004), A Handbook of Human Resource Management Practice, Kogan Page
Publishers.

Sims, R. R. (2002), Managing Organization Behavior, Greenwood Publishing Group Inc. (USA)

5.3 Core Business Fundamental Courses

ACCT 601: Managerial Accounting

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course emphasizes the use of accounting information for internal planning and control
purposes. This orientation contrasts with financial accounting where the focus is on accounting
disclosures for parties external to the firm.
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Course Objectives
This course is intended as an introduction for individuals who will make business decisions and
evaluate the performance of business units using data obtained from the accounting system.
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Understand the basic vocabulary and mechanics of cost accounting
 Understand the basic issues involved in the design of a cost accounting system
 Appreciate the role of management accounting in decisions
 Carry out resource allocation and performance evaluation.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
The module covers the following components:
 Introduction to managerial accounting
 Cost terms and concepts
 The firm’s cost accounting system
 Management accounting information for decision making
 Planning, control and performance measurement

Course Format
Classroom lectures, class tests and final examination.

Required Readings
Horngren, Charles T. Datar, Srikant M., Foster, George, 2006, Cost Accounting – A Managerial
Emphasis, 12th Edition: Pearson Prentice Hall

Stratton, William O., Horngren, Charles T, Sundew, Gray L., 2004, Introduction to
Management Accounting, 3rd Edition: Prentice Hall.

Saxena, V.K. and Saxena C. D. 2004, Advanced Cost and Management Accounting, 17th Edition.

Saleemi, N.A., 2005, Cost Accounting Simplified, 4th Edition: Saleemi Publications.

Gary, Cokins, 2004, Activity Based Cost Management: Making it Work: TATA McGraw Hill.

Colin, Drury, 2004, Management and Cost Accounting, 6th Edition: Thomson Learning.

Recommended Readings
Lucey, T., 2002,Costing, 6th Edition: Bookpower.

Khan, M. Y., Jain, P. K., 2000, Cost Accounting: Tata Mc. Graw.

Lima, Jeremiah, 2004, Cost Accounting, Students’ Manual, NBAA


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MKTG 601: Marketing Management and Strategy

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Strategic Marketing is a central issue in the field of Marketing and Management. A thorough
understanding of Strategic Marketing is critical to the success of all organizations competing in a
marketplace; this includes many non-profit and social organizations. This course addresses the
management challenge of designing and implementing the best combination of marketing
variables to carry out a firm’s strategy in its target markets. Participants will be expected to
become familiar not only with the theories reviewed, but also with their managerial implications,
including matters relating to marketing planning, marketing organization, budgeting and control.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
Specifically, this course seeks to develop the student’s skills in applying the analytic perspectives
and concepts of marketing to such decisions as segmentation and targeting, branding, pricing,
distribution and promotion. The goal is to understand how the firm can benefit by creating and
delivering value to its customers and stakeholders. On successful completion of the course
students will be conversant with a full rage of marketing management and strategy frameworks.
Students will have developed an ability to apply marketing management and strategic concepts
to practical business situations.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
The module covers the following components:
 The Nature of Strategic Marketing
 Understanding the Market
 Segmentation, Positioning and Marketing Mix
 Strategic Marketing Development, including: Strategic Marketing Analysis; Marketing
Strategy Formulation.
 Strategic Market Planning
 Managing marketing channels and personal selling
 Applications of Strategic Marketing, including: Global Marketing Strategies;
Relationship Marketing Strategies; e-Marketing Strategies.
 Resource allocation and Competitive analysis.
 Market entry/exit decisions

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, class rests and final examination.

Required Readings
Jobber D. (2010), Principles and Practice of Marketing, McGraw Hill International (UK) Ltd.

Aaker, D. A. (2009), Strategic Market Management, 9th Edition, Wiley.


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Ross Brennan, Paul Baines, Paul Garneau,and Lynn Vos (2008), Contemporary Strategic
Marketing 2nd Edition, Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN: 9780 23050720-3
Graham Hooley, Nigel Piercy, Brigitte Nicoulard (2008) Marketing Strategy and Competitive
Positioning 4th Edition, Prentice Hall ISBN:978 0 273 70697-7

Doyle, P. and Stern, P. (2006), Marketing Management and Strategy, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall.

Recommended Readings
Chernev, A., (2009), Strategic Marketing Management, 5th Edition, Brightstar Media, Inc.

Quelch, J. et al (1997), Cases in Marketing Management and Strategy,1st Edition, Prentice Hall
Business Publishing.

MBGM 601: Management Communication

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to prepare business leaders for the communication challenges of the
workplace. Students will learn successful communication strategies, and gain confidence using
these strategies.

Course Objectives
The principal objective of the course is to enable students develop and demonstrate effective,
business oriented, and verbal communication skills. Upon completion of this course, the student
will be able to:
 Understand the pillars of effective management communication
 Construct official documents and reports
 Organize and deliver speeches effectively
 Apply communication devices for oral and written communication

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction: Understanding Management Communication
 Pillars of Management Communication
 Letters, Memos and E-Mails
 Reports and Proposals
 Career Communication
 Persuasion, organization and delivery of speeches
 Defending one’s view before adversarial audiences
 Impromptu and prepared speeches
 Effective use of PowerPoint
 Visual display of data
 Dealing effectively with the media.
 Communication Issues for Management Success
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Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, problem assignments, class tests and final examination.

Required Readings
O’Rourkem, J. S. (2009), Management Communication: A. Case – Analysis Approach, Prentice
Hall.

Tripathi, P. S. (2009): Communication Management: A Global Perspective, Global India


Publications.

Bell, a. H. and Dayle M. Smith (2009), Management Communication, John Willey and Sons.

Brounstein, M. Bell, a. H., Smith, D. M. and Isbell, C. (2006), Business Communication, John
Wiley & Sons.

Recommended Readings
Guffery, M. E. and Loewy, D. (2009), Essentials of Business Communication, Cengage
Learning.

Hattersley, M,. E. and Mc Jannet L. (2007) Management Communication: Principles and


Practice 3rd Edition, Mc.Graw – Hill/Irwin.

MBGM 602: Governmental and Legal Environment of Business

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course presents broadly applicable frameworks that will help students to manage and advise
clients more effectively in a world heavily influenced by legal concerns and governmental
forces.

Course Objectives
The main objective of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of how the
law and the political process affect business strategy and decision making. Upon completion of
this course, the student will be able to:
 Understand the legal environment of business
 Deal with challenges involving legal issues related to business enterprises
 Understand the Tanzanian judicial system
 Understand techniques for resolving disputes in businesses
 Understand important issues related to formation of contracts

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction: Legal Environment of Business: Overview
 Legal infrastructure (contracts, intellectual property, antitrust, etc.) and its effect on
Business Strategy
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 How businesses deal with challenges involving government agencies, legislation, or the
press.
 Fundamentals of the Legal Environment of Business
 Legal Foundations: Definitions and Classifications of Law Jurisprudence and Theories of
Law
 Understanding Law in a Global Context
 The Tanzanian Judicial System
 Role of the Judiciary in Public Policy and Government
 Resolving Disputes: Litigation and Alternative Dispute Resolution Options
 Law and Commerce and Overview and Formation of Contracts
 Contract Performance: Conditions, Breach and Remedies

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, with occasional case studies, class tests and and final
examination.

Required Readings
Cross, F. B. and Miller, R. L. (2009), The Legal Environment of Business: Text and Cases –
Ethical, Regulatory, Global and E-Commerce Issues, 7th Edition, Cengage Brain.

Melvin, S. (2010), The Legal Environment of Business: A Managerial Approach: Theory to


Practice, McGraw Hill.

Alexander, D. B., Hartman, L. and Harrison, L. (2011), The Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory
Environment of Business in a Diverse Society, McGraw Hill.

Reed O. L. Shedd, P., Morehead J. and Pagnattaro, M. (2009), The Legal and Regulatory
Environment of Business, McGraw Hill.

Recommended Readings
McAdams, T. (2008), Law Business and Society, McGraw Hill.

McGraw-Hill (2002), Business Law and the Legal Environment, McGraw Hill.

Reed, O. L. (2004), Study Guide Accompany the Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business,
McGraw Hill.

FANC 601: Advanced Corporate Finance

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course reviews the theory and empirical evidence related to the investment and financing
policies of the firm and attempts to develop decision-making ability in these areas. The approach
is rigorous and analytical.
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Course Objectives
The primary objective is to provide a framework, concepts, and tools for analyzing financial and
investment decisions based on fundamental principles of modern financial theory. Its purpose is
to develop a framework for analyzing a firm's investment and financing decisions.
Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Leasing
 Mergers and acquisitions
 Corporate reorganizations
 Financial planning and working capital management
 Decision making under uncertainty
 Cost of capital and capital structure
 Pricing of selected financial instruments and corporate liabilities
 Corporate capital budgeting and valuation
 Investment decisions under uncertainty
 Capital asset pricing,

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Briooks, R. (2006), Introduction to Financial Management, BPP Publishing Ltd., London.

Pandey, I. M. (2003), Financial Management, Vikas Publishing House PVT Ltd.

Reilly, Frank K. and Brown K. C. (2003), Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management,
Thompson South-Western.

Ross, S. A., Westerfiel R. W and Jordan, B. D. (2000), Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 5th
Edition, Irwin Mc Graw Hill.

Van House J. C. and Wachowice Jr. J. M. (2001), Fundamentals of Financial Management, 11th
Edition, Person Education Asia.

Recommended Readings
Waston, Denzil, Anthony Head, (2006), Corporate Finance, 4th Edition: Financial Times/Prentice-
Hall.

Brooks, Ray, (2006), Introduction to Financial Management: Addison Wesley

Arnold, Glen, (2005), Corporate Financial Management: Prentice-Hall

Brealey, Myers, (2005), Principles of Corporate Finance: Tata McGraw Hill


32 | P a g e

Firer, Colin, Ross Stephen A, Westerfield Randolph W. and Jordan Bradford D. (2005),
Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 3rd South African Edition: McGraw-Hill Companies,
Berkshire UK .
Brigham, Eugene, F., Houston, Joel H., (2004), Fundamentals of Financial Management,
Thomson Learning, 10th Edition

MBGM 603: Global Strategic Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course deals with the strategic and organizational management of multinational
corporations (MNCs), focusing on the creation of competitive advantage in a global context.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Carry out external and internal analyses
 Formulate business strategies
 Appraising and Implementing business strategies

Course Contents
Specific topics include:

 Global Strategic Management: An Overview


 External and Internal Analysis
 Formulating Strategy and Developing a Business Model
 Strategic Choice and Positioning
 Leveraging Competitive Advantage [Through Global Market. Global Sourcing, Strategic
Alliances and Innovation
 Implementing the Strategic Plan
 Integration and Emerging Issues in Global Strategic Management

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Mellah, K. and Frynas, J. G. (2010), Global Strategic Management, Oxford University Press,
Inc.

Finlay, P. N. (2009), Strategic Management: An Introduction to Business and Corporate


Strategy, Pearson Education.

Lasserre, P. (2008), Global Strategic Management, Palgrave Mcmillan.

Ungson, G. R. and Yu Wong Y. (2008), Global Strategic Management, M. E. Sharpe.


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Hill, C. and Jones, G. (2009), Strategic Management Theory, Lengage Learning.

Barnuger, Brule, Ireland, Duanne, (2006), Management Challenges and Solutions in Digital Era:
Prentice-Hall.
Recommended Readings
Martin, J. (2005), Organizational Behaviour and Management, 3rd Edition: Thomson

Judge, Tim, Robbins, Stephen, (2006), Management, 8th Edition: Prentice-Hall

Chandan, J. S. (2005), Management Concepts and Strategies: VIKAS

David, Fred R. (2005), Strategic Management Concepts and Cases 9th Edition: PEARSON

Wheeten, Tom, Hunger, David, (2005), Strategic Management and Business Policy, 10th Edition:
Prentice Hall.

MBGM 604: Business Research Methods

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces to students the fundamental aspects of research. It covers issues related to
research proposal construction, data collection techniques, the analysis of data and research
report writing.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Construct viable business research proposals
 Manage data collection process
 Analyze and interpret research data
 Write good research reports

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Overview of Research
 Methods of Data Collection
 Sampling Methods
 Processing and Analysis of Data
 Multivariate Analysis
 Reliability and Validity
 Essentials of Report Writing

Course Format

Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.
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Required Readings
Kothari, C.R., 2004, Research Methodology Methods and Techniques: 2nd Edition: WISHWA
PRAKASHAN.

Pervez, Ghauri, Kjell, Gronhang, 2002, Research Methods in Business Studies: A Practical
Guide: Financial Times/Prentice Hall
Sumathi, S. and Psaravanavel, 2005, Marketing Research Consumer Behaviour: VIKAS

Churchill, Gilbert A. Jr., Iacobucci, Down, 2002, Market Research – Methodological


Foundations: 8th Edition: Thomson South Western

Wilkinson and Bhandarkar, 2004, Methodology and Techniques of Social Research, 6th Revised
Edition: Himalaya Publishing House.

Recommended Readings
Jaber, F. et al 2002, Handbook of Interview Research: Context and Methods: Sage Publications,
Inc.

Kapoor, V.K., 2001, Reprint, 2004, Operational Research, 7th Revised Edition: Sultan Chand
and Sons.

Saunders, M., Lewis, Philip, Thornhill, Adrian, 2003, Research Methods for Business Students,
3rd Edition: Prentice Hall.

MBGM 605: Operations Management: Quality, Productivity & Supply Chain Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course emphasizes two related issues in operations management, processes and supply. A
process is a set of interrelated work activities characterized by specific inputs and value-adding
tasks that produce specific outputs. Matching supply with demand is a primary challenge for a
firm: excess supply is too costly, inadequate supply irritates customers. Matching supply to
demand is easiest when a firm has a flexible supply process, but flexibility is generally
expensive.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Measure key process parameters like capacity and lead time
 Improve a process through approaches like finding and removing bottlenecks or better
division of the work among the people involved in the process
 Improve process and quality management
 Assess the appropriate level of supply flexibility for a given industry
 Explore strategies for economically increasing a firm’s supply

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Operations Management: An Overview
35 | P a g e

 The Scope of Operations and Production Management


 Forecasting and decision Making: Concepts and Tools
 Product Planning, Process Selection, and Capacity Planning
 Product/Service Quality Assurance and Productivity
 Supply Chain Management: Overview
 Demand and Customer Relationship Management Process
 Supplier Relationship Management Process
 Product Development, Manufacturing Flow Management Process
 Supply Chain Management Assessment
 Implementing and sustaining the Supply Chain Management Process

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Jacobs, F. R. and Chase, R. B. (2010), Operations and Supply Chairn Management, McGraw
Hill/Irwin.

Gunn, S. B. (2010), Essential Tools for Operations Management: Tools, Models and Approaches
for Managers and Consultants, Wiley.

Lambert, D. M. (2008), Supply Chain Management: Processes, Partnership & Performance,


Supply Chain Management Institute (USA).

Young, S. T. (2007), Essentials of Operations Management, SAGE Publications.

Slack, N., Chambers, S. and Johnson R. (2007), Operations Management, 5th Ed. FT. Prentice
Hall.

Cohen S., Roussel, J. (2005), Strategic Supply Chain Management, McGraw Hill Professional.

Recommended Readings
Hugos, M. H. (2003), Essential of Supply Chain Management, John Wiley, and Sons.

Mentzer J. T. (2001), Supply Chain Management, Sage Publications.

Meredith, J. R. and Shafer, S. M. (2002) Introducing Operations Management, Wiley.

Kamauff, J, (2009), Manager’s Guide to Operations Management, McGraw Hill.

MBGM 606: Entrepreneurship and Business Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course introduces entrepreneurship and business development. It imparts knowledge on how
to plan an entrepreneurial venture, how to initiate and develop it. This course is intended to
36 | P a g e

provide the MBA students entrepreneurial skills and techniques necessary for business
establishment and development.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

 Understand the concept of entrepreneurship and its close relationship with enterprise and
owner management
 Understand the nature of business development in the context of existing and new
business start ups
 To enable students understand the concepts of innovation and creativity and the roles that
both play in entrepreneurship and business development.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction to Entrepreneurship
 The Trait Theory and the ‘Model Entrepreneur’
 Entrepreneurial Motives
 Entrepreneurial Planning
 Initiating Entrepreneurial Ventures
 Measuring Market Potentials
 Business Development Strategy and the Business Plan
 Approaches to Developing New Businesses

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.
Required Readings
Westhead, Paul 2006, Entrepreneurship: Financial Times/Prentice Hall

Baron, Robert A., Shane, Scott A., 2005, Entrepreneurship: A Process Perspective: Thomson,
South-Western.

Kuratko, D.F. and Hodgetts R.M. 2004, Entrepreneurship a Contemporary Approach: Dryden.

Longenecker- Moore – Petty, 2003, Small Business Management – An Entrepreneurial


Emphasis, 12th Edition: Thomson.

Hirsch, R.D. and Peters M.P., 2002, Entrepreneurship, 5th Edition: TATA McGraw Hill

Hitt, M.A. Ireland, R.D., Camp, S.M. and Sexton, D.L., 2002 Strategic Entrepreneurship:
Integrating Entrepreneurial and Strategic Management Perspectives. Blackwell Publishers.

Recommended Readings
Lawrence, Annet, Weber, James, 2005, Business and Society, 11th Edition: McGraw-Hill
Burns, P., 2001, Entrepreneurship and Small Business : Pal Grave, New York
37 | P a g e

Sexton, D.L. and Landström, 2000, The Blackwell Handbook of Entrepreneurship. The
Blackwell Business.

MBGM 607: Business Ethics and Responsibility

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces to students issues related to ethics in business, human values and ethical
responsibility in business and private life. The course shall enable students acquire an ethical
vision and code of conduct thus bridging the gap between scientific knowledge and ethics.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Appreciate the role of business ethics and sense of responsibility in business success
 Frame business ethics
 Decide and manage business ethics
 Evaluate and conceptualize business ethics
 Understand techniques for inculcating business ethics to employees

Course Contents
 Specific topics include:
 Introduction: Business Ethics and Responsibility
 Framing Business Ethics and Corporate Responsibility
 Making decisions in Business Ethics
 Managing Business Ethics
 Evaluating Business Ethics
 Contextualizing Business Ethics and Responsibility
 Employees and Business Ethics

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Horrigan, B. (2009), Corporate social Responsibility in the 21st Century Edward Elgar
Publishing.

Lovell, A. and Fisher, C. (2008) Business Ethics and Valuers: Individuals, Corporate and
International Perspectives, Prentice Hall.

Visser, W. (2007), The A. to Z. of Corporate Social Responsibility, John Wiley and sons.
Crane, A. and Maten, D. (2007), Byusiness Ethics, Oxford University Press.

Carroll, Archie B., Buchholtz, Ann K., 2006, Business and Society – Ethics and Stakeholder
Management, 6th Edition: Thomson, South Western.
38 | P a g e

Ferrell, O. C., Fraedrich, John and Ferrell, Linda, 2001, Business Ethics: Ethical Decision
Making and Cases 5th edition: Houghton Mifflin Company
Recommended Readings
Colley, Doyle and Hardie, 2002, Corporate Strategy: TATA McGraw Hill

Agere, Sam, 2000, Promoting Good Governance: Principles, Practices and Perspectives
(Managing the Public Service: Strategies for Improvement Series): Commonwealth Secretariat.

Sandra, B. R., Buchholz, R. A., 2000, Rethinking Business Ethics: A Pragmatic Approach:
Oxford University Press.

5.4 The MBA Majors and Concentrations

All MBA students are required to fulfill the course requirements of at least one major. The
program offers 4 alternative majors with concentration in specialized areas within a selected
major. The MBA majors offered at the Zanzibar University include:

ACCOUNTING CONCENTRATION
The Accounting Major has specialization in three alternative accounting areas namely:
1. Financial Accounting and Reporting
2. Cost and Managerial Accounting
3. Taxation

FINANCE CONCENTRATION
The Finance Major has specialization in three alternative finance areas namely:
1. Investment Management and Valuation
2. Banking and Financial Institutions
3. Islamic Banking, Insurance and Finance

MARKETING CONCENTRATION

The Marketing Major has specialization in three alternative marketing areas namely:
1. Marketing Management
2. Marketing Planning and Control
3. Service Marketing and Customer Care

HUMAN RESOURCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION

The Human Resource and Organizational Management Major has specialization in two
alternative management areas namely:

1. Human Resource Management


2. Organizational Management
39 | P a g e

5.5 MBA Accounting Concentration

The Accounting major helps students acquire the skills to measure and communicate an
organization’s economic activities. Accounting is the formal system of collecting, organizing,
and reporting the financial data used to make economic decisions. The data shed light on current
financial status and liquidity, as well as past profitability and funds-generating capability. Its
users include corporate shareholders, lenders, management, employees, research organizations,
and taxing and regulatory agencies. Many different types of economic decisions require
accounting data. One major use of accounting data is to inform outsiders (interested people who
do not have direct access to corporate records) of the firm’s economic status and progress. By
contrast, the firm’s management requires data that will aid in controlling operations and
evaluating performance. Outside agencies often collect accounting data for tax collection and
other social and economic policy purposes. The accounting major at the Zanzibar University
focuses on the user of accounting data. The alternative accounting specializations are preparing
for careers in which accounting data are used extensively.

Requirements for the Major


In addition to the FOUR Analytical Foundation Courses offered in the first year of study and
TEN Core Business Fundamental Courses offered in the first year of study (EIGHT) and
second year of study (TWO), the MBA student is required to opt for one of the following
specialized accounting areas and do four related specialized courses as detailed below:

Financial Accounting and Reporting

Courses in this area of concentration include:


 ACCT 602: Advanced Financial Accounting
 ACCT 603: Tax Planning and Administration
 ACCT 604: Auditing and Investigation
 ACCT 605: Problems in Financial Reporting

Cost and Managerial Accounting

Courses in this area of concentration include:


 ACCT 603: Tax Planning and Administration
 ACCT 604: Auditing and Investigation
 ACCT 606: Advanced Cost Accounting
 ACCT 607: Management Accounting for Multinational Companies

Taxation

Courses in this area of concentration include:


 ACCT 602: Advanced Financial Accounting
 ACCT 603: Tax Planning and Administration
 ACCT 604: Auditing and Investigation
 ACCT 608: Taxes and Business Strategy
40 | P a g e

NB: Courses in italics are the most relevant accounting courses the department offers for those
wishing to sit for the CPA examination administered by the National Board of Accountants and
Auditors (NBAA).

5.6 Course Descriptions

5.6.1 Financial Accounting and Reporting Specialization

ACCT 602: Advanced Financial Accounting

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course is aimed at providing students with a comprehensive knowledge of advanced topics
in accounting, including accounting for foreign transactions, reconstruction, executorships and
trusts, preparation and presentation of financial statements, the valuation of shares and
businesses, and the mechanics of International Accounting Standards.

Course Objectives
The course aims at equipping students with knowledge and skills related to specialized topics
including: Executorships, bankruptcy and the preparation of corporate financial reports and
public sector for publication. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Accounting for foreign transactions, reconstruction, executorships and trusts
 Prepare and present financial statements
 Carry out valuation of shares and businesses
 Understand and apply the International Accounting Standards

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Accounting for Foreign Transactions of Entities
 Accounting for Reconstruction
 Executorships and Trust Account
 Preparation and Presentation of Financial Statements
 Public Sector Reports
 Interpretations of Financial Statement
 Valuation of Shares and Businesses
 Accounting Treatment for Specific Items as per International Accounting Standards

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
International Accounting Standards Board, (2006), International Financial Reporting Standards
and International Accounting Standards (IAS): IASB

Kothar, Jagdish, Barone, Elisabelt, (2006),Financial Accounting: Prentice Hall.


41 | P a g e

Maheshwari, S.N, Maheshwari, S.K., (2005), Financial Accounting, 4th Edition VIKAS

Alexander, D., Britton, A., Jorissen, A., 2005 International Financial Reporting and Analysis,
2nd Edition, Thomson Learning.
Alfredson, K., Leo, K., Picker, R., Pacter, P., Radford J., Applying International Accounting
Standards, J. Wiley

Lewis, Richard, Pendrill, David, 2004, Advanced Accounting, 7th Edition: FT Prentice Hall

Recommended Readings
ACCA, 2004, Preparing Financial Statements: Foulk Lynch

Wood, Frank and Sangster, Alan, 2005, Business Accounting,


10th Edition: Prentice-Hall

Scott, William R., 2003, Financial Accounting Theory, 3rd Edition: Prentice-Hall
Edmonds, McNair, Milan, Olds, 2000, Fundamental Accounting Concepts: 3rd Edition:
McGraw-Hall.

Bendrey, Mike, Hussey, Roger, Colston, West, 2004, Essentials of Financial Accounting in
Business: Thomson

ACCT 603: Tax Planning and Administration

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course presents an overview of the Tanzania tax raising system and its impact on the
planning and conduct of business operations. It draws on the disciplines of business finance,
public finance, and accounting as they relate to taxation.

Course Objectives
The course is aimed at providing students with a comprehensive knowledge of public finance
and taxation, government sources of revenue and government expenditure, tax assessment,
collection and accounting for such revenue are part of this course. Upon completion of this
course, the student will be able to:
 Understand the practical application various taxation concepts and definitions
 Understand the theoretical and practical aspects of the Tanzanian Income Tax 2004 and
VAT
 Understand techniques to curd tax avoidance
 Understand how to deal with objections and appeals

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction: Taxation Concepts and Definitions
 Taxation Theory
 The Income Tax Act, 2004
42 | P a g e

 Introduction to VAT: Theory and Practice


 Tax Avoidance, Planning and Evasion
 Customs
 Objections and Appeals

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Mponguliana, R.G., 2005, The Theory and Practice of Taxation in Tanzania 2nd Edition

The United Republic of Tanzania 2004 Income Tax Act: Government Printer

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2004, The Income Tax Regulation: Government Printer

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2000, The Tax Revenue Appeals Act, 2000: Government
Printer

East Africa Community, 2004- The East African Customs Management Act,

Recommended Readings
Rosen Harney, 2004, Public Finance 7th Edition: McGraw Hill

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2000, The Tax Revenue Appeals Act, 2000: Government
Printer

ACCT 604: Auditing and Investigation

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course includes a consideration of the role of the auditor, the organization of the accounting
profession, and the current audit environment. It introduces the student to generally accepted
auditing standards, professional ethics, and legal liability. The course also covers the auditor’s
reporting standards and uses case studies and professional journal articles as bases for discussion
and analysis.

Course Objectives
The course is geared toward making students be able to:
 Understand current issues and developments relating to auditing and the provision of
audit related and assurance services
 Work within a professional and ethical framework
 Produce an audit report in accordance with the requirements of the auditing standards
 Observe the professional and legal framework within which auditing is practices in the
country.
43 | P a g e

Course Contents
 Specific topics include:
 Professional and ethical considerations
 International developments in Auditing
 Audit and Corporate governance issues
 Auditing in a Computer environment
 Fraud, Irregularities, Money Laundering and Forensic audit
 Audit of Specialized entities
 Audit of not-for profit organizations
 Management Audit
 Public Sector Audit
 Assurance Engagements and prospective financial information

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Boynton, William, 2007, Modern Auditing, 8th Edition:John Wiley and Sons Inc.

Knapp, Michael, 2006, Contemporary Auditing, Real Issues and Cases, 6th Edition:
South-Western College Publishing.

Louwers, Timoths, Ramsay, Robert, Sinason David, Strawser Jerry, 2006, Auditing and
Assurance Services: Academic Internet Publisher.

Hall L, 2006, Information System Auditing and Assurance: Academic Internet Publisher

Glove, J., 2006, Auditing and Assurance, 4th Edition: McGraw

Steinbart, Paul J., Brunson, Romney, Terri J., Marshall B. 2006, Introduction to Microsoft Great
Plains –Focus on Internal Controls: Prentice Hall

Recommended Readings
Pany, Kurt, Whittington, Ray, 2005, Principles of Auditing and Other Assurance Services, 15th
Edition: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

Johnson, Raymond, Boynton, William, 2005, Modern Auditing Assurance Services and Integrity
of Financial Reporting, 8th Edition: John Willey and Sons.

The United Republic of Tanzania: Public Procurement Act, 2004, Government Printer.

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2002, Companies Act No. 12 of 2002: Government Printer
44 | P a g e

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2001, Public Finance Act No. 6 – Revised in 2004:
Government Printer.

ACCT 605: Problems in Financial Reporting

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This intensive one-semester course focuses on how to extract and interpret information in
financial statements. The course adopts a user perspective of accounting by illustrating several
specific accounting issues in a decision context.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Prepare and present Financial Statement in accordance with the stipulated IAS
 Appreciate the importance of accounting policies
 Prepare consolidated Financial Statements
 Analyze Financial Statement effectively

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 The Regulatory Framework (IASB).
 The IASB Conceptual Framework
 Presentation of Financial Statements.
 Accounting Policies, Accounting Estimates and Errors.
 Financial Reporting in Practice
o Property, Plant and Equipment
o Intangible Assets
o Impairment of Assets
o Non-Current Assets held for sale and discontinued operations
o Leases
o Inventories and Construction Contracts
o Financial Instruments
o Provisions and Events After the Reporting Period
o Revenue
o Employee Benefits
o Taxation in Financial Statements
o Statements of Cash Flows
o Financial Reporting in hyperinflationary economics
 Consolidated Financial Statements

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.
45 | P a g e

Required Readings
Ormiston A. and Fraser, L. (2008), Understanding Financial Statements, 9th Edition, person
Education.
Holmes, G. Sugden, A. and Gee, P. (2008), Interpreting Company Reports, Pearson Education.

Resvine, L., Collins d. and Johnson W. B. (2008), Financial Reporting and Analyses 3rd Edition,
Pearson Education.

International Accounting Standards Board, 2006, International Financial Reporting Standards


including International Accounting Standards: IASB.

Hirst, Eric D., Mary Lea Mc Anally 2005 Cases in Financial Reporting: Prentice Hall.

Elliott, B. and Elliott, J. (2005), Financial Accounting, Reporting & Analysis, 2nd Edition,
Pearson Education.

Recommended Readings
Jamie Elliott, Barry Elliott, 2005, Financial Accounting Reporting and Analysis: Financial
Times/Prentice Hall

Barry Elliott and Jamie Elliott, 2004, Financial Accounting and Reporting, 8th Edition: Prentice
Hall.
Nobes, Alexander D., 2004, Financial Accounting – An International Introduction, 2nd Edition,
FT. Prentice Hall

Sutton, T. (2003), Corporate Financial Accounting and Reporting, Pearson Education.

5.6.2 Cost and Managerial Accounting and Reporting Specialization

ACCT 606: Advanced Cost Accounting

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course aims at providing students an in depth practical knowledge of various methods and
techniques in the preparation of costs and management information for planning, control and
decision making purposes.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Acquire knowledge on business investment decision making
 Acquire knowledge of performance measurement techniques.
 Understand the challenges involved in making managerial decisions relating to costing,
pricing and marketing strategies
 Apply alternative quantitative techniques to solve management accounting related
business problems and issues
46 | P a g e

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction of Information for Decision Making
 Income effects of alternative cost Accumulation system
 Measuring relevant costs and revenues
 Product mix decisions when capacity constraints
 Activity Based Costing
 Pricing decisions and profitability analysis
 Decision making under conditions of risk and uncertainty
 Standard costing
 Management control systems
 Divisional performance measures
 Transfer pricing
 Contingency theory and organizational and social aspects of management accounting
 Application of Quantitative Methods to Management Accounting

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Ray Proctor, 2006, Management Accounting for Business Decisions 2nd Edition: Financial
Times/Prentice Hall.

Horngren, Charles T., Datar, Srikant M.and Foster, George M. 2005 Cost Accounting 2nd
Edition: Charles T. Horngren Series in Accounting.

Saxena, V.K. and Saxena C. D. 2005 Basics of Cost Accounting: Problems and Solutions,
New Delhi: Sultan Chand.

Drury, Colin, 2004, Management and Cost Accounting 6th edition: Thomson Learning.

Omachonu, Vicent K., Ross, Joel E, 2004, Principle of Total Quality 3rd Edition: CRC PRESS.

Lucey, T., 2003, Management Accounting, 6th Edition, Bookpower

Recommended Readings
Pauline Weetman, 2006, Management Accounting: Financial Times/Prentice Hall

Trevor Hopper, Robert Scapens, Deryl Northcott, 2006 Issues in Management Accounting 3rd
Edition: Financial Times/Prentice Hall.

David Greenberg, David Weimar, Aidan Vining Anthony Boardman 2006 Cost Benefit Analysis
3rd Edition: Prentice-Hall.
47 | P a g e

ACCT 603: Tax Planning and Administration

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course presents an overview of the Tanzania tax raising system and its impact on the
planning and conduct of business operations. It draws on the disciplines of business finance,
public finance, and accounting as they relate to taxation.

Course Objectives
The course is aimed at providing students with a comprehensive knowledge of public finance
and taxation, government sources of revenue and government expenditure, tax assessment,
collection and accounting for such revenue are part of this course. Upon completion of this
course, the student will be able to:
 Understand the practical application various taxation concepts and definitions
 Understand the theoretical and practical aspects of the Tanzanian Income Tax 2004 and
VAT
 Understand techniques to curd tax avoidance
 Understand how to deal with objections and appeals

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction: Taxation Concepts and Definitions
 Taxation Theory
 The Income Tax Act, 2004
 Introduction to VAT: Theory and Practice
 Tax Avoidance, Planning and Evasion
 Customs
 Objections and Appeals

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Mponguliana, R.G., 2005, The Theory and Practice of Taxation in Tanzania 2nd Edition

The United Republic of Tanzania 2004 Income Tax Act: Government Printer

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2004, The Income Tax Regulation: Government Printer

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2000, The Tax Revenue Appeals Act, 2000: Government
Printer

East Africa Community, 2004- The East African Customs Management Act,

Recommended Readings
Rosen Harney, 2004, Public Finance 7th Edition: McGraw Hill
48 | P a g e

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2000, The Tax Revenue Appeals Act, 2000: Government
Printer

ACCT 604: Auditing and Investigation

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course includes a consideration of the role of the auditor, the organization of the accounting
profession, and the current audit environment. It introduces the student to generally accepted
auditing standards, professional ethics, and legal liability. The course also covers the auditor’s
reporting standards and uses case studies and professional journal articles as bases for discussion
and analysis.

Course Objectives
The course is geared toward making students be able to:
 Understand current issues and developments relating to auditing and the provision of
audit related and assurance services
 Work within a professional and ethical framework
 Produce an audit report in accordance with the requirements of the auditing standards
 Observe the professional and legal framework within which auditing is practices in the
country.

Course Contents
 Specific topics include:
 Professional and ethical considerations
 International developments in Auditing
 Audit and Corporate governance issues
 Auditing in a Computer environment
 Fraud, Irregularities, Money Laundering and Forensic audit
 Audit of Specialized entities
 Audit of not-for profit organizations
 Management Audit
 Public Sector Audit
 Assurance Engagements and prospective financial information

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Boynton, William, 2007, Modern Auditing, 8th Edition:John Wiley and Sons Inc.

Knapp, Michael, 2006, Contemporary Auditing, Real Issues and Cases, 6th Edition: South-
Western College Publishing.

Louwers, Timoths, Ramsay, Robert, Sinason David, Strawser Jerry, 2006, Auditing and
Assurance Services: Academic Internet Publisher.
49 | P a g e

Hall L, 2006, Information System Auditing and Assurance: Academic Internet Publisher

Glove, J., 2006, Auditing and Assurance, 4th Edition: McGraw

Steinbart, Paul J., Brunson, Romney, Terri J., Marshall B. 2006, Introduction to Microsoft Great
Plains –Focus on Internal Controls: Prentice Hall

Recommended Readings
Pany, Kurt, Whittington, Ray, 2005, Principles of Auditing and Other Assurance Services, 15th
Edition: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

Johnson, Raymond, Boynton, William, 2005, Modern Auditing Assurance Services and Integrity
of Financial Reporting, 8th Edition: John Willey and Sons.

The United Republic of Tanzania: Public Procurement Act, 2004, Government Printer.

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2002, Companies Act No. 12 of 2002: Government Printer

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2001, Public Finance Act No. 6 – Revised in 2004:
Government Printer

ACCT 607: Management Accounting for Multinational Companies

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course aims at providing students with an in depth practical knowledge of various methods
and techniques in preparation of costs and management information for planning, control and
decision making purposes in an international context.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Understand the basic concepts of Management Accounting
 Carry out management accounting responsibilities in multinationals

Course Contents
Specific topics include:

 Introduction to Management Accounting: Basic Cost Concepts


 Full Costing
 Cost Allocation
 Activity – Based Costing
 Life Cycle Costing
 Out Sourcing Decisions
 Target Costing, Kaizen Costing
 Cost Management and Product Life Cycle
 Cost Analysis for Marketing Decisions
 Performance Measures Systems
50 | P a g e

 Balanced Scorecard
 Strategic Performance Management

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Drury, C. (2006), Cost and Management Accounting,

Blocker D. Chen K., Cokins, G. and Lin T. (2005), Cost Management: A Strategic Emphasis,

Needless, B. and Crosson, S.(2010), Management Accounting, South-Western.

Mongiello, M. and Harris, P. (2006), ‘Management Accounting and Corporate Management:


Insight into Multinational Hotel Companies”, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality
Management, Vol. 18, Issue 5, pp. 364 – 379.

Weygandt, J. J., Kimmel P. D. and Kieso D. E. (2009), Managerial Accounting: Tools for
Business Decision Making, John Wiley and Sons.

Recommended Readings
Trevor Hopper, Robert Scapens, Deryl Northcott, (2006), Issues in Management Accounting 3rd
Edition: Financial Times/Prentice Hall.

David Greenberg, David Weimar, Aidan Vining Anthony Boardman (2006), Cost Benefit
Analysis 3rd Edition: Prentice-Hall.

5.6.3 Taxation Specialization

ACCT 602: Advanced Financial Accounting

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course provides the students with skills and techniques necessary for exercising judgment
and application in corporate reporting matters encountered by professional accountants in
practice.

Course Objectives
The course aims at equipping students with knowledge and skills related to specialized topics
including: Executorships, bankruptcy and the preparation of corporate financial reports and
public sector for publication. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Account for foreign transactions, reconstruction, executorships and trusts
 Prepare and present financial statements
 Carry out valuation of shares and businesses
 Understand and apply the International Accounting Standards
51 | P a g e

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Accounting for Foreign Transactions of Entities
 Accounting for Reconstruction
 Executorships and Trust Account
 Preparation and Presentation of Financial Statements
 Public Sector Reports
 Interpretations of Financial Statement
 Valuation of Shares and Businesses
 Accounting Treatment for Specific Items as per International Accounting Standards

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
International Accounting Standards Board, (2006), International Financial Reporting Standards
and International Accounting Standards (IAS): IASB

Kothar, Jagdish, Barone, Elisabelt, (2006),Financial Accounting: Prentice Hall.

Maheshwari, S.N, Maheshwari, S.K., (2005), Financial Accounting, 4th Edition VIKAS

Alexander, D., Britton, A., Jorissen, A., 2005 International Financial Reporting and Analysis,
2nd Edition, Thomson Learning.

Alfredson, K., Leo, K., Picker, R., Pacter, P., Radford J., Applying International Accounting
Standards, J. Wiley

Lewis, Richard, Pendrill, David, 2004, Advanced Accounting, 7th Edition: FT Prentice Hall

Recommended Readings
ACCA, 2004, Preparing Financial Statements: Foulk Lynch

Wood, Frank and Sangster, Alan, 2005, Business Accounting,


10th Edition: Prentice-Hall

Scott, William R., 2003, Financial Accounting Theory, 3rd Edition: Prentice-Hall
Edmonds, McNair, Milan, Olds, 2000, Fundamental Accounting Concepts: 3rd Edition:
McGraw-Hall.

Bendrey, Mike, Hussey, Roger, Colston, West, 2004, Essentials of Financial Accounting in
Business: Thomson
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ACCT 603: Tax Planning and Administration

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course presents an overview of the Tanzania tax raising system and its impact on the
planning and conduct of business operations. It draws on the disciplines of business finance,
public finance, and accounting as they relate to taxation.

Course Objectives
The course is aimed at providing students with a comprehensive knowledge of public finance
and taxation, government sources of revenue and government expenditure, tax assessment,
collection and accounting for such revenue are part of this course. Upon completion of this
course, the student will be able to:
 Understand the practical application various taxation concepts and definitions
 Understand the theoretical and practical aspects of the Tanzanian Income Tax 2004 and
VAT
 Understand techniques to curd tax avoidance
 Understand how to deal with objections and appeals

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction: Taxation Concepts and Definitions
 Taxation Theory
 The Income Tax Act, 2004
 Introduction to VAT: Theory and Practice
 Tax Avoidance, Planning and Evasion
 Customs
 Objections and Appeals

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Mponguliana, R.G., 2005, The Theory and Practice of Taxation in Tanzania 2nd Edition

The United Republic of Tanzania 2004 Income Tax Act: Government Printer

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2004, The Income Tax Regulation: Government Printer

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2000, The Tax Revenue Appeals Act, 2000: Government
Printer

East Africa Community, 2004- The East African Customs Management Act,

Recommended Readings
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Rosen Harney, 2004, Public Finance 7th Edition: McGraw Hill


The United Republic of Tanzania, 2000, The Tax Revenue Appeals Act, 2000: Government
Printer

ACCT 604: Auditing and Investigation

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course includes a consideration of the role of the auditor, the organization of the accounting
profession, and the current audit environment. It introduces the student to generally accepted
auditing standards, professional ethics, and legal liability. The course also covers the auditor’s
reporting standards and uses case studies and professional journal articles as bases for discussion
and analysis.

Course Objectives
The course is geared toward making students be able to:
 Understand current issues and developments relating to auditing and the provision of
audit related and assurance services
 Work within a professional and ethical framework
 Produce an audit report in accordance with the requirements of the auditing standards
 Observe the professional and legal framework within which auditing is practices in the
country.

Course Contents
 Specific topics include:
 Professional and ethical considerations
 International developments in Auditing
 Audit and Corporate governance issues
 Auditing in a Computer environment
 Fraud, Irregularities, Money Laundering and Forensic audit
 Audit of Specialized entities
 Audit of not-for profit organizations
 Management Audit
 Public Sector Audit
 Assurance Engagements and prospective financial information

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Boynton, William, 2007, Modern Auditing, 8th Edition: John Wiley and Sons Inc.

Knapp, Michael, 2006, Contemporary Auditing, Real Issues and Cases, 6th Edition:
South-Western College Publishing.
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Louwers, Timoths, Ramsay, Robert, Sinason David, Strawser Jerry, 2006, Auditing and
Assurance Services: Academic Internet Publisher.

Hall L, 2006, Information System Auditing and Assurance: Academic Internet Publisher

Glove, J., 2006, Auditing and Assurance, 4th Edition: McGraw

Steinbart, Paul J., Brunson, Romney, Terri J., Marshall B. 2006, Introduction to Microsoft Great
Plains –Focus on Internal Controls: Prentice Hall

Recommended Readings
Pany, Kurt, Whittington, Ray, 2005, Principles of Auditing and Other Assurance Services, 15th
Edition: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

Johnson, Raymond, Boynton, William, 2005, Modern Auditing Assurance Services and Integrity
of Financial Reporting, 8th Edition: John Willey and Sons.

The United Republic of Tanzania: Public Procurement Act, 2004, Government Printer.

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2002, Companies Act No. 12 of 2002: Government Printer

The United Republic of Tanzania, 2001, Public Finance Act No. 6 – Revised in 2004:
Government Printer

ACCT 608: Taxes and Business Strategy

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The objective of this course is to develop a framework for understanding how taxes affect
business decisions. Traditional finance and strategy courses do not consider the role of taxes.
Similarly, traditional tax courses often ignore the richness of the decision context in which tax
factors operate. The key themes of the framework – all parties, all taxes and all costs – are
applied to decision contexts, such as investments, compensation, organizational form, regulated
industries, financial instruments, tax-sheltered investments, mergers and acquisitions,
multinational, and multistate.

Course Objectives
The ultimate goal is to provide a new approach to thinking about taxes (and all forms of
government intervention) that will be valuable even as laws and governments change.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction: Tax Planning Fundamentals
 Tax Information in Financial Statements
 Taxation of Corporations and their Alternatives: Capital Structure, Corporate
Distribution.
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 Introduction to the Planning for Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures


 Tax Planning for Divestitures
 Tax Arbitrage, Current Developments in Tax Planning
 Tax Planning for Compensation
 International Taxation
 Tax Planning for Investments

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Scholes, M. S. (2008), Taxes and Business Strategy, A Planning Approach, 4th Ed. Prentice Hall.

Agrawal, K. K. (2007), Corporate Tax Planning, Atlantic Publishers and Dist.

Agrawal K. K. (2007), Direct Tax Planning and Management, Atlantic Publishers and Dist.

Karayan, J. E. and Swenson C. W. (2006), Strategic Business Tax Planning, 2nd Edition, Wiley.

Lind, S. A. (2005), Fundamentals of Corporate Taxation, Foundation Press.

Karayan, J. E. Senson, C. W. and Neff, J. W. (2002), Strategic Corporate Tax Planning, John
Wiley and sons.

Recommended Readings
Block, c. D. (2004), Corporate Taxation; Examples and Explanations, Aspen Publishers Online.

5.7 MBA Finance Concentration

The Finance major provides students with the analytic and theoretical tools currently required to
master practical issues in finance, stressing financial management in business firms, financial
institutions, and units of government. The major offers courses relating to the financial
organization, operations, and problems of the economy at large. While some attention is given to
the descriptive, institutional, and historical aspects of the field, primary emphasis is placed on the
analytical foundations of the discipline, stressing theory and methods of analysis and making
extensive use of relevant techniques of economic analysis, mathematics, and statistics. Graduates
have entered their professional careers with positions in financial departments of general
businesses, investment banking firms, broker-dealer firms, and management consulting firms, as
well as various departments of commercial banks and other financial institutions, central banks,
and international financial institutions.

Requirements for the Major


In addition to the FOUR Analytical Foundation Courses offered in the first year of study and
TEN Core Business Fundamental Courses offered in the first year of study (EIGHT) and
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second year of study (TWO), the MBA student is required to opt for one of the following
specialized finance areas and do four related specialized courses as detailed below:

Investment Management and Valuation


Courses in this area of concentration include:

 FANC 602: Investment Management


 FANC 603: Corporate Valuation
 FANC 604: International Corporate Finance
 FANC 605: Fixed Income Securities

Banking and Financial Institutions


Courses in this area of concentration include:

 FANC 606: International Banking


 FANC 607: International Financial Markets
 FANC 604: International Corporate Finance
 FANC 608: Financial Institutions Management

Islamic Banking, Insurance and Finance


Courses in this area of concentration include:

 FANC 609: Islamic Banking and Finance


 FANC 610: Islamic Insurance
 FANC 604: International Corporate Finance
 FANC 608: Financial Institutions Management

NB: Courses in italics are the most relevant accounting courses the department offers for those
wishing to sit for the CPA examination administered by the National Board of Accountants and
Auditors (NBAA).

5.8 Course Descriptions

5.8.1 Investment Management and Valuation Specialization

FANC 602: Investment Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The courses in the investment management programme analyze the functioning of security
markets and provide the background and techniques for the valuation of securities and the
management and control of portfolios of financial assets. Students will learn how to establish
appropriate investment objectives, develop optimal portfolio strategies, estimate risk-return
tradeoffs, and evaluate investment performance. Many of the latest quantitative approaches are
discussed.
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Course Objectives
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the concepts of portfolio analysis in the
general area of institutional investment management. The course discusses principles for
managing investment assets that include equity and fixed-income securities. These principles
apply, for example, to managing corporate pension funds, bank-administered trusts, and other
institutional funds.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Investment Management – Introduction
 Portfolio Selection
 Applying Mean – Variance Analysis
 Asset Pricing Models
 Common Stock Markets, Trading Arrangements and Trading Costs
 Common Stock Portfolio Management Strategies
 Traditional Fundamental Analysis I: Sources of Information
 Traditional Fundamental Analysis II: Financial Ratio analysis
 Traditional Fundamental Analysis III: Earnings Analysis, Cash Analysis, and Dividends
Discount Models
 Security Analysis
 Equity Derivatives
 General Principles of Bond Valuation.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Fabozzi, F. J. Focardi, S. M. and Kolm, P. N. (2010), Quantitative Equity Investing, John Wiley
& Sons.

Fabozzi, F. J. (2009), Institutional Investment Management, John Wiley and Sons.

Singer, B. and Fedorinchik G. (2009), Investment Leadership and Portfolio Management, John
Wiley and Sons Inc.

String, R. a. (2008), Portfolio Construction, Management and Protection, Cengage Learning.

Markewitz, H. M., Fabozzi, F J,. and Kostovetsky, L. (2004)., The Theory and Practice of
Investment Management Workbook: Step-by-step Exercises and Tests to Help You Master the
Theory and Practice of Investment Management, John Wiley and Sons.

Reilly, Frank K., and Brown, Keith C. 2003, Investment Analysis Portfolio Management:
Thompson South-Western.

Recommended Readings
58 | P a g e

Fabozzi, f. J. and Markowitz, H. M. (Ed)., (2002), The Theory and Practice of Investment
Management, John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Hagin, R. (2004), Investment Management, John Wiley and Sons.

Strong, R. (2001), Practical Investment Management, South-Western College Pub.

FANC 603: Corporate Valuation

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The focus of this course is on the valuation of companies. Emphasis is on developing the
required information for valuation from financial statements and other information sources.

Course Objectives
At the end of this course participants should be able to:
 Appreciate the need for corporate valuation
 Understand and apply alternative business valuation models and techniques

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction to Corporate Valuation
 An Overview of Corporate Valuation Models.
 The Need for Corporate Valuation (When do you need to Value a Company?).
 Valuation of Public Versus Private Companies
 Ratio-Based Valuation
 Discounted Cash Flow Valuation
 The Key Value Drivers
 Value-Based Management.
 How to Value a Company in Practice.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Allman, K. A. (2010), Corporate Valuation Modeling, John Wiley and sons.

Hoover, Scott (2006), Stock Valuation, Mc Graw-Hill Professional.

Fry, D. and Tolleryd J. (2003), Corporate Valuation: An Easy Guide to Measuring Value, FT
Prentice Hall.

Fernandez, P. (2002), Valuation, Methods and Shareholder Value Creation, Academic Press.\
Thomas, R. and Gup. B. E. (2009), The Valuation Handbook, John Wiley and Sons.
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Recommended Readings
Yegge, W. A. (2002), A Basic Guide for Valuing a Company, 2nd Edition, Wiley.

Grant, J. L. (2003), Foundations of Economic Value Added, 2nd Edition, John Wiley.

FANC 604: International Corporate Finance

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course analyzes financial problems corporations face that result from operating in an
international environment.

Course Objectives
After completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Develop corporate strategy and foreign investment decisions
 Construct international portfolios to achieve international portfolio diversification
 Apply alternative techniques to manage foreign exchange risks
 Appraise International investments
 Deal with taxation issues in international business
 Deal with issues related to financing for the multinationals

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Corporate strategy and the decision to invest abroad,
 Forecasting exchange rates
 International portfolio diversification,
 Managing exchange risk,
 Taxation issues,
 Cost of capital and financial structure in the multinational firm, and
 Sources of financing.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
V.K. Khalla S. Shiva Ramu, 2004, International Business 8th Revised Edition: Anmol
Publications PVT Ltd.
Adrian Buckley, 2001, Multinational Finance 3rd Edition: Prentice Hall India
Eiteman, D. K., Stonehill, A. I., and Moffett, M. H., 2001, Multinational Business Finance 8th
Edition: Addison Wesley Longman,
Madura, J., 2003, International Financial Management 7th Edition: South-Western,
Eun, C. S. and Resnick, B. G., 2004, International Financial Management 3rd Edition: Irwin,
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Recommended Readings
ACCA 2007 Text, Strategic Financial Management, Part 3, Paper 3.7, ACCA: Kaplan
Publishing
Levich, R. M., 2001, International Financial Markets, 2nd Edition: McGraw-Hill.

FANC 605: Fixed Income Securities

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This is a rigorous study of fixed income securities, including default-free bonds, floating rate
notes, and corporate bonds. Closely related financial instruments such as forwards and futures on
fixed income securities, bond options, and interest rate swaps are also examined. In addition to
analyzing specific types of fixed income securities, there will be an examination of the tools used
in bond portfolio management.

Course Objectives
Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:
 Understand the procedures involved in investing alternative fixed income securities
 Appreciate the role of financial markets in the facilitation of trade of fixed income
securities
 Assess and decide on alternative fixed income investment opportunities
 Determine returns on investment in fixed income securities

Course Contents
 Specific topics include:
 Introduction: An Overview of Fixed Income Securities.
 Bond Primary and Secondary Markets
 Calculating Investment Returns
 Eurobonds
 Stable Value Investments
 Mortgages and Mortgage Backed Securities
 Collateralized Mortgage Obligations.
 Residential Assets-Backed Securities
 Securities Backed by Credit Card Receivables.
 Cash – Collaterized Debt Obligations
 Yield Curve Analysis
 Credit Derivatives

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Veronesi, P. (2010), Fixed Income Securities: Valuation, Risk and Risk Management, John
Wiley and Sons.
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Fabozzi, F. J. et al.(2006), Advanced Bond Portfolio Management, John Wiley and Sons.

Fabozzi, F. (2005), The Handbook of Fixed Income Securities, McGraw Hill.

Choudhry, M. (2004), The Handbook of European Fixed Income Securities, John Wiley & Sons.
Martellini, L. et. Al. (2003), Fixed Income Securities, John Wiley and Sons.

Reilly, Frank K., and Brown, Keith C. (2003), Investment Analysis Portfolio Management:
Thompson South-Western.

Recommended Readings
Tuckman, B. (2002), Fixed Income Securities: Tools for Todays Market, Second Edition, John
Wiley & Sons Inc.
Fabozzi, F. J. (2002), Fixed Income Securities, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Fabozzi, F. J. (2001), Bond Portfolio Management, John Wiley and sons.

5.8.2 Banking and Financial Institutions Specialization

Courses in this area are designed to develop an understanding of financial institutions and
financial markets and their relationship to public policies and management policies. Included are
studies of market structure, profit strategies, relationship of commercial banks and other financial
institutions, problems of asset and liability management, and the theory of interest and asset
prices. Central courses in this specilization include:

FANC 606: International Banking

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course focuses on international financial institutions and international banking activities.
The focus is on the basic analytics of managing a bank’s exposure to liquidity, credit, and market
and country risk. In addition, we will consider how to evaluate and compare the risk exposures
and performance of individual banks.

Course Objectives
Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Compare and contrast alternative banking systems in the world
 Have knowledge and skills the provision international banking services
 Understand risks faced by international banks and the approaches in use to guard against
these risks
 Understand how international banks are regulated
 Understand the techniques for managing international banking risks

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction to International Banking
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 A Brief History of International banking.


 Banking systems Around the World.
 International Banking Services.
 Understanding International Bank Risk.
 Types on International Banking Organizations
 Regulation of International Banking
 International Banking Risk Management.
 Foreign Banking Activities in Tanzania.
 Challenges for International Banks in foreign Markets.
 The Future of Banking and Financial Services.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Kim, S. J. McKenzie, M., and Choi, J. (2010), International Banking in the New Era: Post Crisis
Challenges and Opportunities, Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.

Mehta, D. R. and Fung, H. G. (2004), International Bank Management, Wiley Blackwell.

Fight, A. (2004), Understanding International Bank Risk, John Wiley and Sons.

Mullineux, a. W. and Murinde, V. (2003), Hand Book of International Banking, Edward Elgar
Publishing Ltd.,

Hughes, J. E. and MacDonald, S. B. (2002), International Banking, Addison Wesley.

Johnson, H.J. (2000), Global Financial Institutions and Markets, Wiley Blackwell.

Recommended Readings
Roberts, G. (1997), Law Relating to International Banking, Woodhead Publishing.

Walker, G. a. (2001), International Banking Regulation, Kluwer, Law International.

FANC 607: International Financial Markets

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This is a course on international financial markets and exchange rates. It provide students with
knowledge on operations and mechanics of international financial markets (including the Global
capital Market and the Foreign Exchange Market) as well as the nature and functions of
International Financial institutions.

Course Objectives
After successful completion of this course the student will be able to:
 Understand the nature and operations of the international financial markets
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 Appreciate the role of international financial markets to economic development of


nations
 Understand how financial instruments traded at the international financial markets are
valued

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction Overview of International Financial Markets
 Growth of International Financial Markets
 The Global Capital Market, Money Market and Instruments
 The Foreign Exchange Market
 The International Financial Institutions
 Global Financial Intermediation
 International Bond and Equity Markets.
 Pricing in the foreign currency and Eurocurrency markets
 Short-term returns and market efficiency in the international money markets,
 Derivative Instruments and Markets
 International capital asset pricing,
 Pricing of foreign currency bonds,
 Eurocurrency syndicated loans,

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Grote, R.and Marauhn, T. (2006). The Regulation of International Financial Markets,
Cambridge University Press.

Ghosh, d. K. and Ariff, M. (2004), Global Financial Markets: Issues and Strategies , Greenwood
Publishing Group.

Ghosh, D. K. and Ariff, M. (2004), Regional Financial Markets, Greenwood Publishing Group.

Rose, P. S. (2003), Money and Capital Markets (Financial Institutions and Instruments in a
Global Market Place), 8th Edition, Irwin Mc Graw Hill.

Aurnheiner, L. (2003), International Financial Markets: The Challenge of Globalization,


University of Chicago Press Ltd.,

Smith, R. c. and Walter, I. (2003), Global Banking, Oxford University Press.

Recommended Readings
Johnson, H. (2000), Global Financial Institutions and Markets, Blackwell Publishing Inc.

Johnson, H. J. (2000), Global Positioning for Financial Services, World Scientific.


64 | P a g e

Johnson, H. J. (2000), Global Financial Institutions and Markets, Wiley Blackwell.

FANC 604: International Corporate Finance

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course analyzes financial problems corporations face that result from operating in an
international environment. The course introduces the student to the international dimensions of
corporate finance and financial markets.

Course Objectives
After completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Develop corporate strategy and foreign investment decisions
 Construct international portfolios to achieve international portfolio diversification
 Apply alternative techniques to manage foreign exchange risks
 Appraise International investments
 Deal with taxation issues in international business
 Deal with issues related to financing for the multinationals

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Corporate strategy and the decision to invest abroad,
 Forecasting exchange rates
 International portfolio diversification
 International Investment Appraisal
 Managing exchange risk
 Taxation issues
 Cost of capital and financial structure in the multinational firm, and
 Sources of financing.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
V.K. Khalla S. Shiva Ramu, (2004), International Business 8th Revised Edition: Anmol
Publications PVT Ltd.
Adrian Buckley, (2001), Multinational Finance 3rd Edition: Prentice Hall India
Eiteman, D. K., Stonehill, A. I., and Moffett, M. H., 2001, Multinational Business Finance 8th
Edition: Addison Wesley Longman,
Madura, J., 2003, International Financial Management 7th Edition: South-Western,
Eun, C. S. and Resnick, B. G., 2004, International Financial Management 3rd Edition: Irwin,
Recommended Readings
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ACCA 2007 Text, Strategic Financial Management, Part 3, Paper 3.7, ACCA: Kaplan
Publishing
Levich, R. M., 2001, International Financial Markets, 2nd Edition: McGraw-Hill
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FANC 608: Financial Institutions Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course is about the management of financial institutions. It covers issues related to the
operations of financial institutions, measurement of various risk faced by financial institutions as
well as strategies adopted to protect the financial institutions against risks.

Course Objectives
After completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Understand the operational mechanics of financial institutions
 Measure various risks faced by financial institutions
 Understand the various techniques used to guard against alternative risks

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction: Overview of the Financial Service Industry
 Measuring and Managing Risk on the Balance Sheet
o Credit Risk Analysis and Lending Risk
o Liability and Liquidity Management
o Deposit Insurance and Other Liability Guarantees
o Management of Interest Rate Risk
 Managing Risk off the Balance Sheet
o Off balance Sheet Activities
o Futures and Forwards
o Options and Swaps
 Measuring and Managing other Types of Risk
o Operating Cost and Technology Risk
o Foreign Exchange Risk
o Sovereign Risk

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Saunder A, Cornett, M. (2008), Financial Institutions Management: A Risk Management
Approach, 6th Edition McGraw Hill.

Hull, J. C. (2006), Risk Management and Financial Institutions 1st Edition, Prentice Hall.
Launge, H. (2007), Financial Institutions, Management, McGraw Hill.
Hogan Warrant et al (2001), Warren et al. (2001), Management of Financial Institutions, John
Wiley and Sons.

Recommended Readings
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Sharma, M. (2008), Management of Financial Institutions: With Emphasis on Bank and Risk
Management, Phi Learning.

5.8.3 Islamic Banking, Insurance and Finance Specialization


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FANC 609: Islamic Banking and Finance

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Islamic banking and finance has witnessed a frenetic pace of growth during the last decade. Indeed the
Islamic financial system appears to be the future alternative system to the conventional financial system,
which is frequently faced by crises, the solution of which seems to be not forthcoming. The course
introduces students to alternative banking and finance models and products that may prove to be aid to
economic growth and wellbeing of the people.

Course Objectives
After completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Understand the mechanics of the Islamic Financial System
 Appreciate the ethical norms of Islamic Finance
 Acquire knowledge on the Islamic banking and finance mechanisms
 Understand the mechanics of Islamic Financial Products and Services
 Acquire knowledge on the Management of Islamic Financial Institutions
 Understand Operations of Islamic Capital Markets
 Appreciate the Importance of Islamic Corporate Governance

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 The Islamic Financial System – An Overview
 Major Norms of Islamic Finance
 Islamic Banking
o Islamic Banking Principles
o Commercial Banking
o Deposit and Financing Products
 Management of Islamic Banks [Asset and Liability Management]
 Regulatory Framework fro Islamic Banking and Finance
 Islamic Treasury Management
 Islamic Investment Banking
 Islamic Capital Markets
 Islamic Corporate Governance
 Fund Management and Project Finance

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Abdulrahman, Y. (2010), The Art of Islamic Banking and Finance: Tools and Techniques for
Community Based Banking, Wiley.
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Vwenardos, A. M. (2010), Current Issue in Islamic Banking and Finance: Resilience and
Stability in the Present System World, Scientific Publishing Company.

Khan, M. F. and Porzio, M. (2010), Islamic Banking and Finance in the European Union: a
Challenge, Edward Elgar Publishing.

Roubane A. and Alvi, S. (2010), Islamic Banking and Finance, Routledge.

Iqbal, M. and Llewellyn D. T. (2002), Islamic Banking & Finance; New Perspectives on Profit
Sharing and Risk. Edward Elgar Publishing.

Recommended Readings
Venandos, A. M. (2005), Islamic Banking and Finance in South-East Asia: Its Development and
future, World Scientific Publishing Company.

FANC 604: International Corporate Finance

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course analyzes financial problems corporations face that result from operating in an
international environment.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Develop corporate strategy and foreign investment decisions
 Construct international portfolios to achieve international portfolio diversification
 Apply alternative techniques to manage foreign exchange risks
 Appraise International investments
 Deal with taxation issues in international business
 Deal with issues related to financing for the multinationals

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Corporate strategy and the decision to invest abroad,
 Forecasting exchange rates
 International portfolio diversification,
 Managing exchange risk,
 Taxation issues,
 Cost of capital and financial structure in the multinational firm, and
 Sources of financing.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
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V.K. Khalla S. Shiva Ramu, 2004, International Business 8th Revised Edition: Anmol
Publications PVT Ltd.
Adrian Buckley, 2001, Multinational Finance 3rd Edition: Prentice Hall India
Eiteman, D. K., Stonehill, A. I., and Moffett, M. H., 2001, Multinational Business Finance 8th
Edition: Addison Wesley Longman,
Madura, J., 2003, International Financial Management 7th Edition: South-Western,
Eun, C. S. and Resnick, B. G., 2004, International Financial Management 3rd Edition: Irwin,

Recommended Readings
ACCA 2007 Text, Strategic Financial Management, Part 3, Paper 3.7, ACCA: Kaplan
Publishing
Levich, R. M., 2001, International Financial Markets, 2nd Edition: McGraw-Hill.

FANC 610: Islamic Insurance

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course aims at introducing Takaful as an alternative insurance system to the conventional
insurance system. The course introduces students to the mechanics of Takaful, the legal and
regulatory requirements, the Islamic insurance products and management as well as issues
related to Re-Takaful.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Contrast and Differentiate between Takaful and Conventional Insurance
 Appreciate Islamic Principles of Insurance
 Understand the Legal and Regulatory Requirements for Takaful Adoption
 Acquire knowledge on the Management of Assets under Takaful
 Acquire knowledge and skills for marketing Takaful Products

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction – Islamic Insurance [Takaful] vs. Conventional Insurance System
 Islamic Appraisal of Conventional Insurance
 Islamic Insurance [Takaful) Principles
 Islamic Insurance [Takaful) Products, Models and Mechanisms
 Takaful Legal, Regulatory and Operational Issues
 Re-Insurance [Re-Takaful] Issues
 Asset management within Takaful
 Marketing Takaful Products

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.
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Required Readings
Archer, S., Karim, R. A., and Nienhans, V. (2009), Takaful Islamic Insurance: Concepts and
Regulatory Issue, John Wiley & Sons.

El-Gamar, M. (2008), Islamic Finance: Law, Economics, and Practice, Cambridge University
Press.

Ayub, M. (2007), Understanding Islamic Finance, John Wiley and sons.

Jaffer, S. (2007), Islamic Insurance: Trends, Opportunities and the Future of Takaful, Euro
Money Institutional Investor Plc.

Khorshid, a. (2007), Islamic Insurance: A Modern Approach to Islamic Banking, Taylor and
Francis.

Igbal, M. (2005), General Takaful Practice: Technical Approach to Eliminate Gharar, Gema
Insani Press.

Recommended Readings
Kettle, B. (2010), Introduction to Islamic Banking and Finance, Islamic Banking Training.

Karim, S. A. (2010), The Islamic Moral Economy: A Study of Islamic Money and Financial
Instruments, Universal – Publishers.

Visser, H. (2009), Islamic Finance: Principles and Practice, Edward Elgar Publishing.

Jaffer, S. (2004), Islamic Asset Management: Forming the Future for Sharia Compliant
Investment Strategies, Euro money Books.
FANC 608: Financial Institutions Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course is about the management of financial institutions. It covers issues related to the
operations of financial institutions, measurement of various risk faced by financial institutions as
well as strategies adopted to protect the financial institutions against risks.

Course Objectives
After completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Understand the operational mechanics of financial institutions
 Measure various risks faced by financial institutions
 Understand the various techniques used to guard against alternative risks

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction: Overview of the Financial Service Industry
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 Measuring and Managing Risk on the Balance Sheet


o Credit Risk Analysis and Lending Risk
o Liability and Liquidity Management
o Deposit Insurance and Other Liability Guarantees
o Management of Interest Rate Risk
 Managing Risk off the Balance Sheet
o Off balance Sheet Activities
o Futures and Forwards
o Options and Swaps
 Measuring and Managing other Types of Risk
o Operating Cost and Technology Risk
o Foreign Exchange Risk
o Sovereign Risk

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Saunder A, Cornett, M. (2008), Financial Institutions Management: A Risk Management
Approach, 6th Edition McGraw Hill.

Hull, J. C. (2006), Risk Management and Financial Institutions 1st Edition, Prentice Hall.

Launge, H. (2007), Financial Institutions, Management, McGraw Hill.

Hogan Warrant et al (2001), Warren et al. (2001), Management of Financial Institutions, John
Wiley and Sons.

Recommended Readings
Sharma, M. (2008), Management of Financial Institutions: With Emphasis on Bank and Risk
Management, Phi Learning.

5.9 MBA Marketing Concentration

The marketing major is designed to build deep competency in the art and science of: (1)
choosing which customers to serve, and (2) getting, keeping and growing them through
delivering superior customer value. Marketing majors will gain a proficiency in the latest
methods and concepts for understanding customer behavior and for devising effective marketing
strategies. This is a valuable preparation for careers in consulting and general management and
essential for entrepreneurs. Students are exposed to the role of marketing in the development of
business strategies. Using a combination of lectures, readings, case studies, and computer
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simulations, these core courses review fundamental approaches in product/market selection,


product line management, communications management, pricing, distribution, and marketing
research. Students can choose among three marketing specializations: (i) Marketing Management
(ii) Marketing Planning and Control and (iii) Service Marketing and Customer Care.

Requirements for the Major


In addition to the FOUR Analytical Foundation Courses offered in the first year of study and
TEN Core Business Fundamental Courses offered in the first year of study (EIGHT) and
second year of study (TWO), the MBA student is required to opt for one of the following
specialized marketing areas and do four related specialized courses as detailed below:

Marketing Management

Courses in this area of concentration include:


 MKTG 602: Marketing Research
 MKTG 603: Entrepreneurial Marketing
 MKTG 604: Marketing Mgt: Programme Design & Strategy
 MKTG 605: International Marketing Management

Marketing Planning and Control

Courses in this area of concentration include:


 MKTG 602: Marketing Research
 MKTG 603: Entrepreneurial Marketing
 MKTG 606: Sales Force Management and Customer Care
 MKTG 607: Marketing Communications

Service Marketing and Customer Care

Courses in this area of concentration include:


 MKTG 602: Marketing Research
 MKTG 603: Entrepreneurial Marketing
 MKTG 608: New Product Development
 MKTG 609: Service Marketing and Management

5.10 Course Descriptions

5.10.1 Marketing Management Specialization

MKTG 602: Marketing Research

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Marketing is important to any company that faces competition, and marketing research is the
way companies obtain customer insights. This course provides a rigorous experience in
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marketing research methods (e.g., conjoint analysis, perceptual maps, etc.), and frameworks to
guide when which method is most useful. The course is aimed at managers, whose decision
making is enhanced through marketing research which transforms “data” into “information.”
Techniques of data collection, evaluation of alternative sources of information, methods for
analyzing data and presenting the results are covered.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Appreciate the nature and scope of research in marketing
 Formulate research problems and objectives
 Appreciate alternative research methodologies
 Identify and develop appropriate research tools necessary for collection of data and solve
business problems
 Analyze date and write research reports

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 The Role of Marketing Research and Customer Information in Decision Making
 The Marketing Research Process.
 Preparation and Presentation of Research Findings and Recommendations
 Secondary Data and Customer Data Base.
 Collecting Observation Data.
 Collecting and Analyzing Qualitative Data.
 Collecting Quantitative Date.
 Designing Methods.
 Sampling Methods
 Analyzing Quantitative Date.
 Presenting the Research Results.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Smith S. M. and Albaum G. S. (2005), Fundamentals of Marketing Research, SAGE Publication,
Inc.,

Crouch S. and Housden M. (2003), Marketing Research for Managers, 3rd Edition Butterworth
Heinemann.
Doman D. and Doman M. (2002) Market Research Mede Easy, Self-Counsel Press.

Wilson, A. (2006), Marketing Research: An Integrated Approach, 2nd Edition FT Prentice Hall.

Shao A. and Zhou K. (2006), Marketing Research: An Aid to Decision Making, Atomic Dog Pub
Inc.
75 | P a g e

Recommended Readings
Baines P. and Chansarkar B. (2002), Introducing Marketing Research , John Willey & Sons,
Ltd.,

MKTG 603: Entrepreneurial Marketing

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course offers an in-depth understanding of entrepreneurial marketing. It covers issues
related to important aspects of marketing, including pricing decisions, targeting, segmentation,
product and service advertising and the like, the central theme in all these aspect being the
entrepreneurial aspect as related to thses marketing activities.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students should be:
 Equipped with the necessary concepts, techniques of Entrepreneurial Marketing
 Develop practice based skills of entrepreneurial marketing

Course Contents
Specific topics include:

 Positioning, Targeting and Segmentation.


 Selecting, Developing end Evaluating New Products and Services
 Entrepreneurial pricing Decisions.
 Public Relations and Publicity.
 Entrepreneurial Distribution Channel Decisions
 Product/Service Rollout
 Entrepreneurial Sales Management.
 Promotional and Viral Marketing.
 Entrepreneurial Advertising Decisions
 Hiring is a Marketing Problem
 Marketing and Raising Capital
 Building Strong Bans and Strong Entrepreneurial Companies.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Byrave W. D. and Zacharis, A (2009), The Portable MBA in Entrepreneurship, John Wiley and
Sons.

Lodish, L. M. (2007), Marketing That Works, Pearson Education.

Buskirk, B. D. and Lavik. M. (2004): Entrepreneur Marketing: Real Stories and Survival
Strategies, Thomson/Slough Western.
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Stevens, R. e. Loudon, D. L. and Wrenn, B. (2004), Marketing Management: Text and Cases,
Routledge.

Lodish L. (2002) Entrepreneural Marketing, John Wiley & Sons.

Recommended Readings
McAdam M. (2004) “Entrepreneurial Marketing: The Growth of Small Firms in the New
Economic Era” International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research Vol. 10 ISS:1/2
pp. 167 – 170, Emerald Group Publishing, John Wiley.

Chaston, I. (2000), Entrepreneurial Marketing: Competing by Challenging Conventions,


Macmillan Business.

Lodish, L. M. Morgan H. L. and Kallianpur A. (2001), Entrepreneural Marketing: Lessons from


Whaton’s Pioneering MBA Course, John Willey & Sons, Inc.

Bjrke, B. and Hultman, C. (2002), Entrepreneurial Marketing: The Growth of Small Firms in the
New Economic Eva, Edward Elga Publishing.

MKTG 604: Marketing Management: Programme Design and Strategy

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course addresses the management challenge of designing and implementing the best
combination of marketing variables to carry out a firm’s strategy in its target markets. The goal
is to understand how the firm can benefit by creating and delivering value to its customers and
stakeholders.

Course Objective
The primary objective of this course is to introduce the student to the concepts and theories
underlying marketing decision making with a stronger emphasis on programme design and the
strategic considerations that drive and integrate the decisions made for each element of the
marketing mix. Specifically, this course seeks to develop the student’s skills in applying the
analytic perspectives and concepts of marketing to such decisions as segmentation and targeting,
branding, pricing, distribution and promotion.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Resource allocation, market entry/exit decisions
 Competitive analysis
 Analysis of marketing situations
 Segmentation and targeting decisions
 Branding and pricing decisions
 Distribution and promotion decisions

Course Format
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Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Baker, M., Marketing Strategy and Management (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007).

Baker, M. and Hart, S., Product Strategy and Management (Harlow: Pearson/FT, 2007).

Hutt, M.D. and Speh, T.W., Business Marketing Management: Strategic View of Industrial and
Organisational Markets (Cincinnati, OH: South Western, 2006).

Percy, L. and Elliott, R., Strategic Advertising Management (Oxford: Oxford University Press,
2005).

Cravens, D. and Piercy, N., Strategic Marketing (London: McGraw-Hill, 2005).

Aaker, D., Strategic Marketing Management (New York: Wiley, 2004).

Doyle, P., Marketing Management and Strategy (Harlow: Pearson/FT, 2002).

Recommended Readings
Porter, M.E., Competitive Strategy: Techniques for Analysing Industries and Competitors (New
York: Free Press, 1980 and 2004).

Dibb, S. and Simkin, L., Marketing Planning (London: Cengage, 2008).

Hines, T., Supply Chain Strategies (Oxford: Butterworth- Heinemann, 2004).

Nagle, T. and Holden, R.K., The Strategy and Tactics of Pricing (Englewood Cliffs, NJ:
Prentice-Hall, 2005).

De Chernatony, L. and McDonald, M., Creating Powerful Brands (Oxford: Butterworth-


Heinemann, 2004).

Keller, K.L., Strategic Brand Management (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 2007).

MKTG 605: International Marketing Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course explores the substantive issues, information sources, and cultural sensitivities
required to develop an effective international strategy and associated market plan.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the students should be:
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 Equipped with the skills and techniques necessary for carrying out international
marketing activities
 Able to plan and implement marketing strategies, product and service policies
 Able to appraise challenges in international marketing

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Organization and Control in International Marketing Management
 International Pricing Strategy
 Marketing Strategy Planning
 Product Policy and Planning
 International Advertising
 Marketing Strategy Planning for International Markets
 The Firms as a Business System
 International Markets
 Marketing in a Consumer – Oriented Society: Appraisal and Challenges

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Kotabe, M. (2010), Global Marketing Management, International Student Version 5th Edition,
Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Warren K. J. (2009), Global Marketing, Pearson Education.

Doole, I. and Lowe R. (2008) International Marketing Strategy: Analysis, Development and
Implementation, South Western Cengage Learning.

Mathur, U.C. (2008), International Marketing Management: Text and Cases, Sage Publications.

Albaum, G. and Duerr, E. (2008), International Marketing and Export Management, Prentice,
Hall.

Keegan W. J. & Green M. C. (2006), Global Marketing, Academic Internet Publishers.

Recommended Readings
Dewan, J. M. and Sudershan K. N. (2003) International Marketing Management, Discovery
Publishing House.

Keegan, W. J. Schlegelmilch (2001), Global Marketing Management: A European Perspective,


FT Prentice Hall.

4.10.2 Marketing Planning and Control Specialization


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MKTG 602: Marketing Research

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Marketing is important to any company that faces competition, and marketing research is the
way companies obtain customer insights. This course provides a rigorous experience in
marketing research methods (e.g., conjoint analysis, perceptual maps, etc.), and frameworks to
guide when which method is most useful. The course is aimed at managers, whose decision
making is enhanced through marketing research which transforms “data” into “information.”
Techniques of data collection, evaluation of alternative sources of information, methods for
analyzing data and presenting the results are covered.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Appreciate the nature and scope of research in marketing
 Formulate research problems and objectives
 Appreciate alternative research methodologies
 Identify and develop appropriate research tools necessary for collection of data and solve
business problems
 Analyze date and write research reports

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 The Role of Marketing Research and Customer Information in Decision Making
 The Marketing Research Process.
 Preparation and Presentation of Research Findings and Recommendations
 Secondary Data and Customer Data Base.
 Collecting Observation Data.
 Collecting and Analyzing Qualitative Data.
 Collecting Quantitative Date.
 Designing Methods.
 Sampling Methods
 Analyzing Quantitative Date.
 Presenting the Research Results.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.
Required Readings
Smith S. M. and Albaum G. S. (2005), Fundamentals of Marketing Research, SAGE Publication,
Inc.,

Crouch S. and Housden M. (2003), Marketing Research for Managers, 3rd Edition Butterworth
Heinemann.

Doman D. and Doman M. (2002) Market Research Mede Easy, Self-Counsel Press.
80 | P a g e

Wilson, A. (2006), Marketing Research: An Integrated Approach, 2nd Edition FT Prentice Hall.

Shao A. and Zhou K. (2006), Marketing Research: An Aid to Decision Making, Atomic Dog Pub
Inc.

Recommended Readings
Baines P. and Chansarkar B. (2002), Introducing Marketing Research , John Willey & Sons,
Ltd.,

MKTG 603: Entrepreneurial Marketing

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course offers an in-depth understanding of entrepreneurial marketing. It covers issues
related to important aspects of marketing, including pricing decisions, targeting, segmentation,
product and service advertising and the like, the central theme in all these aspect being the
entrepreneurial aspect as related to these marketing activities.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students should be:
 Equipped with the necessary concepts, techniques of Entrepreneurial Marketing
 Develop practice based skills of entrepreneurial marketing

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Positioning, Targeting and Segmentation.
 Selecting, Developing end Evaluating New Products and Services
 Entrepreneurial pricing Decisions.
 Public Relations and Publicity.
 Entrepreneurial Distribution Channel Decisions
 Product/Service Rollout
 Entrepreneurial Sales Management.
 Promotional and Viral Marketing.
 Entrepreneurial Advertising Decisions
 Hiring is a Marketing Problem
 Marketing and Raising Capital
 Building Strong Bans and Strong Entrepreneurial Companies.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Byrave W. D. and Zacharis, A (2009), The Portable MBA in Entrepreneurship, John Wiley and
Sons.

Lodish, L. M. (2007), Marketing That Works, Pearson Education.


81 | P a g e

Buskirk, B. D. and Lavik. M. (2004): Entrepreneur Marketing: Real Stories and Survival
Strategies, Thomson/Slough Western.

Stevens, R. e. Loudon, D. L. and Wrenn, B. (2004), Marketing Management: Text and Cases,
Routledge.

Lodish L. (2002) Entrepreneural Marketing, John Wiley & Sons.

Recommended Readings
McAdam M. (2004) “Entrepreneurial Marketing: The Growth of Small Firms in the New
Economic Era” International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research Vol. 10 ISS:1/2
pp. 167 – 170, Emerald Group Publishing, John Wiley.

Chaston, I. (2000), Entrepreneurial Marketing: Competing by Challenging Conventions,


Macmillan Business.

Lodish, L. M. Morgan H. L. and Kallianpur A. (2001), Entrepreneural Marketing: Lessons from


Whaton’s Pioneering MBA Course, John Willey & Sons, Inc.

Bjrke, B. and Hultman, C. (2002), Entrepreneurial Marketing: The Growth of Small Firms in the
New Economic Eva, Edward Elga Publishing.

MKTG 606: Sales Force Management and Customer Care

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course provides students with the necessary theoretical and analytical tools and techniques
for the management of sales force and customer handling

Course Objectives
Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:
 Appreciate the changes in the field of sales management in the world
 Acquire skills and techniques necessary for establishing, and directing the sales force to
enhance company’s performance
 Acquire skills and techniques for assessing sales force effectiveness and performance
 Appreciate the need for customer care
 Develop strategies for training and development for effective customer service

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Changing World of Sales Management
 Describing the Personal Selling Function
 Developing and Directing the Sales Force
 Determining Sales Force Effectiveness and Performance
 Introduction to Customer Cares
 How managers need to drive and support a service strategy.
82 | P a g e

 Listening to Customers
 Implementing a Service Excellence Strategy
 The Internal Customer
 Training and Development for Customer Service
 Sustaining a Customer Focus.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Johnston M. W. and Marshall, G. W. (2010), Sales Force Management, McGraw Hill
Companies, Inc.

Ingram, T. N., Laforge, R. W. and Avila R. A. (2009), Sales Management Analysis and Decision
Making, M.E. Sharpe Inc.

Cook, S.(2008), Customer Care excellence: How to Create an Effective Customer Focus, 6th
Edition, Kogan Page Ltd.

Havardar, K. K. and Cavale v. M. (2007), Sales and Distribution Management: Text and Cases,
Tata McGraw Hill Education.

Johnston M. W. (2005, Sales Force Management, 8th Edition, McGraw Fill Education (India)

Tyagi C. L. and Kumar, a. (2004), Sales Management, Atlantic Publishers and Distributors.

Recommended Readings
Churchill, G. A, (2000), Sales Force Management, 7th Edition Irwin/Mc Graw Hill.

Brown A. (1999), Strategic Customer Care: An Evolutionary Approach to Increasing Customer


Value and Profitability, Wiley.
Knox S. (2003), Customer Relationship Management: Perspectives from the Marketplace,
Butterworth, Heinemann.

Rajola, F. (2003), Customer Relationship Management: Organizational and Technological


Perspectives, Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
MKTG 607: Marketing Communications

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will describe and analyze the marketing communication and its role in firm’s
performance.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:
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 Increase understanding of the importance communication in marketing, with emphasis on


its impact on the attainment of marketing objectives
 Develop marketing communication skills and appreciate the role of alternative marketing
communication styles
 Increase understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of personal selling, sales
promotion, direct marketing and public relations

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction: Marketing Communication.
 Principles of Communication and New Approach to Marketing Communication
 Developments in Marketing Communication
 Rethinking Marketing Communication Styles.
 The Integrated Marketing Communication Mix
 The Nature and Scope of Advertising
 Planning the Advertising Campaign
 Advertising Creativity
 Advertising Media
 Principles of Personal Selling and Personal Selling in Practice
 Principles of Sales Promotion and Sales Promotion in Practice
 Principles of Direct Marketing and Direct Marketing in Practice
 Principles of Public Relations and Public Relations in Practice

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Pelsmacker P. Geuensn M. and Bergh J. (2007), Marketing Communications: European
Perspective, Prentice Hall.

Fill C. and Hughes G. (2007) Marketing Communications 2007-2008, Butterworth Hinemann.

Kinimel, Allan (2005), Marketing Communication: New Approaches, Technologies and Styles,
Oxford University Press.

Fill, C. (2005), Marketing Communications, FT/Prentice Hall.

Smith P. R. and Taylor, J. (2004), Marketing Communication: An Integrated Approach, Kogan


Page Publishers.

Copley, P. (2004), Marketing Communications Management: Concepts and Theories, Cases and
Practices, Butterworth- Heinemann.

Recommended Readings
84 | P a g e

Fill C. (2006), Simple Marketing Communications, FT. Prentice Hall.

Varey, R. J. (2002), Marketing Communication: Principles and Practice, Routlege, London

Yeshin, T. (1988) Integrated Marketing Communications: The Holistic Approach, Butterworth –


Heinemann.

Bird Steve and Ludi Koekember (2004), Marketing Communications, Juta and Company Ltd.,

5.10.3 Service Marketing and Customer Care Specialization

MKTG 602: Marketing Research

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Marketing is important to any company that faces competition, and marketing research is the
way companies obtain customer insights. This course provides a rigorous experience in
marketing research methods (e.g., conjoint analysis, perceptual maps, etc.), and frameworks to
guide when which method is most useful. The course is aimed at managers, whose decision
85 | P a g e

making is enhanced through marketing research which transforms “data” into “information.”
Techniques of data collection, evaluation of alternative sources of information, methods for
analyzing data and presenting the results are covered.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
 Appreciate the nature and scope of research in marketing
 Formulate research problems and objectives
 Appreciate alternative research methodologies
 Identify and develop appropriate research tools necessary for collection of data and solve
business problems
 Analyze date and write research reports

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 The Role of Marketing Research and Customer Information in Decision Making
 The Marketing Research Process.
 Preparation and Presentation of Research Findings and Recommendations
 Secondary Data and Customer Data Base.
 Collecting Observation Data.
 Collecting and Analyzing Qualitative Data.
 Collecting Quantitative Date.
 Designing Methods.
 Sampling Methods
 Analyzing Quantitative Date.
 Presenting the Research Results.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Smith S. M. and Albaum G. S. (2005), Fundamentals of Marketing Research, SAGE Publication,
Inc.,

Crouch S. and Housden M. (2003), Marketing Research for Managers, 3rd Edition Butterworth
Heinemann.

Doman D. and Doman M. (2002) Market Research Mede Easy, Self-Counsel Press.

Wilson, A. (2006), Marketing Research: An Integrated Approach, 2nd Edition FT Prentice Hall.

Shao A. and Zhou K. (2006), Marketing Research: An Aid to Decision Making, Atomic Dog Pub
Inc.
86 | P a g e

Recommended Readings
McQuarrie, E.F., The Market Research Toolbox: A Concise Guide for Beginners (London: Sage,
2005).

Baines P. and Chansarkar B. (2002), Introducing Marketing Research , John Willey & Sons,
Ltd.,

Chisnall, P.M., Marketing Research (Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill, 2004).

Malhotra, N.K. and Birks, D.F., Marketing Research: An Applied Approach (Harlow: FT
Prentice Hall, 2002).

MKTG 603: Entrepreneurial Marketing

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course offers an in-depth understanding of entrepreneurial marketing. It covers issues
related to important aspects of marketing, including pricing decisions, targeting, segmentation,
product and service advertising and the like, the central theme in all these aspect being the
entrepreneurial aspect as related to these marketing activities.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students should be:
 Equipped with the necessary concepts, techniques of Entrepreneurial Marketing
 Develop practice based skills of entrepreneurial marketing

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Positioning, Targeting and Segmentation.
 Selecting, Developing end Evaluating New Products and Services
 Entrepreneurial pricing Decisions.
 Public Relations and Publicity.
 Entrepreneurial Distribution Channel Decisions
 Product/Service Rollout
 Entrepreneurial Sales Management.
 Promotional and Viral Marketing.
 Entrepreneurial Advertising Decisions
 Hiring is a Marketing Problem
 Marketing and Raising Capital
 Building Strong Bans and Strong Entrepreneurial Companies.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.
87 | P a g e

Required Readings
Byrave W. D. and Zacharis, A (2009), The Portable MBA in Entrepreneurship, John Wiley and
Sons.

Lodish, L. M. (2007), Marketing That Works, Pearson Education.

Buskirk, B. D. and Lavik. M. (2004): Entrepreneur Marketing: Real Stories and Survival
Strategies, Thomson/Slough Western.

Stevens, R. e. Loudon, D. L. and Wrenn, B. (2004), Marketing Management: Text and Cases,
Routledge.

Lodish L. (2002) Entrepreneural Marketing, John Wiley & Sons.


Recommended Readings
McAdam M. (2004) “Entrepreneurial Marketing: The Growth of Small Firms in the New
Economic Era” International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research Vol. 10 ISS:1/2
pp. 167 – 170, Emerald Group Publishing, John Wiley.

Chaston, I. (2000), Entrepreneurial Marketing: Competing by Challenging Conventions,


Macmillan Business.

Lodish, L. M. Morgan H. L. and Kallianpur A. (2001), Entrepreneural Marketing: Lessons from


Whaton’s Pioneering MBA Course, John Willey & Sons, Inc.

Bjrke, B. and Hultman, C. (2002), Entrepreneurial Marketing: The Growth of Small Firms in the
New Economic Eva, Edward Elga Publishing.

MKTG 608: New Product Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course’s primary focus is on new product/service decisions and development processes. The
course provides a comprehensive analytical coverage of the various product decisions, critical
discussion of the research needed as input to the decisions, and the contributions of management
and behavioral sciences to the development process. The course provides the student with a
number of tools and concepts necessary for creating and managing product development
processes.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Increase understanding of the role of planning in new product development and the
associated challenges
 Understand the process and stages involved in New Product Development

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 The role of new products in marketing and corporate management
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 The Marketing Opportunity: (including: The Business Concept Embodied in the New
Product Idea, Solving the Customers’ Problem in the Product, Idea Evaluation within the
Framework of the Business, New Product Development as a competitive Weapon)
 Product life cycle and product positioning
 Product portfolio
 Developing a product concept as well as effective prototyping strategies
 New product development testing, management.
 Market Research and Technical Research
 The Pre-launch Checklist: Setting Up the Organization.
o Pilot Run Manufacturing
o Setting up the Infrastructure
o Training for Personnel
o Material Procurement
 Launching (including: Launch objectives, The Product Rollout, Initial Monitoring of
Results, Product Promotion and Customer Visits, The Sales Channel)
 The Pursuit (including: Product Management, Managing Product Change, Marketing
Feedback and Product Modifications, Life Cycle Management of Product)

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.
Required Readings
Lock C. and Kavadias S. (2008), Handbook of New Product Development Management, Elsevier
Ltd.,

Trott P. (2008), Innovation Management and New Product Development, Prentice Hall.
Griffin A. and Somermeyer, S. (2007), The PDMA, Tool Book for New Product Development,
John Wiley & sons.

Kumar S. and Phrommathed P. (2005), New Product Development: An Empirical Study of the
Effect of Innovation Strategy, Organization Learning, and Marketing Conditions, Springer
Science + Business Media, Inc.

Brooke M. Z. and Millo W. R. (2003), New Product Development: Successful Innovation in the
Market Place, International Business Press.

Recommended Readings
Jurgens, U. (2000) New Product Development and Product Networks: Global Industrial
Experience, Springer – Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

Annaechino, M. A. (2003), New Product Development: From Initial Idea to Product


Management, Elsevier Butterworth Heinemann.

MKTG 609: Service Marketing and Management

COURSE DESCRIPTION
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Services Marketing and Management provides an in-depth consideration of how services are
conceptualized designed and managed, creating the basis for a clear understanding of the multi-
dimensional aspects of services.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, the students should be able to:
 Appreciate and understand the unique challenges in managing and delivering quality
services.
 Promote a customer service-oriented mindset
 Monitor and evaluate service performance

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction to Service Marketing (including: What is a service, Characteristic of
services, The 7 Ps of Services; Core and augmented service Organization Clients)
 Design of the Service (including: Structure of Organizations, Culture of Organizations
Organizational Charts, The Concept of Design, Service Classification, Objects of the,
Service processes, Customer Contact, Distribution)
 The Service Setting and Service Quality Management
 Demand and Capacity Management
 Service Strategy and Communications
 Consumer Behaviour in Services
 Marketing Segmentation and Service Positioning
 Service Pricing and Demand Management
 Customer Relationship Management
 Consumer Protection in Services
 Performance Measurements and Monitoring and Evaluating the Service

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Mc. Laughlin M. W. (2009), Winning the Professional Service Sale: Unconventional Strategies
to Reach More Clients, Land Profitable Work, and Maintain Your Sanity, John Wiley and Sons.

Rao K. R. M. (2007), Service Marketing, Pearson Education India.

Mudie, P. and Pirrie, A. (2006), Service Marketing Management, Butterworth – Hernemann.

Lovelock, C. and Wirtz J. (2006), Services Marketing, 6th Edition, Prentice – Hall.

Crimore, A. (2003), Service Marketing and Management, Sage Publications.

Lovelock, c. & Wright L. (2002), Principles of Service Marketing and Management, Prentice
Hall.
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Recommended Readings
Kotler, P. Hayes T. J. and Bloum P. N. (2002), Marketing Professional Services: Forward
Thinking Strategies for Boosting your Business, Your Image, and Your Profits, Prentice Hall.

Clarke, G. (2000), Marketing a Service for Profit: A Practical Guide to Key Service Marketing
Concepts, Rogan Page.

Gronrools, C. (2000), Service Management and Marketing: A Customer Relationship


Management Approach. Willey.

5.11 MBA Human Resource and Organizational Management Concentration

The Human Resource and Organizational Management major is designed to educate students in
the leading edge of theory and practice associated with the management of employees and the
design of organizations. It spans topics from understanding the behavior of individuals and
groups to designing management systems and structures to support business strategy. It serves
students with a range of career objectives: (1) those who seek leadership positions focusing on
employees in organizations; (2) those interested in consulting in the area of organizational
effectiveness or management consulting more generally; and (3) those interested in balancing a
more technical academic and business backgrounds with greater depth in understanding
behavioral and management expertise.

Requirements for the Major

In addition to the FOUR Analytical Foundation Courses offered in the first year of study and
TEN Core Business Fundamental Courses offered in the first year of study (EIGHT) and
second year of study (TWO), the MBA student is required to opt for either of the following
specialized human resource and organizational management areas and do four related specialized
courses as detailed below:

Human Resource Management


Courses in this area of concentration include:
 HROM 602: Strategic Management of Human Assets
 HROM 603: Human Resource Training and Development
 HROM 604: Labour Law and Employment Relations
 HROM 605: Procurement of Human Resources

Organizational Management
Courses in this area of concentration include:
 HROM 602: Strategic Management of Human Assets
 HROM 606: Corporate Governance and the Board
 HROM 607: Foundation of Teamwork and Leadership
 HROM 608: Managing Organizational Change

5.12 Course Descriptions


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5.12.1 Human Resource Management Specialization

HROM 602: Strategic Management of Human Assets

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces the student to the strategic role human resource management might play
in creating competitive advantages for firms. Students are exposed to the importance of HRM
policies and practices in context and consider broader corporate strategies, business activities,
and competitiveness in an increasingly global marketplace. Attention is given to the diversity of
the Tanzanian workforce, and to the effects of changing technologies in production and in
provision of services

Course Objectives
The principle objectives of the course are to:
 Equip the student with a good understanding of the human resource functions and
appreciate the importance of the characteristics of modern workplaces.
 Enable the students to understand the key tenets of strategic HRM and the role of
strategic HR and its link to business strategies
 Make students recognize the key factors in the design of work and role of HR in assisting
managers to improve their work design
 Enable students assessing the recruiting function for finding the best people.
 Enable students to analyze different ways for developing people at work and assess
performance pay systems.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 HRM and the resource-based view
 Learning and Development
 Job analysis and design
 Recruitment and Selection
 Motivation at Work
 Managing and Improving Performance
 Employee Retention
 Interviewing Techniques
 Remuneration and Reward Strategies
 Negotiation in the Workplace
 Counseling and Dispute Resolution
 Managing Employment Issues Ethically

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
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Torrington, D., Hall, L. and Taylor, S. (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition,
Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.

Stone, R. J. (2008), Human Resource Management, 6th Edition, John Wiley and Sons, Milton.

Arnold, J. et al (2005), Work Psychology: Understanding human Behavior in the Workplace, 4th
Edition, Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.

Armstrong, M. (2003), Human Resource Management Practice, Kogan Page Publishers.

Fitz-enz J. and Davison B. (2001), How to Measure Human Resource Management, 3rd Edition,
Mc. Graw-Hill.

Grobler P. A. et al (2000), Contemporary Issues in Human Resource Management, Oxford


University Press.

Recommended Readings
Wiig, K. (2004), People – Focused Knowledge Management: How Effective Decision Making
Leeds to Corporate Success, Elsevier Inc. UK.

Armstrong, M. and Stephens, T. (2005), A Handbook of Employee Reward Management and


Practice, Kogan Page Publishers.

HROM 603: Human Resource Training and Development

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course is geared to impart knowledge on the organizational needs assessment and its
importance. The course also describes the role of learning, training and career development and
performance appraisal.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Increase knowledge and skills on effective training and development and apply the
knowledge and acquired skills for their career development
 To assess training needs and propose training programmes
 Appraise alternative training methods

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction: The Role of Learning and Development in Organizations
 Learning and Competitive Strategy
 Training Needs Assessment and Development of Training Programmes
 Planning and Designing of Training Development
 Alternative Training Method
 Career Development and Knowledge Management
 Evaluation of Training Effectiveness
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 Performance Appraisal

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Swanson, R. A. and Holton, E. F. (2009), Foundation of Human Resource Development, Berret
Koehler Publishers.

Werner, J. M. and DeSimone, R. L. (2008), Human Resource Development, Cengage Learning.

Martin, V. (2006), Managing Projects in Human Resources, Training and Development, Kogan
Page Limited.

Wilson, J. P. (2005), Human Resource Development: Learning and Training for Individuals and
Organizations, 2nd Edition, Kogan Page Limited

Sims, R. R. (2006), Human Resource Development: Today and Tomorrow, IAP

Laird, D. Naquin, S. S., and Holton, E. F. (2003), Approaches to Training and Development,
Perseus Books Group.

Recommended Readings

Green, G. (2002), Training and Development, Capstone.

Rae, L. (2000), Effective Planning in Training and Development, Kogan Page Publishers.

Marquardt, M. J. and Enget D. W. (1992), Global Human Resource Development, Prentice Hall.

HROM 604: Labour Law and Employment Relations

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course aims at developing students’ understanding of the relationship between employers
and their workers. The course puts an emphasis on the understanding of issues related to:
collective representation of workers’ interests through unions, management of employment
relationships in the absence of collective representation, relationship between employment
relations and business strategies.

Course Objectives
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
 Understand the nature and need of human resource relations
 Understand the tasks and pertinent issues related to public relations
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 Create alignments between human resource strategies and business strategies in a cost
effective manner
 Understand the legal and regulatory aspects of labour and employment relations.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Introduction to Industrial Relations Theory
 Management of Industrial Relations
 The Concept of Collective Bargaining
 Labour Unions and Collective Agreements
 Employment Legislation and the Legal Framework
 Tanzania Labour Movement

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Bamber, G. J. Lansbury R,. D. and Wailes N. (2010), International and Comparative
Employment Relations: Globalization and Change, Allen & Urwin

Leat, M. (2007), Exploring Employee Relations, 2nd Ex. Butterworth Heinemann (UK).
Finkin, M. W. (2006), Comparative Labour Law, in M. Reimann and R. Simmwerman (eds), The
Oxford Handbook of Comparative Law, Oxford University Press.
Judge G. and Gennard J. (2005), Employee Relations, CIPD Publishing.

Holinshead, G. Nichalas, P. and Tailby S. (2002), Employee Relations, Pearson Education.

Rose E. (2004_ Employment Relations, F.T. Prentice Hall.

Recommended Readings
Blanpain, R. Broniwich, W. Rymkevich O. etc al. (2009), The Modernization of Labour Law and
Industrial Relations in Comparative Perspective, Kuwer Law International.

HROM 605: Strategic Staffing and Recruitment

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course explores issues related staffing and recruitment in organizations. It explores the core
elements in the staffing and recruitment process, including the designing of the selection process,
determination of staffing costs and the evaluation of staffing options.

Course Objectives
After completion of the course students should be able to:
 Understand the process by which human resource requirements in an organization are
determined
 Understand the methods and techniques of job analysis
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 Understand methods and techniques of staffing and recruitments


 Understand the process by which people and jobs are matched
 Understand the Interview Process and Selection Procedures

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 The Context for Recruitment and Selection
 Competences [What do we want to Measure, What are Competencies, The Purposes of
Competencies, Problems Relating to Recruitment & Selection.
 Designing the Selection Process.
 Calculating Staffing Costs and Evaluating Staffing Options.
 Attracting the Right Applicants. [Managing our Applicant Pool, Advertisement]
 Application Form Design.
 Competency Based Interviewing I: Principles
 Competency Based Interviewing II: Practice.
 Decision Making and Evaluation.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Brown, J. N. and Swain A. (2009), The Professional Recruiter’s Handbook: Delivering
Excellency in Recruitment, Practice Kogan Page Ltd.
Phillips J.M. and Gully, S.M. (2009), Strategic Staffing, Prentice Hall.

Caruth D. L. Caruth, G. D. and Pane S. (2008), Staffing the Contemporary Organization: A


Guide to Planning, Recruiting and Selecting for Human Resource Professionals, 3rd Edition,
Greenwood Publishing Group.

Schuler, R. S. and Jackson S. E. (2007) Strategic Human Resource Management, Wiley


Blackwell.

Salaman, G. and Billsberry J. (2005), Strategic Human Resource Management, SAGE.

Burkholder, N. C., Edwards P. J. and Sartain L. (2004), On Staffing: Advice and Perspectives
from HR Leaders John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Recommended Readings
Wood, R. and Tim Payne (2000) Competence Based Recruitment and Selection, John Wiley and
Sons Ltd.

5.12.2 Organizational Management Specialization

HROM 602: Strategic Management of Human Assets


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COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces the student to the strategic role human resource management might play
in creating competitive advantages for firms. Students are exposed to the importance of HRM
policies and practices in context and consider broader corporate strategies, business activities,
and competitiveness in an increasingly global marketplace. Attention is given to the diversity of
the Tanzanian workforce, and to the effects of changing technologies in production and in
provision of services

Course Objectives
The principle objectives of the course are to:

 Equip the student with a good understanding of the human resource functions and
appreciate the importance of the characteristics of modern workplaces.
 Enable the students to understand the key tenets of strategic HRM and the role of
strategic HR and its link to business strategies
 Make students recognize the key factors in the design of work and role of HR in assisting
managers to improve their work design
 Enable students assessing the recruiting function for finding the best people.
 Enable students to analyze different ways for developing people at work and assess
performance pay systems.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 HRM and the resource-based view
 Learning and Development
 Job analysis and design
 Recruitment and Selection
 Motivation at Work
 Managing and Improving Performance
 Employee Retention
 Interviewing Techniques
 Remuneration and Reward Strategies
 Negotiation in the Workplace
 Counseling and Dispute Resolution
 Managing Employment Issues Ethically

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Torrington, D., Hall, L. and Taylor, S. (2008), Human Resource Management, 7th Edition,
Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.

Stone, R. J. (2008), Human Resource Management, 6th Edition, John Wiley and Sons, Milton.
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Arnold, J. et al (2005), Work Psychology: Understanding human Behavior in the Workplace, 4th
Edition, Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.

Armstrong, M. (2003), Human Resource Management Practice, Kogan Page Publishers.

Fitz-enz J. and Davison B. (2001), How to Measure Human Resource Management, 3rd Edition,
Mc. Graw-Hill.

Grobler P. A. et al (2000), Contemporary Issues in Human Resource Management, Oxford


University Press.

Recommended Readings
Wiig, K. (2004), People – Focused Knowledge Management: How Effective Decision Making
Leeds to Corporate Success, Elsevier Inc. UK.

Armstrong, M. and Stephens, T. (2005), A Handbook of Employee Reward Management and


Practice, Kogan Page Publishers.

HROM 606: Corporate Governance and the Board

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The course will be of interest to student/future general managers involved in the design and
implementation of compensation strategies within firms, and will equip students with tools to
manage and participate in these systems in a variety of organizational settings. The class will
also be considering the role of the board of directors in implementing compensation strategies,
we well as the selection and succession of top management.

Course Objectives
The principal objectives of the course are to:
 Provide students with a general framework for describing and analyzing organization
problems in relation to corporate governance, executive compensation and the board of
directors.
 Enable students compare and contrast alternative theoretical frameworks for corporate
governance
 Enable students to Design Governance Mechanisms to Improve Corporate Performance
 Equip students with tools for evaluation of corporate governance rules and practices
 Assess effectiveness of Corporate Governance Bodies
 Formulate and Execute Social Responsible Investment Strategies

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 Corporations and Corporate Governance
 The Role of Boards in Corporate Governance
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 The Role of Transparency in Corporate Governance


 Shareholders and Shareholder Activism
 Corporate Governance Failure
 Institutional Investors, Creditors and Credit Rating Agencies
 Corporate Governance Systems Worldwide
 Corporate Accountability, Environmental, Social and Governance Considerations
 Moral Hazard, Systematic Risk and Bailouts
 Corporate Citizenship.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
A. Kim, R Nofsinger and J. Mohr (2010), Corporate Governance, 3rd Edition, Pearson Education
Inc. (USA).

Solomon J. (2007), Corporate Governance and Accountability 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons,
Chichester, UK.

Mallin, C. A. (2007), Corporate Governance, Oxford University Press


Mallin, C. A. (2006), International Corporate Governance: A Case Study Approach, Edward
Elgar Publishing.

Mallin, C. A. (2006), Handbook of International Corporate Governance: Country Analyses:


Edward Elgar Publishing.

Recommended Readings
Colley, Doyle and Logan (2005), Corporate Governance, Executive MBA Series: TATA
McGraw Hill.

R.A.G. Monks and N. Minow, (2004), Corporate Governance, 3rd Edition, Blackwell
Publishing.

Colley, J. L. (2005), What is Corporate Governance? Mc. Graw Hill Professional.

Du Press J. J. et al. (2005), Principles of Contemporary Corporate Governance, Cambridge,


University Press.

Duplessis J. J., McConvill J. & Bagaric M. (2005), Principles of Contemporary Corporate


Governance, Cambridge University Press.

HROM 607: Foundation of Teamwork and Leadership

COURSE DESCRIPTION
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In today's fast changing, hyper-competitive environment, teamwork and co-operative working


enhance the organisation's adaptive capability. The team, rather than the individual, is
increasingly seen as the building block of organisations and a key source of competitive
advantage. At every level of an organization, teamwork and leadership are required for
organizational success. Teamwork and leadership have always been critical to society, but they
have acquired new significance in recent years during this era of heightened uncertainty,
restructuring, and change. The tenor of leadership has changed as well. Many organizations are
flattening their hierarchies and building work teams, with “command and control” leadership
giving way to facilitation and empowerment. HROM provides the basic foundation to the
understanding of pertinent issues and challenges surrounding the building and sustaining work
teams.

Course Objectives
The course will enable students to:
 Understand and appreciate the role of the underlying principles, practices and techniques
in leadership.
 Appreciate the role individuals and teams play in an organization
 Learn and understand concepts, process, and approaches to creating, organizing, and
leading teams.

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 The Twelve Leadership Myths and Six Fundamental Leadership Principles and Basic
Tenets
 Six Approaches to the Application of Leadership Skills
 Evaluating Leadership Priorities
 Tasks and Social Elements of Team Functioning
 Creating Teams/Team Building
o Types of Team Building Interventions
o Role Clarification and Negotiation
o Stages of Team Development
o Personality and Ability\Teamwork skills
 Diversity of Team Members and Implications of Diversity
 Leading Teams
o The Three Team Leadership Tasks
o The Three Elements of Leading Teams
o Developing Team Leadership Skills
o Self Managing or Self- Leading Work Teams
 Organizing Your Team
o Team Support Roles
o Team Member Job Description
o Running Team Meetings
o Monitoring Progress

Course Format
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Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.

Required Readings
Lussier, R. N. and Achua C. F. (2010), Theory, Application and Skill Development, 4th Edition,
South Western.

Northouse P. G. (2010), Leadership: Theory and Practice, 5th Edition, SAGE Publications, Inc.
(India).
Kouzen, J. M. and Posner B. Z. (2007), Leadership Challenge, 4th Edition, John Wiley and Sons,
Inc.

West A. (2004), Effective Teamwork: Practical lessons form Organizational Research, BPS
Blackwell.
West, M. A. and Markiewics, L. (2004), Building Team Based Working: A Practical Guide to
Organizational Transformation, John Wiley and Sons.

West, M. A., Tjosvold, D and Smith, K. G. (2005), The Essentials of Team-working:


International Perspective, John Wiley and Sons.

Recommended Readings
Eikenberry, K. (2007), Remarkable Leadership: Unleashing Your Leadership Potential One Skill
at a Time, John Wiley and Sons.

Topping, P. A. (2002), Managerial Leadership, McGraw Hill Companies Inc.

Tjosvold D. (2003), International Handbook of Organizational Teamwork and Cooperative


Working, John Wiley and Sons.

Pokras Sandy (2002), Working in Teams: A Team Member Guidebook, Cengage Learning.

Staw, M. D (2001), Research in Organizational Behavior, Elsevier Science Ltd.

HROM 608: Managing Organizational Change

COURSE DESCRIPTION
During the last decade it has become clear that in the global economy, firms must constantly
adapt to changing technological, competitive, demographic and other environmental conditions
in order to survive and prosper. The importance of acquiring the knowledge and tools for
changing organizations successfully cannot be overemphasized (particularly for students headed
for consulting and management careers, although not limited to them). This course focuses on
specific concepts, theories and tools that can assist executives entrusted with the task of leading
organizational change.

Course Objectives
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Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:


 Understand the politics and need for organizational change
 Plan and implement organizational changes
 Lead and manage the evolution of change

Course Contents
Specific topics include:
 The Politics of Change: Why a Company Needs to Change and What can be Changed
 Confronting the Realities of Change
 Planning and implementing Organizational Change
 Organizational Change Models
 Successfully Leading Change Efforts: Key Factors
 Managing the Evolution of the Change
 Developing and Communicating a Shared Vision
 Aligning Strategy and Culture
 Downsizing, Restructuring and Reengineering
 Organizational Adaptation.

Course Format
Classroom lectures and discussion, case studies and problem assignments, tests and final
examination.
Required Readings
Cummings, T. G. and Worley C. G. (2009), Organizational Development and Change, 9th
Edition, South Western.

By, R. T. (2009), Managing Organizational Change in Public Services, Routledge.

Palmer, I. et al (2008), Managing Organizational Change: A Multiple Perspectives Approach,


Mc. Graw Hill Irwin.

Galoppin, L. and Caems, S. (2007), Managing Organizational Change During SAP


Implementation, Galileo Press.

Leban, B. and Stone, R (2007), Managing Organizational Change, John Wiley and Sons.
Jones, Gareth, 2006, Organization Theory, Design and Change, 5th Edition: Prentice-Hall.

Recommended Readings
Mullins, Laurie J., 2005, Management and Organizational Behaviour, 7th Edition:
Prentice-Hall

Wheeten, Tom, Hunger, David, 2005, Strategic Management and Business Policy, 10th Edition:
Prentice Hall.

Martin, J., 2005, Organizational Behaviour and Management, 3rd Edition: Thomson.

Demson, R. D. (2001), Managing Organizational Change in Transitional economies, Routledge.


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PART SIX
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CAPACITY TO DELIVER THE MBA PROGRAMME
6.1 Physical and Human Resources

The ZU MBA Degree Programme is a conspicuously interdisciplinary programme, whose


running shall be made possible through the collaboration of various units of Zanzibar University
as well as external academicians and professionals. Physical recourses shall be adequate to avoid
any unnecessary struggle for physical resources with undergraduate programme resource
requirements.

6.2 Faculty and other Human Resources

The Internal Faculty of the Programme constitutes carefully selected experts from the ZU
Faculty of Business Administration, Faculty of Law and Sharia, and faculty of Arts and Social
Sciences. The internal resource persons for the MBA Programme shall be appointed by the ZU in
consultation the respective Faculties. The resource person will have a PhD Degree in the core
disciplines of the programme (i.e. Accounting, Finance, Marketing, and Human Resource and
Organizational Management) or the service disciplines of the programmes (i.e. Economics,
Statistics, and Law and Sharia)

External Faculty of the Programme shall constitutes experts from Higher Learning Institutions in
Tanzania, majority of whom have been participating in running ZU undergraduate degree
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programmes. Higher learning institutes from which ZU MBA Programme will draw learning
expertise include University of Dar es Salaam UDSM (University of Dar es Salaam Business
School, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences-Department of Economics, Faculty of Law, and
Department of Statistics), Institute of Finance Management IFM (Faculty of Accounting,
Finance and Banking), and College of Business Education (CBE). There are already several
members of the ZU as well as prospective external experts that satisfy the criteria and can
contribute toward a competitive delivery of the ZU MBA.

6.3 Physical Resources

Zanzibar University has currently adequate physical recourses to accommodate the running of
the proposed MBA Programme. There sufficient lecture and seminar rooms for the purpose.
Library facilities shall be enhanced and required and recommended readings shall be acquired in
time to facilitate smooth running of the programme.

6.4 Administrative Staff

The faculty of Business Administration, with the cooperation of the Directorate of PGSRI, shall
administer the ZU MBA Programme. The faculty has adequate, competent and long experienced
administrative functionaries necessary for administering the programme.

6.5 Capacity Building Programme

In the immediate term, the MBA is designed in such a manner that it will be collaboratively run
by both internal faculty members and external experts. The medium and long term perspectives
are that ZU shall develop institutional capacity to run the programme. Efforts are under way to
train for PhD the ZU master’s holders.
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PART SEVEN
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MBA CODE OF ETHICS
7.1 Description of the ZU MBA Code of Ethics
Members of the Zanzibar University community are expected to uphold the highest ethical
standards. This applies equally to the MBA student during pursuance of their MBA. There shall
be an MBA Code of Ethics whose mission is to promote the growth of ethically responsible
business managers at the Faculty of Business Administration through adherence to the highest
standards of academic integrity and overall ethical conduct, and to develop a sense of individual
responsibility. The MBA student shall maintain the highest standards of honesty and integrity
and strive for these standards in his or her representations, academic pursuits, and respect for the
property and individual rights of others. The ZU MBA Code of Ethics shall relate to three
standards namely: Representation, Academic Pursuits, and Property.

Representations
The MBA student shall represent himself or herself honestly in all oral or written statements. The
student shall not misrepresent any material fact to other students, faculty, staff, prospective
employer, or anyone else while representing himself or herself as a member of the Zanzibar
University community in particular through:
 Lying to ZU a faculty member or administrator, either directly through oral or written
statements in order to gain, say, preferential treatment.
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 Misrepresenting any material fact on a Zanzibar University application or other official


document.
 Misrepresenting the originality of one’s work, including failure to cite the contributions
of another (plagiarism).

Academic Pursuits
The MBA student is expected to represent his or her academic product honestly and fairly. The
student shall not use any dishonest method to gain an unfair advantage over other students in
academic pursuits, especially through:
 Giving or receiving any unauthorized aid on an assignment, test or exam, including
working in groups on any assignment that has been designated as individual by the
instructor
 Failure to comply with the academic guidelines established by the instructor for
assignments
 Submitting for credit substantially the same work done for another assignment either
academic or professional, except with prior approval of the instructor.

Property
The MBA student shall respect the materials, data, and property of other members of the ZU
community and visitors to the Zanzibar University. The student shall not misuse or
misappropriate the materials, data, or other property of another, especially through:
 Accessing, removing, or destroying any information, materials, or other property from
another student’s or student organization’s premises, locker, computer files, or mail
folder without prior permission.
 Accessing or removing without prior permission, or hiding or destroying any records,
files, job postings, or academic materials from the library, the faculty or any other
administrative office.
 Utilizing for commercial gain any material provided to ZU specifically and restrictively
for educational purposes without prior permission of the provider.

7.2 Administration of the Code


There shall be an Ethics Committee that will administer the code. The Ethics Committee will
comprise selected faculty members and no fewer than nine and no more than eighteen ZU MBA
students elected by the ZU MBA student body. The Ethics Committee will be responsible for
hearing complaints under the Code. Hearings are not intended to be juridical in nature. The
committee will determine how and where intent and state-of mind fit into the proceedings at its
discretion. All students matriculating in the Faculty of Business Administration must comply
with the standards set forth in the MBA Code of Ethics and the Policies on Conduct of the
University of Zanzibar.
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ANNEXES

POLICY & GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR MBA DISSERTATION


ANNEX 1

GUIDELINES FOR DISSERTATION PRESENTATION

1. Length: (Limits should be observed as closely as possible). The length of Master’s


Research Paper (MBA by Coursework & Dissertation) shall be between 15,000 and
20,000 words depending on the nature of the research topic.

2. Format: A4 Paper, Times New Roman, Font Size 12, Double Spaced. Margin at binding
edge should not be less than 40 mm and other margins should not be less than 20mm,
both for type and diagrams/images.

3. Binding
The bound dissertation shall be bound with boards. The binding shall be of a fixed kind
in which leaves are permanently secured. The boards shall have a sufficient rigidity to
support the weight of the work when standing on a shelf. The dissertation/thesis is to be
hard-bound in black with plain gold lettering.

The cover should include the followings:


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(a) Zanzibar University.


(b) Faculty of Business Administration.
(c) Dissertation Title.
(d) Name of Student.
(e) Name of Supervisor.
(f) Statement of the main aim of the dissertation.
(g) Month & Year

The spine shall carry the name of the student, degree and year (in that order) to be read
upright when the volume is flat with front cover uppermost.

4. Copies
After the examination of the dissertation, each candidate shall produce and submit four
(4) duly bound copies to the Directorate of Postgraduate Studies. The final submission of
the dissertation shall be accompanied by a submission letter by the supervisor testifying
that the four (4) copies submitted are generally error-free. The four (4) copies submitted
shall later be distributed as follows: One (1) copy shall be sent to the respective
Department, one (1) copy to the Supervisor of the candidate, one (1) copy to the
Candidate, and one (1) copy shall be deposited in the Main Library for reference. A
dissertation so approved may be consulted or copied in the Library or through an inter-
library loan. Users must undertake not to use or reproduce material so obtained without
the consent of the Librarian and must duly acknowledge the source of such information.

ANNEX 2

SEQUENCING OF THE PRELIMINARY PAGES

1) Cover page (see attached sample)

2) Title page (see attached sample)

3) Certification (see attached sample)

4) Declaration and Copyright (see attached sample)

5) Acknowledgement

6) Dedication (if any)

7) Abstract

8) List of Abbreviations

9) List of Cases (if any)


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10) List of Statutes (if any)

11) List of Tables & Figures

12) Table of Contents

With the exception of the cover page, all other pages should be serially numbered using
Roman Numerals.

ANNEX 3

COVER PAGE

ZANZIBAR UNIVERSITY
FACULTY OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
(Fonts 14, bold, centred)

RESEARCH TOPIC
ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEM IN ZANZIBAR:
THE CASE OF THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION - ZANZIBAR
(Fonts 14, bold, centred)

BY
MARYAM JUMA HASSAN
(Fonts 12, bold, centred)
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SUPERVISOR
PROF. MUHIDIN A. SALEH
(Fonts 12, bold, centred)

A RESEARCH SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS


FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
(ACCOUNTING) OF ZANZIBAR UNIVERSITY
(Font 12, bold, centred)

AUGUST - 2012
(Font 12, bold, centred)

ANNEX 4

CERTIFICATION

The undersigned supervisors certify that they have read and hereby recommend for acceptance
by the Faculty of Business Administration of Zanzibar University a dissertation/thesis titled:
ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEM IN ZANZIBAR: The Case of the Ministry of
Education, in fulfilment of the requirements of the Degree of Masters in Business
Administration (Accounting) of the Zanzibar University.
(Font 12, normal)

……………………………………….
PROF. MUHIDIN A. SALEH
(SUPERVISOR)
(Font 12, bold, centred)
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……………………..
DATE
(Font 12, bold, centred)

……………………………………….
DR. MAKAME A. ABDULLA
(SUPERVISOR)
(Font 12, bold, centred)

………………………..
DATE
(Font 12, bold, centred)

ANNEX 5

DECLARATION AND COPYRIGHT

I, Maryam Juma Hassan, declare that this dissertation/thesis is my own original work and that it
has not been presented and will not be presented to any other University for a similar or any
other degree award.

Signature…………………………………………………………
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This dissertation/thesis is copyright material protected under the Berne Convention, the
Copyright Act of 1999 and other international and national enactments, in that behalf, on
intellectual property. It may not be produced by any means, in full or in part, except for short
extracts in fair dealings, for research or private study, critical scholarly review or discourse with
an acknowledgement, without the written permission of the Zanzibar University.

FEE STRUCTURE FOR THE MBA PROGRAMME

ANNEX 6

Fees for MBA by Coursework & dissertation

Costs payable directly to the University (in US Dollars)


Description Faculty of Arts & Social sciences
Year 1 Year 2
1. Application Fees 20 -
2. Admission Fee 20 -
3. Registration Fee 45
4. Tuition Fee 2000 -
5. Examination Fee 100 1000
6. Research Fee - 1,400
7. Resource Fee 150 150
8. Caution Fee 100 -
9. Students Union Fee 10 10
10. Students’ ID 10 -
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11. Graduation Fee - 50


Total 2,455 2,610

Recommended costs payable directly to the student (in US Dollars)


Description Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
Year 1 Year 2

1. Books 400 400


2. Stationery 150 150
3. Accommodation 300 300
4. Meals* 2,640* 2,640*
5. Research Activities - 450
6. Medical Expenses 100 100
Total 3,590 4,040

*Based on Tshs 7,500= per day for one year. Sponsors may vary the rate in accordance with their policies.

Note:
1) Foreign candidates will pay fees in terms of US Dollars.
2) Local candidates will pay fees in terms of Tanzanian Shillings equivalent to US Dollars specified herein as
per the exchange rate of date of payment.
ANNEX 7

Fees for MBA by Thesis

Costs payable directly to the University (in US Dollars)


Description Faculty of Arts & Social sciences
Year 1 Year 2
1. Application Fees 20 -
2. Admission Fee 20 -
3. Registration Fee 45 -
4. Tuition Fee 200 -
5. Examination/Viva-Voce Fee 20 1000
6. Research Fee 1,400 1,400
7. Resource Fee 150 150
8. Caution Fee 100 -
9. Students Union Fee 10 10
10. Students’ ID 10 -
11. Graduation Fee - 50
Total 1,975 2,610
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Recommended costs payable directly to the student (in US Dollars)


Description Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences
Year 1 Year 2
1. Books 400 400
2. Stationary 150 150
3. Accommodation 300 300
4. Meals* 2,640* 2,640*
5. Research Activities 900 900
6. Medical Expenses 100 100
Total 4,490 4,490
*Based on Tshs 7,500= per day for one year. Sponsors may vary the rate in accordance with their
policies.

Note:

1) Foreign candidates will pay fees in terms of US Dollars.


2) Local candidates will pay fees in terms of Tanzanian Shillings equivalent to US Dollars
specified herein as per the exchange rate of date of payment.