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Probing Ict Competency Of Student-Teachers In

Region 10: Basis For Software Input Development

Ryan Glenn C. Narvasa


narvasa.ryan@g.cu.edu.ph

ABSTRACT
Teacher Education Institutions (TEIs) play a vital role in
producing quality teachers through offering relevant Teacher
Education Programs. In the advent of Information and
Communication Technology (ICT) as one of the highlights of the
21st Century Education, Teacher Education must also be at par
with the changes. This study aims to probe the competencies
on Information and Communication Technology, especially
on Technology Operations and Concepts, vis-à-vis with the
preparations done by the Center of Excellence-Institutions
(COE-TEIs), which is evident on various factors.
The study employed descriptive type of research design that
deals with the quantitative data taken from survey responses of
the 178 Student-Teachers of the COE-TEIs in Region 10, namely
Capitol University and Mindanao State University-Iligan
Institute of Technology. Frequency and correlation of variables
were analyzed that yielded to several findings such as: student-
teachers have Very Good Competency on all the Standards
under Technology Operations and Concepts; Educational
Technology subjects has significant positive correlation with the
competencies; Age has significant negative correlation with the
standard on the use of internet and networking applications;
and Facilities and Ownership of Personal ICT Devices has
significant positive correlation with the level of competency.
Another remarkable finding is identified on the
commendable level of competency through the interventions
and practices provided by the TEIs. These interventions and
practices include the integration of laboratory and lecture in
LAMDAG Journal of the Graduate School 2016, Vol. 7 No. 1
©2016 by the Capitol University Press
18 | Narvasa

the Educational Technology subject, widening of the linkages


with ICT sectors, and ensuring one-to-one ratio of computer
units and enhancement of faculty trainings. These findings are
deemed beneficial to be modelled by the non-COE-TEIs of the
region through the integration of technology in the curricula,
pedagogy and teacher training.
Another remarkable finding is identified on the
commendable level of competency through the interventions
and practices provided by the TEIs. These interventions and
practices include the integration of laboratory and lecture in
the Educational Technology subject, widening of the linkages
with ICT sectors, and ensuring one-to-one ratio of computer
units and enhancement of faculty trainings. These findings are
deemed beneficial to be modelled by the non-COE-TEIs of the
region through the integration of technology in the curricula,
pedagogy and teacher training.

KEYWORDS
Teacher Education, Information and Communication
Technology (ICT), Educational Technology, ICT Competency, and
21st Century Teaching

Introduction
“If we teach today as we taught yesterday we rob our
children of tomorrow” – John Dewey

The teacher is an important element of the teaching-learning


process. This element links students and the learning environment.
Thus, teachers’ capability must be enhanced in providing a conducive,
engaging and relevant learning environment geared towards the 21st
century education. With this, it is essential to start from the starting
point of teacher training- the Teacher Education Program. The Teacher
Education Program is necessary for the growth of the teaching force
through the improvement of the curricula or content, pedagogy and
teacher training. Based from the Report of the UNESCO International
Conference on ICT and post-2015 Education, the main challenge of the
LAMDAG Journal oof the Graduate School 2016 | 19

21st century Education is to empower the teacher to rethink about


teaching and learning (UNESCO, 2015). To address this challenge, the
UNESCO suggested solutions and one of these is the reinforcement of
the institutional capacity of teacher training institutions and schools.
It is in this light that inputs on educational innovations for teacher
education must be in unison with the demands of the modern
environment. In connection with this, Information and Communication
Technology (ICT) literacy is part of the global competence for the
21st century. According to Kozma (2008) the 21st Century presents
challenges and significant opportunities to national policy makers.
Furthermore, as cited by Rodriquez (2008) that the Information
Society Index (ISI), ranked the Philippines 48th among the 55 nations,
in terms of preparedness and ability to absorb advances and growth in
ICT. In the context of education, educational policy makers are being
asked to formulate educational policies and programs-particularly
those related to Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
Similarly, the Department of Education (DepED) has initiated its
DepEd ICT Strategic Plan also known as DepEd ICT4E. This is an ICT
5-year strategic plan for the Philippine Schools. According to Secretary
Luistro the results of the ICT4E Assessment will serve as basis for
determining the achievement of the objectives on “Understanding the
State of the Art of Information and Communications Technology for
Education in the Philippine schools”. A teacher must possess them in
order to survive in this 21st century and be able to contribute to the
development of the 21st century learners.” (Corpuz et. al, 2015).
In accordance with Piaget and Bruner’s Constructivism and
Vygotsky’s Social Constructivism, the theoretical basis for this paper
fits 21st century education on critical thinking, communication and
collaboration with the use of ICT in education. According to Corpuz et. al
(2015) to remain relevant an interesting, the teacher must possess 21st
century skills. The 21st Century Skills can be categorized in to four (4)
namely: 1) Communication Skills, 2) Learning and innovation Skills, 3)
Information, media and Technology Skills, and 4) Life and Career Skills. A
teacher must possess them to survive in this 21st century Teaching and
be able to contribute to the development of the 21st century learners.”
Rodriquez (2008) testified that in relation to Teacher Education, one
of the objectives of the “ICT Plan for 21st Century” in the Philippines is
20 | Narvasa

the development of competence among teachers in using technology in


designing, producing and using ICT-based instructional materials. Thus,
this study probes the extent of the capacity-building on ICT through the
Teacher Education Program in the Region. To do so, the competencies
of the Student Teachers in the region, represented by Student Teachers
of the Center of Excellence Teacher Education Institutions, were
analysed vis-à-vis with the factors affecting such level of competencies.
The findings of this endeavour would contribute a lot to the Teacher
Education Program of the entire region.

Methodology
Descriptive type of research was used wherein the profile of the
student-teachers and the ICT Competency were analyzed. Descriptive
research as defined by Best and Kahn (1998) “is concerned with the
conditions or relationship that exist, opinion that are held, process that
are going on, effects that are evident, or tends that are developing.”
In addition, several statistical treatments were used in this study
such as: the simple mean in determining the average rate of the
respondents from the questionnaire, the chi-square and the Pearson-
product Moment of Correlation for the correlation of the variables and
the Cronbach Alpha for the testing the reliability of the instrument.
The questionnaires yielded a promising Cronbach’s Alpha of 0.9767
indicating high reliability of the test.
This study was conducted in the two Teacher Education
Institutions that were given by the Commission on Higher Education
the status as Center of Excellence until March 2016 pursuant to CHED
Memorandum Order no. 37, s., 2015. As basis for their recognition,
these institutions are chosen based on the criteria according to
Instructional quality, Research and Publication, Extension and Linkages,
and institutional qualification (CHED Memorandum Order No. 55, s.
2006). The qualifications/ standards for a Center of Excellence includes:
administration, curriculum, facilities and equipment, ICT Capabilities,
community extension, LET Performance and graduate profile. In
addition, Center of Excellence Teacher Education Institutions also have
the responsibilities such as to act as a role model in the local, regional
and national community. It is in this light that COE-TEIs would serve as
LAMDAG Journal oof the Graduate School 2016 | 21

basis for the quality of ICT integration in the Teacher Education Program
in the Region. Their practices would be beneficial in benchmarking for
the non-COE TEIs, a way of developing the teacher Education Program
throughout the region. This study covers the Student-teachers of the
two (2) Center of Excellence-Teacher Education Institutions in Region
10.
Conclusions and recommendations were drawn out from the data
collected from the respondents who answered the self-assessment
questionnaire in a Likert-Scale format. This scale measures attitude,
feelings and behaviours of the respondents. The questionnaire has
two parts. Part 1 was for the profiling of the respondents including
the survey on the availability of ICT Facilities in the TEIs. The second
Part is the Likert Scale containing Statements of the Indicators of the
competencies in the NICS.
The scale has five scale points number and labelled as:
1- poor; 2- fair; 3- good; 4-very good; 5- excellent
Furthermore, findings were triangulated with qualitative data taken
from the interviews in order to discuss the impact and implications as
part of the aim of this research.

Discussion

The ICT Competency


Table 1
Mean of the ICT Competency of the Student Teachers per Standard
Verbal
Standard Mean Description
Interpretation
Standard 1: Basic operations Students manifest
3.93 Very good
and troubleshooting the competency
Standard 2: Use of appro- stated in the
priate teaching and office 4.19 Very good indicator with
productivity tools mastery and
minimal mistake
Standard 3: Use of internet
3.79 Very good
and networking applications
Standard 4: Information and
3.85 Very good
data management
Overall Mean 3.94 Very good
22 | Narvasa

Based on the findings, the student teachers were categorized


with Very good rating with the overall mean of 3.94. With this value
of the mean, student teachers are considered competent enough in
performing and dealing with ICT tools including other communication
and productivity devices as well as on-line and offline applications.
With the mean of 3.93, students have a ‘very good’ competency in
Standard 1: Basic Operations and Troubleshooting. This implies that
Student-teachers can already work independently with almost all of
the Technology Operations and concepts. The operations and concepts
would cover the computer’s basic input-process-storage-output
scheme.
According to Wells (2009) computer works in advantage of speed-
performing billion of calculations; reliability- dependable electronic
components; accuracy- results are error-free if data are correct;
Storage-it can store and retrieve volumes of data and information;
Communication-can communicate and share resources. Computers
are run by software-the instructional and application programs and
hardware- the actual machine. Troubleshooting may also cover both
hardware and software such as attachments of cables and replacements
of parts or installation of programs and detecting and fixing of errors.
In addition, Standard 3 reflects the competency of the student-teachers
for internet accessibility including e-mailing and downloading of
application. This also covers the social media sites.
This commendable competency is brought by several factors that
are discussed in this study wherein Educational Technology educators
need to sustain and consider. Indeed, Blackwell, J., and Yost, N., (2013)
claimed teacher education faculty were advised to integrate technology
into the curriculum which can be considered authentic and address the
needs of the digital natives of the class. In the same manner, tech-savvy
faculty are also encouraged to work together to bring their talents and
skills to this new environment by creating nurturing relationships when
integrating technology.
LAMDAG Journal oof the Graduate School 2016 | 23

The ICT Competency and Age

Table 2
Correlation Table between Age and ICT Competency
of the Student-Teachers
Chi-square Level of Verbal
Standard
x2 Significance Interpretation
Standard 1:Basic operations 3.933 .415 Not Significant
and troubleshooting
Standard 2:Use of appro- 4.830 .305 Not Significant
priate teaching and office
productivity tools
Standard 3:Use of internet 9.968 .041 Significant
and networking applications
Standard 4: Information and 5.371 .251 Not Significant
data management
Overall Standard 6.349 .175 Not Significant

Table 2 presents no significant relationship with the overall mean


of the four standards with the Chi-square value of = 6.349 (p=.175)
thus, accepts the null hypothesis. However, among all the standards,
Standard 3 on the use of internet and networking applications has a
very significant positive correlation with the age of the respondents
with the chi-square value of = 9.968 (p=.041), thus rejects the null
hypothesis.
This relationship identified implies that as age becomes older, usage
and interest on Internet application decreases. In the study conducted
by Vazquez (2014) graduate school students and graduate school faculty
has rated themselves “satisfactory” only on the competencies involving
computer hardware management, file management, word processing,
spread sheet, database management, presentation, internet and
emailing competencies. This can be considered as an example of a
trend or pattern of ICT skills development in terms of age.
The results were supported by Gervey, B., et. al. (2000) as they
found out that age differences in using the internet significantly
influenced by the types of product or information they seek and
purchase online. Overall, younger members of the online community
are significantly more likely than their older counterparts to use internet
24 | Narvasa

to get information about variety of consumer category. Among all the


respondents, majority of them are 20-24 years old who still belong to
the younger generations who seeks information and preferred modes of
information gathering especially the internet and involves themselves
to social networking sites and other online community.

The ICT Competency and Grade

Table 3
Correlation Table between the Grade in Educational Technology 1
and the ICT Competency of the Student Teachers
Correlation
Level of Verbal
Standard Coefficient
Significance Interpretation
R
Standard 1:Basic opera- .124 .100 Not Significant
tions and troubleshooting
Standard 2:Use of appro- .161 .032 Significant
priate teaching and office
productivity tools
Standard 3:Use of internet .177 .018 Significant
and networking applica-
tions
Standard 4: Information .120 .111 Not Significant
and data management
Overall Standard .160 .033 Significant

Table 3 showcases the respondents’ grade in educational


Technology 1. The results show significant positive correlation with the
overall mean of the competency standard with the value of r=0.160
(=.033), thus rejects the null hypothesis. However, among the four
(4) standards, standard 2 (r=0.161, p=.032) and standard 3 (r=.177,
p=.018) have a significant relationship with the grade in Educational
Technology 1 Subject. Both standards deal with Productivity software
and internet and networking applications. This correlation implies the
involvement of these productivity and online software and activities in
the instructional activities of the subjects.
The results were supported by Zhao (2013) since the latter said
LAMDAG Journal oof the Graduate School 2016 | 25

that pre-service teachers started to understand the educational


potential of technology and the various ways of using technology as a
tool. For example, when they used PowerPoint software for making an
instructional game material, they started to consider PowerPoint to be
more than a presentation tool; it was an interactive learning tool which
could be used for different educational purposes.

Table 4
Frequency Distribution of the Grades in Educational Technology 2
CU MSU-IIT Total
Grades
F % F % F %
1.50 2 4.08 6 4.65 8 4.49
1.75 18 36.74 46 35.66 64 35.96
2.00 29 59.18 77 59.69 106 59.55
TOTAL 49 100 129 100 178 100

Table 4 reveals that majority of the students garnered 2.0 in their


Educational Technology 2 class with the frequency percentage of 59.55.
This frequency is also true with both schools wherein CU has 59.18%
and MSU-IIT has 59.69%. This would mean that concepts and theories
introduced in the subject were mastered by the students. These
theories and concept covered the different media formats, ICT and the
role of computer in education.

Table 5
Correlation Table between the Grade in Educational Technology 2
and the ICT Competency of the Student Teachers
Correla-
Level of Verbal
tion
Standard Signifi- Interpreta-
Coefficient
cance tion
R
Standard 1:Basic operations and trouble- .177 .018 Significant
shooting
Standard 2:Use of appropriate teaching .200 .008 Highly Signifi-
and office productivity tools cant
Standard 3:Use of internet and network- .147 .051 Not Signifi-
ing applications cant
26 | Narvasa

Standard 4: Information and data manage- .111 .141 Not Signifi-


ment cant
Overall Standard .170 .024 Significant

Table 5 presents the correlation of the grades in Educational


Technology 2. This reveals the significant positive relationship with the
overall mean of the competencies with the value of r=.170 (p=.024),
thus rejects the null hypothesis.
The data implies that generally, Educational Technology 2 subject
contributes the increase of ICT competency among student-teachers
and any interventions done in the subject would also increase the said
competency. Based from the NCBTS-Based Table of Specification for
the Licensure Examination for Teachers (2010), 5% of the Professional
Education Cluster deals with the competency on applying the
principles in the preparation and utilization of the conventional and
non-conventional technology as well as traditional and alternative
technology.
The results further denote that the curriculum must be substantial
enough with technology-based principles and concepts for teaching.
Among the best practices of the COE-TEIs in enhancing the content
of the Educational Technology, manuals were created by the faculty
themselves. Educational Technology faculty creates the manuals with
the same content.
In addition, as reflected in both subjects on Table 4 and Table 5,
there is no significant relationship with the Standard 4 with the value of
r= .120 (0.111) and r=0.111(0.141), respectively. Thus, accepts the null
hypothesis. This would imply that contents of Educational Technology
Subject must be reviewed to address the competency on Standard
4: Information and Data management. Data management includes
retrieval, storage and presentation of information. The competency
for this standard includes use of webpages for online presentation and
offline or online storage platforms.
LAMDAG Journal oof the Graduate School 2016 | 27

The ICT Competency and Facilities

Table 6
Frequency Distribution of the Extent of the Utilization of the ICT
Facilities for each of the student-teacher (n=8)
CU MSU-IIT Total
Extent N = 49 N=129 N-178
f % f % f %
Highly adequate 18 36.73 46 35.66 64 35.95
Adequate 32 65.31 82 63.57 114 64.05
Not adequate 0 0 0 0 0 0

Table 6 exhibits the extent of the utilization of the ICT facilities


among the student-teachers for the past 3 years. This further presents
the total number of students who utilized the facilities rated based on the
hypothetical interval. The data shows that 65.05% of the respondents
have adequately utilized the facilities. The extent of utilization is
‘adequate’ for both schools wherein CU has 65.31% and 63.57% of its
population. This implies that among the 8 facilities mentioned in this
study, they have utilized about 4-6 (3.4-5.6 range) devices or facilities.

Table 7
Correlation Table between the Extent of Utilization of ICT Facilities
attended and the ICT Competency of the Student Teachers
Correlation
Level of Verbal
Standard Coefficient
Significance Interpretation
r
Standard 1:Basic operations .374 .000 Highly Significant
and troubleshooting
Standard 2:Use of appropriate .316 .000 Highly Significant
teaching and office
productivity tools
Standard 3:Use of internet and .298 .000 Highly Significant
networking applications
Standard 4: Information and .333 .000 Highly Significant
data management
Overall Standard .361 .000 Highly Significant
28 | Narvasa

Table 7 showcases the facilities, all standards, including the overall


mean of the standards, have high significant positive correlation with
the facilities utilized by the students. As reflected in table 7, the overall
mean of the standards has a correlation coefficient value of r=0.361
(.000) thus, rejects the null hypothesis.
This means that the more facilities provided by the TEIs the more
opportunity for the students of the teacher Institution to enhance their
ICT skills. In addition, this is supported by the fact that both Center of
Excellence Teacher Education Institution see to it that ICT facilities are
available for the Education Students. The college has computer units
in the Learning Resource Center. Aside from this, computer of the
Computer Science Department can be utilized also with one student
per computer unit ratio. In addition, MSU-IIT College of Education
has its own Computer laboratory while CU College of Education has a
computer laboratory in the Learning Resource Centre (LRC), both are
for Educational Technology subjects only.
In this case, according to Singh (2013) teacher education institutions
are making efforts to use technology in teaching-learning while schools
still follow the traditional method Research outcomes showed that the
situation is far from attaining technology integration in educational
practices. Since teacher education institution provides relevant and
good facilities for ICT for training purposes, basic education schools
demand upgrading also. Furthermore, Linkages really played important
role in providing inputs to the Student-Teachers. Several of these inputs
come from Intel Teach and Microsoft Education Network Trainings
conducted separately or integrated in the Educational Technology
Courses. The MSU-IIT Education Dean testified in an interview, MSU-
IIT is the Intel Teach hub of Mindanao wherein Educational Technology
Teachers were trained by Intel Philippines.
This linkage would also give opportunity to the faculty handling
Educational Technology subjects to be trained locally and internationally,
which in return, beneficial for the students. This data contextualizes
the findings of Febro (2013) on a case study for ICT Integration in
MSU-IIT the development process involved continuous reflection and
participation by the Educational Technology faculty using observations,
course assessments, and responses to the results of pre-service
teachers’ implementation of ICT in the classroom. Both courses require
LAMDAG Journal oof the Graduate School 2016 | 29

partnerships with Department of Education schools. The positive effects


of the partnership process extend to faculty development, curricular
review of programmes, and policy-making”.
On the other hand, the Dean of the College of Education of Capitol
University cited Intel Teach and Microsoft Educator Network as the
provider in terms of ICT inputs being integrated in the Educational
Technology courses.

The ICT and Trainings Attended

Table 8
Frequency Distribution of the Extent of ICT Trainings/Courses
attended by the each of the
CU MSU-IIT Total
Extent N = 49 N=129 N-178
f % f % f %
High 0 0 3 2.33 3 2.32
Moderate 20 40.82 50 39.76 70 54.26
Low 29 59.18 27 20.93 56 43.41

Table 8 shows the extent of ICT Training/ Courses attended by the


student-teachers. These trainings and courses were either taken by
the student before, during or after they took the education subjects
or before they enrolled as education students. It can be observed
that CU has a low extent with 59.18% of the population while MSU-
IIT is moderate with 39.76%. Meanwhile, the overall population is
considered to have moderate extent of trainings and courses also for
ICT with 54.26%. This would mean that among the trainings presented
in this study, the student-teachers were able to take one (1) or two (2)
trainings or courses only.
30 | Narvasa

Table 9
Correlation Table between the extent of ICT Training/ courses attended
and the ICT Competency of the Student Teachers
Correlation Level of
Verbal
Standard Coefficient Signifi-
Interpretation
r cance
Standard 1:Basic operations and troubleshooting .152 .043 Significant
Standard 2:Use of appropriate teaching and of- .067 .372 Not Significant
fice productivity tools
Standard 3:Use of internet and networking ap- .169 .024 Significant
plications
Standard 4: Information and data management .177 .018 Not Significant
Overall Standard .161 .032 Significant

Table 9 presents that trainings attended by the students affects the


competency of the Student-Teachers. With the overall value of r= 0.161
(p=.032) there is a significant positive correlation, thus rejects the null
hypothesis. This would mean that as the number of trainings increases
the more they develop their competency in any of the standards.
Basically, this is the primary objective of any training- the enrichment
of the skills essential for the needs of every participant. Then we
could say that subjects in the classroom are not only enough, trainings
introduced by various third-party linkages significantly contribute also
to one’s ICT Competency. This implies that software inputs should be
given emphasis for students.

The ICT Competency and the Personal Devices

Table 10
Frequency Distribution of the Extent of the Ownership of Personal ICT
Devices of the student-teacher (n=9)
CU MSU-IIT Total
Extent N = 49 N=129 N-178
f % f % f %
Highly sufficient 28 57.14 95 73.65 123 69.08
Sufficient 12 24.48 29 59.18 41 23.03
Not sufficient 9 18.37 4 3.10 13 7.30
LAMDAG Journal oof the Graduate School 2016 | 31

Table 10 shows the extent of the ownership of personal ICT


devices of the student-teachers. In the total population, generally, the
ownership of devices is highly sufficient with the frequency percentage
of 69.08%. This means that they acquire or own 6-9 ICT devices based
from the list of items given. Specifically, each of the school has high
sufficiency also with 57.14% for CU and 73.65% for MSU IIT.
In the light of communication and Information age, people are
into communication and information gadgets. The most affordable and
accessible device that a student could have are phones and laptops.
This also contributes to their productivity and accessibility to a good
and effective communication. In general, common ICT devices are
already owned by the student-teachers themselves. It is in this light
that acquisition of ICT Skills would be learned through first hand
experiences.

Table 11
Correlation Table between the Extent of Ownership of the ICT Devices
and the ICT Competency of the Student Teachers
Correlation
Level of Verbal
Standard Coefficient
Significance Interpretation
r
Standard 1:Basic .241 .001 Highly Significant
operations and
troubleshooting
Standard 2:Use .074 .328 Not Significant
of appropriate
teaching and office
productivity tools
Standard 3:Use .191 .011 Significant
of internet and
networking ap-
plications
Standard 4: Infor- .146 .052 Not Significant
mation and data
management
Overall Mean of .181 .015 Highly Significant
the Standards
32 | Narvasa

Table 11 reveals the effect and influence of the ownership of


Personal ICT devices for communication, entertainment and productivity
purposes, it was found out that the number and accessibility to the
personal ICT devices or gadget has a high positive significant correlation
with Standard 1 (r=0.241, p=.001), Standard 3 (r=0.191, p=0.011) and
the overall mean of the standards (r=0.181, p=0.015) thus, rejects the
null hypothesis.
With this correlation, it implies that gadgets owned by the student-
teachers help in the enhancement of their ICT Competency. In this
manner, students in the Teacher Education Institution were given the
opportunity to utilize the gadgets for personal, communication and
productivity purposes which gives an impact in learning.
Melinte, (2012) claimed that the impact of Information and
Communication Technologies (ICT) on future learning strategies and
trajectories must be taken into consideration. This impact cannot be
foreseen but we can suppose it will be tremendous, ICT will become
a major tool for landscaping future learning. By the considering the
evolution on ICT we can see that it shaped our general life.
However, among all the Standard 2 on “ICT productivity tool and
software” have the data computed with no significance at all. With
this correlation of variables, mobile phones with 82.68 %t and Laptop
or netbook with 67.98%. This implies that we could say that mobile
phone is often used for communication and not for the operations of
productivity software which is more effective in desktop devices. It is
also very interesting to see the high correlation on standard 1 due to
the ownership of device. This would determine that the more you own
the device the greater the chance for the ideal to be more familiar with
the device’s concepts and operations. This is the basic competency of
Standard 1.

Best Practices of the Center of Excellence-Teacher Education


Institutions
1. Integration of Basic Computer Technology and Operations and
Concepts. There is an integration of Basic Computer Technology
and Operations and Concepts on the specific topics such as:
Basic Computer operations and maintenance; Use office and
teaching productivity tool; Use of internet and networking
LAMDAG Journal oof the Graduate School 2016 | 33

applications; Information and data management.


2. Lecture and laboratory Classes in Educational Technology
Subjects. COE-TEIs Educational Technology Subjects are
composed of Lecture and Laboratory or Hands-on classes to
further explain the concepts through the hands-on activities.
3. Creation and Provision of Modules in the COE-TEIs. There
are Modules created intended for the lecture and laboratory
classes for educational technology so that there is common
reference for the Instructors handling the subject.
4. Laboratory and ICT Facilities. There is an enough provision
of Computer laboratory or Units intended for Educational
Technology courses only. This would also address the problems
of those who don’t have Personal ICT device since ownership of
devices correlates with the competencies per standard.
5. Linkages. There was a linkage on ICT with the service and
software providers such as Microsoft, Intel, FITEd and UNESCO.
In addition, COE-TEIs have implemented faculty development
training, especially those who are handling Educational
Technology Subjects.
6. Adaptation of the software inputs were student-teachers of the
TEI achieved the “very good” competency. To further develop the
ICT Skills Development among non-COE TEIs, for the Software
Inputs for ICT integration in the Teacher Education Program. In
view thereof, based from the finding of this research, below is
the Software Inputs for the ICT integration for the Development
of the competency on Technology Operations and Concepts
that covers the curricula, pedagogy and Teacher Training.

Conclusion and Implications


Teacher Education Institutions (TEIs) are the nursery of the
Teaching Force in the region and in the whole nation. It is in this light
that innovations must be addressed and introduced to the pre-service
teachers who will soon serve the Teaching institutions in the society.
It was found out that there is a significantly high negative correlation
of the competency and age of the respondents of this study. Indeed,
it is better to start the good practice on ICT integration to the young
34 | Narvasa

Teaching enthusiast by revisiting the curriculum, pedagogy and teacher


training of the Teacher Education programs.
As modelled by the Center of Excellence-Teacher Education
Institutions of the region, it is indeed a significant factor to give emphasis
not only on the content but also with the provisions of the facilities.
In addition, educational technology subject, trainings and linkages
are contributing factors to introduce a wide variety of Technology
Integration Inputs for the Teacher Education Programs. This is a good
basis for a very good academic benchmarking of the best practices of
ICT Integration among non-Center of Excellence Teacher Education
Institutions throughout the Region. Among the practices to be modelled
which contributed to the ICT competency level of the student teachers
are: integration of Basic Computer Technology and Operations and
Concepts on the specific topics such as; basic Computer operations and
maintenance, use office and teaching productivity tool, use of internet
and networking applications, Information and data management;
educational Technology Subjects should be composed of Lecture and
Laboratory classes to further explain the concepts through the hands-
on activities; the creation of modules for the lecture and laboratory
classes for educational technology so that there is common reference
for the Instructors handling the subject; widen the linkages on ICT with
the service and software providers such as Microsoft, Intel, FITEd and
UNESCO and others; further faculty development training, especially
those who are handling Educational Technology Subjects and; provision
of Computer laboratory intended for Educational Technology courses
only. This would also address the problems of those students who do
not have Personal ICT device since ownership of devices correlates with
the competencies per standard.
With the positive and significant correlations among the variables
found in this study, these initiatives of the Teacher Education Institutions
are for the betterment of the teacher education program to support the
continuous improvement on the quality of Education in the country.
LAMDAG Journal oof the Graduate School 2016 | 35

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Public Documents
CHED Memorandum Order No. 37, series of 2015
CHED Memorandum Order No. 55, series of 2006
CHED Memorandum Order No. 37, series of 2015
CHED Memorandum Order No. 24, series of 2010
CHED Memorandum Order No. 33, Series of 2010