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Did the Word „Deus“ exist

in the Archaic Alphabets?


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3
0 0
Ugaritic A B G Kh D E W Z H Θ Y K Ś L M Z N Ẓ S O Φ Ṣ Q R Θ Gh T Ƕ Ω S
Table 1 The word D5 – E6 – W7 – Z8 in the Ugaritic alphabet (transliterated in Latin letters)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
Hebrew Æ B G D Ε V Z H T I Ch L M N S Gh Ph Ts K R S T

Table 2 The word D4 – E5 – V6 – Z7 in the Phoenician and Hebrew alphabets (transliterated in Latin
letters)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
Etruscan A B C D ΕV ZH Θ I K L M N S O P Ś Q R S T U X Φ Χ

Table 3 The word D4 – E5 – V6 – Z7 in the early Etruscan alphabet at the Bucchero-Amphore of


Formello (from: Formello Alphabet.jpg) (transliterated in Latin letters)

Abstract
The periodic tables indicate the standard linguistic structure of 5 phonetic categories, based on the
the 5 mechanisms to produce the human phonemes: the lips, the throat, the palate, the tongue and
the teeth. These 5 categories are named (1) labials , (2) gutturals, (3) palatals, (4) linguals, (5)
dentals. Some of the divine names (such as DYAUS) are composed by concatenating 5 letters as
representatives of the 5 categories.
The 4-letter word DEUZ may be found in the Hebrew, Phoenician and the early Etruscan alphabet.
A similar pattern DEWZ or DEUZ may be identified in the Periodic Table for the Ugaritic signary,
which seems to be represent a mold for the standard alphabetic ABC...-sequence.
Although the letter Z is found within the first 10 symbols of most archaic alphabets the Z usually
had been removed from the 7th respectively the 8th position and was to be relocated at the end of the
alphabet. Also the vowel interpretation (U, Y) and the consonant part (V, W) of the digamma W6
had to be removed from the 6th respectively 7th location and relocated at the end of the alphabet.
In the Latin alphabet most traces of the original location of these letters had been removed. Only the
digamma “F” inherited the labial location from the “waw”. The guttural location of the “Z” had
been transferred to the “G”.
The analysis of archaic alphabets
The search for the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th letters in archaic alphabets may often result in a pattern such as
in Phoenician or Hebrew D4 – E5 – W6 – Z7. In the Ugaritic alphabet the 5th, 6th , 7th and 8th letters
contains a similar set of letters: D5 – E6 – W7 – Z8 .
Especially the letters Z7 resp. Z8 do not really fit in the guttural patterns. Obviously the archaic
linguists tended to remove the letter Z from the Z7 resp. Z8 locations and relocate this letter at the
end of the alphabet. Also the vowel interpretation (U) and the consonant part (V, W) of the digamma
W6 had to be removed from the 6 th respectively 7th location to be relocated at the end of the
alphabet.

The Latin alphabet


In the Latin alphabet most traces of the original location of these letters had been removed. Only the
digamma “F” inherited the labial functionality from the “waw”. The guttural location of the “Z” had
been transferred to the “G”.

Fig. 1 The periodic classification of the Latin alphabet


Source: Ganesha Vidya (1968) by L.S. Wakankar (Scribd)
The Ugaritic alphabet
The Periodic Table for the Ugaritic alphabet (transliterated in Latin letters) may be categorized in 5
“periods” as follows:
Vowels Labials Gutturals Palatals Linguals Dentals Nasals Sibilants (?)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1 A1 B2 G3, Kh4 D5
2 E6 W7 Z8, H9 Th10 (Θ, Þ)
3 Y11 (y) K12 Ś13 L14 M15, N17 Z16 Ẓ18 S19
4 O20 P,Φ21 Q23 Ṣ22 (?) R24 Θ 25, Gh26, T27
5 Ƕ28 (I) Ω29 (U) S30
Table 4 A Periodic Table for the Ugaritic alphabet (transliterated in Latin letters).

The Phoenician and Hebrew alphabets


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
Hebrew Æ B G D Ε V Z H T I Ch L M N S Gh Ph Ts K R S T

Table 5 The word D4 – E5 – W6 – Z7 in the Phoenician and Hebrew alphabets (transliterated in


Latin letters)

1 – Invisible world 2a – The visible world 2b – Spiritual World


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
Mothers Æ M S
Planets B G D Ch Ph R T
Zodiac Ε V Z H T I L N S Gh Ts K
“Vowels” Æ Ε V I (O)
Origin I
Months March-August September-December Jan/
Feb.
Symbols Air Saturn I Sun Eart Ve- Mer- sky mo
Jupiter IHV h nus cury on
Mars Æ-eternity

Table 6: The Mothers, Double and Single letters in the Hebrew alphabet
The early Etruscan alphabet

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
Etruscan A B C D ΕV ZH Θ I K L M N S O P Ś Q R S T U X Φ Χ

Table 7 The word D4 – E5 – W6 – Z7 in the early Etruscan alphabet at the Bucchero-Amphore of


Formello (from: Formello Alphabet.jpg) (transliterated in Latin letters)

Col. Col. Col. Col. Col. Col. Col. Old Persian


#1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 concepts
Vowels Labials Velar Retroflex Palatals Dentals Nasals Semi- Sibilants
P, F, B Gutturals Cerebrale C, Ç, J Alveolar N & M vocals S, Z, Ś
K, X, G Linguals T, Θ, D Y, V, R
R, S
A B (C → “g,k”) C(→ “s”) D

E (V→) F (Z →) G, H (Θ) V

I (J) K L M,N

O P Q R,S (Ś) T R S,Ś

U V(W) X Y Z V,Y Z

Table 8 Periodic System for the early Etruscan alphabet


(derived from the Bucchero-Amphore of Formello)

The Greek alphabet


Flinders Petrie composed a Periodic Table for the Greek alphabet (1912), in which the letter Z7
seems to be inserted at a position between the labials and gutturals:

2: Flinders Petrie's Periodic Table in the Greek alphabet (1912)


Source: The formation of the alphabet (Petrie, W. M. Flinders) (1912)
The categorizing of individual letters in the alphabet
According to the History of the Greek alphabet and History of the Latin alphabet we may identify
the word DEVZ in the first original 10 alphabetical characters. These four letters DEVZ may also
be interpreted as DEUS or DEYS.
The introduction of the vowels is claimed to be initiated in the Greek alphabets.

The origin of the Greek alphabet


The first 5 Greek vowels may have been defined as A, E, I, O, U (α, ε, ι, ο, and υ). The first
consonants could be chosen as B (β) and T (τ). The first Greek alphabet may have contained 18
letters, beginning with A (α) and the Latin alphabet is said to have started with 15 letters.
Hyginus (c. 64 BC – AD 17) recounts the following legend about the introduction of
Phoenician letters to Greece:

The three Fates created the first five vowels of the alphabet and the letters B and T. It
is said that Palamedes, son of Nauplius invented the remaining eleven consonants.
Then Hermes reduced these sounds to characters, showing wedge shapes because
cranes fly in wedge formation and then carried the system from Greece to Egypt*. This
was the Pelasgian alphabet, which Cadmus had later brought to Boeotia, then Evander
of Arcadia, a Pelasgian, introduced into Italy, where his mother, Carmenta, formed the
familiar fifteen characters of the Latin alphabet. Other consonants have since been
added to the Greek alphabet. Alpha was the first of eighteen letters, because alphe
means honor, and alphainein is to invent.[9]1

The shape of the alphabetical letters


The shape of the alphabetical letters may have been modified from cuneiform to alphabetical
codes.
But there are some who attribute the invention of letters to the Syrians, from whom the
Phoenicians learned them and communicated them to the Greeks when they came with
Cadmus into Europe; hence the Greeks called them Phoenician letters. To these that
hold this opinion, it is answered that the Phoenicians were not the first that found out
letters, but only changed the form and shape of them into other characters, which many
afterwards using the name of Phoenicians grew to be common. 2

Restructuring of the Phoenician abjad


The majority of the letters of the Phoenician alphabet were adopted into Greek with
much the same sounds as they had had in Phoenician. However, Phoenician, like other
Semitic scripts, has a range of consonants, commonly called gutturals, that did not exist
in Greek: ʼāleph [ʔ], hē [h, e, a], ḥēth [ħ], and ʽayin [ʕ]. Of these, only ḥēth was retained
in Greek as a consonant, eta, representing the [h] sound in those dialects that had an [h],
while the consonants ʼāleph, hē and ʽayin became the vowels alpha [a], e [e] and o [o],
respectively.[a] 3

1 Hyginus' account ; source : Hyginus. Fabulae, 277.


2 Diodorus' account
3 Restructuring of the Phoenician abjad
The four letters D4,E5,U6,Z7
The early Phoenician and Hebrew alphabets contain four letters D4 – E5 – W6 – Z7. In the Ugaritic
alphabet this pattern is shifted from D4 – E5 – W6 – Z7 to D5 – E6 – W7 – Z8 .

The fourth letter D4


According to the Sefer Yetzirah the fourth letter D4 is categorized as a lingual letter4. In other
languages the D is often categorized as a dental letter.

The fifth letter E5 (resulting in the vowel E)


Phoenician had foreshadowed the development of vowel letters with a limited use of
matres lectionis, that is, consonants that pulled double duty as vowels, which for
historical reasons occurred mostly at the ends of words. For example, the two letters
wāw and yōdh stood for both the approximant consonants [w] and [j], and the long
vowels [u] and [i] in Phoenician.

The sixth letter U6 (Digamma)


Digamma, waw, or wau (uppercase: Ϝ, lowercase: ϝ, numeral: ϛ) is an archaic letter of
the Greek alphabet. It originally stood for the sound /w/ but it has remained in use
principally as a Greek numeral for 65.

The seventh letter Z7


Zeta has the numerical value 7 rather than 6 because the letter digamma (also called 'stigma' as a
Greek numeral) was originally in the sixth position in the alphabet6.
The seventh letter ζ may be interpreted as [zd] 7, respectively [dz]8:
Unlike the other Greek letters, this letter did not take its name from the Phoenician letter
from which it was derived; it was given a new name on the pattern of beta, eta and
theta.

The letter ζ represents the voiced alveolar fricative /z/ in Modern Greek. The sound
represented by zeta in Greek before 400 BCE is disputed. See Ancient Greek phonology
and Pronunciation of Ancient Greek in teaching.9

4 The Hierarchical Structure of the Hebrew Alphabet


5 digamma
6 Numeral
7 Arguments for [zd] : The transcriptions from Persian by Xenophon and testimony by grammarians support the
pronunciation [zd] in Classical Attic. [z(ː)] is attested from c. 350 BC in Attic inscriptions, and was the probable
value in Koine.
8 Arguments for [dz] : [dʒ] or [dz] may have existed in some other dialects in parallel.
9 For the special case of zeta, see Zeta (letter).
Conclusion
The periodic tables indicate the standard linguistic structure of 5 phonetic categories, based on the
the 5 mechanisms to produce the human phonemes: the lips, the throat, the palate, the tongue and
the teeth. These 5 categories are named (1) labials , (2) gutturals, (3) palatals, (4) linguals, (5)
dentals.
Some of the divine names (such as DYAUS) are composed by concatenating 5 letters as
representatives of the 5 categories.
The 4-letter word DEUZ may be found in the Hebrew, Phoenician and the early Etruscan alphabet.
A similar pattern DEWZ or DEUZ may be identified in the Periodic Table for the Ugaritic signary,
which seems to be represent a mold for the standard alphabetic ABC...-sequence.
Although the letter Z is found within the first 10 symbols of most archaic alphabets the Z usually
had been removed from the 7th respectively the 8th position and was to be relocated at the end of the
alphabet. Also the vowel interpretation (U, Y10) and the consonant part (V, W) of the digamma W6
had to be removed from the 6th respectively 7th location and relocated at the end of the alphabet.
In the Latin alphabet most traces of the original location of these letters had been removed. Only the
digamma “F” inherited the labial location from the “waw”. The guttural location of the “Z” had
been transferred to the “G”.

10 In the system of Greek numerals, Υʹ has a value of 400. It is derived from the Phoenician waw.
Contents
Abstract.................................................................................................................................................1
The analysis of archaic alphabets.........................................................................................................2
The Latin alphabet...........................................................................................................................2
The Ugaritic alphabet.......................................................................................................................3
The Phoenician and Hebrew alphabets............................................................................................3
The early Etruscan alphabet.............................................................................................................4
The Greek alphabet .........................................................................................................................4
The categorizing of individual letters in the alphabet..........................................................................5
The origin of the Greek alphabet.....................................................................................................5
The shape of the alphabetical letters................................................................................................5
Restructuring of the Phoenician abjad ............................................................................................5
The four letters D4,E5,U6,Z7...............................................................................................................6
The fourth letter D4.........................................................................................................................6
The fifth letter E5 (resulting in the vowel E)...................................................................................6
The sixth letter U6 (Digamma)........................................................................................................6
The seventh letter Z7.......................................................................................................................6
Conclusion............................................................................................................................................7
Appendix – Papers of J. Richter at Academia.edu and Scribd.............................................................9
Appendix – Papers of J. Richter at Academia.edu and Scribd
Periodic Tables are documented in:
1. Notes on the Common Architecture of European Alphabets (Ugaritic, Old Persian signary,
the Greek alphabet, Sanskrit)
2. A Periodic Table for PIE-Alphabets (languages: Ugaritic, Latin, Elder and Younger Futhark,
Gothic, etc.)
3. A Periodic Table for the Cyrillic Alphabet (Glagolitic, early Cyrillic and Russian alphabets)
4. A Periodic Table for the Coptic Alphabet
5. A Periodic Table for the Old-English Alphabet including “The insertion of Chilperic's letters
in the Old English alphabet”.
6. A Periodic Table for the Icelandic Alphabet (Scribd)
7. A Periodic Table for the Phoenician and Hebrew Alpabet (Scribd)
8. De hiërarchische structuur van het Hebreeuwse alfabet (Scribd)
9. The Hierarchical Structure of the Hebrew Alphabet (Scribd)
10. Periodic Tables for the Dalecarlian Runes and the Elfdalian Alphabet (Scribd)
11. A Periodic Table for the Dutch Language
12. Periodic Tables for the Sami Alphabets
13. Het hart van de Nederlandse taal
14. Eight Periodic Tables for the Sámi Languages
15. Overview of the Periodic Tables of the Sami Languages
16. Periodic Tables for the Upper and Lower Sorbian Alphabets
17. A Periodic Table for the Greek Alphabet
18. Periodic Tables for the Euboean and Etruscan Alphabets (Scribd)
19. Did the Name „Deus“ exist in the Archaic Alphabet? (Scribd)

The (approximately) 150 following papers are sorted according to the initial upload date11 :
• Did the Name „Deus“ exist in the Archaic Alphabet? (Scribd)
• Periodic Tables for the Euboean and Etruscan Alphabets (Scribd)
• A Periodic Table for the Greek Alphabet
• Periodic Tables for the Upper and Lower Sorbian Alphabets
• Overview of the Periodic Tables of the Sami Languages
• Eight Periodic Tables for the Sámi Languages
• Het hart van de Nederlandse taal
• Periodic Tables for the Sami Alphabets
• A Periodic Table for the Dutch Language
• Periodic Tables for the Dalecarlian Runes and the Elfdalian Alphabet (Scribd)
• The Hierarchical Structure of the Hebrew Alphabet (Scribd)
• De hiërarchische structuur van het Hebreeuwse alfabet (Scribd)
• A Periodic Table for the Phoenician and Hebrew Alpabet (Scribd)
• A Periodic Table for the Icelandic Alphabet (Scribd)
• A Periodic Table for the Coptic Alphabet (Scribd)
• A Periodic Table for the Cyrillic Alphabet (Scribd)
• The Impact of Ternary Coding Systems (Scribd)
• A Pedigree for Alphabets (Scribd)
• The Composition of the European Alphabets (Scribd)
• The Letter Repositioning in the Greek and Latin Alphabets
• Unstably Classified Letters in Alphabets (Scribd)
11 https://independent.academia.edu/JoannesRichter, respectively https://independent.academia.edu/richterJoannes
• Notes on the Common Architecture of Alphabetical Structures (Academia.edu)
• A Periodic Table for PIE-Alphabets
• A Periodic Classification for the Gothic Alphabet (obsolete, Scribd)
• A Periodic Classification for the Futhark-Alphabets (obsolete, Scribd)
• A Periodic Classification for the Latin Alphabet (obsolete, Scribd)
• The Model of a Language as a Communication Link (Scribd)
• The Roots of the Indo-European Alphabets (12.5.2020)
• Samenvatting van "The Alphabet as an Elementary Document"
• The Alphabet as an Elementary Document
• The Origin of the Name Dyaus
• De oorsprong van de naam Diaus
• The History of Designing an Alphabet (Scribd)
• Een architectuur voor de PIE-talen (Scribd)
• An Architecture for the PIE-Languages
• A Suggested Restoration of the 'Futhark'-Sequence (Scribd)
• The Composition of the Sky- God's Name in PIE-Languages
• The Ternary Codes in Language and Creation (Scribd)
• The Role of Saussure's Letter "E"
• The Optimal Number of Vowels in Languages (Scribd)
• A Ternary Encoding to Optimize Communications and Cooperation
◦ A Golden Box to Control the Lightnings
◦ The Ancient Lightning Rods around the Mediterranean Sea
◦ Die ältesten Blitz(ab)leiter am Mittelmeer (Scribd)
◦ Pyramids in the Role as Power Plants
◦ Piramides als energiecentrales (Scribd)
◦ The Role of the Pyramids in Melting Glass and Meta... (Scribd)
◦ The Egyptian Drilling Technology (Scribd)
• The Architecture of the Younger Futhark Alphabet
• The Sources for the IΩ- Pronouns
• Notes to Herodotus' Histories of IΩ, Europa and Medea
◦ The Role of Irrigation and Drainage in a Successful Civilisation
◦ De rol van de irrigatie en drainage in een succesv... (Scribd)
◦ Notes to Frazer's "Pausanias's Description of Greece"
◦ The Initials of European Philosophy
◦ Atlantis vormde 3400 jaar geleden een Helleens Delta-project
◦ The War against Atlantis
• The "Ego"-Root inside the Name "Thebes"
• The Role of the AEtts in the Futharc Alpabet
• The Reconstruction of a European Philosophy
• Traces of an old religion (The Root "Wit" in Wittekind)
• Woden (Wuþ) as the Designer and Author of the Futhark Alphabet
• Is the Core "Wut" in "Wutach" symbolizing "Wutan" ("Woden")
• The Bipolar Core of Germanic Languages
• Simon Stevin's Redefinition of Scientific Arts
• Simon Stevin's definitie van wetenschappelijk onderz
• De etymologie van de woorden met Wit-, Wita en Witan-kernen
• The "Vit"-Roots in the Anglo-Saxon Pedigree
• The Traces of "Wit" in Saxony
• King Chilperic I's letters (ΔΘZΨ) may be found at the beginning ("Futha") of the runic
alphabet and at the end (WIJZAE) of the Danish alphabet
• Aan het slot (WIJZAE) van het Deense alfabet en aan het begin ("Futha") van het
runenalfabet bevinden zich de letters (ΔΘZΨ) van koning Chilperik I
• The Role of the Ligature AE in the European Creation Legend
• A Concept for a Runic Dictionary
• Concentrating the Runes in the Runic Alphabets
• Traces of Vit, Rod and Chrodo
• De sleutelwoorden van het Futhark alfabet
• The Keywords of the Futhark Alphabet
• Het runenboek met het unieke woord Tiw
• A short Essay about the Evolution of European Personal Pronouns
• The Evolution of the European Personal Pronouns
• De miraculeuze transformatie van de Europese samenleving
• The Miraculous Transformation of European Civilization
• The Duality in Greek and Germanic Philosophy
• Bericht van de altaarschellist over de Lof der Zotheid
• De bronnen van Brabant (de Helleputten aan de Brabantse breuklijnen)
• De fundamenten van de samenleving
• De rol van de waterbronnen bij de kerstening van Nederland
• De etymologie van "wijst" en "wijstgrond"
• The Antipodes Mith and With
• The Role of the Dual Form in the Evolution of European Languages
• De rol van de dualis in de ontwikkeling der Europese talen
• The Search for Traces of a Dual Form in Quebec French
• Synthese van de Germanistische & Griekse mythologie en etymologie
• De restanten van de dualis in het Nederlands, Engels en Duits
• Notes to the Corner Wedge in the Ugaritic Alphabet
• The Origin of the long IJ-symbol in the Dutch alphabet
• Over de oorsprong van de „lange IJ“ in het Nederlandse alfabet
• The Backbones of the Alphabets
• The Alphabet and and the Symbolic Structure of Europe
• The Unseen Words in the Runic Alphabet
• De ongelezen woorden in het runenalfabet
• The Role of the Vowels in Personal Pronouns of the 1st Person Singular
• Over de volgorde van de klinkers in woorden en in godennamen
• The Creation Legends of Hesiod and Ovid
• De taal van Adam en Eva (published: ca. 2.2.2019)
• King Chilperic's 4 Letters and the Alphabet's Adaptation
• De 4 letters van koning Chilperik I en de aanpassing van het Frankenalfabet
• The Symbolism of Hair Braids and Bonnets in Magical Powers
• The Antipodes in PIE-Languages
• In het Nederlands, Duits en Engels is de dualis nog lang niet uitgestorven
• In English, Dutch and German the dual form is still alive
• The Descendants of the Dual Form " Wit "
• A Structured Etymology for Germanic, Slavic and Romance Languages
• The “Rod”-Core in Slavic Etymology (published: ca. 27.11.2018)
• Encoding and decoding the runic alphabet
• Über die Evolution der Sprachen
• Over het ontwerpen van talen
• The Art of Designing Languages
• Notes to the usage of the Spanish words Nos and Vos, Nosotros and Vosotros
• Notes to the Dual Form and the Nous-Concept in the Inari Sami language
• Over het filosofische Nous-concept
• Notes to the Philosophical Nous-Concept
• The Common Root for European Religions (published: ca. 27.10.2018)
• A Scenario for the Medieval Christianization of a Pagan Culture
• Een scenario voor de middeleeuwse kerstening van een heidens volk
• The Role of the Slavic gods Rod and Vid in the Futhorc-alphabet
• The Unification of Medieval Europe
• The Divergence of Germanic Religions
• De correlatie tussen de dualis, Vut, Svantevit en de Sint-Vituskerken
• The Correlation between Dual Forms, Vut, Svantevit and the Saint Vitus Churches
• Die Rekonstruktion der Lage des Drususkanals (published: ca. 27.9.2018)
• Die Entzifferung der Symbolik einer Runenreihe
• Deciphering the Symbolism in Runic Alphabets
• The Sky-God, Adam and the Personal Pronouns
• Notities rond het boek Tiw (Published ca. 6.2.2018)
• Notes to the book TIW
• Von den Völkern, die nach dem Futhark benannt worden sind
• Designing an Alphabet for the Runes
• Die Wörter innerhalb der „Futhark“-Reihe
• The hidden Symbolism of European Alphabets
• Etymology, Religions and Myths
• The Symbolism of the Yampoos and Wampoos in Poe's “Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym
from Nantucket”
• Notizen zu " Über den Dualis " und " Gesammelte sprachwissenschaftliche Schriften "
• Ϝut - Het Nederlandse sleutelwoord
• Concepts for the Dual Forms
• The etymology of the Greek dual form νώ (νῶϊ)
• Proceedings in the Ego-pronouns' Etymology
• Notities bij „De godsdiensten der volken“
• The Role of *Teiwaz and *Dyeus in Filosofy
• A Linguistic Control of Egotism
• The Design of the Futhark Alphabet
• An Architecture for the Runic Alphabets
• The Celtic Hair Bonnets (Published Jun 24, 2018)
• Die keltische Haarhauben
• De sculpturen van de Walterich-kapel te Murrhardt
• The rediscovery of a lost symbolism
• Het herontdekken van een vergeten symbolisme
• De god met de twee gezichten
• The 3-faced sculpture at Michael's Church in Forchtenberg
• Over de woorden en namen, die eeuwenlang bewaard gebleven zijn
• De zeven Planeten in zeven Brabantse plaatsnamen
• Analysis of the Futhorc-Header
• The Gods in the Days of the Week and inside the Futhor-alphabet
• Een reconstructie van de Nederlandse scheppingslegende
• The Symbolism in Roman Numerals
• The Keywords in the Alphabets Notes to the Futharc's Symbolism
• The Mechanisms for Depositing Loess in the Netherlands
• Over het ontstaan van de Halserug, de Heelwegen en Heilwegen in de windschaduw van de
Veluwe
• Investigations of the Rue d'Enfer-Markers in France
• Die Entwicklung des französischen Hellwegs ( " Rue d'Enfer "
• De oorsprong van de Heelwegen op de Halserug, bij Dinxperlo en Beltrum
• The Reconstruction of the Gothic Alphabet's Design
• Von der Entstehungsphase eines Hellwegs in Dinxperlo-Bocholt
• Over de etymologie van de Hel-namen (Heelweg, Hellweg, Helle..) in Nederland
• Recapitulatie van de projecten Ego-Pronomina, Futhark en Hellweg
• Over het ontstaan en de ondergang van het Futhark-alfabet
• Die Etymologie der Wörter Hellweg, Heelweg, Rue d'Enfer, Rue de l'Enfer und Santerre
• The Etymology of the Words Hellweg, Rue d'Enfer and Santerre
• The Decoding of the Kylver Stone' Runes
• The Digamma-Joker of the Futhark
• The Kernel of the Futhorc Languages
• De kern van de Futhark-talen
• Der Kern der Futhark-Sprachen
• De symboolkern IE van het Nederlands
• Notes to Guy Deutscher's "Through the Language Glass"
• Another Sight on the Unfolding of Language (Published 1 maart, 2018)
• Notes to the Finnish linguistic symbolism of the sky-god's name and the days of the week
• A modified Swadesh List (Published 12 / 17 / 2017)
• A Paradise Made of Words
• The Sky-God Names and the Correlating Personal Pronouns
• The Nuclear Pillars of Symbolism (Published 10 / 28 / 2017)
• The Role of the Dual Form in Symbolism and Linguistics (Oct 17, 2017)
• The Correlation between the Central European Loess Belt, the Hellweg-Markers and the
Main Isoglosses
• The Central Symbolic Core of Provencal Language (Oct 7, 2017)
• The Hermetic Codex II - Bipolar Monotheism (Scribd)