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Access Power Solutions

Installation Guide
(SM40 Controlled)

Issue: IPN 997-00012-37B


Issue Date: May 2005
Eaton Corporation disclaims any liability for direct, indirect, incidental, special or
consequential damages arising out of the application or use of any information
contained in this document. The foregoing disclaimer applies to damages or personal
injury, property damage, loss of operation, loss of profits, loss of product or loss of time,
whether incurred by the purchaser, the purchaser’s employees or third party.
Information in this document does not constitute a warranty, representation or
guarantee concerning the suitability or performance of Powerware products. No such
warranty, representation or guarantee is expressed or implied.
Information contained in this document is subject to change without further notice.
Powerware, Intergy, CellSure, SiteSure, PowerManagerII and DCTools are trade
names, trademarks, and/or service marks of Eaton Power Quality Corporation or its
subsidiaries and affiliates. Unless otherwise noted, brands, product names, trademarks
or registered trademarks are the property of their respective holders.
Subject to the right to use its equipment, Eaton Corporation does not convey any right,
title or interest in its intellectual property, including, without limitation, its patents,
copyrights and know-how.
No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means
or for any purpose other than the Purchaser’s personal use, without the express written
permission of Eaton Corporation.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation


All Rights Reserved.
General Description

APS3 Series DC Power Systems


APS3 DC power systems can be powered by a wide range of AC power sources such as
single-phase, two-phase, three-phase (L-N) or three-phase (L-L). Details about the AC
connection options can be found in Chapter 3.

12

11

10

8
3 7
6
4 5

( AC Rating Label
) Up to three Access Power Rectifiers (see page 5)
* SM40 Supervisory Module (see page 6)
+ Optional SM40 keypad, display and LED indicators (see Chapter 5)
' Integrated AC and DC Distribution with any combination up to 10 of AC / Load / Battery Miniature
Circuit Breakers (MCBs) and MOVs depending on customer requirements

, Fuse Fail Board (provides electronic detection of tripped MCBs / blown fuses)
9 DC Common
: Optional I/O Interface Board (see page 7)
; Optional Low Voltage Disconnect (LVD) Unit (see page 8)
- Surge Decoupling Coils
. Backplane (provides interface connections for the rectifiers, SM40 supervisory module and optional
alarm relays (x3), digital inputs (x3), temperature sensor, SiteSure modules and I/O interface board)

/ SiteSure Connector (RCP)

Optional top cover not shown.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


2 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 1
General Description

APS12/18/24 Series DC Power Systems


The diagram below shows a typical layout of an APS24 DC power system with four
APS6-000 rectifier power shelves stacked. This is the maximum expandable system size.
Other system configurations can be built by stacking two or three APS6-000 rectifier power
shelves to form the APS12 or APS18 series respectively.
Contact your local Powerware DC product representative for more details about
APS12/18/24 series DC power systems.

( DC Distribution (a wide range of DC


distribution modules are available
with 18 mm or 27 mm MCBs or
fuses and optional LVD modules)

) ACD24 AC Distribution
(configurable for single and dual
three-phase AC inputs)

* SM40 keypad, display and LED


indicators

+ SM40 Supervisory Module for


controlling up to 24 Access Power
Rectifiers (see page 5)

' Up to four APS6-000 Series


Rectifier Power Shelves for
applications that require more power
or extra redundancy

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


4 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 1
General Description

SM40 Supervisory Module


The SM40 supervisory module provides the control and monitoring functions for Access
Power Solutions (APS) DC power systems with up to 24 Access Power Rectifiers.
The SM40 is fully configurable for complete operational flexibility with all system operating
parameters stored in a default or customized configuration file. Only minimal on-site
configuration changes are required, before the power system is ready for operation.
The SM40 has an onboard audible indicator and two alarm LEDs. Alarm relay, digital input,
temperature sensor(s), LVD and fuse fail terminations are located on the I/O Interface Board.
The SM40 communicates via a standard RS-232 serial interface, accessible from the front.
You can use the RS-232 serial interface to:
• Connect directly to a PC running the DCTools software
• Remotely monitor the SM40 using DCTools, PowerManagerII or third party management
software

( Display Module
Connector

) RS-232 Serial Interface


* Power On LED
+ Non-Urgent Alarm LED
' Urgent Alarm LED

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


6 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 1
General Description

APS3 Series DC Power Systems


APS3 DC power systems can be powered by a wide range of AC power sources such as
single-phase, two-phase, three-phase (L-N) or three-phase (L-L). Details about the AC
connection options can be found in Chapter 3.

12

11

10

8
3 7
6
4 5

( AC Rating Label
) Up to three Access Power Rectifiers (see page 5)
* SM40 Supervisory Module (see page 6)
+ Optional SM40 keypad, display and LED indicators (see Chapter 5)
' Integrated AC and DC Distribution with any combination up to 10 of AC / Load / Battery Miniature
Circuit Breakers (MCBs) and MOVs depending on customer requirements

, Fuse Fail Board (provides electronic detection of tripped MCBs / blown fuses)
9 DC Common
: Optional I/O Interface Board (see page 7)
; Optional Low Voltage Disconnect (LVD) Unit (see page 8)
- Surge Decoupling Coils
. Backplane (provides interface connections for the rectifiers, SM40 supervisory module and optional
alarm relays (x3), digital inputs (x3), temperature sensor, SiteSure modules and I/O interface board)

/ SiteSure Connector (RCP)

Optional top cover not shown.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


2 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 1
General Description

Low Voltage Disconnect (Optional)


The Low Voltage Disconnect (LVD) can be configured as Load or Battery disconnect. The
LVD in APS DC power systems is normally wired as Battery disconnect. The LVD
disconnects the batteries from the load, at the preset LVD disconnect voltage or after a preset
time (LVD1 only), to prevent damage to the batteries due to excessive deep discharge. The
LVD then reconnects the batteries at the preset reconnect voltage, after the AC power is
restored.
The SM40 supervisory module provides two independent LVD channels for controlling up to
two LVD units (LVD1 and LVD2). LVD1 and LVD2 can have different disconnect and
reconnect voltages or LVD1 can be set for timed disconnect.
Dual LVD control is typically used for urgent / non-urgent load disconnect prioritization.
For example during an AC power outage where the batteries are supplying the load, LVD1
can be connected to non-urgent (low priority) loads and set to disconnect before LVD2.
LVD2 in turn can be connected to the system batteries. Therefore, the system batteries are
powering the urgent (high priority) load instead of the non-urgent loads. Once the batteries
have discharged to a level where the preset battery termination voltage is reached, LVD2 will
operate (disconnect) to prevent deep discharge of the batteries.
Standard off-the-shelf LVD options fall into two categories:
• LVDs for APS3 power systems (see below)
• LVDs for APS6 power systems (see page 9)

APS3 Power Systems


The single-card 100 A LVD module is used in APS3 power systems (see page 2).

2
3

( Rectifier Termination
) LVD Control Termination (RJ45)
* Fuse Fail Termination (RJ45)
(To Fuse Fail Detection Module)

+ Power In (LVD Supply from Backplane)


' Load or Battery Termination

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


8 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 1
General Description

APS12/18/24 Series DC Power Systems


The diagram below shows a typical layout of an APS24 DC power system with four
APS6-000 rectifier power shelves stacked. This is the maximum expandable system size.
Other system configurations can be built by stacking two or three APS6-000 rectifier power
shelves to form the APS12 or APS18 series respectively.
Contact your local Powerware DC product representative for more details about
APS12/18/24 series DC power systems.

( DC Distribution (a wide range of DC


distribution modules are available
with 18 mm or 27 mm MCBs or
fuses and optional LVD modules)

) ACD24 AC Distribution
(configurable for single and dual
three-phase AC inputs)

* SM40 keypad, display and LED


indicators

+ SM40 Supervisory Module for


controlling up to 24 Access Power
Rectifiers (see page 5)

' Up to four APS6-000 Series


Rectifier Power Shelves for
applications that require more power
or extra redundancy

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


4 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 1
General Description

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


10 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 1
General Description

SM40 Supervisory Module


The SM40 supervisory module provides the control and monitoring functions for Access
Power Solutions (APS) DC power systems with up to 24 Access Power Rectifiers.
The SM40 is fully configurable for complete operational flexibility with all system operating
parameters stored in a default or customized configuration file. Only minimal on-site
configuration changes are required, before the power system is ready for operation.
The SM40 has an onboard audible indicator and two alarm LEDs. Alarm relay, digital input,
temperature sensor(s), LVD and fuse fail terminations are located on the I/O Interface Board.
The SM40 communicates via a standard RS-232 serial interface, accessible from the front.
You can use the RS-232 serial interface to:
• Connect directly to a PC running the DCTools software
• Remotely monitor the SM40 using DCTools, PowerManagerII or third party management
software

( Display Module
Connector

) RS-232 Serial Interface


* Power On LED
+ Non-Urgent Alarm LED
' Urgent Alarm LED

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


6 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 1
I/O Interface Boards

I/O Interface Boards


The I/O Interface Board interfaces with the SM40 supervisory module and external devices
such as LVDs, temperature sensors and fault indication devices of network monitoring
equipment. I/O Interface boards provide easily accessible terminations for alarm relays,
digital inputs, temperature sensor(s), LVD drivers and MOV / load / battery fuse fail
detection.
New I/O Interface boards with different combinations of alarm relays, digital inputs,
temperature sensor(s), MOV / load / battery fuse fail and LVD driver card(s) can be created
to meet virtually any specific requirement. Contact your local Powerware DC product
representative for details.
The two standard I/O Interface boards are shown below. These illustrations may vary from
actual I/O Interface boards in your system.

Basic I/O Interface Board


( Auxiliary Temperature Sensor 8
Termination
(2A = Brown (+); 2B = Blue (-))

) Terminations for up to six User 7


Digital Inputs

* Fuse Fail / External LVD Controller


Termination

+ MOV Fail Termination 6


1
' Loom Connector (P2) to Backplane
, Loom Connector (P1) to Backplane 2
5
9 Temperature Sensor Termination (1A
= Brown (+); 1B = Blue (-))
3
: Terminations for up to six user-
configurable Alarm Relays 4
(Relay 1 to Relay 6)
(Relay 6 is labelled as Monitor OK)

Basic I/O Interface Board with LVD Driver Cards

( Basic I/O Interface Board (as above)


) LVD2 Driver Card (see also page 9)
* LVD1 Driver Card (see also page 9)

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 1 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
7
General Description

Low Voltage Disconnect (Optional)


The Low Voltage Disconnect (LVD) can be configured as Load or Battery disconnect. The
LVD in APS DC power systems is normally wired as Battery disconnect. The LVD
disconnects the batteries from the load, at the preset LVD disconnect voltage or after a preset
time (LVD1 only), to prevent damage to the batteries due to excessive deep discharge. The
LVD then reconnects the batteries at the preset reconnect voltage, after the AC power is
restored.
The SM40 supervisory module provides two independent LVD channels for controlling up to
two LVD units (LVD1 and LVD2). LVD1 and LVD2 can have different disconnect and
reconnect voltages or LVD1 can be set for timed disconnect.
Dual LVD control is typically used for urgent / non-urgent load disconnect prioritization.
For example during an AC power outage where the batteries are supplying the load, LVD1
can be connected to non-urgent (low priority) loads and set to disconnect before LVD2.
LVD2 in turn can be connected to the system batteries. Therefore, the system batteries are
powering the urgent (high priority) load instead of the non-urgent loads. Once the batteries
have discharged to a level where the preset battery termination voltage is reached, LVD2 will
operate (disconnect) to prevent deep discharge of the batteries.
Standard off-the-shelf LVD options fall into two categories:
• LVDs for APS3 power systems (see below)
• LVDs for APS6 power systems (see page 9)

APS3 Power Systems


The single-card 100 A LVD module is used in APS3 power systems (see page 2).

2
3

( Rectifier Termination
) LVD Control Termination (RJ45)
* Fuse Fail Termination (RJ45)
(To Fuse Fail Detection Module)

+ Power In (LVD Supply from Backplane)


' Load or Battery Termination

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


8 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 1
Low Voltage Disconnect (Optional)

APS6 Power Systems


The LVDs used in APS6 power systems are based on 200 A contactors and LVD driver cards
(one LVD driver card per contactor). A maximum of two contactors can be mounted on the
inside of the integrated AC and DC distribution rear panel.

The LVD driver cards are soldered into the basic I/O Interface board (as shown on page 7).

Each LVD driver card has an automatic/manual selector switch to manually override
automatic control of the LVD. If the automatic/manual selector switch is set to AUTO, the
LVD is controlled by the SM40 supervisory module. Two contactor status LEDs indicate
whether the LVD contacts are closed (green LED on) or open (red LED on).

If the LVD contactor is manually opened or closed during servicing, NO alarm is generated
until the LVD contactor position is out-of-sequence with the LVD contactor position
command of the SM40. If the automatic/manual selector switch is set to manual (closed or
open) during servicing, ensure that the switch is set to AUTO once servicing is complete.

The auxiliary switch on the contactor provides feedback to the SM40 supervisory module
on whether the contacts are open or closed.

10
9
2

8
7

4 5 6
3

( LVD Contactor (200 A)


) Auxiliary Switch Terminations on Contactor
* Coil Terminations on Contactor
+ LVD Driver Card
' Power In (LVD Supply from Backplane)
, Auxiliary Switch Termination on LVD Driver Card
9 Contactor Status LED (green) – indicates closed contacts
: Automatic/Manual Selector Switch
; Contactor Status LED (red) – indicates open contacts
- Coil Termination on LVD Driver Card

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 1 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
9
General Description

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


10 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 1
Chapter 2

Pre-Installation
4
C h a p t e r 2
Pre-Installation

Overview

Topic Page
Warnings 12

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 2 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
11
Pre-Installation

Warnings
This section contains important warnings relating to:
• Hazardous Energy Levels
• Location and Environment
• Electrical Safety
• Rectifiers
• DC Distribution
• Servicing
• EMC Compliance

 Hazardous Energy Levels

• Rectifiers and batteries contain hazardous energy levels. Only personnel trained and
experienced in DC power systems should service this equipment.
• Always use insulated tools.
• Do not short-circuit the live and common bus bars or cables.
• Take care that short circuits are not caused by accidentally dropping or touching
metal objects onto the cell or monobloc terminals. Sealed valve regulated batteries are
electrically live at all times and must be treated with care. They can supply high
short-circuit currents even if the case or lid is damaged. Remove any personal metal
adornment such as a chain, watch or ring, which could cause short circuits and
personal injury. Synthetic clothing such as nylon should also not be worn. Always
ensure that any shrouding supplied with the batteries is correctly fitted to cable
connectors.

 Location and Environment

• APS DC power systems must be mounted in an enclosed cabinet that meets the safety
and fire enclosure requirements (as specified in AS/NZS 60950.1, EN 60950-1 and
UL 60950-1).
• To maintain optimum system cooling, keep the front and rear of the APS DC power
system clear from walls or other equipment. The minimum recommended clearance
distance at the front and rear of the APS DC Power System is 50 mm (2”).
• Dust build-up within APS DC power systems may cause premature failure. In dusty
environments, either install the power system in a sealed and air-conditioned
equipment room, or provide fan assisted filtered air to create a positive pressure
environment inside the equipment room. Both options require regular cleaning of the
air filters.
• Do not allow water or any foreign object to enter the APS DC power system. Do not
place objects containing liquid on top of or near the unit.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


12 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 2
Warnings

 Electrical Safety

• The APS DC power system may be powered from multiple AC sources. All AC power
sources must be isolated before internally servicing the equipment.
• If the APS DC power system is to be installed in a location where the ambient
temperature may rise above 50ºC (122ºF), then V90 rated cable should be used for all
connections.
• The maximum earth leakage current of each Access Power Rectifier is 2.2 mA. Ensure
that any upstream Residual Current Devices (RCDs) are appropriately rated.
• APS DC power systems are not compatible with IT (Impedance Terra) AC power
distribution topologies. Contact your local Powerware DC product representative for
advice.
• APS DC power system MCBs are not a disconnect device. The APS DC power system
must be connected to a suitable upstream AC supply disconnect device such as
Miniature Circuit Breaker(s) (MCB) or fuses. This device must isolate both the phase
and neutral conductors in single-phase and three-phase connections, unless the
neutral conductor is clearly identified.
• A registered electrician (or suitably qualified person) must check the integrity of the
installed cabling, BEFORE the APS DC power system is powered up.
• Commissioning must be performed in the sequence documented in this guide.

 Rectifiers

• Do not install the rectifiers until the room has been cleaned and is dust free.
• To reduce the risk of electric shock and maintain optimum system cooling, always
cover empty rectifier slots with blanking panels.
• To avoid electrical shock, do not place hands inside the rectifier shelf.
• Rectifier cases may exceed 100ºC (212ºF), especially after prolonged operation. When
removing a rectifier from the shelf, allow it to cool down first or use suitable gloves.
• Do not attempt to disassemble rectifiers. Return them, in their original packaging, to
your local Powerware DC product representative for replacement or repair.

 DC Distribution

DC Common of the APS DC power system can be connected to earth (ground). If this
connection is made all of the following conditions must be met:
1 Your equipment and the APS DC power system must be located within the same
premises.
2 No switching or disconnecting devices are allowed in the conductor between the DC
common line and the point of connection to the earth (ground) electrode conductor.
(See Chapter 3 for more details.)

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 2 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
13
Pre-Installation

 Servicing

APS DC power systems contain hazardous voltages. Do not attempt to disassemble or


service the unit if you are not qualified.

 EMC Compliance

• APS DC power systems may be used in close proximity to other electronic equipment,
provided installation is carried out according to instructions in this manual. However,
proper installation and compliance with EMC standards does not guarantee that the
APS DC power system will not respond to electromagnetic disturbances, or will not
cause interference to other equipment in a particular installation.
• In a domestic environment this product may cause radio interference in which case the
user may be required to take adequate measures.
• Changes or modifications to APS DC power systems not approved by Eaton
Corporation could void FCC (Federal Communications Commission) authority to
operate that equipment.
• APS3 and APS6 power systems have been tested and found to comply with the limits
for a Class B digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential
installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy
and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that the
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause
harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which
the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


14 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 2
Chapter 3

Installation
4
C h a p t e r 3
Installation

Overview

Topic Page
Mounting the APS DC Power System 16
Input Transient Protection 17
Connecting the APS DC Power System to the AC Supply 20
High AC Voltage Protection 27
Connecting the DC Load and Battery Cables 28
Connecting the Output of the APS DC Power System to Earth 32
Mounting the Battery Temperature Sensor 33
Installing the Batteries 34
Installing External Alarm and Digital Inputs Cabling 35

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 3 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
15
Installation

Mounting the APS DC Power System


APS3 and APS6 power systems come pre-assembled with two rack-mounting brackets in the
position shown.
The two rack-mounting brackets can be moved backwards and lined up with alternative
bracket-mounting holes, to provide greater mounting flexibility.
Two different types of rack-mounting brackets are available for mounting APS3 and APS6
power systems in 19-inch wide or 23-inch wide racks.

( Rack-mounting bracket (available for 19-inch and 23-inch wide racks)


) Alternative bracket mounting holes for greater mounting flexibility

Clearance Requirements
APS DC power systems require the following minimum clearances:
• Front and Rear Clearance - 50 mm (2”) from walls and other equipment, required for
optimum system cooling and access.
• Top Clearance - 44.45 mm (1¾") or 1U from other equipment, required for cable access
and optimum system cooling.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


16 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 3
Input Transient Protection

Input Transient Protection


To prevent lightning damage to APS DC power systems, structural lightning protection and
transient overvoltage protection needs to be installed at each site.
Transient protection is also required to protect an APS DC power system from other sources
of transients, such as:
• Circuit or grid switching by the power company
• Electrical switching of large inductive loads (such as motors, transformers, and electrical
drives) or capacitive loads (such as power factor correction) or manufacturing
equipment.
A suitably qualified consultant should be used to develop a transient protection plan for the
equipment to be installed at the site. The transient protection plan and associated installation
should comply with IEC 61643-12 and needs to:
1 Capture the lightning strike at a known and preferred point outside the building
2 Conduct the main lightning energy safely to earth
3 Dissipate the lightning energy into a low impedance earthing system
4 Eliminate earth potential differences inside the building
5 Protect the AC supply using a coordinated transient voltage surge suppression plan, that
includes:
• Primary surge protection
• Secondary surge protection
• Primary / secondary surge decoupling coils
• Secondary / tertiary surge decoupling coils
6 Protect the data and control lines using a coordinated transient voltage surge
suppression plan

Earthing (Grounding)
The most important aspect of any power system installation at a site is the integrity of the
earthing systems. Failing to provide effective earthing will significantly reduce site
protection. Most sites have a number of earthing systems inherent in their design, such as:
• Power (AC mains) earth
• Power (DC system) earth
• Tower / building lightning protection earth
For optimum protection, all earths must be brought together at one "star" point, otherwise
surge currents can flow within the system creating large voltages that can cause damage to
equipment that does not normally require surge protection, such as rectifier outputs and
communications interfaces.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 3 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
17
Installation

If dealing with a site-tower, and especially if lightning-prone, the tower earth is most
important (because it conducts the majority of the surge to earth), and should therefore be
used as the "star" point. For other installations, a 'direct-lightning' earth will not be available
therefore a structural or power system earth will be used. In multi-storey buildings, always
try to use structural earths if the common earth point cannot be found at ground level. For
basements / single storey buildings, the mains power earth is usually the most appropriate.

Primary Transient Protection


Primary transient protection must be considered at all sites. If fitted, primary transient
protection must be installed on the incoming mains power supply either at the main AC
switchboard or incoming distribution board.
In the absence of sufficient information, primary transient protective devices with a
minimum repeat strike rating of 100kA (8/20 µs wave shape) are recommended.
In addition, primary transient protection must be coordinated with downstream secondary
transient protection via suitably rated surge decoupling coils. (These should have been
specified as part of the transient protection plan for the site. If no surge decoupling coils
were specified, air-core 15 µH surge decoupling coils should be suitable.)

Secondary Transient Protection


Secondary transient protection (downstream from primary transient protection) must be
present at all sites to protect the APS DC power system from transients.
Typically, APS DC power systems are factory-fitted with secondary transient protection.
These transient protective devices will protect the power system from a limited number of
repeated 15 kA transients (8/20 µs wave shape).
Factory-fitted secondary transient protection consists of:
• Phase-to-neutral metal oxide varistors (MOVs) with a voltage rating of 385 V, capable of
withstanding temporary overvoltages
• A neutral-to-earth spark gap (gas discharge tube)
• Surge decoupling coils
If secondary transient protection is not fitted inside the APS DC power system, then external
secondary transient protection must be installed in the sub switchboard that supplies the
APS DC power system.
Carefully consider the residual voltage seen by the DC power system (maximum 6 kV) and
the decoupling between the transient protection system and the DC power system.
Transients must be limited to less than 2 kA.

Tertiary Transient Protection


Rectifiers are fitted with low-level transient protection, designed to protect the rectifiers from
voltage spikes, generated during operation of the upstream transient protection system.
Rectifiers should never be installed without adequate upstream surge protection.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


18 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 3
Input Transient Protection

Installation
Install the transient protection according to the diagram below.

Transient protective devices are fitted with alarm contacts and visual indicators.
Status of all externally installed transient protective devices should be monitored either by:
• Regularly inspecting the visual indicators
• Connecting the alarm contacts to the MOV Fail termination on the I/O Interface Board
(preferred option) or to the building management system. (See Chapter 1 for location of
MOV Fail termination on I/O Interface Board)

The alarm signal lines of the external transient protective devices must be isolated from the
AC supply (by voltage-free relay contacts) before connecting these signal lines to the APS
DC power system.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 3 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
19
Installation

Connecting the APS DC Power System to the AC Supply

 The maximum earth leakage current of each Access Power Rectifier is 2.2 mA.
Ensure that any upstream Residual Current Devices (RCDs) are appropriately
rated.

 APS DC power system MCBs are not a disconnect device. The APS DC power
system must be connected to a suitable upstream AC supply disconnect device
such as Miniature Circuit Breaker(s) (MCB) or fuses. This device must isolate
both the phase and neutral conductors in single-phase and three-phase
connections, unless the neutral conductor is clearly identified.

 If the APS DC power system is to be installed in a location where the ambient


temperature may rise above 50º (122ºF), then V90 rated cable should be used for
the AC connections.

 There must be adequate discrimination between the rectifier internal fuse and
the upstream AC supply-disconnect device. Failure to do this may result in the
loss of AC power to all rectifiers, if a fault occurs in one rectifier. Refer to AC
Discrimination section on the next page for more information.

 Only use a two-phase or three-phase (L-L) AC power source if referenced to earth,


or a protection system is in place so that the phase-earth voltage cannot exceed
the rating of the rectifier.

Location of AC Rating Label


Refer to Chapter 1 (pages 2 and 3) for location of AC Rating label.

AC Installation Practices
Before you start connecting the APS DC power system to the AC supply, please read the
following AC installation practices:
• A qualified electrician familiar with local wiring regulations should carry out the
installation. (North America: refer to National Electric Code ANSI/NFPA 70 or
Canadian Electrical Code (CSA C22.1).
• Ensure that each cable entry gland provides firm strain relief and adequate anchorage for
each AC supply cable.
• Prevent excessive strain on the AC wiring and terminal connections inside the APS DC
power system.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


20 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 3
Connecting the APS DC Power System to the AC Supply

• Strip the sheath of each AC supply cable inside the APS DC power system back towards
the cable entry gland to increase the temperature rating of the cable. Allow the sheath to
protrude approximately 10 mm (⅜ inch) through the cable entry gland.
• Before terminating the AC supply cable at the APS DC power system, strip the insulation
of the AC supply cable conductors back approximately 7 mm (¼ inch) and crimp a
ferrule over the bare conductor ends. For each of the conductors, ensure that the ferrule
fits over all the strands of wire.
• Ensure that the earth conductor is 30-50 mm (1¼ - 2 inches) longer than the live and
neutral conductors (in single-phase connections) or all live conductors (in multi-phase)
connections.
• Terminate the AC supply cable at the APS DC power system before terminating the AC
supply cable at the switchboard.
• Label the switchboard.
• Once all AC supply cabling is in place and terminated, perform electrical insulation and
continuity tests. Remove the MOVs if high AC voltages are used as part of these tests.

AC Discrimination
Each rectifier has an internal fast-acting 15A fuse in both the phase (L) and neutral (N) AC
input lines. Under certain internal fault conditions these fuses will blow.
If there is insufficient discrimination between these fuses and any upstream AC supply-
disconnect device then the upstream AC supply-disconnect device will operate when a
rectifier fuse blows. This will disconnect the AC supply to all rectifiers.
The average time-current curve of the rectifier internal fuse is shown below. To ensure there
is adequate discrimination, the time-current curve of the upstream AC supply-disconnect
device must be entirely outside (to the right of) the curve shown.

Source: Littelfuse Electronic Designer’s Guide, November 2000, p60.

The minimum size MCB that will discriminate with the rectifier fuses depends on the
MCB characteristics, but is typically a 40A D-curve.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 3 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
21
Installation

APS3 AC Connection Options


APS3 DC power systems can be connected to single-phase (L-N), two-phase (L-L),
three-phase (L-N) and three-phase (L-L) AC power sources. (See AC wiring options on the
next page).
AC power is connected to the internal AC circuit breaker(s) of an APS3 DC power system (if
fitted). If no internal AC circuit breaker(s) are fitted, then the AC power source needs to be
connected to the AC circuit breaker(s) of an external AC distribution module.

The AC supply cable (supplying the APS3 power system) must be sized according to your local
wiring regulations.

A typical example of connecting a single-phase (L-N) AC supply cable to the internal AC


Distribution of an APS3 DC power system is shown below.
Use this diagram in conjunction with the appropriate AC wiring diagram on the next page,
and warnings and installation practices on page 20, to connect the AC supply cable to your
APS3 DC power system.

( To comply with electromagnetic emission standards EN 55022 class B, wind 3 turns of all live and neutral
(if present) conductors of the AC supply cable on the toroid provided.
TM
) Cable-tie the supplied Nomex cover to the AC supply cable conductor(s) (as shown) to prevent accidental
contact with the live terminal(s) of the MCB(s).

* Cable-tie all live conductors of the incoming AC supply cable together, close to their terminations. For
single-phase connections, cable-tie the live connector of the incoming AC supply cable to the nearest
conductor available, close to their terminations. This prevents the bare end of a conductor from touching
metal parts, if it becomes loose.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


22 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 3
Connecting the APS DC Power System to the AC Supply

Single-phase (L-N) Two-phase (L-L) – N. America (see last  p 20)

Minimum AC Input Voltage (L-N) 150 V 185 V 200 V 220 V Minimum AC Input Voltage (L-L) 150 V 185 V 200 V 220 V

Maximum AC Input Current (per phase) 36 A 29 A 27 A 24.5 A Maximum AC Input Current (per phase) 36 A 29 A 27 A 24.5 A

Three-phase (L-N) Three-phase (L-L) (see last  p 20)

Minimum AC Input Voltage (L-N) 150 V 185 V 200 V 220 V Minimum AC Input Voltage (L-L) 150 V 185 V 200 V 220 V

Maximum AC Input Current (per phase) 12 A 10 A 9A 8A Maximum AC Input Current (per phase) 21 A 17 A 15.5 A 14 A

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 3 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
23
Installation

APS6 AC Connection Options


APS6 DC power systems can be connected to single-phase (L-N), two-phase (L-L),
three-phase (L-N) and three-phase (L-L) AC power sources. (See AC wiring options on the
next three pages.)
AC power is connected to the internal AC circuit breaker(s) of an APS6 DC power system (if
fitted). If no internal AC circuit breaker(s) are fitted, then the AC power source needs to be
connected to the AC circuit breaker(s) of an external AC distribution module.

The AC cable (supplying the APS6 DC power system) must be sized according to your local
wiring regulations.

A typical example of connecting a three-phase (L-N) AC supply cable to the internal AC


Distribution of an APS6 DC power system is shown below.
Use this diagram in conjunction with the appropriate AC wiring diagram on the next three
pages, and warnings and installation practices on page 20, to connect the AC supply cable to
your APS6 power system.

( To comply with electromagnetic emission standards EN 55022 class B, wind 3 turns of all live and neutral
(if present) conductors of the AC supply cable on the toroid provided. The toroid must be fitted in the
integrated AC and DC Distribution, as indicated in the diagram above.
TM
) Cable-tie the supplied Nomex cover to the AC supply cable conductor(s) (as shown) to prevent accidental
contact with the live terminal(s) of the MCB(s).

* Cable-tie all live conductors of the incoming AC supply cable together, close to their terminations.
For single-phase connections, cable-tie the live connector of the incoming AC supply cable to the nearest
conductor available, close to their terminations. This prevents the bare end of a conductor from touching
metal parts, if it becomes loose.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


24 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 3
Connecting the APS DC Power System to the AC Supply

Single-phase (L-N)

Minimum AC Input Voltage (L-N) 150 V 185 V 200 V 220 V

Maximum AC Input Current (per phase) 72 A 58 A 54 A 49 A

DRG3677420A-2
APS6

BACKPLANE
Rectifier 5
Rectifier 6

Rectifier 2

Rectifier 1
Rectifier 3
Rectifier 4
N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L
Le

Ld

Lb

La
Lc
Lf
AC Distribution

= Surge Decoupling Coil


APS
E
N
L1

Dual Feed Single-phase (L-N)

Minimum AC Input Voltage (L-L) 150 V 185 V 200 V 220 V

Maximum AC Input Current (per phase) 36 A 29 A 27 A 24.5 A

DRG3677420A-3
APS6

BACKPLANE
Rectifier 5

Rectifier 3
Rectifier 6

Rectifier 4

Rectifier 2

Rectifier 1
N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L
N/L

N/L
Ld

Lb
Le

La
Lc
Lf
AC Distribution

= Surge Decoupling Coil


APS
L1 N E
L1 N E

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 3 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
25
Installation

Two-phase (L-L) – N America (see last  p 20)

Minimum AC Input Voltage (L-L) 150 V 185 V 200 V 220 V

Maximum AC Input Current (per phase) 72 A 58 A 54 A 49 A

DRG3677420A-1
APS6

BACKPLANE
Rectifier 5
Rectifier 6

Rectifier 2

Rectifier 1
Rectifier 3
Rectifier 4
N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L
La
Le

Ld

Lb
Lc
AC Distribution

Lf

= Surge Decoupling Coil


APS
E
L2
L1

Three-phase (L-N)

Minimum AC Input Voltage (L-N) 150 V 185 V 200 V 220 V

Maximum AC Input Current (per phase) 24 A 19.5A 18 A 16.5 A

DRG3677420A-4
APS6

Rectifier 5

Rectifier 3
Rectifier 6

Rectifier 4

Rectifier 2

Rectifier 1

BACKPLANE
N/L
N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L
AC Distribution

Le

Ld

Lb

La
Lc
Lf
APS

= Surge Decoupling Coil


E
N
L1 L2 L3

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


26 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 3
High AC Voltage Protection

Three-phase (L-L) (see last  p 20)

Minimum AC Input Voltage (L-L) 150 V 185 V 200 V 220 V

Maximum AC Input Current (per phase) 41.5 A 34 A 31 A 28 A

DRG3677420A-5
APS6

Rectifier 5

Rectifier 3
Rectifier 6

Rectifier 4

Rectifier 2

Rectifier 1

BACKPLANE
N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L

N/L
AC Distribution

Le

Ld

Lb

La
Lc
Lf
APS

= Surge Decoupling Coil


E
L3
L2
L1

High AC Voltage Protection


If the AC supply voltage is expected to exceed the rating of 275VL-N , then it is strongly
recommended that an external high voltage protection unit be installed. The high voltage
protection unit automatically disconnects the AC supply from the APS DC power system.
When the AC input voltage returns to within acceptable limits, the high voltage protection
unit automatically reconnects the AC supply.

Installation
Install the high voltage protection unit according to the diagram below.
Status of the high voltage protection unit should be monitored by connecting the
High VAC alarm to one of the Digital Inputs on the I/O Interface Board (see Chapter 1 for
location).

The High VAC alarm signal lines must be isolated from the AC supply (by a voltage-free relay
contact) before connecting these signal lines to the APS DC power system.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 3 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
27
Communications

Communications Options
The SM40 supervisory module in the APS DC power system, can communicate to a local or
remote PC via a standard RS-232 serial interface, accessible from the front.
Shown below are the four standard communications options. Contact Eaton Corporation’s
Telecommunications Solutions Division for other communications options.

Direct Connection

Ethernet

PSTN Modem

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


58 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 6
Communications Options

GSM Modem

Use DCTools for setting up SMS text messaging. Setup from the front panel is not possible.

In general setup of SMS text messaging in DCTools requires the following:


• Entering the name(s) of the SMS receiver(s). A maximum of three names can be entered.
• Enabling SMS text messaging for each receiver.
• Entering the telephone number(s) of the SMS receiver(s). Only one telephone number per
receiver can be entered.

See application note AN0024 for implementation details. To receive application notes, contact
your local Powerware DC product representative or email dc.info@powerware.com

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 6 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
59
Chapter 7

Maintenance
4
C h a p t e r 7
Maintenance

Overview

Topic Page
Troubleshooting 62
Replacing a Rectifier 66
Replacing an SM40 Supervisory Module 69
Monitoring and Replacing Transient Protective Devices 72
Battery Disposal and Recycling 72

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
61
Troubleshooting

Problem Possible Cause Required Action


Rectifier yellow LED Rectifier power limit is active. Check if the APS is recovering
on from a recent AC power outage.
The APS may still be charging
the batteries after the power
outage. No further action is
required.
Check that the rectifier capacity
of the APS is not exceeded.
Additional rectifiers may be
required.
Rectifier temperature None. The APS will return to
turndown is active, due to low normal operation when the AC
AC supply voltage or excessive supply has returned to within its
ambient temperature. rated AC input voltage or
operating temperature range, as
specified in Appendix C.
High system output Equalize, Fast Charge and/or Disable active processes if not
voltage Temperature Compensation required.
process is active
Incorrect float voltage setting at Check the float voltage setting of
the SM40 the SM40.
Record new setting.
Faulty rectifier Remove rectifier modules one at
a time. (The output voltage
returns to normal when faulty
rectifier is removed.)
Replace faulty rectifier.
Low system output Rectifiers not on Restore AC power.
voltage (rectifiers not Battery Test and/or Disable active processes if not
in current limit) Temperature Compensation required.
process is active.
Incorrect float voltage setting at Check the float voltage setting of
the SM40. the SM40.
Record new setting.
Low system output Load is too high for rectifier Reduce load or add rectifier
voltage and rectifier capacity. modules.
yellow LEDs are on Battery is recharging after AC Check battery has recharged
(rectifiers are in power outage. within expected time.
current limit).
continued

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
63
Maintenance

Problem Possible Cause Required Action


System provides no LVD is wired as load Check that the LVD is enabled
output with the load disconnect. and set to correct values at the
connected. SM40 using DCTools.
Check that the selector switch on
the LVD driver card is set to
Auto.
Check that the LVD control and
DC power cables are connected.
Check the load connections to
the LVD.
System has no LVD is wired as battery Check LVD is enabled and set to
battery input with disconnect. correct values at the SM40 using
the batteries DCTools.
connected. Check that the selector switch on
the LVD driver card is set to
Auto.
Check LVD control and DC
power cables are connected.
Check the battery connections to
the LVD.
SM40 does not Local/External current shunt Check that the Local/External
correctly register the selector switches in the wrong selector switches on the
current shunts and position. backplane are set to Local.
the displayed values
are over range.
SM40 display is SM40 display loom is Reconnect SM40 display loom.
blank. disconnected. Wait 10 seconds for correct
operation.
Faulty SM40 display Contact your local Powerware
DC product representative
SM40 green SM40 is not powered. Check the SM40 card is fully
Power On LED off. inserted into the backplane.
SM40 is faulty. Contact your local Powerware
DC product representative.
SM40 red LED on SM40 “Urgent Alarm” active Check the type of “Urgent
Alarm” using DCTools or press

the key on the SM40 front


panel.
SM40 yellow LED SM40 “Non-Urgent Alarm” Check the type of “Non-Urgent
on active. Alarm” using DCTools or press

the key on the SM40 front


panel.
continued

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


64 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting

Problem Possible Cause Required Action


No Ethernet Wrong IP address, netmask Check the settings with the
communications and/or incompatible network network administrator.
between SM40 and Gateway may be required
local PC (only
applicable if Site Faulty communications cable Replace faulty cable.
Gateway Module The Telnet Active check box in Disable the Telnet Active check
(SGM10) or similar the DCTools or PowerManagerII box in the DCTools or
Ethernet interface is Comms Properties dialog is PowerManagerII Comms
used). enabled. Properties dialog.
No serial Incorrect cable Check that a null modem cable
communications has been used.
between SM40 and Null modem cable not plugged Check that the null modem cable
local PC into PC or plugged into the is plugged into the PC and into
wrong port. the correct port.
Communications port settings Reconfigure the PC port
of PC do not match that of the properties (19K2 8 N 1).
RS-232 serial port of the APS
DC power system.
Incorrect S3P address Check that the S3P address in
DCTools is set to 0. If using
PowerManagerII, set the S3P
address to the same address as
the SM40 (typically 1).
Monitor OK relay Application corrupt or Check the configuration and
(Relay 6) hardware fault. ensure that there is no other
de-energized alarm mapped to this relay.
Otherwise, contact your local
Powerware DC product
representative for a replacement
SM40.
SM40 displays Missing configuration Download the appropriate
Config Error configuration file into the SM40.
Invalid configuration Contact your local Powerware
DC product representative.
SM40 displays Incorrect rectifier voltage, Check that all rectifiers are of the
Incorrect Rect V because of installed rectifiers same type and replace as
with different nominal output appropriate. See relevant power
voltages. system installation guide for
details.
SM40 displays Incorrect number of cells in a Check the number of cells in a
Wrong No. Cell battery string – a result of a battery string, nominal voltage of
mismatch between string each cell and the nominal voltage
voltage and nominal rectifier of the rectifiers.
output voltage.
Incorrectly configured, Configure, connect or replace
SM40 displays ??? disconnected or failed sensor sensor.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
65
Replacing a Rectifier

Step 2 - Pull out the rectifier

 The rectifier may be hot, especially after prolonged operation.


Allow the rectifier to cool down or use suitable gloves.

Grip the rectifier front panel with one hand as indicated by the arrows in the
diagram below and slowly pull it out from the shelf, supporting the base of the
rectifier with your other hand.

To avoid damage to the connector, do not rest the rectifier on its connector, once
it has been removed from the shelf.

Procedure complete

You must now insert a replacement rectifier into the empty slot (see page 68), or fit a
blanking panel.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
67
Maintenance

Inserting a Rectifier

Step 1 - Align the new rectifier with the burst-out guides in the shelf

Step 2 - Push in the rectifier

 To avoid injury to your hands, keep your fingers clear, as


shown in the diagram below.

1 Slowly push in the rectifier, until the rear connector of the rectifier engages
fully with the backplane connector.

1 Tighten the rectifier retaining screw.


2 Check that the rectifier’s Power On LED turns on and the and alarm
LEDs are off.

The alarm LED turns on for about 1 second when the rectifier powers up.

Procedure complete

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


68 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 7
Maintenance


2 Disconnect the display module ribbon cable.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


70 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 7
Replacing an SM40 Supervisory Module

Step 6 - Reconnect the LVD (if fitted)


If an LVD is fitted, check that the system output voltage is correct then
reconnect the LVD as follows.
• APS3 systems: Plug the LVD control cable into the appropriate RJ45
socket on the single-card LVD module (see page 8).
• APS6 systems: Switch the Automatic/Manual selector switch on the LVD
driver card (see page 9) to AUTO.

Step 7 - Check that the new SM40 operates as intended


1 Check all control functions, alarms and current measurement.

Any periodic function will restart from the time when power was applied
to the new SM40.

2 Check the system identification parameters and communications settings.


3 Change the configuration as required to ensure that the SM40 operates as
intended.
4 Check that all rectifiers are communicating and that the SM40 has
registered all rectifiers. This can be checked from the front panel by
viewing the individual rectifier currents in Main Display Mode. See front
panel menu structure on inside front cover or Viewing System Values in
Chapter 5 for details.

Procedure complete

Return the faulty SM40, in its antistatic bag, with the completed Equipment Incident Report
form to your nearest authorized service agent for replacement or repair.

A copy of the Equipment Incident Report form can be found at the back of this guide.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
71
Maintenance

Monitoring and Replacing Transient Protective Devices


APS DC power systems are protected against transients caused by lightning or high power
switching at the site or at substation level. Transient protection is normally implemented at
building level (primary transient protection) and power system/sub-switchboard level
(secondary transient protection.)
The most widely used transient protective devices are metal oxide varistors (MOVs). These
MOVs are generally fitted in the main AC switchboard of the building for primary transient
protection and the AC distribution of the APS DC power system or sub-switchboard
(powering the APS DC power system) for secondary transient protection.

Monitoring the MOVs


MOVs are fitted with alarm contacts and visual indicators. These alarms should have been
wired to the supervisory module and from there extended to the building management
system. If the MOVs are not monitored automatically, then regular visual inspections must
be carried out.

Replacing the MOVs


MOVs must be functional at all times. In practice, it is impossible to predict when a MOV
will fail. That depends entirely on the number and magnitude of the transients sustained.
For that reason we recommend the following, depending on how accessible the site is.
• For easily accessible sites – If a MOV has failed (as indicated by a MOV Fail alarm or the
visual indicator), then replace all the MOVs as soon as possible.
• For remote sites with difficult access – Replace all the MOVs during scheduled
maintenance visits, irrespective of whether they have failed or not.

We strongly recommend inspecting the MOVs in the main AC switchboard at the same time
and replacing them as appropriate.

If any MOV or other transient protection device has failed then the design of the primary and
secondary transient protection systems, and the maintenance plan, at that site must be
reviewed.
For further information about input transient protection, refer to Chapter 3.

Battery Disposal and Recycling


Eaton's Powerware Division recommends using properly trained and experienced service
technicians. It is important that your service technicians follow Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) guidelines or equivalent local regulations to dispose of all batteries. Please
remember that the owner is responsible and liable to ensure those EPA guidelines or
equivalent local regulations are followed.
Contact your local Powerware DC product representative for further information.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


72 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 7
Appendix A

Glossary of Alarms
4
A p p e n d i x A
Glossary of Alarms

AC Fail All rectifiers are reporting loss of AC power.

ACD Fan Fail The AC Distribution cooling system or fan controller has failed.

AC High The AC voltage is above the configured AC High threshold.

AC Low The AC voltage is below the configured AC Low threshold.

Aux Temp High The auxiliary temperature sensor is at a temperature above the high
temperature set point.

Aux Temp Low The auxiliary temperature sensor is at a temperature below the low
temperature set point.

Battery Charge Over-Current The battery charge current is above a preset percentage of the battery
(displayed as Battery Over Current) C10 capacity.

Batt Temp High This alarm indicates either thermal runaway of the batteries or that the
batteries are operating at a temperature that may cause reduced battery
life.

Batt Temp Low This alarm indicates a risk to the battery standby power system. Note
that lower temperatures reduce the battery capacity.

Battery Fuse Fail The Battery Fuse Fail input to the SM40 is active.
(displayed as Batt Fuse Fail)

Battery Test Active A Battery Test is active.

Battery Test Fail The batteries do not have the required capacity or are not operating in
a fully charged state.

Equalize Active An Equalize process is active.

Fast Charge Active A Fast Charge process is active.

High Float The float voltage is above its normal range.

High Load The bus voltage is higher than the range that is safe for the load and/or
battery.

In Discharge The batteries are discharging.

Load Fuse Fail The Load Fuse Fail digital input to the SM40 is active.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Appendix A IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
73
Glossary of Alarms

Low Float The float voltage is below its normal range.

Low Load The bus voltage is below its normal range.

LVD1 Disconnect The operating conditions of the power system have automatically
triggered a low voltage disconnect.

LVD1 Fail LVD1 is faulty.

LVD1 Manual A local operator has manually triggered LVD1. (APS6 only)

LVD2 Disconnect The operating conditions of the power system have automatically
triggered a low voltage disconnect.

LVD2 Fail LVD2 is faulty.

LVD2 Manual A local operator has manually triggered LVD2. (APS6 only)

MOV Fail The surge protection system has failed. One or more MOV cartridges
may need to be replaced.

Multiple Rectifier Comms Lost Normally this alarm indicates that multiple rectifiers have been
(displayed as Rectifiers Absent) removed during routine maintenance. However, faulty rectifier
communications or losing the rectifier communications bus can also
trigger this alarm. If removing multiple rectifiers triggers this alarm,
you can reset it from the front panel before it triggers an external
alarm.

Multiple Rectifier Fail Multiple rectifiers are faulty or that their AC power has been removed
without causing partial or total AC failure.

Partial AC Fail More than 20% of the rectifiers are reporting loss of AC power or loss
of a phase.

Rectifier Absent See Rectifier Comms Lost

Rectifier Comms Lost A rectifier has been removed during routine maintenance. However,
(displayed as Rectifier Absent) faulty rectifier communications or losing the rectifier communications
bus can also trigger this alarm. If removing a rectifier triggers this
alarm, you can reset a Rectifier Fail alarm from the front panel before it
triggers an external alarm.

Rectifier Fail A rectifier is faulty or its AC power has been removed without causing
partial or total AC failure. You can reset a Rectifier Fail alarm from the
front panel before it triggers an external alarm.

Rectifiers Absent See Multiple Rectifier Comms Lost

Sensor Fail The current, temperature or voltage sensing system is faulty.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


74 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Appendix A
Glossary of Alarms

SiteSure Missing SiteSure equipment is not operational or not installed.

System Overload The power system is operating close to its maximum capacity and
more rectifiers may need to be inserted. The System Overload
threshold is configurable.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Appendix A IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
75
Glossary of Alarms

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


76 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Appendix A
Appendix B

Control Function Glossary


4
A p p e n d i x B
Control Function Glossary

Active Voltage Control


Active Voltage Control maintains a constant float voltage under varying load conditions.
Enable Active Voltage Control to prevent undercharging the batteries of your APS during
high load demand.

Auxiliary Temperature Disconnect


Auxiliary Temperature Disconnect is used in special configured systems to shut down an
installation when preset temperature extremes are reached.
If this control function is enabled, and auxiliary temperature extremes above the preset
Auxiliary Temperature Disconnect High Turn Off or below the Auxiliary Temperature
Disconnect Low Turn Off are registered, then the SM60 supervisory module will respond as
follows (depending on the configuration):
• Disconnect LVD1, and/or
• Disconnect LVD2, and/or
• Shut down all rectifiers

Caution
Do NOT enable this control function unless your system is appropriately wired and
configured. Failure to do so will result in loss of reliable power under certain temperature
conditions. Contact Eaton Corporation’s Telecommunications Solutions Division’s
application engineers for further details.

Battery Current Limit (BCL)


Battery Current Limit automatically limits the battery charge current within a configured
range (a percentage of the C10 rating of the battery) by varying the system voltage.
Enable Battery Current Limit to prevent:
• Overcharging of the batteries in under-loaded systems
• Overgassing of the batteries
BCL Engine Run Limit limits the battery charge current to a preset value, when the power
system is powered by a standby engine/alternator during an extended AC power outage. A
smaller engine/alternator set can therefore be used without excessively pulling down the
alternator voltage.
If BCL Engine Run Limit is enabled, then:
• The battery current limit process will use the Engine Run Limit as the charge parameter
rather than Battery Current Limit, and
• Digital Input 1 (DI1) is re-assigned as the Engine Run input. Digital Input 1 (DI1) and
User Alarm 1 are therefore not available.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Appendix B IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
77
Control Function Glossary

Battery Test
Battery Test is a preventative maintenance tool that monitors the discharge capabilities to
ensure that the condition of the battery has not deteriorated over time.
The SM40 supervisory module temporarily reduces the output voltage of the rectifiers just
below the bus voltage for a set duration. The battery now supplies power to the load. A
battery test passes if the battery capacity remains above a predetermined level for the
duration of the test.

Battery Test does NOT function during a Fast Charge or Equalize process or during the first
48 hours after an AC power outage.

Current Share
Current Share ensures that the total output power of the power system is evenly shared
between all rectifiers.

Equalize
Equalize charges the batteries at a higher voltage after they have been fully charged to ensure
that all individual cell voltages are the same.
Battery manufacturers recommend that batteries be equalized periodically. Refer to the
battery manufacturer’s instructions, before equalizing the batteries.

Fast Charge
Fast Charge automatically increases the float voltage of the power system to recharge the
batteries as quickly as possible after an AC power outage.
Enable Fast Charge if your site experiences frequent AC power outages.

Fast Charge does NOT function during a Battery Test, Equalize or if the battery current sensor
fails.

If Fast Charge is used, then Battery Current Limit (BCL) should also be used.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


78 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Appendix B
Control Function Glossary

Low Volts Disconnect


Low Voltage Disconnect disconnects the batteries (Battery Disconnect) or the load (Load
Disconnect), at the preset LVD disconnect voltage. This prevents damage to the batteries due
to excessive deep discharge. The LVD reconnects the batteries or loads after the AC power is
restored.
The supervisory module can control one or two LVD units.
There are three modes of LVD operation:
1 Normal Mode: In this mode LVD2 Slave Mode and LVD1 Disconnect Delay Timer are
disabled and LVD1 is configured to disconnect at a higher disconnect voltage than LVD2.
2 LVD2 Slave Mode: In this mode LVD2 Slave Mode is enabled and LVD2 will mirror the
operation of LVD1.
3 LVD1 Disconnect Delay Timer Mode: In this mode LVD1 Disconnect Delay Timer is
enabled. LVD1 therefore disconnects after a specified time period (rather than at a
specified disconnect voltage). Use this mode to disconnect a low priority load
(connected to LVD1) first and maintain battery current to a high priority load (connected
to LVD2) for a longer time.

When configuring the LVD reconnect voltage, ensure that the expected open-circuit recovery
voltage of the discharged batteries does not rise above the LVD reconnect voltage.

Relay Test
A feature to simulate an alarm at the SM40 end by toggling the state of a relay between active
and inactive. Use the Relay Test function to test alarms at a remote location.

Temperature Compensation
Temperature Compensation automatically varies the float voltage to cancel the effects of
increasing or decreasing ambient battery temperature.
As the ambient temperature of the battery increases, the voltage required to maintain it in a
fully charged state decreases.
Enable Temperature Compensation to help maintain optimum battery capacity over a wider
temperature range, which in turn extends battery life.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Appendix B IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
79
SM40 Operations

Activating the Relay Test Function and Toggling the Relay States
The Relay Test function can be used during the commissioning phase of an APS DC power
system to test the relay configuration and alarm wiring to the remote location.

► To activate the Relay Test function and toggle the relay states
1 From the Main Display Mode, press the key to enter Configuration Mode.

2 Press the key to scroll down to Relay Test – the last item in Configuration Mode.

3 Press the key to enter Relay Test Mode.

4 Press either the or key to select a relay.

5 Press the key to toggle the state (active or inactive) of the selected relay. The selected
relay state will be toggled for 10 seconds (the default Relay Test Duration, which is
configurable in DCTools), before returning to its original configured state.

If the state of a relay has been set to disabled, its state can not be toggled.

6 Press the key to return to Configuration Mode. (All relays return to their configured
states.)

The display time-out interval in Relay Test mode is 2 minutes.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


56 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 5
Chapter 6

Communications
4
C h a p t e r 6
Communications

Overview

Topic Page
Communications Options 58
DCTools / PowerManagerII Setup 60

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 6 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
57
Communications

Communications Options
The SM40 supervisory module in the APS DC power system, can communicate to a local or
remote PC via a standard RS-232 serial interface, accessible from the front.
Shown below are the four standard communications options. Contact Eaton Corporation’s
Telecommunications Solutions Division for other communications options.

Direct Connection

Ethernet

PSTN Modem

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


58 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 6
Communications Options

GSM Modem

Use DCTools for setting up SMS text messaging. Setup from the front panel is not possible.

In general setup of SMS text messaging in DCTools requires the following:


• Entering the name(s) of the SMS receiver(s). A maximum of three names can be entered.
• Enabling SMS text messaging for each receiver.
• Entering the telephone number(s) of the SMS receiver(s). Only one telephone number per
receiver can be entered.

See application note AN0024 for implementation details. To receive application notes, contact
your local Powerware DC product representative or email dc.info@powerware.com

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 6 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
59
Communications

DCTools / PowerManagerII Setup


For your chosen communications option, configure the communications settings, (using the
latest version of DCTools or PowerManagerII) according to the table below.

The latest version of DCTools can be downloaded from http://www.powerware.com/downloads.


For the latest version of PowerManagerII contact your Powerware DC product representative.

Then check that DCTools/PowerManagerII communicates correctly.

Properties Direct Connection Ethernet Modem


Comms Enabled True True True

Protocol S3P S3P S3P

Connect Using COM1 Ethernet Select a COM port

S3P Address 0 (See Note 1) 0 (See Note 1) 0 (See Note 1)

Phone Number – – User specific

Modem Logon – – (See Note 2)

Server IP Address – 192.168.33.60 –

(See Note 3)

Server Port – 14000 (See Note 3) –

Telnet – Cleared (See Note 4) –


Note 1: 0 = Broadcast, 1-65279 = individual address

Note 2: Clear if a logon script is not required for your modem.


Select if a logon script is required. Click the Logon Script button to define.
For more details, see DCTools / PowerManagerII online help.

Note 3: Allocated by network administrator

Note 4: Some Ethernet interfaces (such as routers) may require this to be set.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


60 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 6
Chapter 7

Maintenance
4
C h a p t e r 7
Maintenance

Overview

Topic Page
Troubleshooting 62
Replacing a Rectifier 66
Replacing an SM40 Supervisory Module 69
Monitoring and Replacing Transient Protective Devices 72
Battery Disposal and Recycling 72

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
61
Maintenance

Troubleshooting
Use the table below to troubleshoot minor APS DC power system installation and
operational problems. If you still cannot solve a problem, contact your local Powerware DC
product representative for assistance.

Problem Possible Cause Required Action


All rectifiers are off AC power to the system is off Restore AC power.
(no LEDs on) and and the batteries are fully
SM40 display is discharged or disconnected.
blank
Green LED of one or AC power to rectifier(s) off or Restore AC power.
more rectifiers is off one or more phases are off
Rectifier is not fully inserted. Check that the rectifier is fully
inserted.
Internal rectifier fault Remove the rectifier and insert
another one in the same slot.
If the second rectifier operates
normally, the first rectifier is
faulty and must be returned to
your local Powerware DC
product representative.
Rectifier red LED on Very low AC voltage or AC Check the AC supply. The APS
supply failed will return to normal operation
when the AC supply has
returned to within its specified
AC input voltage range. See
Appendix C.
AC overvoltage None. The APS will return to
normal operation when the AC
supply has returned to within its
specified AC input voltage
range, as specified in
Appendix C.
Rectifier shut down Check if a rectifier has in fact
been shut down, using DCTools.
If yes, turn on the rectifier using
DCTools.
Rectifier(s) failed Use DCTools to determine if a
rectifier has failed or has been
shut down.
If a rectifier has failed, replace it.
If a rectifier has been shut down,
refer to required action for
Rectifier Shut Down.
DC overvoltage Remove and re-insert rectifier(s).
continued

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


62 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting

Problem Possible Cause Required Action


Rectifier yellow LED Rectifier power limit is active. Check if the APS is recovering
on from a recent AC power outage.
The APS may still be charging
the batteries after the power
outage. No further action is
required.
Check that the rectifier capacity
of the APS is not exceeded.
Additional rectifiers may be
required.
Rectifier temperature None. The APS will return to
turndown is active, due to low normal operation when the AC
AC supply voltage or excessive supply has returned to within its
ambient temperature. rated AC input voltage or
operating temperature range, as
specified in Appendix C.
High system output Equalize, Fast Charge and/or Disable active processes if not
voltage Temperature Compensation required.
process is active
Incorrect float voltage setting at Check the float voltage setting of
the SM40 the SM40.
Record new setting.
Faulty rectifier Remove rectifier modules one at
a time. (The output voltage
returns to normal when faulty
rectifier is removed.)
Replace faulty rectifier.
Low system output Rectifiers not on Restore AC power.
voltage (rectifiers not Battery Test and/or Disable active processes if not
in current limit) Temperature Compensation required.
process is active.
Incorrect float voltage setting at Check the float voltage setting of
the SM40. the SM40.
Record new setting.
Low system output Load is too high for rectifier Reduce load or add rectifier
voltage and rectifier capacity. modules.
yellow LEDs are on Battery is recharging after AC Check battery has recharged
(rectifiers are in power outage. within expected time.
current limit).
continued

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
63
Maintenance

Problem Possible Cause Required Action


System provides no LVD is wired as load Check that the LVD is enabled
output with the load disconnect. and set to correct values at the
connected. SM40 using DCTools.
Check that the selector switch on
the LVD driver card is set to
Auto.
Check that the LVD control and
DC power cables are connected.
Check the load connections to
the LVD.
System has no LVD is wired as battery Check LVD is enabled and set to
battery input with disconnect. correct values at the SM40 using
the batteries DCTools.
connected. Check that the selector switch on
the LVD driver card is set to
Auto.
Check LVD control and DC
power cables are connected.
Check the battery connections to
the LVD.
SM40 does not Local/External current shunt Check that the Local/External
correctly register the selector switches in the wrong selector switches on the
current shunts and position. backplane are set to Local.
the displayed values
are over range.
SM40 display is SM40 display loom is Reconnect SM40 display loom.
blank. disconnected. Wait 10 seconds for correct
operation.
Faulty SM40 display Contact your local Powerware
DC product representative
SM40 green SM40 is not powered. Check the SM40 card is fully
Power On LED off. inserted into the backplane.
SM40 is faulty. Contact your local Powerware
DC product representative.
SM40 red LED on SM40 “Urgent Alarm” active Check the type of “Urgent
Alarm” using DCTools or press

the key on the SM40 front


panel.
SM40 yellow LED SM40 “Non-Urgent Alarm” Check the type of “Non-Urgent
on active. Alarm” using DCTools or press

the key on the SM40 front


panel.
continued

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


64 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 7
Troubleshooting

Problem Possible Cause Required Action


No Ethernet Wrong IP address, netmask Check the settings with the
communications and/or incompatible network network administrator.
between SM40 and Gateway may be required
local PC (only
applicable if Site Faulty communications cable Replace faulty cable.
Gateway Module The Telnet Active check box in Disable the Telnet Active check
(SGM10) or similar the DCTools or PowerManagerII box in the DCTools or
Ethernet interface is Comms Properties dialog is PowerManagerII Comms
used). enabled. Properties dialog.
No serial Incorrect cable Check that a null modem cable
communications has been used.
between SM40 and Null modem cable not plugged Check that the null modem cable
local PC into PC or plugged into the is plugged into the PC and into
wrong port. the correct port.
Communications port settings Reconfigure the PC port
of PC do not match that of the properties (19K2 8 N 1).
RS-232 serial port of the APS
DC power system.
Incorrect S3P address Check that the S3P address in
DCTools is set to 0. If using
PowerManagerII, set the S3P
address to the same address as
the SM40 (typically 1).
Monitor OK relay Application corrupt or Check the configuration and
(Relay 6) hardware fault. ensure that there is no other
de-energized alarm mapped to this relay.
Otherwise, contact your local
Powerware DC product
representative for a replacement
SM40.
SM40 displays Missing configuration Download the appropriate
Config Error configuration file into the SM40.
Invalid configuration Contact your local Powerware
DC product representative.
SM40 displays Incorrect rectifier voltage, Check that all rectifiers are of the
Incorrect Rect V because of installed rectifiers same type and replace as
with different nominal output appropriate. See relevant power
voltages. system installation guide for
details.
SM40 displays Incorrect number of cells in a Check the number of cells in a
Wrong No. Cell battery string – a result of a battery string, nominal voltage of
mismatch between string each cell and the nominal voltage
voltage and nominal rectifier of the rectifiers.
output voltage.
Incorrectly configured, Configure, connect or replace
SM40 displays ??? disconnected or failed sensor sensor.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
65
Maintenance

Replacing a Rectifier
APR rectifiers can be replaced without switching off the APS DC power system and
disconnecting the equipment it powers.
This section covers the following procedures.
• Removing a Rectifier
• Inserting a Rectifier

Removing a Rectifier

 To reduce the risk of electric shock and maintain optimum system cooling,
always cover empty rectifier slots with blanking panels.

 To avoid electric shock do not place hands inside the rectifier shelf.

 Do not attempt to disassemble faulty rectifiers. Return them, (in their original
packaging) along with the completed Equipment Incident Report, to your nearest
authorized service agent for replacement or repair.

Step 1 - Loosen the rectifier retaining screw with a Pozidriv® screwdriver

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


66 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 7
Replacing a Rectifier

Step 2 - Pull out the rectifier

 The rectifier may be hot, especially after prolonged operation.


Allow the rectifier to cool down or use suitable gloves.

Grip the rectifier front panel with one hand as indicated by the arrows in the
diagram below and slowly pull it out from the shelf, supporting the base of the
rectifier with your other hand.

To avoid damage to the connector, do not rest the rectifier on its connector, once
it has been removed from the shelf.

Procedure complete

You must now insert a replacement rectifier into the empty slot (see page 68), or fit a
blanking panel.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
67
Maintenance

Inserting a Rectifier

Step 1 - Align the new rectifier with the burst-out guides in the shelf

Step 2 - Push in the rectifier

 To avoid injury to your hands, keep your fingers clear, as


shown in the diagram below.

1 Slowly push in the rectifier, until the rear connector of the rectifier engages
fully with the backplane connector.

1 Tighten the rectifier retaining screw.


2 Check that the rectifier’s Power On LED turns on and the and alarm
LEDs are off.

The alarm LED turns on for about 1 second when the rectifier powers up.

Procedure complete

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


68 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 7
Replacing an SM40 Supervisory Module

Replacing an SM40 Supervisory Module


The SM40 supervisory module can be replaced without switching off the APS DC power
system and disconnecting the equipment it powers.

Before you start, you need


• A PC with the latest version of DCTools installed.
• A copy of the appropriate SM40 configuration file, which can be one of the following -
the old configuration file, a backed-up configuration file or a modified default
configuration file
• A null modem cable
• To wear an antistatic strap to prevent possible damage of the static sensitive components
on the SM40 card

Step 1 - Isolate the LVD (if fitted) to avoid unexpected LVD operation


To isolate the LVD in:
• APS3 systems, disconnect the LVD control cable on the single-card LVD
module (see page 8).
• APS6 systems, switch the Automatic/Manual selector switch on the LVD
driver card to CLOSED (see page 9).

The green contactor status LED will turn on, indicating closed contacts.

Step 2 - Backup the configuration of the old SM40


If the old SM40 is still operational or if you are just upgrading the supervisory
module, use DCTools to backup its configuration file.

Step 3 - Remove the old SM40 from the shelf


1 Remove the front panel by removing the screw(s) with a PoziDriv® screwdriver.

DRG 3677161A-7

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
69
Maintenance


2 Disconnect the display module ribbon cable.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


70 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 7
Replacing an SM40 Supervisory Module

Step 6 - Reconnect the LVD (if fitted)


If an LVD is fitted, check that the system output voltage is correct then
reconnect the LVD as follows.
• APS3 systems: Plug the LVD control cable into the appropriate RJ45
socket on the single-card LVD module (see page 8).
• APS6 systems: Switch the Automatic/Manual selector switch on the LVD
driver card (see page 9) to AUTO.

Step 7 - Check that the new SM40 operates as intended


1 Check all control functions, alarms and current measurement.

Any periodic function will restart from the time when power was applied
to the new SM40.

2 Check the system identification parameters and communications settings.


3 Change the configuration as required to ensure that the SM40 operates as
intended.
4 Check that all rectifiers are communicating and that the SM40 has
registered all rectifiers. This can be checked from the front panel by
viewing the individual rectifier currents in Main Display Mode. See front
panel menu structure on inside front cover or Viewing System Values in
Chapter 5 for details.

Procedure complete

Return the faulty SM40, in its antistatic bag, with the completed Equipment Incident Report
form to your nearest authorized service agent for replacement or repair.

A copy of the Equipment Incident Report form can be found at the back of this guide.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Chapter 7 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
71
Maintenance

Monitoring and Replacing Transient Protective Devices


APS DC power systems are protected against transients caused by lightning or high power
switching at the site or at substation level. Transient protection is normally implemented at
building level (primary transient protection) and power system/sub-switchboard level
(secondary transient protection.)
The most widely used transient protective devices are metal oxide varistors (MOVs). These
MOVs are generally fitted in the main AC switchboard of the building for primary transient
protection and the AC distribution of the APS DC power system or sub-switchboard
(powering the APS DC power system) for secondary transient protection.

Monitoring the MOVs


MOVs are fitted with alarm contacts and visual indicators. These alarms should have been
wired to the supervisory module and from there extended to the building management
system. If the MOVs are not monitored automatically, then regular visual inspections must
be carried out.

Replacing the MOVs


MOVs must be functional at all times. In practice, it is impossible to predict when a MOV
will fail. That depends entirely on the number and magnitude of the transients sustained.
For that reason we recommend the following, depending on how accessible the site is.
• For easily accessible sites – If a MOV has failed (as indicated by a MOV Fail alarm or the
visual indicator), then replace all the MOVs as soon as possible.
• For remote sites with difficult access – Replace all the MOVs during scheduled
maintenance visits, irrespective of whether they have failed or not.

We strongly recommend inspecting the MOVs in the main AC switchboard at the same time
and replacing them as appropriate.

If any MOV or other transient protection device has failed then the design of the primary and
secondary transient protection systems, and the maintenance plan, at that site must be
reviewed.
For further information about input transient protection, refer to Chapter 3.

Battery Disposal and Recycling


Eaton's Powerware Division recommends using properly trained and experienced service
technicians. It is important that your service technicians follow Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) guidelines or equivalent local regulations to dispose of all batteries. Please
remember that the owner is responsible and liable to ensure those EPA guidelines or
equivalent local regulations are followed.
Contact your local Powerware DC product representative for further information.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


72 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Chapter 7
Appendix A

Glossary of Alarms
4
A p p e n d i x A
Glossary of Alarms

AC Fail All rectifiers are reporting loss of AC power.

ACD Fan Fail The AC Distribution cooling system or fan controller has failed.

AC High The AC voltage is above the configured AC High threshold.

AC Low The AC voltage is below the configured AC Low threshold.

Aux Temp High The auxiliary temperature sensor is at a temperature above the high
temperature set point.

Aux Temp Low The auxiliary temperature sensor is at a temperature below the low
temperature set point.

Battery Charge Over-Current The battery charge current is above a preset percentage of the battery
(displayed as Battery Over Current) C10 capacity.

Batt Temp High This alarm indicates either thermal runaway of the batteries or that the
batteries are operating at a temperature that may cause reduced battery
life.

Batt Temp Low This alarm indicates a risk to the battery standby power system. Note
that lower temperatures reduce the battery capacity.

Battery Fuse Fail The Battery Fuse Fail input to the SM40 is active.
(displayed as Batt Fuse Fail)

Battery Test Active A Battery Test is active.

Battery Test Fail The batteries do not have the required capacity or are not operating in
a fully charged state.

Equalize Active An Equalize process is active.

Fast Charge Active A Fast Charge process is active.

High Float The float voltage is above its normal range.

High Load The bus voltage is higher than the range that is safe for the load and/or
battery.

In Discharge The batteries are discharging.

Load Fuse Fail The Load Fuse Fail digital input to the SM40 is active.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Appendix A IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
73
Glossary of Alarms

Low Float The float voltage is below its normal range.

Low Load The bus voltage is below its normal range.

LVD1 Disconnect The operating conditions of the power system have automatically
triggered a low voltage disconnect.

LVD1 Fail LVD1 is faulty.

LVD1 Manual A local operator has manually triggered LVD1. (APS6 only)

LVD2 Disconnect The operating conditions of the power system have automatically
triggered a low voltage disconnect.

LVD2 Fail LVD2 is faulty.

LVD2 Manual A local operator has manually triggered LVD2. (APS6 only)

MOV Fail The surge protection system has failed. One or more MOV cartridges
may need to be replaced.

Multiple Rectifier Comms Lost Normally this alarm indicates that multiple rectifiers have been
(displayed as Rectifiers Absent) removed during routine maintenance. However, faulty rectifier
communications or losing the rectifier communications bus can also
trigger this alarm. If removing multiple rectifiers triggers this alarm,
you can reset it from the front panel before it triggers an external
alarm.

Multiple Rectifier Fail Multiple rectifiers are faulty or that their AC power has been removed
without causing partial or total AC failure.

Partial AC Fail More than 20% of the rectifiers are reporting loss of AC power or loss
of a phase.

Rectifier Absent See Rectifier Comms Lost

Rectifier Comms Lost A rectifier has been removed during routine maintenance. However,
(displayed as Rectifier Absent) faulty rectifier communications or losing the rectifier communications
bus can also trigger this alarm. If removing a rectifier triggers this
alarm, you can reset a Rectifier Fail alarm from the front panel before it
triggers an external alarm.

Rectifier Fail A rectifier is faulty or its AC power has been removed without causing
partial or total AC failure. You can reset a Rectifier Fail alarm from the
front panel before it triggers an external alarm.

Rectifiers Absent See Multiple Rectifier Comms Lost

Sensor Fail The current, temperature or voltage sensing system is faulty.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


74 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Appendix A
Glossary of Alarms

SiteSure Missing SiteSure equipment is not operational or not installed.

System Overload The power system is operating close to its maximum capacity and
more rectifiers may need to be inserted. The System Overload
threshold is configurable.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Appendix A IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
75
Glossary of Alarms

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


76 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Appendix A
Appendix B

Control Function Glossary


4
A p p e n d i x B
Control Function Glossary

Active Voltage Control


Active Voltage Control maintains a constant float voltage under varying load conditions.
Enable Active Voltage Control to prevent undercharging the batteries of your APS during
high load demand.

Auxiliary Temperature Disconnect


Auxiliary Temperature Disconnect is used in special configured systems to shut down an
installation when preset temperature extremes are reached.
If this control function is enabled, and auxiliary temperature extremes above the preset
Auxiliary Temperature Disconnect High Turn Off or below the Auxiliary Temperature
Disconnect Low Turn Off are registered, then the SM60 supervisory module will respond as
follows (depending on the configuration):
• Disconnect LVD1, and/or
• Disconnect LVD2, and/or
• Shut down all rectifiers

Caution
Do NOT enable this control function unless your system is appropriately wired and
configured. Failure to do so will result in loss of reliable power under certain temperature
conditions. Contact Eaton Corporation’s Telecommunications Solutions Division’s
application engineers for further details.

Battery Current Limit (BCL)


Battery Current Limit automatically limits the battery charge current within a configured
range (a percentage of the C10 rating of the battery) by varying the system voltage.
Enable Battery Current Limit to prevent:
• Overcharging of the batteries in under-loaded systems
• Overgassing of the batteries
BCL Engine Run Limit limits the battery charge current to a preset value, when the power
system is powered by a standby engine/alternator during an extended AC power outage. A
smaller engine/alternator set can therefore be used without excessively pulling down the
alternator voltage.
If BCL Engine Run Limit is enabled, then:
• The battery current limit process will use the Engine Run Limit as the charge parameter
rather than Battery Current Limit, and
• Digital Input 1 (DI1) is re-assigned as the Engine Run input. Digital Input 1 (DI1) and
User Alarm 1 are therefore not available.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Appendix B IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
77
Control Function Glossary

Battery Test
Battery Test is a preventative maintenance tool that monitors the discharge capabilities to
ensure that the condition of the battery has not deteriorated over time.
The SM40 supervisory module temporarily reduces the output voltage of the rectifiers just
below the bus voltage for a set duration. The battery now supplies power to the load. A
battery test passes if the battery capacity remains above a predetermined level for the
duration of the test.

Battery Test does NOT function during a Fast Charge or Equalize process or during the first
48 hours after an AC power outage.

Current Share
Current Share ensures that the total output power of the power system is evenly shared
between all rectifiers.

Equalize
Equalize charges the batteries at a higher voltage after they have been fully charged to ensure
that all individual cell voltages are the same.
Battery manufacturers recommend that batteries be equalized periodically. Refer to the
battery manufacturer’s instructions, before equalizing the batteries.

Fast Charge
Fast Charge automatically increases the float voltage of the power system to recharge the
batteries as quickly as possible after an AC power outage.
Enable Fast Charge if your site experiences frequent AC power outages.

Fast Charge does NOT function during a Battery Test, Equalize or if the battery current sensor
fails.

If Fast Charge is used, then Battery Current Limit (BCL) should also be used.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


78 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Appendix B
Control Function Glossary

Low Volts Disconnect


Low Voltage Disconnect disconnects the batteries (Battery Disconnect) or the load (Load
Disconnect), at the preset LVD disconnect voltage. This prevents damage to the batteries due
to excessive deep discharge. The LVD reconnects the batteries or loads after the AC power is
restored.
The supervisory module can control one or two LVD units.
There are three modes of LVD operation:
1 Normal Mode: In this mode LVD2 Slave Mode and LVD1 Disconnect Delay Timer are
disabled and LVD1 is configured to disconnect at a higher disconnect voltage than LVD2.
2 LVD2 Slave Mode: In this mode LVD2 Slave Mode is enabled and LVD2 will mirror the
operation of LVD1.
3 LVD1 Disconnect Delay Timer Mode: In this mode LVD1 Disconnect Delay Timer is
enabled. LVD1 therefore disconnects after a specified time period (rather than at a
specified disconnect voltage). Use this mode to disconnect a low priority load
(connected to LVD1) first and maintain battery current to a high priority load (connected
to LVD2) for a longer time.

When configuring the LVD reconnect voltage, ensure that the expected open-circuit recovery
voltage of the discharged batteries does not rise above the LVD reconnect voltage.

Relay Test
A feature to simulate an alarm at the SM40 end by toggling the state of a relay between active
and inactive. Use the Relay Test function to test alarms at a remote location.

Temperature Compensation
Temperature Compensation automatically varies the float voltage to cancel the effects of
increasing or decreasing ambient battery temperature.
As the ambient temperature of the battery increases, the voltage required to maintain it in a
fully charged state decreases.
Enable Temperature Compensation to help maintain optimum battery capacity over a wider
temperature range, which in turn extends battery life.

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Appendix B IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
79
Control Function Glossary

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


80 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Appendix B
Appendix C

Specifications
4
A p p e n d i x C
Specifications

System AC Input
AC Input Voltage Range L-N: 90 – 275 V
L-L: 90 – 275 V

Maximum AC Input Current APS3: see page 23 for details


APS6: see pages 25 to 27 for details
APS12: 48A/∅ (3∅ L-N)
APS18: 72A/∅ (3∅ L-N)
APS24: 96A/∅ (3∅ L-N)

Frequency Range 45-66 Hz

Maximum Earth Leakage Current 2.2 mA (per rectifier)

System DC Output
Nominal DC Output Voltage 24 V / 48 V

Maximum DC Output Power APS3: 2.25 kW / 4.5 kW / 2.16 kW


(with APU24 / APR48 / APU48 rectifiers) APS6: 4.5 kW / 9 kW / 4.32 kW
APS12: 9 kW / 18 kW / 8.64 kW
APS18: 13.5 kW / 27 kW / 12.96 kW
APS24: 18 kW / 36 kW / 17.28 kW

DC Output Voltage Range 21.5 - 29 V /43 - 57.5 V

Over Voltage Shutdown Trip Point 29 V / 58 V

Environment
Ambient Temperature Range (operating) -40°C to 70°C [-40°F to 158°F ]
Output current derates above 50 °C [122°F]

Relative Humidity (operating and storage) <95% (non condensing)

Dimensions H, W, D
APS3 3U, 19” mounting, 300 mm [11.8”]*

APS6 6U, 19” mounting, 300 mm [11.8”]*

Access Power Rectifier 3U, 66 mm [2.6”], 280 mm [11”]

* Additional clear air space is required at rear for rectifier exhaust air venting.

Weight
APS3 6 kg [13 lb]*

APS6 10 kg [22 lb]*

Access Power Rectifier 1.9 kg [4.2 lb]

* typical configuration, excluding rectifiers

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


Appendix C IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
81
Specifications

Alarm Relays
Contact Arrangement One changeover contact per relay

Maximum Switching Voltage 60 V DC or 30 V AC

Maximum Switching Current 500 mA

Maximum Continuous Current 500 mA

Maximum Power Rating 30 W or 15 VA

Maximum Wire Size 1.5 mm2

Isolation Relay connections are isolated to


500V DC from all other circuitry,
earth and system common.

Digital Inputs
Input Impedance 47 kΩ pull-up resistor to +5 V.
(Referenced to supervisory module 0 V.)

Maximum Wire Size 1.5 mm2

APR48 / APR24 Rectifiers


Rated AC Input Voltage Range 185 – 275 V
Full output up to 50°C [122°F]

150 – 275V
Full output up to 30°C [86°F]

Maximum AC Input Current 12 A

Rated Output Power 1500 W / 750 W

Rated Output Current 31 A @ 48V / 31 A @ 24 V

Preset Voltage 54.5 V / 27 V

Rectifier AC Fuse (internal) 15 A

APU48 Rectifiers
Rated AC Input Voltage Range 90 – 275 V
Full output up to 50°C [122°F]

Maximum AC Input Current 10 A

Rated Output Power 720 W

Rated Output Current 15 A @ 48V

Preset Voltage 54.5 V

Rectifier AC Fuse (internal) 15 A

Comprehensive supervisory module and rectifier product data sheets are available. Please
contact your local Powerware DC product representative or email dc.info@powerware.com

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


82 IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Appendix C
EQUIPMENT INCIDENT REPORT
Please enter as much information as you can. Send the completed form, together with the item for repair to your nearest
authorized service agent. NOTE: Only one fault to be recorded per form.
For further information contact the Powerware DC Product Services Division
Telephone:++64 3 343 3314 or Fax:++64 3 343 7446.

Date: ...........................
Customer Information
Company: .....................................................................................................................
Postal Address: .....................................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................
Return Address (Not PO Box): ................................................................................................
.....................................................................................................................
Telephone: ................................. Facsimile: ...................... E-mail: ..........................
Contact Name: .....................................................................................................................

Location of Failure
Product code........................ Serial number............................. Document No....................
System type installed in............................................................... Serial number....................
Site name or location................................................................................................................

Fault discovered Delivery Unpacking Installation


Initial test Operation after..........years ............

Failure source Design Manufacturing Documentation


Transportation Installation Handling
.............................
Effect on system operation None Minor Major ........................

INFORMATION (fault details, circumstances, consequences, actions)

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

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Internal use only.


Reference No:............ RMA: ............. NCR: .............. Signature: .................. Date: ..........
INFORMATION continued (fault details, circumstances, consequences, actions)

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SG/03 ISS04
Worldwide Support
4
Worldwide Support

For technical support, contact one of the numbers below and for a complete list of our
worldwide sales offices, visit our website http://www.powerware.com or email
dc.info@powerware.com

Australia Tel. +61-2-9878-5000

Canada Tel. +1-800-461-9166

Central America Tel. +52-5527-8009

China Tel. +86-21-6350-0606

Europe / Middle East / Africa Tel. +44-1243-810-500

Hong Kong / Korea / Taiwan Tel. +852-2745-6682

India Tel. +91-11-2649-9414 to 18

New Zealand / Pacific Tel. +64-3-343-7448

Singapore / South East Asia Tel. +65-6829-8888

South America Tel. +55-15-235-3100

United States of America Tel. +1-877-797-9473 (Toll Free)

Copyright © 2004-2005 Eaton Corporation. All Rights Reserved.


IPN 997-00012-37B May 2005
Notes:
SM40 Front Panel Menu Structure
Main Display Mode
Default
Display

Display with Active Alarm

Display with Active


Control Process

Status View Mode

Press to go to
Active
Alarm(s) the Default Display
in Main Display Mode

OR

Press to go to
Press to go to
No Active Configuration Mode
Main Display Mode Alarm(s)
(see back cover)

Enter Key: go to Configuration Mode and Up Key: scroll up lists and menus and Information Key: view status messages
Edit Mode, save configuration changes, clear increase configuration values and a list of active alarms in Status View Mode
alarms or toggle relay states

Escape Key: go to Main Display Mode or Down Key: scroll down lists and menus Display Time-out:
cancel configuration changes and decrease configuration values Edit Mode - 15 seconds
Other modes - 2 minutes
SM40 Front Panel Menu Structure
Configuration Mode Edit Mode

from Main Display Mode


(see front cover) Cancel Change Value
Save

Cancel Change Value


Save

Cancel Change Value


Save

Cancel Change Value


Save

Cancel Change Value


Press to go to Save
Main Display Mode
(see front cover)
Other parameters:
EQ Voltage
Battery Test
BT Duration
BT End Voltage
Low Float Alarm
Low Load Alarm
High Float Alarm
High Load Alarm
AC High Alarm
AC Low Alarm
Batt High Temp
Press to go to Edit Mode
Fast Charge
FC Voltage
LVD1
LVD2
Batt. Current Limit
BCL Limit
Engine Run
Engine Run Limit
UI Access
Audible Indicator
Serial Access Password

Select Relay
Exit
Toggle State

Enter Key: go to Configuration Mode and Up Key: scroll up lists and menus and Information Key: view status messages
Edit Mode, save configuration changes, clear increase configuration values and a list of active alarms in Status View Mode
alarms or toggle relay states

Escape Key: go to Main Display Mode or Down Key: scroll down lists and menus Display Time-out:
cancel configuration changes and decrease configuration values Edit Mode - 15 seconds
Other modes - 2 minutes