Sie sind auf Seite 1von 15

 Romeo

 &  Juliet  
Adapted  for  Lean  &  Hungry  Theatre  by  Kevin  Finkelstein  
 
[A  Note  about  the  music.    CAPULET’S  THEME  and  MONTAGUE’S  THEME  are  referenced  
throughout  the  script.    The  melody  of  both  stems  from  a  bigger  piece  (i.e.  the  melody  strains  
can  be  heard  in  this  “bigger  piece,”  which,  for  the  purposes  of  this  script,  is  called  SHOW  
THEME]  
 
PROLOGUE  
 
[MUSIC  #1:    SHOW  THEME  BUILDS]  
 
CAPULET  
Two  households,  both  alike  in  dignity,  
 
MONTAGUE  
In  fair  Verona,  where  we  lay  our  scene,  
 
TYBALT  
From  ancient  grudge  break  to  new  mutiny,  
 
MERCUTIO  
Where  civil  blood  makes  civil  hands  unclean.  
 
NURSE  
From  forth  the  fatal  loins  of  these  two  foes  
 
ROMEO  &  JULIET  
A  pair  of  star-­‐cross'd  lovers  take  their  life;  
 
FRIAR  LAURENCE  
Whose  misadventured  piteous  overthrows  
 
LADY  MONTAGUE  
Do  with  their  death  bury  their  parents'  strife.  
 
PARIS  
The  fearful  passage  of  their  death-­‐mark'd  love,  
 
 
LADY  CAPULET  
And  the  continuance  of  their  parents'  rage,  
 
BENVOLIO  

1  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
Which,  but  their  children's  end,  nought  could  remove,  
 
PRINCE  
Is  now  but  one  hour’s  traffic  of  our  stage.  
 
[MUSIC  #2:  SHOW  THEME  OUT  (BUTTON?    BLEND?)]  
[MUSIC  #3:  LEAN  &  HUNGRY  THEME  SONG  IN]  
 
HOST  
From  the  heart  of  the  nation’s  capital  you’re  listening  to  a  Lean  &  Hungry  Theater  radio  drama  
adaptation  of  William  Shakespeare’s  classic  tragic  love  story,  “Romeo  &  Juliet.”  
 
Brought  to  you  with  the  support  of  WAMU-­‐FM  and  the  St.  Stephen  and  the  Incarnation  Arts  
Collaborative,  and  endorsed  by  the  Columbia  Lighthouse  for  the  Blind,  this  performance  of  
“Romeo  &  Juliet”  is  presented  in  one  hour.  
 
And  now,  Lean  &  Hungry  Theater  presents  “Romeo  &  Juliet.”  
 
[MUSIC  #4:  LEAN  &  HUNGRY  THEME  SONG  OUT]  
 
NARRATOR  
Love  is  in  the  air  and  Cupid  has  his  arrows  knocked.    For  the  young  teens  of  Verona,  California,  
the  days  are  filled  with  classes,  fencing  lessons,  planning  for  the  big  Spring  Formal,  and  way  too  
much  testosterone.    For  the  opulent,  high-­‐class  families  of  Capulets  and  Montagues,  however,  
the  arrival  of  the  season  simply  means  more  planning,  positioning  and  fighting.    For  these  two  
families,  the  most  influential  and  highly  regarded  in  Verona,  nothing  is  more  important  than  
being  viewed  as  the  crème  de  la  crème,  and  that  will  only  happen  for  one  when  the  other  is  
disgraced.  
 
As  our  story  opens,  classes  are  about  to  be  dismissed  for  the  day  at  the  Prince  Preparatory  
Academy.    Any  hope  of  a  peaceful  end  to  the  day  is  dashed  when  Balthasar,  loyal  to  the  
Montague  family,  and  Sampson,  of  the  Capulets,  pass  each  other  in  the  hallway.    Ah,  the  hot-­‐
headedness  of  youth.  
 
SCENE  I.    
 
[SFX  #1:  SCHOOL  BELLS]  
 
[SFX  #2:  STUDENTS  MILLING  IN  HALLWAYS  AND  EXITING  SCHOOL]  
 
 
BALTHASAR  
Do  you  bite  your  thumb  at  me,  sir?  
 

2  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
SAMPSON  
I  do  bite  my  thumb,  sir.  
 
BALTHASAR  
Do  you  bite  your  thumb  at  me,  sir?  
 
SAMPSON  
No,  sir,  I  do  not  bite  my  thumb  at  you,  sir,  but  I  bite  my  thumb,  sir.  
Do  you  quarrel,  sir?  
 
BALTHASAR  
Quarrel  sir!  no,  sir.  
 
SAMPSON  
If  you  do,  sir,  I  am  for  you:  I  serve  as  good  a  man  as  you.  
 
BALTHASAR  
No  better.  
 
[SFX  #3:  AMBIENT  SOUND  OUT]  with  
 
Actors:  “It’s  on!”  “Oh,  snap!”  etc.    2  seconds.    Actors  out  with:  
 
[SFX  #4:  FOIL  BEING  DRAWN]  
 
SAMPSON  
Draw,  if  you  be  a  man.  
 
[SFX  #5:  FOIL  BEING  DRAWN,  2  BLADES  CONNECTING  ONCE]  
 
Actors:  “Fight!  Fight!”  Cheers,  etc.    over  
 
[SFX  #6:  FIGHT  NOISES  OF  SWORDFIGHT  (FOILS)]  
 
 Actors  out  with:  
 
[SFX  #7:  FOOTSTEPS  RUNNING  UP  ON  TILE,  FOIL  BEING  DRAWN]  
 
Enter  BENVOLIO  
 
 
BENVOLIO  
Put  up!  You  know  not  what  you  do.  
 

3  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
[SFX  #8:  END  FIGHT  NOISES  OF  SWORDFIGHT]  
 
Enter  TYBALT  
 
TYBALT  
Turn  thee,  Benvolio,  look  upon  thy  death.  
 
BENVOLIO  
I  keep  the  peace,  Tybalt:  put  up  thy  sword,  
Or  manage  it  to  part  these  men  with  me.  
 
TYBALT  
What,  drawn,  and  talk  of  peace!  I  hate  the  word,  
As  I  hate  hell,  all  Montagues,  and  thee:  
 
[SFX  #9:  FOIL  BEING  DRAWN  (under  next  line)]  
 
Have  at  thee,  coward!  
 
[SFX  #10:  FIGHT  NOISES  OF  SWORDFIGHT  (FOILS)  under:]  
 
BALTHASAR  
Clubs,  bills,  and  partisans!    
 
SAMPSON  (overlapping)  
Strike!  beat  him  down!  
 
BALTHASAR  (w/  others)  
Down  with  the  Capulets!  
 
SAMPSON  (w/  others)  
Down  with  the  Montagues!  
 
Enter  PRINCE  
 
[SFX  #11:  FOOTSTEPS  (TILE),  PRINCE’S  FLOURISH]  
 
 
 
 
PRINCE  
Rebellious  subjects,  enemies  to  peace,  
Profaners  of  this  neighbour-­‐stained  steel,-­‐-­‐  
Will  they  not  hear?  What,  ho!    

4  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
 
[SFX  #12:  FIGHT  NOISES  AND  HALLWAY  NOISES  END]  
 
You  men,  you  beasts,  
On  pain  of  torture,  from  those  bloody  hands  
Throw  your  mistemper'd  weapons  to  the  ground,  
And  hear  the  sentence  of  Headmistress  Prince.  
If  ever  you  disturb  our  streets  again,  
Your  lives  shall  pay  the  forfeit  of  the  peace.  
For  this  time,  all  the  rest  depart  away.  
 
[SFX  #13:  PA  RECORDING:    “Headmistress  Prince,  please  report  to  your  office.”]  
 
PRINCE  
Once  more,  on  pain  of  death,  all  men  depart.  
 
NARRATOR  
Headmistress  Prince,  one,  Capulets  and  Montagues,  zero.    Still,  don’t  be  too  hard  on  them.    We  
were  all  young,  once  upon  a  time.    It’s  clear  from  this  latest  skirmish  that  the  Capulets  and  
Montagues  won’t  be  breaking  bread  together  anytime  soon.    And  speaking  of  the  Montagues,  it  
looks  like  Benvolio  has  arrived  at  their  house,  looking  for  their  son,  Romeo.    Like  most  teenage  
males,  Romeo  has  lately  been  spending  his  free  time  thinking  about  women,  wine  and  song.    
Benvolio  is  a  little  worried  that  life  might  be  passing  Romeo  by,  and  he’s  talking  with  Lord  and  
Lady  Montague  about  it…  
 
SCENE  II.  
 
LADY  MONTAGUE  
O,  where  is  Romeo?  saw  you  him  to-­‐day?  
 
BENVOLIO  
Madam,  an  hour  before  the  worshipp'd  sun,  
So  early  walking  did  I  see  your  son:  
Towards  him  I  made,  but  he  was  ware  of  me  
And  stole  into  the  covert  of  the  wood.  
 
MONTAGUE  
Many  a  morning  hath  he  there  been  seen.  
 
 [MUSIC  #5:  MONTAGUE’S  THEME]  
 
BENVOLIO  
See,  where  he  comes:  so  please  you,  step  aside;  
I'll  know  his  grievance,  or  be  much  denied.  

5  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
 
MONTAGUE  
Come,  madam,  let's  away.  
 
Exeunt  MONTAGUE  and  LADY  MONTAGUE  
 
[SFX  #14:  2  FOOTSTEPS  EXIT,  SOFTLY  (SLIPPERS  ON  CARPET)]  
 
BENVOLIO  
Good-­‐morrow,  cousin.  
 
ROMEO  
Is  the  day  so  young?  
 
BENVOLIO  
But  new  struck  nine.  
 
ROMEO  
Ay  me!  sad  hours  seem  long.  
 
BENVOLIO  
What  sadness  lengthens  Romeo's  hours?  
 
ROMEO  
Not  having  that,  which,  having,  makes  them  short.  
 
BENVOLIO  
In  love?  
 
ROMEO  
Out-­‐-­‐  
 
BENVOLIO  
Of  love?  
 
ROMEO  
Out  of  her  favour,  where  I  am  in  love.  
 
 
 
BENVOLIO  
Alas,  that  love,  so  gentle  in  his  view,  
Should  be  so  tyrannous  and  rough  in  proof!  
 

6  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
ROMEO  
Alas,  that  love,  whose  view  is  muffled  still,  
Should,  without  eyes,  see  pathways  to  his  will!  
Dost  thou  not  laugh?  
 
BENVOLIO  
No,  coz,  I  rather  weep.  
 
ROMEO  
Good  heart,  at  what?  
 
BENVOLIO  
Tell  me  in  sadness,  who  is  that  you  love.  
 
ROMEO  
In  sadness,  cousin,  I  do  love  a  woman.  
 
BENVOLIO  
I  aim'd  so  near,  when  I  supposed  you  loved.  
 
ROMEO  
Rosaline:  She'll  not  be  hit  
With  Cupid's  arrow;  she  hath  Dian's  wit;  
O,  she  is  rich  in  beauty,  only  poor,  
That  when  she  dies  with  beauty  dies  her  store.  
 
BENVOLIO  
Then  she  hath  sworn  that  she  will  still  live  chaste?  
 
ROMEO  
She  hath  forsworn  to  love,  and  in  that  vow  
Do  I  live  dead  that  live  to  tell  it  now.  
 
BENVOLIO  
Be  ruled  by  me,  forget  to  think  of  her.  
 
ROMEO  
O,  teach  me  how  I  should  forget  to  think.  
 
 
BENVOLIO  
By  giving  liberty  unto  thine  eyes;  
Examine  other  beauties.  
 

7  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
ROMEO  
Farewell:  thou  canst  not  teach  me  to  forget.  
 
[MUSIC  #6:  MONTAGUE  THEME  OUT]  
 
NARRATOR  
Wait,  what?    I  thought  this  was  supposed  to  be  Romeo  &  Juliet,  not  Romeo  &  Rosaline!    Well,  
who  can  understand  the  workings  of  a  16-­‐year-­‐old’s  mind?  Let’s  head  over  to  Lord  Capulet’s  
house,  where  Lord  and  Lady  Capulet  are  chatting  with  the  County  Paris,  who’s  no  slouch  in  the  
status  department.    The  County  Paris  has  just  presented  his  case  for  wedding  Lord  and  Lady  
Capulet’s  only  daughter,  Juliet.      
 
SCENE  III.    
 
[SFX  #15:  AMBIENT  SOUNDS  OF  A  GOLF  COURSE]  
 
[MUSIC  #7:  CAPULET  THEME]  
 
PARIS  
My  lord,  what  say  you  to  my  suit?  
 
CAPULET  
But  saying  o'er  what  I  have  said  before:  
 
[SFX  #16:  SOUND  OF  GOLF  BALL  BEING  HIT]  
 
My  child  is  yet  a  stranger  in  the  world;  
She  hath  not  seen  the  change  of  fourteen  years,  
Let  two  more  summers  wither  in  their  pride,  
Ere  we  may  think  her  ripe  to  be  a  bride.  
 
PARIS  
Younger  than  she  are  happy  mothers  made.  
 
[SFX  #17:  SOUND  OF  GOLF  BALL  BEING  HIT]  
 
CAPULET  
And  too  soon  marr'd  are  those  so  early  made.  
But  woo  her,  gentle  Paris,  get  her  heart,  
An  she  agree,  within  her  scope  of  choice  
Lies  my  consent  and  fair  according  voice.  
This  night  I  hold  an  old  accustom'd  feast,  
Whereto  I  have  invited  many  a  guest,  
Such  as  I  love;  and  you,  among  the  store.  

8  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
 
To  Servant,  giving  a  paper  
 
[SFX  #18:    PAPER  BEING  SHAKEN]  
 
Go,  sirrah,  trudge  about  
Through  fair  Verona;  find  those  persons  out  
Whose  names  are  written  there,  and  to  them  say,  
My  house  and  welcome  on  their  pleasure  stay.  
 
Servant  
Aye,  my  good  lord.  
 
[SFX  #19:  GOLF  CART  DRIVES  AWAY]  
 
[MUSIC  #8:  MUSIC  OUT]  
 
[SFX  #20:  DURING  NEXT  MONOLOGUE,  CHANGE/INCREASE  IN  AMBIENT  NOISES,  AS  SERVANT  
WALKS  FROM  GOLF  COURSE  TO  BUSY  STREET]  
 
Servant  
Find  them  out  whose  names  are  written  here!  It  is  
written,  that  the  shoemaker  should  meddle  with  his  
yard,  and  the  tailor  with  his  last,  the  fisher  with  
his  pencil,  and  the  painter  with  his  nets;  but  I  am  
sent  to  find  those  persons  whose  names  are  here  
writ,  and  can  never  find  what  names  the  writing  
person  hath  here  writ.  
 
[SFX  #21:  2  FOOTSTEPS  APPROACH,  FAST  (SNEAKERS  ON  SIDEWALK)]  
 
BENVOLIO  
Why,  Romeo,  art  thou  mad?  
 
ROMEO  
Not  mad,  but  -­‐-­‐God-­‐den,  good  fellow.  
 
Servant  
God  gi'  god-­‐den.  I  pray,  sir,  can  you  read?  
 
ROMEO  
Ay,  mine  own  fortune  in  my  misery.  
Stay,  fellow;  I  can  read.  
 

9  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
Reads  
'Signior  Martino  and  his  wife  and  daughters;  
County  Paris  and  his  beauteous  sisters;  the  lady  
widow  of  Vitravio;  mine  uncle  Capulet,  his  wife    
and  daughters;  my  fair  niece  Rosaline;    
Livia;  Tybalt,  and  the  lively  Helena…'    
 
A  fair  assembly:  whither  should  they  come?  
 
Servant  
Up.  
 
ROMEO  
Whither?  
 
Servant  
To  supper;  to  our  house.  
 
ROMEO  
Whose  house?  
 
Servant  
My  master's.  
 
ROMEO  
Indeed,  I  should  have  ask'd  you  that  before.  
 
Servant  
Now  I'll  tell  you  without  asking:  my  master  is  the  
great  rich  Capulet;  and  if  you  be  not  of  the  house  
of  Montagues,  I  pray,  come  and  crush  a  cup  of  wine.  
Rest  you  merry!  
 
[SFX  #22:  FOOTSTEPS  EXIT,  CLEATS  ON  SIDEWALK]  
 
BENVOLIO  
At  this  same  ancient  feast  of  Capulet's  
Sups  the  fair  Rosaline  whom  thou  so  lovest,  
With  all  the  admired  beauties  of  Verona:  
Go  thither;  and,  with  unattainted  eye,  
Compare  her  face  with  some  that  I  shall  show,  
And  I  will  make  thee  think  thy  swan  a  crow.  
 
ROMEO  

10  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
I'll  go  along,  no  such  sight  to  be  shown,  
But  to  rejoice  in  splendor  of  mine  own.  
 
[SFX  #23:  STREET  NOISES  OUT]  
 
NARRATOR  
Romeo  is  so  caught  up  in  his  lust  for  Rosaline  that  he’s  planning  to  walk  right  into  the  lion’s  den  
tonight!    This  won’t  end  well.    Let’s  check  in  on  the  Capulet’s  house.    Amidst  the  preparations  
for  tonight’s  Spring  Formal  (one  of  the  highlights  of  the  social  scene  each  year),  Lady  Capulet  
comes  to  her  daughter  Juliet’s  bedchamber,  and  finds  Juliet’s  Nurse  instead.  
 
SCENE  IV  
 
LADY  CAPULET  
Nurse,  where's  my  daughter?  call  her  forth  to  me.  
 
Nurse  
Now,  by  my  maidenhead,  at  twelve  year  old,  
I  bade  her  come.  What,  lamb!  what,  ladybird!  
God  forbid!  Where's  this  girl?  What,  Juliet!  
 
[MUSIC  #9:  CAPULET’S  THEME]  
 
[SFX  #24:  FOOTSTEPS  ENTER,  SLIPPERS  ON  CARPET]  
 
JULIET  
Madam,  I  am  here.  
What  is  your  will?  
 
LADY  CAPULET  
This  is  the  matter:-­‐-­‐Nurse,    
Thou  know'st  my  daughter's  of  a  pretty  age.  
 
Nurse  
Faith,  I  can  tell  her  age  unto  an  hour.  
I'll  lay  fourteen  of  my  teeth,-­‐-­‐  
And  yet,  to  my  teeth  be  it  spoken,  I  have  but  four-­‐-­‐  
Peace,  I  have  done.  God  mark  thee  to  his  grace!  
On  Lammas-­‐eve  at  night  shall  she  be  fourteen;  
That  shall  she,  marry;  I  remember  it  well.  
'Tis  since  the  earthquake  now  eleven  years;  
And  she  was  wean'd,-­‐-­‐I  never  shall  forget  it,-­‐-­‐  
Of  all  the  days  of  the  year,  upon  that  day:  
For  I  had  then  laid  wormwood  to  my  dug,  

11  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
Sitting  in  the  sun  under  the  dove-­‐house  wall;  
My  lord  and  you  were  then  at  Mantua:-­‐-­‐  
Nay,  I  do  bear  a  brain:-­‐-­‐but,  as  I  said,  
When  it  did  taste  the  wormwood  on  the  nipple  
Of  my  dug  and  felt  it  bitter,  pretty  fool,  
To  see  it  tetchy  and  fall  out  with  the  dug!  
Thou  wast  the  prettiest  babe  that  e'er  I  nursed:  
An  I  might  live  to  see  thee  married  once,  
I  have  my  wish.  
 
LADY  CAPULET  
Marry,  that  'marry'  is  the  very  theme  
I  came  to  talk  of.  Tell  me,  daughter  Juliet,  
How  stands  your  disposition  to  be  married?  
 
JULIET  
It  is  an  honour  that  I  dream  not  of.  
 
Nurse  
An  honour!  were  not  I  thine  only  nurse,  
I  would  say  thou  hadst  suck'd  wisdom  from  thy  teat.  
 
LADY  CAPULET  
Well,  think  of  marriage  now;  Thus  then  in  brief:  
The  valiant  Paris  seeks  you  for  his  love.  
 
Nurse  
A  man,  young  lady!  lady,  such  a  man  
As  all  the  world-­‐-­‐why,  he's  a  man  of  wax.  
 
LADY  CAPULET  
Verona's  summer  hath  not  such  a  flower.  
 
Nurse  
Nay,  he's  a  flower;  in  faith,  a  very  flower.  
 
LADY  CAPULET  
What  say  you?  can  you  love  the  gentleman?  
This  night  you  shall  behold  him  at  our  feast;  
Read  o'er  the  volume  of  young  Paris'  face,  
And  find  delight  writ  there  with  beauty's  pen;  
So  shall  you  share  all  that  he  doth  possess,  
By  having  him,  making  yourself  no  less.  
 

12  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
Nurse  
No  less!  nay,  bigger;  women  grow  by  men.  
 
LADY  CAPULET  
Speak  briefly,  can  you  like  of  Paris'  love?  
 
JULIET  
I'll  look  to  like,  if  looking  liking  move:  
But  no  more  deep  will  I  endart  mine  eye  
Than  your  consent  gives  strength  to  make  it  fly.  
 
[SFX  #25:  BEDROOM  DOORS  OPEN]  
 
Servant  
Madam,  the  guests  are  come,  supper  served  up,  you  
called,  my  young  lady  asked  for,  the  nurse  cursed  in  
the  pantry,  and  every  thing  in  extremity.  I  must  
hence  to  wait;  I  beseech  you,  follow  straight.  
 
LADY  CAPULET  
We  follow  thee.  
 
SCENE  V.  
 
[SFX  #26:  DURING  THIS  SCENE,  THE  GROUP  IS  WALKING  TO  THE  CAPULET  PARTY.    SOUNDS  
SHOULD  FADE  IN  AND  BUILD  OF  LAUGHTER,  GENERAL  PARTY  SOUNDS,  RIGHT  UP  THROUGH  
THE  BEGINNING  OF  THE  NEXT  SCENE.    PARTY  ATMOSPHERE  IS  YOUNG,  HIP]  
 
[MUSIC  #10:    PARTY  MUSIC  BUILDS  WITH  SFX.    PARTY  ATMOSPHERE  IS  YOUNG,  HIP.    
PERHAPS  A  MODERN  VERSION  OF  CAPULET’S  THEME?]  
 
ROMEO  
What,  shall  this  speech  be  spoke  for  our  excuse?  
Give  me  a  torch:  I  am  not  for  this  ambling;  
Being  but  heavy,  I  will  bear  the  light.  
 
MERCUTIO  
Nay,  gentle  Romeo,  we  must  have  you  dance.  
 
 
ROMEO  
No,  Mercutio:  you  have  dancing  shoes  
With  nimble  soles:  I  have  a  soul  of  lead  
So  stakes  me  to  the  ground  I  cannot  move.  

13  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
 
MERCUTIO  
You  are  a  lover;  borrow  Cupid's  wings,  
And  soar  with  them  above  a  common  bound.  
 
ROMEO  
Is  love  a  tender  thing?  it  is  too  rough,  
Too  rude,  too  boisterous,  and  it  pricks  like  thorn.  
 
MERCUTIO  
If  love  be  rough  with  you,  be  rough  with  love;  
 
BENVOLIO  
Come,  knock  and  enter;  and  no  sooner  in,  
But  every  man  betake  him  to  his  legs.  
 
MERCUTIO  
Come,  we  burn  daylight,  ho!  
 
ROMEO  
And  we  mean  well  in  going  to  this  mask;  
But  'tis  no  wit  to  go.  
 
MERCUTIO  
Why,  may  one  ask?  
 
ROMEO  
I  dream'd  a  dream  to-­‐night.  
 
MERCUTIO  
And  so  did  I.  
 
ROMEO  
Well,  what  was  yours?  
 
MERCUTIO  
O,  then,  I  see  Queen  Mab  hath  been  with  you.  
She  is  the  fairies'  midwife,  and  she  comes  
In  shape  no  bigger  than  an  agate-­‐stone  
On  the  fore-­‐finger  of  an  alderman,  
Drawn  with  a  team  of  little  atomies  
Athwart  men's  noses  as  they  lie  asleep;  
And  in  this  state  she  gallops  night  by  night  
Through  lovers'  brains,  and  then  they  dream  of  love;  

14  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0  
 
O'er  courtiers'  knees,  that  dream  on  court'sies  straight,  
O'er  lawyers'  fingers,  who  straight  dream  on  fees,  
O'er  ladies  '  lips,  who  straight  on  kisses  dream.  
Sometime  she  driveth  o'er  a  soldier's  neck,  
And  then  dreams  he  of  cutting  foreign  throats.  
This  is  the  hag,  when  maids  lie  on  their  backs,  
That  presses  them  and  learns  them  first  to  bear,  
Making  them  women  of  good  carriage:  
This  is  she-­‐-­‐  
 
ROMEO  
Peace,  peace,  Mercutio,  peace!  
Thou  talk'st  of  nothing.  
 
MERCUTIO  
True,  I  talk  of  dreams,  
Which  are  the  children  of  an  idle  brain,  
Which  is  as  thin  of  substance  as  the  air  
And  more  inconstant  than  the  wind.  
 
BENVOLIO  
This  wind,  you  talk  of,  blows  us  from  ourselves;  
Supper  is  done,  and  we  shall  come  too  late.  
 
[SFX  #27:  LEVELS  LOWERED]  
 
[MUSIC  #11:  MUSIC  LEVELS  LOWERED]    
 
[MUSIC  #12:  [ADD  IN  “VISIONARY”  SOUNDS]  
 
ROMEO  
I  fear,  too  early:  for  my  mind  misgives  
Some  consequence  yet  hanging  in  the  stars  
Shall  bitterly  begin  his  fearful  date  
With  this  night's  revels  and  expire  the  term  
Of  a  despised  life  closed  in  my  breast  
By  some  vile  forfeit  of  untimely  death.  
 
[MUSIC  #13:  [  “VISIONARY”  SOUNDS  OUT]  
 
[MUSIC  #14:  MUSIC  LEVELS  BACK  UP]    
 
[SFX  #28:  LEVELS  BACK  UP]  
 

15  |  P a g e     V e r s i o n   4 . 0   F I N A L :     1 2 . 0 3 . 1 0