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Project MIMs

Grade 12 – Practical Research 2

G12 MIMs LC 1
QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

Learning Competency:
• describes characteristics, strengths, weaknesses, and kinds of quantitative research

Objectives:
• define quantitative research;
• describe and understand the characteristics, strengths, weaknesses and kinds of
quantitative research

REMEMBER:

DEFINITION OF QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

Quantitative research is an objective, systematic empirical investigation of


observable phenomena through the use of computational techniques. It highlights
numerical analysis of data hoping that the numbers yield unbiased results that can be
generalized to some larger population and explain a particular observation. Simply,
quantitative research is concerned with numbers and its relationship with events.

ENLIGHTEN:

CHARACTERISTICS OF QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

1. OBJECTIVE. Quantitative research seeks accurate measurement and


analysis of target concepts. It is not based on mere intuition and guesses. Data
are gathered before proposing a conclusion or solution to a problem.

2. CLEARLY DEFINED RESEARCH QUESTIONS. The researchers know in


advance what they are looking for. The research questions are well-defined
for which objective answers are sought. All aspects of the study are carefully
designed before data are gathered.

3. STRUCTURED RESEARCH INSTRUMENTS. Standardized instruments


guide data collection, thus, ensuring the accuracy, reliability and validity of
data. Data are normally gathered using structured research tools such as
questionnaires to collect measurable characteristics of the population like age,
socio-economic status, number of children, among others.

4. NUMERICAL DATA. Figures, tables, or graphs showcase summarized data


collection in order to show trends, relationships or differences among variables.
In sum, the charts and tables allow you to see the evidence collected.

5. LARGE SAMPLE SIZES. To arrive at a more reliable data analysis, a normal


population distribution curve is preferred. This requires a large sample size,
depending on how the characteristics of the population vary. Random sampling
is recommended in determining the sample size to avoid researcher’s bias in
interpreting the results.

6. REPLICATION. Quantitative methods can be repeated to verify findings in


another setting, thus strengthen and reinforcing validity of findings eliminating
the possibility of spurious conclusions.

7. FUTURE OUTCOMES. By using complex mathematical calculations and with


the aid of computers, if - then scenarios may be formulated thus predicting future
results. Quantitative research puts emphasis on proof, rather than discovery.
STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

STRENGTHS OF QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

The strengths of the quantitative research are the following:

1. It is objective. The most reliable and valid way of concluding results, giving way
to a new hypothesis or to disproving it. Because of bigger number of the
sample of a population, the results or generalizations are more reliable and
valid. Since it provides numerical data, it cannot be easily misinterpreted.

2. The use of statistical techniques facilitates sophisticated analyses and allows you
to comprehend a huge amount of vital characteristics of data.

3. It is real and unbiased. If the research is properly designed it filters out


external factors, and so can be seen as real and unbiased.

4. The numerical data can be analyzed in a quick and easy way. By employing
statistically valid random models, findings can be generalized to the
population about which information is necessary.

5. Quantitative studies are replicable. Standardized approaches allow the study


to be replicated in different areas or over time with formulation of comparable
findings.

6. Quantitative experiments are useful for testing the results gained by a


series of qualitative experiments, leading to a final answer, and narrowing
down of possible directions to follow.

WEAKNESSES OF QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH

The weaknesses of the quantitative research are the following:

1. Quantitative research requires a large number of respondents. It is assumed


that the larger the sample is, the more statistically accurate the findings are.

2. It is costly. Since, there are more respondents compared to qualitative research,


the expenses will be greater in reaching out to these people and in reproducing
questionnaires.

3. The information is contextual factors to help interpret the results or to explain


variations are usually ignored. It does not consider the distinct capacity of the
respondents to share and elaborate further information unlike the qualitative
research.

4. Many information is difficult to gather using structured research instruments,


specifically on sensitive issues like pre-marital sex, domestic violence,
among others.

5. If not done seriously and correctly, data from questionnaires may be incomplete
and inaccurate. Researchers must be on the look-out on respondents who are
just guessing in answering the instrument.

KINDS OF QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGNS

Research design refers to the overall strategy that you choose in order to
integrate the different components of the study in a coherent and logical way, thereby
ensuring you will effectively address the research problem. Furthermore, a research design
constitutes the blueprint for the selection, measurement and analysis of data. The research
problem determines the research you should.

Quantitative methods emphasize objective measurements and the statistical,


mathematical, or numerical analysis of data collected through polls, questionnaires, and
surveys, or by manipulating pre-existing statistical data using computational techniques.
The kind of research is dependent on the researcher’s aim in conducting the study
and the extent to which the findings will be used. Quantitative research designs are
generally classified into experimental and non-experimental as the following matrix below.

The following are the various kinds of quantitative research design that a researcher
may employ:

1. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH DESIGN. This allows the researcher to


control the situation. In doing so, it allows the researcher to answer the
question, “What causes something to occur?” This kind of research also allows
the researcher to identify cause and effect relationships between variables
and to distinguish placebo effects from treatment effects. Further, this
research design supports the ability to limit alternative explanations and to infer
direct causal relationships in the study; the approach provides the highest
degree level of evidence for single studies.

A. PRE-EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN. A type of research applies to


experimental design that with least internal validity. One type of pre-
experiment, the simple group, pre- test-post-test design, measures
the group two times, before and after the intervention.

Instead of comparing the pretest with the posttest within one


group, the posttest of the treated groups is compared with that of
an untreated group. Measuring the effect as the difference between
groups marks this as between-subjects design. Assuming both groups
experienced the same time-related influences, the comparison group
feature should protect this design from the rival explanations that
threaten the within-subject design.

Two classes of experimental design that can provide better


internal validity than pre- experimental designs are: quasi-experimental
and true experimental design (Dooly, 1999).

B. QUASI – EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN. In this design, the researcher can


collect more data, either by scheduling more observations or finding
more existing measures. Quasi-experimental design involves selecting
groups, upon which a variable is tested, without any random pre-
selection processes. For example, to perform an educational
experiment, a class might be arbitrarily divided by alphabetical selection
or by seating arrangement. The division is often convenient and,
especially in an educational situation, causes as little disruption
as possible. After this selection, the experiment proceeds in a
very similar way to any other experiment, with a variable being
compared between different groups, or over a period of time.

There are two types of quasi-experimental design, these are:

a. Non-Equivalent Control Group. This refers to the chance failure of


random assignment to equalize the conditions by converting a
true experiment into this kind of design, for purpose of analysis.

b. Interrupted Time Series Design. It employs multiple measures


before and after the experimental intervention. It differs from the
single- group pre-experiment that has only one pretest and one
posttest. Users of this design assume that the time threats such as
history or maturation appear as regular changes in the measures
prior to the intervention.

C. TRUE-EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN. It controls for both time-related and


group-related threats. Two features mark true experiments: two or more
differently treated groups; and random assignment to these groups.
These features require that the researchers have control over the
experimental treatment and the power to place subjects in groups.

True experimental design employs both treated and control


groups to deal with time-related rival explanations.

A control group reflects changes other than those due to the


treatment that occur during the time of the study. Such changes
include effects of outside events, maturation by the subjects, changes
in measures and impact of any pre-tests.

True experimental design offers the highest internal validity


of all the designs. Quasi-experimental design differs from true
experimental design by the absence of random assignment of
subjects to different conditions. What quasi- experiments have in
common with true experiments is that some subjects receive an
intervention and provide data likely to reflect its impact.

2. NON-EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN. In this kind of design, the researcher


observes the phenomena as they occur naturally, and no external variables are
introduced. In this research design, the variables are not deliberately
manipulated nor is the setting controlled. Researchers collect data without
making changes or introducing treatments. This may also be called as
DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH DESIGN because it is only one under non-
experimental design.

DESCRIPTIVE RESEARCH DESIGN’s main purpose is to observe,


describe and document aspects of a situation as it naturally occurs and
sometimes to serve as a starting point for hypothesis generation or theory
development.

The types of descriptive design are as follows:

A. SURVEY. It is used to gather information from groups of people by


selecting and studying samples chosen from a population. This is
useful when the objective of the study is to see general picture of
the population under investigation in terms of their social and economic
characteristics, opinions, and their knowledge about the behavior
towards a certain phenomenon.

B. CORRELATIONAL. It is conducted by researchers whose aim would be


to find out the direction, associations and/or relationship between
different variables or groups of respondents under study. Correlational
Research has three types, these are:

a. Bivariate Correlational Studies. It obtains score from two


variables for each subject, and then uses them to calculate a
correlation coefficient. The term bivariate implies that the two
variables are correlated (variables are selected because they are
believed to be related).

Example: Children of wealthier (variable one), better


educated (variable 2) parents earn higher salaries as adults.

b. Prediction Studies. It uses correlation coefficient to show how one


variable (the predictor variable) predicts another (the criterion
variable).

Example: Which high school applicants should be admitted to


college?

c. Multiple Regression Prediction Studies. All variables in the


study can contribute to the over-all prediction in an equation that
adds together the predictive power of each identified variable.

Example: Suppose the High School GPA is not the sole


predictor of college GPA, what might be other good predictors?

C. EX-POST FACTO or CAUSAL-COMPARATIVE. This kind of


research derives conclusion from observations and manifestations
that already occurred in the past and now compared to some dependent
variables. It discusses why and how a phenomenon occurs.

Example 1: A researcher is interested in how weight influences


stress-coping level of adults. Here the subjects would be separated
into different groups (underweight, normal, overweight) and their
stress-coping levels measured. This is an ex post facto design
because a pre-existing characteristic (weight) was used to form the
groups.

Example 2: What is the Effect of Home Schooling on the Social


Skills of Adolescents?

D. COMPARATIVE. It involves comparing and contrasting two or more


samples of study subjects on one or more variables, often at a single
point of time. Specifically, this design is used to compare two distinct
groups on the basis of selected attributes such as knowledge level,
perceptions, and attitudes, physical or psychological symptoms.

Example: A comparative Study on the Health Problems among


Rural and Urban People in Ilocos Region, Philippines.

E. NORMATIVE. It describes the norm level of characteristics for a


given behavior. For example: If you are conducting a research on the
study habits of the high school students you are to use the range of score
to describe the level of their study habits. The same true is when you
would want to describe their academic performance.

F. EVALUATIVE. It is a process used to determine what has happened


during a given activity or in an institution. The purpose of evaluation is to
see if a given program is working, an institution is successful according
to the goals set for it, or the original intent was successfully attained. In
other words, in evaluation judgments can be in the forms of social
utility, desirability, or effectiveness of a process. For example, we
can cite here a situation. In evaluation study, it will not just be
considering the performance of the students who were taught under
modular instruction; instead, it is the rate of progress that happened
among the students who were exposed to modular instruction.

Example: A test of children in school is used to assess the


effectiveness of teaching or the deployment of a curriculum.
G. METHODOLOGICAL. In this approach, the implementation of a variety
of methodologies forms a critical part of achieving the goal of developing
a scale- matched approach, where data from different disciplines can be
integrated.

SUM UP:
LET’S TRY:

Instructions: Write your comprehensive learning about the following.

1. What is quantitative research?


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2. What are the characteristics of quantitative research?


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3. Discuss the strengths of quantitative research.


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4. Discuss the weaknesses of quantitative research.


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5. Describe each kind of quantitative research design. Give example each.


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REINFORCEMENT:

A. Identification

Instructions: Identify the word/s being described by the following. Write your answer on
the space provided in each number.

1. It highlights numerical analysis of data hoping that the numbers yield unbiased results
that can be generalized to some larger population and explain a particular observation.
_______________
2. It suggests that the data concerned can be analyzed in terms of numbers.
_______________
3. This kind of research derives conclusion from observations and manifestations that
already occurred in the past and now compared to some dependent variables.
_______________
4. It describes the norm level of characteristics for a given behavior. _______________
5. In this design, the researcher can collect more data, either by scheduling more
observations or finding more existing measures. _______________
6. It is conducted by researchers whose aim would be to find out the direction, associations
and/or relationship between different variables or groups of respondents under study.
_______________
7. It refers to the overall strategy that you choose in order to integrate the different
components of the study in a coherent and logical way, thereby ensuring you will
effectively address the research problem. _______________
8. It controls for both time-related and group-related threats. Two features mark true
experiments: two or more differently treated groups; and random assignment to these
groups. _______________
9. All variables in the study can contribute to the over-all prediction in an equation
that adds together the predictive power of each identified variable. _______________
10. Its main purpose is to observe, describe and document aspects of a situation as it
naturally occurs and sometimes to serve as a starting point for hypothesis generation or
theory development. _______________

B. Multiple Choices

Instructions: Choose the correct letter that best describe the question or best complete
the statement. Write your answer before the number.

1. Which of the following BEST defines quantitative research?


A. It is an exploration associated with libraries, books, and journals.
B. It is an activity concerned with finding new truth in education.
C. It is a systematic process obtaining numerical information about the world.
D. It is an activity of producing or proving a theorem.

2. Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of quantitative research?


A. Data are gathered before proposing a conclusion or solution to a problem.
B. Quantitative methods can be repeated to verify findings in another setting, thus
strengthen and reinforcing validity of findings eliminating the possibility of
spurious conclusions.
C. Figures, tables, or graphs showcase summarized data collection in order to show
trends, relationships or differences among variables. In sum, the charts and tables
allow you to see the evidence collected.
D. It seeks to gather a more comprehensive understanding of activities related to human
behavior and the attributes that rule such behavior.

3. Which of the following describes the characteristics of research where data are in form
of statistics?
A. Objective C. Replication
B. Numerical Data D. Large Sample Size

4. This characteristic of quantitative research which refers to its necessity to arrive


at a more reliable data analysis.
A. Large Sample Sizes C. Numerical Data
B. Replication D. Objective
5. It is done to check the correctness and verify the findings of the study.
A. Large Sample Sizes C. Numerical Data
B. Replication D. Objective

6. The researchers know in advance what they are looking for. The research questions
are well- defined for which objective answers are sought. All aspects of the study are
carefully designed before data are gathered.
A. Future Outcomes C. Clearly defined Research Questions
B. Structured Research Instruments D. Numerical Data

7. Which research design seeks to describe “what is”?


A. Correlational C. Experimental
B. Descriptive D. Evaluation

8. In this type of research, the investigator tries to probe the significance of relationship
between two or more factors or characteristics
A. Correlational C. Ex-post facto
B. Experimental D. Survey

9. Which of the item below does NOT hold true for descriptive research?
A. describes the nature of a situation or an event
B. presents the profile of persons, events, and things
C. describes past situations
D. there is no manipulation of variables or search for cause and effect related
to the performance

10. Which of the following illustrates a quantitative study?


A. attributes to malnutrition in children
B. public opinion to the sex scandal of the Pres. in our country
C. academic performance of high school students
D. all the above choices

C. Alternate Responses

Instructions: Determine if the description given below is a strength or weakness of a


quantitative research. Write your answer on the blank provided for each
number.

1. The most reliable and valid way of concluding results, giving way to a new hypothesis or
to disproving it. _______________

2. Since, there are more respondents compared to qualitative research, the expenses will
be greater in reaching out to these people and in reproducing questionnaires.
_______________

3. If not done seriously and correctly, data from questionnaires may be incomplete and
inaccurate. _______________

4. Standardized approaches allow the study to be replicated in different areas or over time
with formulation of comparable findings. _______________

5. Quantitative experiments are useful for testing the results gained by a series of
qualitative experiments, leading to a final answer, and narrowing down of possible
directions to follow. _______________

6. It is assumed that the larger the sample is, the more statistically accurate the findings
are. _______________

7. Researchers must be on the look-out on respondents who are just guessing in answering
the instrument. _______________

8. It does not consider the distinct capacity of the respondents to share and elaborate
further information unlike the qualitative research. _______________

9. It is real and unbiased. _______________

10. It is costly. _______________


D. Matching Type

Instructions: Match items in COLUMN A with those of COLUMN B by writing the letter of
the correct answers in the space provided for each number.

Answers Column A Column B


1. the posttest of the treated groups is
compared with that of an untreated group A. Normative
2. a test of children in school is used to assess the
effectiveness of teaching or the deployment of a B. Survey
curriculum
3. useful when the objective of the study is to see C. Census
general picture of the population under
investigation in terms of their social and economic D. Evaluative
characteristics, opinions, and their knowledge
about the behavior towards a certain E. Comparative
phenomenon
4. conducting a research on the study habits of the F. Ex-post facto
high school students you are to use the range of
score to describe the level of their study habits G. Descriptive
5. discusses why and how a phenomenon occurs
6. selecting groups, upon which a variable is H. Correlational
tested, without any random pre-selection
processes I. Bivariate Correlational
7. uses correlation coefficient to show how one
variable (the predictor variable) predicts another J. Prediction
(the criterion variable)
8. employs both treated and control groups to deal K. Multiple Regression
with time-related rival explanations
9. it obtains score from two variables for each L. Pre-Experimental
subject, and then uses them to calculate a
correlation coefficient M. Quasi Experimental
10. term that seems synonymous to survey
research N. True Experimental

Challenge!

Find fifteen (15) different research titles from research reports/ journals and classify
them as to any of the research designs we have discussed. Choose only quantitative
research titles. Follow the format below.

No. RESEARCH TITLE QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGN

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.
No. RESEARCH TITLE QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGN

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

Prepared by:

MR. JESTER G. DE LEON


Master Teacher I, MNHS – SHS