Sie sind auf Seite 1von 14

1

EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal

Assessment 1B:
Music Reflective Journal
S00278864
2
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal
LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Class: Stage 1 – Year 1 Date: Week 1-2 of Term 1 Start: 10:00 Finish: 11:00
Key Learning Area: Creative Arts, English, Lesson Topic: Students compose their own lyrics and perform using body percussion.
Humanities & Social Sciences
Recent Prior Experience: Exploring the marine life
Syllabus Outcome(s): Indicators of Learning for this lesson: Assessment:
MUS1.1 Sings, plays and moves, to a range By the end of this lesson, the students will: - Self assessment:
of music, demonstrating an awareness of - Listen to Identify musical instruments Strategic whole class/ individual
musical concepts. - Sing along to the rhythm questioning, observe Ss
- Create sounds using their bodies to refine lyrics or participation, video record each
rhythm. group performance to observe on
- Modify the lyrics Ss progress using criteria,
- Engage and participate in groupwork reflections.
- Peer assessment:
Oral feedback

Any safety issues to be considered: Resources:


T to monitor carefully while Ss clear tables and chairs ‘The Lion Sleep’s Tonight’ by We are Kid’s United (2018), Whiteboard and markers, Laptop,
to make some free space. video camera to record performance.

LESSON SEQUENCE
3
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal
Lesson Content / Indicators of Timing Teaching Strategies / Learning Experiences: Resources and
Learning: (mins) Organisation:
INTRODUCTION
Ss will learn to: 5- 10 1. T explains lesson goal: Organisation:
- Identify musical mins a. By the end of the lesson you will learn about body percussion and to - Ss sitting on the floor
instruments play along to your composed song. as a whole class,
b. “Have you heard the song The Lion Sleep’s Tonight from the movie facing T.
Lion King? I will play the song for you and I want you to listen and tell
me which instruments you can hear” Resources:
c. “Musical instruments can include anything from clicking fingers to - ‘The Lion Sleep’s
drums and voices.” Tonight’ by We are
2. T plays video and Ss only listen to the song. Kid’s United (2018)
a. Ss to share their ideas on musical instruments (voice, tambourine,
bongo etc.).
b. “Body percussion is a great musical instrument because we only need
our bodies to make the sounds! We will be creating musical sounds
with our body to sing along ‘The Lion Sleep’s Tonight’. But first we are
going to play around with the words of the song”
DEVELOPMENT
Ss will learn to: 40 – T Modelling: Organisation:
- Sing along to the music, 45 1. As a class, sing the song together with lyrics on the whiteboard. Repeat 2 to 3 - Ss in groups of 5
using the lyrics on the mins times until they are comfortable.
whiteboard. 2. Split the class into groups of 5 and assign each group with their part. Resources:
- Create sounds using their Assign group 1 - Whiteboard and
bodies to refine lyrics or A- weema-weh, a-weema-weh, a-weema-weh, a-weema-weh markers
rhythm. Assign group 2
B- In the jungle, the mighty jungle The lion sleeps tonight In the jungle the
4
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal
quiet jungle The lion sleeps tonight
Assign group 3
C- Near the village the peaceful village The lion sleeps tonight Near the
village the quiet village The lion sleeps tonight
Assign group 4
D- Hush my darling don't fear my darling The lion sleeps tonight Hush my
darling don't fear my darling The lion sleeps tonight
3. Each group to practice their part and create a musical sound using body
percussion e.g. Group 1 = clicking fingers to the rhythm. Group 2= clap on lap
then clap both hands to the rhythm.
Ss will learn to: Guided/ Independent Learning: Organisations:
- Share ideas to modify the 1. In your groups, recreate the lyrics. - Ss in groups of 5.
lyrics, describing the sea. a. The words must be modified to describe the sea. - Final performance: In
- Create sounds using their b. T to model: Weema-weh  Swishy swashy (sound of water), In the one big circle.
bodies to refine lyrics or Jungle  In the Sea. Resource:
rhythm. c. Include body percussion. - Whiteboard and
- Engage and participate in 2. Practice as a group. markers.
groupwork 3. T to attend to each group to guide their thinking. Assessment:
- Sing along the rhythm 4. Practice as a class. - T to observe for group
5. Perform the final piece. participation
a. When each group is performing their part, other groups mirror the - Record performance: T
musical instrument sound modelled by that group. to assess using criteria
marking sheet.
CLOSURE
Ss will learn to: 5-10 Reflection questions: Organisations:
- Reflect on composition. mins 1. Do you think body percussion is a good musical instrument? Why or why not? - Ss sit on the floor as a
- Reflect on Body 2. Was it hard to change the words of the lyrics? whole class.
5
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal
Percussion. 3. What did you enjoy most about this music lesson? Assessment:
- Assess Ss on
reflection questions.

Critical Reflection:

This fun and interactive music lesson aims for students to recreate the lyrics and to perform their piece using body percussion. Stage 1,

year 1 are the perfect group for this activity as they are focusing on developing their literacy knowledge. These activities will further develop

the focused area of vocabulary and descriptive languages as they are challenged to replace the words of the well-known song ‘The Lion

Sleeps Tonight’ (2018). Children need to activate their prior knowledge of marine life from the previous class and use descriptive words

that best describes the sea in their lyrics. Taking into account EALD and indigenous Australians, I have made this activity a group work

based, having a capable student as a scribe and the less confident students to share their ideas orally. This strategy takes into account

diverse learners and provides all students a chance to collaborate, think creatively and take risks to build on their knowledge (Freeman et

al., 2003). Further on, students meet the requirements of the syllabus through the exploration of body percussion, by developing sounds

with their bodies to match with the constant beat and rhythm of the music, exploring endless possibilities (Harland et al., 2000; NSW

Education Standards Authority, 2006). I believe this is a simple and fun activity and yet a fantastic way for students to take risks and

engage in higher order thinking (Nicholas, 2012). To conclude, students sing and perform their piece to develop their confidence and love

for music in a fun and interactive environment (NESA, 2006).

LESSON PLAN FORMAT

Class: Stage 2 – Year 3 Date: Week 1-2 of Term 1 Start: 10:00 Finish: 11:00
Key Learning Area: Creative Arts, Health & Physical Lesson Topic: Musical notes & Rhythms
6
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal
Educations
Recent Prior Experience: Graphical notation.
Syllabus Outcome(s): Indicators of Learning for this lesson: Assessment:
MUS2.4 Identifies the use of musical By the end of this lesson, the students will: - Self assessment:
concepts and musical symbols in a range of - Listen and identify musical notes and rhythms Strategic whole class/ individual
repertoire - Identify musical notes and replace the words to the song questioning, observe Ss
with the syllables. participation, video record each
- Sing the syllables using rhythm group performance to observe on
- Engage and participate in groupwork Ss progress using criteria,
reflections.
- Peer assessment:
Oral feedback

Any safety issues to be considered: Resources:


T to monitor carefully while Ss clear tables and chairs ‘Introduction to Rhythm Reading: Stage 2’ by Visual Musical Minds (2017), whiteboard and
to make some free space. markers, paper and pen, laptop, music note sheets (See Appendix A), famous music sheets
(See Appendix B) and musical zap cards (See Appendix C)

LESSON SEQUENCE

Lesson Content / Indicators Timing Teaching Strategies / Learning Experiences: Resources and
of Learning: (mins) Organisation:
INTRODUCTION
7
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal
Ss will learn to: 5- 10 1. T explains lesson goal: Organisation:
- Listen mins a. You will learn to read traditional musical notations and its rhythm. - Ss sitting on the floor as
- Understand notations 2. T plays video. a whole class, facing T.
and rhythms a. T to model by singing the notes along with the video Resources:
b. Encourage Ss to join during repeat. - ‘Introduction to Rhythm
Reading: Stage 2’ by
Visual Musical Minds
(2017)
DEVELOPMENT
Ss will learn to: 40 – T Modelling: Organisation:
- Sing the notes. 45 1. Use the screen to show the sheet  Music notes. - Ss sitting on the floor as
- Listen to the rhythm and mins a. Explain to the Ss the concept of rhythm: The length of the sound and a whole class, facing T.
identify the notes. silences (long or short). - Ss activity: in groups of
- Identify notes and b. T to explain and model each notation and its rhythm, by singing the 4
translate lyrics to syllables ti-ri-ti-ri, ti-ti, ta, Tah-ah, Ta-ah-ah-ah, rest. Resources:
syllables c. Ss to repeat after each example. - Music notes sheet (See
2. In groups of 4, Ss to notate allocated song using the syllables. (ti-ri-ti-ri, ti-ti, ta, Appendix A)
Tah-ah, Ta-ah-ah-ah, rest) - Famous music sheets
a. E.g. Twinkle, Twinkle little star will be translated to Ti-ti, ti-ti, ti-ti, tah-ah. for group work activity.
b. Sing the song using the syllables. (See Appendix B)
c. Other groups to guess which song. - Screen (smartboard/
projector)
- Whiteboard and
markers
Ss will learn to: Musical Zap Game: Organisations:
- Engage and participate 1. Split class into two equal groups, allocate a team leader and form a line behind - Ss in two equal groups
in groupwork the leader. - Musical Zap Cards
8
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal
- Clap, tap or sing the 2. Stack the pile of Musical ZAP cards in front of each team. (See Appendix C)
notes 3. The team leaders to do ‘Scissors, Paper, Rock’. Winner to choose which team Resource:
- Respond to the goes first. - Paper and pen (Tally
instructions of the game. 4. The team leader picks up the card, places on the floor and claps, taps or sings points)
the notes on the card. Assessment:
5. If done correctly the team earns points. T tally’s the points. - T to observe group
6. After their attempt (successful or not) they head to the back of the line. participation.
7. The second team draws a card and completes the rhythm. - T to observe Ss
8. The game repeats until all the Ss gets a turn. progress during the
Modifications/ Differentiation: game.
1. To spice up the game add in below cards:
a. Zap Cards: These cards have extra task that need to be completed
e.g. Jump, run around the class
b. Musical Zap Cards: Play a style of song e.g. beatboxing, rapping,
hip hop, classical
CLOSURE
Ss will learn to: 5-10 Reflections questions: Assessment:
- Reflect on lesson mins a. How many beats are in a half note? - Assess Ss on reflection
b. What are the rhythm syllables we learnt today? questions.
Critical Reflection:

Learning to read music is like learning a new language, and when I was a child I struggled to follow on. Taking into account my experience

and less confident learners, I believe this lesson is more appropriate for stage 2 year 3 groups. The teacher explicitly models how to identify

and sing each note and the students practice by repeating after the teacher. The aim is to help students familiarise the notes by connecting

with the visual features, and to adapt their numeracy skills to count the rhythm of the notes. By using familiar musical pieces such as

Twinkle, twinkle little star, students are less overwhelmed for this activity, which is to replace the words with the rhythm syllables explored
9
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal
earlier. Students will develop skills to read music and become aware of the rhythm, as expected in stage 2 (NESA, 2006). By implementing

Zone of Proximal Development strategy, students are provided the scaffold to learn, to use their prior knowledge and to attempt the

activities (Vygotsky, 1978). To finish the lesson on a fun note, I have incorporated a game-based activity where students revise the skills

learnt to solidify their knowledge. This game is perfect to help the teacher to formatively assess students’ level of understanding and plan to

cater for areas that need further development. As such, the lesson explores the endless possibilities of learning music, starting with

numeracy development through simple act of learning to playing a game (Brown, 2012).

Reference List:

Brown, L.L. (2012, May 25). The Benefits of Music Education. Retrieved from https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/the-benefits-of-music-

education

Freeman, G.D., Sullivan, K. & Fulton, C.R. (2003). Effects of creative drama on self-concept, social skills, and problem behaviour. The

Journal of Educational Research, 96(3), 131-138. doi: 10.1080/00220670309598801


10
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal
Harland, J., Kinder, K., Lord, P., Stott, A., Schagen, I., Haynes, J., … Paola., R. (2000). Arts education in secondary schools: Effects and

effectiveness. Retrieved from https://www.nfer.ac.uk/publications/eaj01/eaj01.pdf

L. Macquarrie (n.d.). Note Duration and Reading Rhythms [Digital image]. Retrieved from http://recordersupport.weebly.com/note-duration-

and-reading-rhythms.html

M. Grayburn (n.d.) Hot Cross Buns [Digital image]. Retrieved from http://recordersupport.weebly.com/hot-cross-buns.html

M. Grayburn (n.d.) It’s Raining, It’s Pouring [Digital image]. Retrieved from http://recordersupport.weebly.com/its-raining-its-pouring.html

M. Grayburn (n.d.) Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star [Digital image]. Retrieved from http://recordersupport.weebly.com/twinkle-twinkle-little-

star.html

M. Grayburn (n.d.) Amazing Grace [Digital image]. Retrieved from http://recordersupport.weebly.com/amazing-grace.html

Nicholas, J. (2012). Benefits to students and the broader society of music education in schools. Retrieved from

https://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/images/stories/committees/etc/submissions/Music_Ed_Inquiry/1_Julia_Nicholas_04122012.pdf

NSW Educational Standards Authority. (2006). NSW Creative Arts Syllabus, Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

Teach Starter Publishing (n.d.) Musical ZAP Game – Notes with Rhythm Syllables [Digital image]. Retrieved from

https://www.teachstarter.com/au/teaching-resource/musical-zap-game-notes-rhythm-syllables/

Visual Musical Minds. (2017, Oct 29). Introduction to Rhythm Reading: Stage 2 [Video]. Youtube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHad-

I5AJT0

Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press

We are Kid’s United. (2018, Dec 12). The Lion Sleep’s Tonight [Video]. Youtube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bV4WYhXD-OU
11
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal

Appendices
Appendix A: Music Notes Sheets
12
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal

Retrieved from website http://recordersupport.weebly.com/note-duration-and-reading-rhythms.html


13
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal
Appendix B: Famous Music Sheets

Retrieved from website http://recordersupport.weebly.com/

Appendix C: Musical Zap Game


14
EDAR504: Music Reflective Journal

Retrieved from website https://www.teachstarter.com/au/teaching-resource/musical-zap-game/