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High Court orders parricide case retrial.

By: Panaligan, Rey G.

Publication: Manila Bulletin

Date: Saturday, September 30 2000


You are viewing page 1

The Supreme Court, in an unprecedented ruling, ordered yesterday a partial re-trial of a parricide case against a wife sentenced to

death for killing her husband in 1995, under the ''battered woman syndrome'' theory which she claimed to be equivalent to self-

defense.

Set for re-trial for

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the reception of expert psychological and/or psychiatric opinion on the plea for self-defense under the "battered woman syndrome"
theory was the case of Marivic I. Genosa who confessed to the killing of her husband Ben on Nov. 15, 1995, in barangay. Bilwang,
Isabel, Leyte.

In a unanimous decision written by Associate Justice Artemio V. Panganiban, the High Court said, "The court cannot properly

evaluate her battered 'woman syndrome defense,' absent expert testimony on her mental and emotional state at the time of the

killing and the possible psychological cause and effect of her fatal act."

It said the prosecution should be given the opportunity to cross-examine the defense witnesses and refute the expert opinion given,

"consistent with the principle of due process and the right to a fair trial."

After receiving the expert testimonies, the Ormoc City Regional Trial Court (RTC), which sentenced Mrs. Genosa to death, was

ordered to forward to the Supreme Court the report on the proceedings together with the transcript of the stenographic notes and

documentary evidence.

The novel theory on "battered woman syndrome" was presented to the High Court by lawyer Katrina Legarda on behalf of Mrs.

Genosa on her appeal.

The High Court was told that the syndrome "is already a recognized form of self-defense in the United States and Europe, and in

the US, it is classified as a post-traumatic stress disorder, rather than a form of mental illness."

Mrs. Genosa asked the court to allow her to present evidence to prove that her relationship with her husband had afflicted her with

the syndrome.

She cited the testimony of her witness, Dr. Dino Caing, who had told the trial court that she had consulted him at least six times

due to injuries related to domestic violence and 23 times for severe hypertension due to emotional stress.
She said the testimony of an expert can explain how her experiences as a battered woman had affected her perception of danger

and her honest belief in its imminence, and why she had resorted to force against her batterer.

Ruling in favor of Mrs. Genosa, the High Court said, "her discourse on the subject has convinced the court that the syndrome

deserves serious consideration, especially in the light of its possible effect on her very life."

"The records already bear some evidence of domestic violence. Even the victim's brother and mother attested to the spouses'

quarrels every now and then. The trial court, however, simplistically ruled that since violence had not immediately proceeded the

killing, self-defense could not be appreciated," it said.

But, it said "the court cannot, for mere technical or procedural objections, deny appellant the opportunity to offer this defense, for

any criminal conviction must be based on proof of guilt beyond reasonable doubt," it said.

It pointed out that "it is equally important to determine whether Mrs. Genosa had acted freely, intelligently, and voluntarily when

she killed her spouse."

"Accused persons facing the possibility of the death penalty must be given fair opportunities to proffer all defenses possible that

could save them from capital punishment," it added.

High Court orders parricide case retrial.


By: Panaligan, Rey G.

Publication: Manila Bulletin

Date: Saturday, September 30 2000


You are viewing page 2

The Supreme Court, in an unprecedented ruling, ordered yesterday a partial re-trial of a parricide case against a wife sentenced to

death for killing her husband in 1995, under the ''battered woman syndrome'' theory which she claimed to be equivalent to self-

defense.

Set for re-trial for

Ads By Google

Full-Text Online Journals


Research online. Academic journals & books at Questia Online Library.
www.Questia.com/Journals
the reception of expert psychological and/or psychiatric opinion on the plea for self-defense under the "battered woman syndrome"
theory was the case of Marivic I. Genosa who confessed to the killing of her husband Ben on Nov. 15, 1995, in barangay. Bilwang,
Isabel, Leyte.

In a unanimous decision written by Associate Justice Artemio V. Panganiban, the High Court said, "The court cannot properly

evaluate her battered 'woman syndrome defense,' absent expert testimony on her mental and emotional state at the time of the

killing and the possible psychological cause and effect of her fatal act."
It said the prosecution should be given the opportunity to cross-examine the defense witnesses and refute the expert opinion given,

"consistent with the principle of due process and the right to a fair trial."

After receiving the expert testimonies, the Ormoc City Regional Trial Court (RTC), which sentenced Mrs. Genosa to death, was

ordered to forward to the Supreme Court the report on the proceedings together with the transcript of the stenographic notes and

documentary evidence.

The novel theory on "battered woman syndrome" was presented to the High Court by lawyer Katrina Legarda on behalf of Mrs.

Genosa on her appeal.

The High Court was told that the syndrome "is already a recognized form of self-defense in the United States and Europe, and in

the US, it is classified as a post-traumatic stress disorder, rather than a form of mental illness."

Mrs. Genosa asked the court to allow her to present evidence to prove that her relationship with her husband had afflicted her with

the syndrome.

She cited the testimony of her witness, Dr. Dino Caing, who had told the trial court that she had consulted him at least six times

due to injuries related to domestic violence and 23 times for severe hypertension due to emotional stress.

She said the testimony of an expert can explain how her experiences as a battered woman had affected her perception of danger

and her honest belief in its imminence, and why she had resorted to force against her batterer.

Ruling in favor of Mrs. Genosa, the High Court said, "her discourse on the subject has convinced the court that the syndrome

deserves serious consideration, especially in the light of its possible effect on her very life."

"The records already bear some evidence of domestic violence. Even the victim's brother and mother attested to the spouses'

quarrels every now and then. The trial court, however, simplistically ruled that since violence had not immediately proceeded the

killing, self-defense could not be appreciated," it said.

But, it said "the court cannot, for mere technical or procedural objections, deny appellant the opportunity to offer this defense, for

any criminal conviction must be based on proof of guilt beyond reasonable doubt," it said.

It pointed out that "it is equally important to determine whether Mrs. Genosa had acted freely, intelligently, and voluntarily when

she killed her spouse."

"Accused persons facing the possibility of the death penalty must be given fair opportunities to proffer all defenses possible that

could save them from capital punishment," it added.


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Ecleo case to get new judge today

Cebu Daily News


First Posted 10:35:00 06/01/2009

Filed Under: Legal issues, Crime

THE prosecution in the seven-year-old parricide case against Philippine Benevolent Missionaries Association divine master Ruben Ecleo Jr. is hoping that the new
judge who would be assigned today to the case would be able to resolve the motion to cancel Ecleo's bail.

The Supreme Court in a resolution dated April 15, directed Regional Trial Court (RTC) Judge Meinrado Paredes to “immediately raffle” Ecleo's case to one of
Cebu City's judges after granting the motion for inhibition of Judge Geraldine Faith Econg of Branch 9.

Paredes of Branch 13 will preside over the regular raffling of cases this 3 p.m.

Among those who might be able to handle the Ecleo case are RTC Judges Raphael Yrastorza, Silvestre Maamo, Gabriel Ingles, Simeon Dumdum, Sylva
Paderanga and Soliver Peras.

Drugs, family and commercial courts are excluded from handling Ecleo's case as well as Judges Estela Alma Singco and Douglas Marigomen because they are
already loaded with cases.

Ecleo was accused of killing his wife Alona Bacolod by strangulation inside their home in Banawa, barangay Guadalupe, Cebu City on Jan. 5, 2002.

Her remains were found inside a plastic bag dumped in a ravine in Dalaguete town, Cebu three days later.

Six judges including Econg have inhibited from handling the parricide case against Ecleo, a former mayor of San Jose town, Dinagat Island in Surigao del Norte.

Other judges who have inhibited from the case were Galicano Arriesgado, Olegario Sarmiento, Generosa Labra, Anacleto Caminade and Ireneo Lee-Gako.

Labra of Branch 23 granted a P1 million bail on Ecleo who was described to be a “walking time bomb that might drop dead anytime,” referring to Ecleo's heart
condition.

Integrated Bar of the Philippines (IBP) Cebu City Chapter President Michael Yu said he is hoping the truth will finally come out and justice will be served.

“I hope the case will be moving after it will be re-raffled,” Yu said.

He said the IBP will continue supporting the prosecutors of the case. /Reporter Ador Vincent S. Mayol