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Honors
English
122


Instructor 


Roseanne
Alvarez

Title
 Associate
Professor
of
English;
Women's
Studies
Option
Coordinator

Office
Phone
 (732)
224
‐
2684

Office
Address
 LAH
222D


Office
Hours 
 T:
3:45‐5:45;
W:
12:30 ‐2:30;
Th:
4:30
 ‐
5:30

E‐mail
 ralvarez@brookdalecc.edu

Location 


ATEC
020

Times


Thurs.
1:30
‐
4:15PM

Start
Date


1/20

Required
Texts


The
Craft
of
Research. 

Wayne
C.
Booth,
Gregory
G.
Columb.

2008. 



ISBN:
9780226065663

MLA
Handbook
for
Writers
of
Research
Papers. 

MLA. 

2009.
ISBN:978160329024


COURSE
DESCRIPTION

Honors
English
122
engages
the
student
in
every
aspect
of
the
research
and
writing
processes.


You
will
learn
to
access,
assess,
and
synthesize
various
types
of
information
from
different


media
and
sources;
concurrently,
you
will
learn
to
develop
critical
arguments
that
both
utilize


and
question
the
world
of
ideas
in
which
you
immerse
yourself.



As
members
of
the
Honors
Cohort
at
Brookdale,
students
will
have
the
opportunity
to
develop


and
expand
their
experiences
as
engaged
students,
researchers
and
citizen;
learn
to
develop


research
projects
that
can
have
a
direct
impact
on
our
local
communities;
and
discover
that


research
is
not
only
(and
actually)
fun,
but
vital
to
developing
knowledge
and
solutions
that
can


make
a
difference
in
both
local
and
global
contexts.



Honors
English
122
is
paired
with
SOCI
101
in
order
to
foster
a
learning
community.

An


essential
component
of
this
learning
community
is
to
develop
a
focus
on
so cial
issues
that


student
researchers
will
have
an
opportunity
to
address
in
ENGL
122.

This
learning
community


is
designed
to
meet
the
objectives
stated
in
the
Honors
program
description
and
Mission:


"Honors
at
Brookdale
provides
an
enriched
academic
experience
to
a
select
cohort
of
highly


motivated
students.
Through
a
curriculum
that
emphasizes
global
awareness,
cultural


experiences,
and
local
engagement,
Brookdale
Honors
students
are
challenged
to
connect
their


studies
to
the
world
beyond
the
campus.
By
fostering
collaborative
learning
and
intellectual


inquiry,
Honors
at
Brookdale
prepares
students
for
transfer
to
competitive
four‐year
colleges


and
universities,
as
well
as
for
citizenship
in
our
21st
century
world."
(Mission
Statement)

Both 
courses
will 
offer
students
the
opportunity
to
foster
"local
engagement"
with
the
option
 to
complete
a
Service
Learning
project
during
the
course
of
the
semester.

Research
will
be
 understood
and
experienced
in
context,
with
the
aim
of
developing
broader
analysis
that
links
 local
issues
to
global
concerns.




SCHEDULE

You
will
find
the
complete
schedule
of
readings
and
assignments
posted
on
a
Unit
and
weekly


basis
at
the
"Schedule
&
Assignments"
section
of
our
ENGL
122
Angel
course
page.
Our
weekly


folders
are
collected
in
a
series
of
five
themed
Units.



UNIT
ONE:
Introduction
&
Contexts


UNIT
TWO:
Methods
&
Source
Work


UNIT
THREE:
Process
&
Analysis


UNIT
FOUR:
Methods
II:
The
Problem
for
Argument


UNIT
FIVE:

Praxis
(Theory
into
Practice)


COURSE
REQUIREMENTS

The
122
 Writing
ePortfolio:


Your
122
ePortfolio
will
document
your
artifacts
(research,
projects)
and
self
assessment.

Your


ePortfolio
is
graded
based
on
the
guidelines
stated
in
the
English
Department’s
122
Syllabus,
as


well
as
the
particular
rubrics
assigned
to
the
ePortfolio
contents
listed
below:



1.
Research
In‐Process
Reflection
Assignments=
100pts
total

2.
Service
Learning
or
Community
Focus
Journals=
100pts
total
(SLJs:
50
pts
guaranteed
if


objectives
met);
students
who
cannot
participate
in
service
learning
must
produce
an
additional
 research
project
based
on
a
local
community
organization,
needs
assessment
or
issue.

(See
 “Requirements
in
Detail”) 2.
Two
research
papers
(8
– 
10pp
&
12
 ‐
15pp)
=
100pts
total

3.
Perspective
Assignments
=
40pts
total

4.
Gr oup
Projects
&
Final
Research
Presentation
(F2F
and
Online;
does
not
include
attendance)


=
60pts
total
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

=
60pts
total


Grading
Scale


For
specific
guidelines
on
research
paper
portfolio
grading,
see
the
Departmental
Syllabus.




 

A 


376
 ‐
400


 

A ‐














355
 ‐
3 75

B+ 












345
 ‐
354

B



326
– 
344


B‐












315‐ 325

C+ 












305
 ‐
319

C

280
 ‐
304

D

240
 ‐
279

F





0
‐
239

COURSE
REQUIREMENTS
&
POLICIES
IN
DETAIL

Research‐in ‐process
logs
&
assignments
(100pts):


Research
Logs:
Weekly,
informal
journals
or
blogs
where
you
discuss
any
and
all
aspects
of
your
 research.
Due
dates,
and
specific
requirements
will
be
posted
in
advance
(see
Calendar
and


Unit
folders).
Journals
typically
consist
of
1‐2
typed
pages
each.
Assignments
will
be
collected


weekly
during
the
specific
paper
research
period.
 
ANGEL
DROP
BOXES
will
be
available
for
each
 week's
work. 

Throughout
the
semester,
all
work
should
be
submitted
electronically
via
ANGEL
 DROP
BOX. 

Thinking
"outside"
of
boxes
sometimes
means
trying
out
new
ones.

:)


Other/Research‐in ‐Process
Assignments:
Research‐in ‐process
assignments
will
be
explained
in
 greater
detail
in
class
and
as
the
class
progresses;
these
assignments
will
include:
formal
paper
 proposals,
outlines,
annotated
bibliographies,
and
other
assignments
we'll
work
on
for
each
 step
in
our
research
writing
process.

Proposals,
bibliographies,
outlines
and
other
assignments
 will
be
explained
in
class
and
on
our
ANGEL
schedule.



Perspective
Assignments
(40pts):



 

"Perspective
Assignments"
are
assigned
approx.
every
two
to
three
weeks,
depending
on
the
 schedule. 

Typically,
perspective
assignments
ask
us
to
go
"beyond"
our
own
topics
of
research
 and
consider
other
issues
and
perspectives
that
will
enhance
your
overall
understanding
of
the
 academic
research
and
writing
processes.
For
example,
you
may
be
asked
to
read
about
a
 specific
issue
from
two
different
sources;
you
will
then
post
a
short
response
discussing
the
 "perspective(s)"
offered
in
both
sources
on
the
particular
issue,
as
well
as
what
you
feel
about


the
issue
at
hand.
Perspective
assignments
will
be
explained
in
greater
detail
as
the
course
 progresses. 




Service
Learning
or
Community
Focus
Journals
(100pts):


Service
Learning
Journals:

 Students
who
participate
in
Service
Learning
must
complete
a
series
of
reflection
journals


throughout
their
course
of
service;
students
are
required
to
produce
a
minimum
of
5
journals


(length
to
be
determined
by
student;
one
page
minimum).

Service
Learning
journals
are
 flexible,
but
should
document 
and
 reflect
on
the
following:


Experience/activities
for
each
date
of
service


Development
of
ideas
linked
to
research
topic


Self‐
assessment 
of
progress
in
connecting
service
to
research
process
and
topic


Service
Learning
participants
are
guaranteed
 50
out
of
100
points
for
SL
Journals.

The
 remaining
score
is
based
on
how
well
you
meet
the
stated
requirements
noted
above.

Service
 Learning
journals
should
be
seen
as
directly
linked
to
aiding
you
in
developing
your
research
 projects
and
papers.

Please
see
“Service
Learning”
folder
for
details
on
procedures
and
 assessment. 


Community
in
Focus
Research
Journal:


It
is
highly
recommended
that
all
students
participate
in
service
learning
to
fulfill
the
objectives
 and
lea rning
outcomes
of
this
course.
However,
there
are
circumstances
when
students
are
 unable
to
participate
in
a
given
semester.
Students
who
cannot
participate
in
Service
Learning
 will
have
the
opportunity
to
develop
a
community
needs
assessment
research
project
that
will
 aid
in
their
overall
research
goals.

The
Community
in
Focus
Journal
is
in
addition
to
other


assigned
logs
and/or
perspective
assignments.

Students
must
produce
a
minimum
of
10
journal


submissions
(2
pages
each;
10pts
each).
Journals
will
be
based
on
student
directed
research,


specific
prompts,
a
primary
source
interview
session**,
and
a
brief
book
review.

Journals
are


graded
in
5
periods
(after
each
pair
of
journals
submitted);
each
period
includes
a
student
self‐

assessment.


Please
see
“Community
In
Focus”
folder
at
our
Angel
page
for
details
on


procedures
and
assessment.


**Students
developing
“Community
in
Focus”
research
and
journals
must
interview
students
in
 either
GEO
(Gender
Equity
Organization)
or
the
Global
Citizenship
Club.

Please
let
Professor
 Alvarez
know
when
you
plan
to
reach
out
to
either
student
organization
in
order
to
prepare
for
 your
interview. 


Developing
our
voices
and
audiences:
public
and
private
rhetorical
modes

Some
of
the
world’s
most
insightful
and
active
researchers
are
also
bloggers
for
major


periodicals.

This
semester,
you
will
have
the
opportunity
to
develop
your
voice
as
a
“public”


writer
(ie.
blogger)
by
choosing
to
submit

any
of
the
journals,
logs
or
perspective
assignments


(this
includes
Service,
Community
in
Focus,
Research
Logs
or
Perspective
Assignments)
as
blog


entries
on
your
blog
space
at
Brookdale’s
Portal.




If
you
choose
to
submit
a
written
assignment
as
a
blog
entry,
you
must
determine
several
 factors
which
will
shape
the
scope
and
focus
of
your
entry:


purpose
and
audience:
In
discussing
your
research
process,
what
would
be
different
 about
blogging
it
for
an
audience?

How
will
a
public
readership
change
the
way
you
 present
your
ideas?



hypertext:
bloggers
create
opportunities
for
readers
to
learn
more
about
the
topic
by
 embedding
hyperlinks.

Thinking
carefully
about
embedding
content
links
should
be
part
 of
the
consideration
for
your
entry.



Word
count:
all
blog
entries
must
meet
a
minimum
requiremen t
of
350
words
per
entry
 (this
is
the
equivalent
to
one
page)
 If
you
choose
to
submit
a
written
assignment
as
a
blog
post,
please
inform
me
of
your
 submission
by
posting
a
brief
note
at
the
assignment
drop
box.

I
will
subscribe
to
your
blog
 once
I
am
aware
of
your
submissions.


For
more
information 
on
navigating
your
Brookdale
Portal,
please
see
this
link . 


Research
Projects/Papers
(100pts):


Our
research
projects
and
papers
are
based
on
the
idea
of
“thinking
globally;
acting
locally.”

If
 you
look
at
the
headings
for
each
paper,
however,
you
will
see
that
the
verbs
are
reversed.

This
 is
no
typo.

Indeed,
in
performing
your
service
learning,
you
are
certainly
“acting”
and
engaging
 your
community.

But
the
act
of
thinking
beyond
your
locale
is
also
action ;
ultimately,
an
 important
inquiry
in
our
course
is
to
explore
the
power
of
engaged
research,
research
that
 creates
vital
links
in
our
global
society.




Paper
One:
Thinking
Locally
(Definition,
Exposition
&
Analysis)


8
– 
10
pages
(MLA
Citation)


Topic
developed
by
student;
topic
should
be
in
some
way
related
to
service
learning
or
 community
in
focus
research.


Paper
Two:

Acting
Globally
(Argument
&
Persuasion;
synthesis
of
rhetorical
modes)



12
– 
15
pages
(MLA
Citation)


Topic
and
focus
developed
by
student;
thesis
should
be
in
some
manner
related
to
 service
learning
or
community
in
focus
research.




Students
must
demonstrate
global
linkages
in
research
and
thesis.

For
example,
a
 student
participating
in
service
learning
for
a
local
food
pantry
may
wish
to
explore
the
 issue
of
hunger
and
food
scarcity
more
broadly.

She
will
initiate
a
research
project
that
 will
allow
her
to
raise
questions
and
address
a
particular
problem
she
surfaces
through
 primary
and
secondary
source
research.




Specific
guidelines,
source
requirements
and
procedures
will
be
made
available
at
our
course


Angel
page
and
discussed
in
detail.




Group
Projects
&
Final
Research
Presentations
(60pts):


Team/Group
Projects
(30pts):

Throughout
the
semester,
we
will
have
assigned
group
projects.



These
brief
team
assignments
will
be
held
in
class,
and
students
will
have
to
work
together
to
 teach
or
present
topics
covered
in
our
course.

Specific
group
assignments
will
be
posted
at
our
 Angel
page. 


Final
Research
Presentation
(30pts):

On
the
last
day
of
our
class
meeting,
each
student
will


offer
a
brief,
5‐ 7
minute
presentation
of
their
research.

The
research
presentation
can
focus
on
 a
particular
aspect
of
your
final
research
paper,
service
learning
or
a
combination.
Ultimately,


t his
is
where
we
get
to
see
the
results
of
your
efforts
in
the
course.

Power
Point
is
not


required,
but
students
must
be
prepared
(notes,
slides,
guide)
to
present
a
coherent


presentation
of
research.


Course
Policies:

Assignment
Policy All
work
is
expected
to
be
presented
on
time.
 
You
will
always
be
able
to
get
your
work
on
time


as
we
are
utilizing
electronic
drop
boxes
through
our
ANGEL
122
course
page;
should
you
have


any
technology
issues,
bring
in
hard
copies.

The
most
important
thing
to
realize
is
that
getting
 your
work
in
and
by
the
due
date
is
part
of
what
it
takes
to
successfully
complete
the
 expectations
of
the
course.

If
you
anticipate
an
absence
on
a
particular
assignment's
due
date,
 please
speak
to
me
in
advance
in
order
to
get
full
credit
for
the
assignment. 

Again,
you
will
 always
be
able
to
submit
your
work
electronically.

Late
assignments,
without
advance
notice,
 will
significantly
affect
your
final
grade.



Paper
One
and
Paper
Two
Portfolios
are
due
on
time
and
at
the
deadline.

Incomplete
or


portfolios
not
submitted
by
the
stated
deadline
will
lose
one
FULL
letter
grade
for
each
day


beyond
the
deadline.



Cell/Smart
Phone/Electronic
Device
of
any
kind
Policy Silence
all
devices
before
class
begins.
Students
who
attempt
to
make
or
receive
calls
or
texts
 during
our
class
will
be
asked
to
leave.
Speak
to
me
in
advance 
if
there
is
a
special
circumstance
 for
excusing
yourself
in
order
to
make
or
receive
a
call
or
text.


Conduct
Policy

If
you
learn
anything
you
will
learn
that
I
deeply
care
for
my
students
and
the
environment
in


which
we
work
together.
Therefore,
I
reserve
the
right
to
remove
students
from
my
classroom


who
disrupt
our
learning
process
and/or
create
a
distracting
or
hostile
work
environment.


Ultimately,
we
are
here
to
think,
learn,
question
and
share
together;
let's
make
it
work.


Plagiarism
Policy

Plagiarism
is
an
issue
that
we
address
both
as
a
theme
for
discussion
and
a
reality
of


undergraduate
research
practices
at
the
college
and
university
level;
we
will
discuss
various


ideas
and
definitions,
the
academic
honor
code,
and
the
notion
of
intellectual
property
and


originality
in
the
digital
age;
however,
for
the
purpose
of
understanding
how
this
affects
you


directly,
the
following
definition
applies:
using
another
person's
words
or
ideas
without
giving


standard
citation
credit
is
plagiarism.
Any
student
who
presents
a
plagiarized
assignment
at
any


point
in
the
semester
will
automatically
fail
the
course
and
should
withdraw
immediately.


Students
who
hand
in
plagiarized
papers
at
the
end
of
term
or
after
the
date
to
withdraw
will


fail
the
course.
Any
student
submitting
a
plagiarized
paper
or
assignment,
regardless
of
the


stage
in
the
semester
will
be
reported
for
violating
the
Academic
Integrity
Code
and
will
face


probationary
status
at
the
college.
The
most
important
thing
to
remember
is
that
our
class
is


about
learning
to
honor
your
voice
in
relation
to
the
world
of
ideas
in
which
you
immerse


yourself.
We
are
here
to
learn
to
do
this,
and
I
am
here
to
help
you
each
and
every
step
of
the


way.
Bottom
line:
respect
your
voice
as
a
writer.

Class
Participation
Policy

Class
participation
is
the
most
significant
aspect
of
this
course.
It
might
only
amount
to
30pts
of


your
overall
final
grade,
but
it's
about
99%
of
this
course.
I
try
to
keep
lectures
to
a
minimum;


the
rest
of
the
class
is
spent
in
various
ways:
discussion,
group
presentations,
writing,


researching,
questioning,
and
thinking.




Disability
Services
Policy

Disability
Services
Ernest
Oversen,
Director
MAC
111,
Main
Academic
Complex
(732)
224 ‐2730
 TTY
(732)
842‐ 4211
FAX
(732)
530‐7417



The
Disability
Services
Office
(DSO)
assists
students
with
disabilities
to
access
the
many
 resources
at
Brookdale.
The
College
provides
numerous
academic
opportunities,
cultural
 enrichment
and
a
wide
array
of
social
activities.
Adjusting
to
college
life
and
its
academic
 demands
requires
advisement,
support
and
a
great
deal
of
information.
At
Brookdale
there
are
 many
students
with
disabilities.
A
recent
Student
Satisfaction
Survey
of
students
with
 disabilities
indicated
that
they
find
a
welcoming
and
supportive
environment
at
Brookdale.
We
 are
continuing
to
make
services
and
facilities
even
better,
and
are
committed
to
providing
the
 physical
facilities
and
academic
environment
that
enable
our
students
to
reach
their
academic
 goals.
Qualifications
If
you
self‐ identify
through
the
Disability
Services
Office,
provide
 appropriate
documentation
of
your
disability
and
request
specific
services,
you
will
qualify
for
 services,
and
reasonable
accommodations
which
are
appropriate
for
the
college
level
and
are
 recommended
in
the
documentation.
Students
have
a
wide
variety
of
disabilities‐‐the
services
 and
accommodations
that
they
receive
are
just
as
varied.
Our
students
with
disabilities
are
 treated
as
individuals,
and
their
needs
are
handled
on
a
case‐by ‐case
basis
with
high
 confidentiality
standards.


Other
Resources:


The
Writing
Center
located
in
LAH
118
offers
a
wealth
of
input
and
assistance
with
student


writing.
Utilizing
the
Writing
Center
for
any
of
your
formal
written
assignments,
revisions
or


projects
is
encouraged
and
you'll
be
happy
you
took
the
30
minutes
out
of
your
week
to
work


with
a
trained
professional
on
your
work,
ideas,
writing,
etc.
Please
follow
the
Writing
Center


link
provided
above
or
our
Resources
page
for
further
information
on
making
appointments


and
learning
more
about
the
opportunities
the
Center
offers
all
student
writers!



English
Department
Secretary
‐
(732)
224‐2513

Office
location:
East
Wing
of
Larrison
Hall
‐


LAH
222.

Hours:
8:30
A.M. ‐5:00
P.M.
Monday
through
Friday.


Bankier
Library
Students
will
find
Bankier
Library
an
essential
and
vital
component
to
their


experience
in
the
course.

For
more
information
on
hours
of
operation,
please
visit:



http://ux.brookdalecc.edu/library/library_hours.php


or
call:
(732)
224‐ 2706.