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HERITAGE  ASSESSMENT    
OF  
108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  HEYTESBURY  ROAD  
SUBIACO  
 

   

   
 

Prepared  by  
Annette  Green,  Greenward  Consulting  
 
For  the  
City  of  Subiaco  
 
21  April  2015    

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Disclaimer  
This   Heritage   Assessment   has   been   prepared   from   information   gathered   in   the   course   of   the   document’s  
production   by   Annette   Green   (physical   description   and   selected   historical   research,   referencing   online  
historical   newspapers,   Post   Office   Directories,   Electoral   Rolls   and   family   histories)   and   Sofia   Boranga,  
Coordinator   Subiaco   Heritage,   City   of   Subiaco   (provision   of   historical   land   titles   and   historical   research,  
referencing  historical  Rates  Books  and  Post  Office  Directories).    It  should  be  noted  that  the  readily  accessible  
on-­‐line  sources  relating  to  occupancy  of  the  properties  ceases  in  c.1949  and  that  the  primary  focus  has  been  
on  the  first  half  of  the  twentieth  century.  
The   author   has   exercised   due   care   to   avoid   errors   in   the   information   contained   in   the   report,   but   does   not  
warrant  that  it  is  error  or  omission  free.  No  person  or  organization  should  use  or  rely  solely  on  this  document  
for  detailed  advice,  or  as  the  basis  for  formulating  decisions  or  actions,  without  considering,  and  if  necessary  
obtaining,  relevant  advice  from  other  sources.    In  particular  it  should  be  noted  that  the  physical  descriptions  
have   been   based   on   streetscape   inspections   only   and   that   comprehensive   historical   research   has   not   been  
undertaken  for  individual  places  or  associated  people.  
Apart  from  any  fair  dealing  for  the  purposes  of  private  study  or  research,  as  permitted  under  the  Australian  
Copyright  Act,  no  part  of  the  information  in  this  document  may  be  stored  in  a  retrieval  system,  reproduced,  or  
transmitted  in  any  form  without  express  permission  of  the  City  of  Subiaco.    
 

   
 
CONTENTS  

1.   INTRODUCTION  ...........................................................................................................  1  
Background  ................................................................................................................................  1  
Related  Places  ............................................................................................................................  1  
Study  Area  .................................................................................................................................  2  
2.   ASSESSMENT  &  MANAGEMENT  RECOMMENDATIONS  ................................................  3  
Levels  of  Contribution  ................................................................................................................  3  
Statement  of  Significance  ...........................................................................................................  3  
Integrity,  Authenticity  and  Condition  .........................................................................................  4  
Management  Recommendations   ...............................................................................................  5  
3.   SUPPORTING  DOCUMENTATION  .................................................................................  7  
Historical  notes    .........................................................................................................................  7  
Sequence  of  development  ..........................................................................................................  9  
Associations  -­‐  Developers  ..........................................................................................................  10  
Associations  -­‐  Builders  ...............................................................................................................  11  
Associations  -­‐  Residents  ............................................................................................................  11  
Historic  Themes  ........................................................................................................................  12  
References  ................................................................................................................................  12  
Description  of  the  Study  Area  ....................................................................................................  13  
Key  Features/  Elements  .............................................................................................................  13  
Pedestrian  views  of  street  trees,  verges,  footpaths  and  fences  ..................................................  15  
Pedestrian  views  of  building  details  ..........................................................................................  16  
4.   PLACE  RECORDS  ........................................................................................................  17  
108  Heytesbury,  Subiaco  ...........................................................................................................  19  
110  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  23  
116  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  27  
118  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  31  
120  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  33  
122  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  37  
109  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  41  
111  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  45  
113  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  49  
115  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  53  
117  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  57  
119  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  61  
121  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  65  
123  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  69  
129  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  73  
135  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  ..................................................................................................  77  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road   21  April  2015    


   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page  Left  Blank  Intentionally

 
 

108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road   21  April  2015    


   
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     1  
 
HERITAGE  ASSESSMENT  OF  108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  HEYTESBURY  ROAD,  
SUBIACO  

1. INTRODUCTION  
Background   In  February  2015,  the  City  of  Subiaco  commissioned  Annette  Green,  Greenward  
Consulting,  to  undertake  a  heritage  assessment  of  108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  
Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco,  as  part  of  a  community  heritage  survey.        
The  purpose  of  this  assessment  was  to  determine  whether  or  not  these  places  
form  a  streetscape  (or  part  of  a  collection  of  streetscapes)  that  is  eligible  for  
listing  as  a  Conservation  Area  under  the  Town  Planning  Scheme.      
As  part  of  this  process,  a  place  record  was  prepared  for  each  individual  property,  
including  a  brief  outline  of  its  initial  development  and  early  history,  plus  a  concise  
description  of  the  place,  as  viewed  from  the  street.  Background  historical  
information  (including  a  summary  of  early  Rate  Books  entries  and  copies  of  early  
land  titles)  was  provided  by  Sofia  Boranga,  Coordinator  Subiaco  Heritage,  City  of  
Subiaco.    This  was  supplemented  by  on-­‐line  research  undertaken  by  Annette  
Green,  which  primarily  referenced  historical  newspapers,  Post  Office  Directories,  
Electoral  Rolls,  and  family  trees.    This  readily  available  historical  information  
generally  relates  to  the  period  up  to  the  mid-­‐twentieth  century  and  this  defined  
the  typical  cut-­‐off  date  for  the  research  (other  than  reference  to  historical  aerial  
photographs  dating  from  1948  to  the  present).  
The  documentary  and  physical  information  was  then  analysed  as  part  of  a  
professional  assessment  of  the  level  of  contribution  that  each  place  makes  to  the  
heritage  values  of  the  surrounding  streetscape  (broadly  considering  aesthetic,  
historic,  social  and  research  values,  within  the  context  of  the  City  of  Subiaco).      
The  place  records  were  then  reviewed  in  order  to  assess  the  streetscape  and  
heritage  values  of  the  study  area.    
This  assessment  forms  part  of  an  ongoing  process  to  assist  development  and  
planning  within  the  City  of  Subiaco.  
Related  Places   The  study  area  forms  a  continuation  of  nearby  residential  areas  that  have  been  
previously  considered  in  the:  
• Assessment  of  the  Rawson  Street  Heritage  Area  (prepared  by  Hocking  
Heritage  Studio  for  the  City  of  Subiaco,  June  2013)  
• Heritage  Assessment  of  2-­‐26  Campbell  Street,  2-­‐22  Union  Street,  135-­‐165  
Hamersley  Road  &  70-­‐104  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  (prepared  by  Greenward  
Consulting  for  the  City  of  Subiaco,  July  2014)  
• Heritage  Assessment  of  Peet  and  Bastow’s  Redfern  Street  Subdivision,  1-­‐12  
Redfern  Street,  Subiaco  (prepared  by  Greenward  Consulting  for  the  City  of  
Subiaco,  January  2015)  
It  also  forms  a  continuation  of,  and  partly  overlaps,  the  area  considered  in  the:  
• Heritage  Assessment  of  James  Chesters’  Union  Street  Subdivision  –  2-­‐22  Union  
Street,  5-­‐21  Union  Street,  159-­‐177  Hamersley  Road  &  98-­‐110  Heytesbury  
Road,  Subiaco  (prepared  by  Greenward  Consulting  for  the  City  of  Subiaco,  
December  2014)  
Note:  Rawson  Street  was  declared  a  Conservation  Area  in  December  2013.  

108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Introduction   21  April  2015      


 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     2  
 
Study  Area    
This  Community  Heritage  
Survey  has  considered  the  
area  defined  by  108-­‐122  
and  109-­‐135  Heytesbury  
Road,  Subiaco.      
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure  1  
 

108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Introduction   21  April  2015      


 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     3  
 
2. ASSESSMENT  &  MANAGEMENT  RECOMMENDATIONS  
Levels  of  
Contribution  

 
Figure  2  

Statement  of   Aesthetic  Value  


Significance   • The  houses  along  this  section  of  Heytesbury  Road  were  constructed  in  the  
period  c.1899  to  1918.    The  development  undertaken  during  this  period  used  a  
cohesive  palette  of  materials  and  styles,  resulting  in  an  aesthetically  pleasing  
streetscape.  
• The  study  area  is  dominated  by  representative,  suburban  examples  of  
Federation  Queen  Anne  houses.    These  collectively  illustrate  a  gradual  
evolution  in  the  architectural  detailing  of  this  type  of  place  between  1899  and  
1918.  
• The  former  corner  shop  (135  Heytesbury  Road,  constructed  in  1922)  is  typical  
of  a  small  general  store  of  the  early  twentieth  century  and  retains  its  
traditional  shopfront  windows  and  corner  entry,  although  it  has  been  adapted  
as  a  residence.    Its  traditional  aesthetic  qualities  within  the  streetscape  have  
been  diminished  by  the  removal  of  the  corner  verandah.  
• The  development  at  the  north-­‐west  corner  of  Heytesbury  and  Hensman  Roads  
(98  Hensman  Road)  lies  outside  of  the  Study  Area,  but  the  weatherboard  side  
façade  provides  complementary  streetscape  element.  
 
 

108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Assessment     21  April  2015    


   
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     4  
 
  Historic  Value  
• The  residential  subdivision  of  this  area,  which  extends  across  parts  of  Perth  
Suburban  Lots  255,  256,  274  &  275,  represents  the  early  development  
activities  of  Sydney  and  Melbourne  based  real  estate  agents  and  property  
developers:  the  Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  Building  Company  Ltd  of  
Sydney;  James  Peet  and  Austin  Bastow  of  Melbourne  (later  Perth);  and  James  
Chesters,  of  Melbourne  (later  Perth).  
In  this  context  it  helps  to  illustrate  the  status  of  Western  Australia  as  a  place  of  
opportunity  during  the  gold  rush  era  of  the  late  nineteenth  century  –  
attracting  significant  interest  and  investment  from  the  eastern  states.  
• The  historical  evidence  confirms  that  the  first  house  to  be  built  within  the  
Study  Area  was  #116,  which  was  erected  as  the  home  of  Austin  Bastow,  
architect,  on  part  of  his  own  subdivision  in  1899.    Further  research  has  
confirmed  that  this  was  one  of  the  first  four  houses  built  along  the  whole  
length  of  Heytesbury  Road,  and  is  only  one  of  these  four  still  remaining.  
• Autin  Bastow’s  brick  villa  was  an  early  example  of  the  ‘better  class  of  building’  
that  represented  the  rapid  transition  of  Subiaco  from  a  place  of  tents  and  
modest  timber  houses  to  a  developing  suburb  in  the  period  around  1899-­‐
1905.      
• The  number  of  houses  listed  for  Heytesbury  Road  in  the  Post  Office  Directories  
increased  from  4  in  1901  to  63  in  1907,  of  which  10  were  located  between  
Union  Street  and  Hensman  Road.      These  were  all  brick  houses  of  a  standard  
suitable  for  the  families  of  skilled  tradesmen,  business  owners  and  
professional  men,  and  illustrated  the  establishment  of  the  higher  parts  of  
Subiaco  as  a  desirable  place  of  residence.  
• These  houses  also  help  to  represent  the  initial  wave  of  development  that  
followed  the  extension  of  the  Perth  Electric  Tramways  Company's  line  along  
Rokeby  Road  to  Kings  Park  (from  c.1899/1900).    
• The  corner  store,  built  at  135  Heytesbury  Road  in  1922,  illustrates  the  
provision  of  services  for  the  community  at  a  time  when  the  local  general  store  
stocked  a  small  amount  of  most  of  the  day-­‐to-­‐day  household  requirements.    In  
this  case  the  store  complemented  the  butcher’s  shop  that  was  operating  at  
the  same  time  on  the  nearby  corner  of  Hensman  Road  and  Redfern  Street  (80  
Hensman  Road).  
Representativeness  
• The  study  area  includes  a  good  representative  collection  of  the  early  twentieth  
century  villas  that  were  developed  to  a  standard  suitable  for  the  families  of  
professional  and  business  men,  in  close  proximity  to  the  civic  centre,  business  
centre,  school  and  tramway.  
Integrity,   Integrity  
Authenticity  and   The  overall  integrity  of  the  place  as  a  collection  of  early  twentieth  century  houses  
Condition   (dating  from  the  period  c.1899  to  1918)  is  high,  with  the  exception  of  118  
  Heytesbury  Road,  which  was  replaced  in  c.1980.    
The  integrity  of  135  Heytesbury  Road  as  an  inter-­‐war  corner  shop  has  been  
diminished  by  its  adaptation  and  extension  as  a  private  residence,  but  its  original  
use  can  still  be  readily  understood  from  the  surviving  physical  evidence.  

 
 

108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Assessment     21  April  2015    


   
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     5  
 
  Authenticity    
All  of  the  early  twentieth  century  houses  have  undergone  some  degree  of  
adaptation  and/or  extension  to  meet  modern  living  standards.    Typical  changes  
include  rear  extensions,  new  fencing,  modification  of  the  front  yards  to  
accommodate  cars  and  re-­‐roofing.    However,  the  original  houses  (as  viewed  from  
the  street)  have,  overall,  retained  a  medium  to  high  level  of  authenticity.      
Note:  the  exceptions  to  this  are  108  Heytesbury  Road,  where  the  major  
alterations  and  additions  undertaken  since  the  1980s  have  largely  obscured  the  
original  design  and  detailing;  and  118  Heytesbury  Road,  where  the  original  house  
was  was  replaced  in  c.1980.    
Condition  
Based  on  a  streetscape  survey,  the  buildings  in  the  study  area  appear  to  be  
generally  well  maintained  and  in  good  condition.    Within  the  public  realm,  the  
verges  are  also  generally  well  maintained.  
Management   Based  on  the  assessment  of  significance,  above,  it  is  recommended  that  the  study  
Recommendations     area,  comprising  108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road,  warrants  identification  
as  a  conservation  area  under  the  City  of  Subiaco  Town  Planning  Scheme.  
122  Heytesbury  Road  has  been  previously  entered  in  the  Heritage  List  under  the  
Town  Planning  Scheme  for  its  particular  historic  and  aesthetic  values.  If  the  street  
is  identified  as  a  conservation  area,  individual  listing  of  the  other  houses  would  
not  be  required  to  achieve  the  heritage  outcomes  relevant  to  this  streetscape.      
Based  on  its  aesthetic  values  (and  the  period  of  development)  108-­‐122  and  109-­‐
135  Heytesbury  Road  form  an  extension  of  the  nearby  areas  that  were  
recommended  for  listing  as  conservation  areas  in  the:  
• Assessment  of  the  Rawson  Street  Heritage  Area  (prepared  by  Hocking  
Heritage  Studio  for  the  City  of  Subiaco,  June  2013)  
• Heritage  Assessment  of  2-­‐26  Campbell  Street,  2-­‐22  Union  Street,  135-­‐165  
Hamersley  Road  &  70-­‐104  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  (prepared  by  Greenward  
Consulting  for  the  City  of  Subiaco,  July  2014)  
• Heritage  Assessment  of  James  Chesters’  Union  Street  Subdivision  –  2-­‐22  Union  
Street,  5-­‐21  Union  Street,  159-­‐177  Hamersley  Road  &  98-­‐110  Heytesbury  
Road,  Subiaco  (prepared  by  Greenward  Consulting  for  the  City  of  Subiaco,  
December  2014)  
• Heritage  Assessment  of  Peet  and  Bastow’s  Redfern  Street  Subdivision,  1-­‐12  
Redfern  Street,  Subiaco  (prepared  by  Greenward  Consulting  for  the  City  of  
Subiaco,  January  2015)  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Assessment     21  April  2015    


   
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     6  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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108-­‐122  and  109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Assessment     21  April  2015    


   
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     7  
 
3. SUPPORTING  DOCUMENTATION  
Historical  notes  1   During  the  early  years  of  settlement  most  of  the  Subiaco  area  formed  part  of  the  
  Perth  Commonage.  In  1879  land  was  set  aside  for  the  Fremantle  to  Guildford  
Railway  and  this  line  was  officially  opened  in  March  1881.    Two  years  later  the  
Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  section  of  the  Perth  
Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  be  made  available  for  
private  sale.  The  land  in  question  incorporated  the  majority  of  Subiaco  and  part  of  
Shenton  Park  (originally  West  Subiaco)  and  was  laid  out  as  5  acre  lots  on  a  grid  
pattern  -­‐  designated  as  Perth  Suburban  Lots  (PSL).    
The  Subiaco  Municipal  Council  was  created  in  1895;  Metropolitan  Water  Works  
Board  services  were  extended  to  Subiaco  in  1898/1899;  and  the  Perth  Electric  
Tramways  Company's  line  was  built  through  to  the  corner  of  Rokeby  and  Broome  
(Hay)  Roads  in  1899  and  up  Rokeby  Road  to  Kings  Park  by  January  1900.    Loans  
made  available  through  the  granting  of  municipal  status  also  allowed  the  funding  
of  road  construction  and  the  laying  of  footpaths,  which  by  1903  comprised  about  
20  kilometres.  From  that  time,  improvements  like  street  trees  and  parks  also  
occurred  under  the  influence  of  Alexander  Rankin,  who  was  the  first  Town  Clerk  
and  Engineer  for  the  Subiaco  Council.    
Development  was  well  underway  by  1905  and  much  of  the  available  land  in  the  
inner  areas  had  been  developed  by  the  late-­‐1920s,  with  Subiaco  evolving  as  a  
suburb  with  a  diverse  residential  character:  
The  district  originally  was  mainly  a  working  man's  suburb,  but  the  advantage  
it  held  out  to  the  city  worker  precluded  its  ever  being  a  one-­‐class  town,  and  it  
was  invaded  by  business  and  professional  men,  civil  servants,  and  others,  who  
desired  to  be  in  close  proximity  to  their  daily  work.  (The  West  Australian,  4  
August  1928,  p  7)  
The  area  considered  in  this  report  formed  part  of  Perth  Suburban  Lots  255,  256,  
274  &  275,  as  outlined  below:  
• PSL  255  was  purchased  by  the  Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  Building  
Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    Two  years  later  it  was  transferred  to  
James  Chesters  of  155  Elizabeth  Street,  Melbourne,  estate  agent,  and  by  the  
beginning  of  1894  Chesters  had  subdivided  this  land  as  Deposited  Plan  899,  
with  42  lots  laid  out  around  Queen  Street  (soon  renamed  Union  Street).  Lots  
18  to  21  of  this  subdivision  were  subsequently  developed  as  108  and  110  
Heytesbury  Road.  
• PSL  256  was  purchased  by  the  Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  Building  
Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    No  development  was  undertaken  at  
that  time  and  in  June  1896  the  whole  of  the  property  was  transferred  to  
James  Thomas  Peet  and  Austin  Bastow  of  Melbourne,  Estate  Agents.    By  
September  of  that  year,  Peet  and  Bastow  had  subdivided  this  land  as  
Deposited  Plan  938,  with  42  residential  allotments  laid  out  along  parts  of  
Hensman  Road,  Hamersley  Road,  Beryl  (later  Redfern)  Street  and  Heytesbury  
                                                                                                                       
1
      This  section  of  the  report  has  been  based  on:  
− Land  title  research  for  the  study  area  (City  of  Subiaco);    
− Review  of  the  Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  and  Electoral  Rolls  of  the  period  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au  
and  ancestry.com.au);  
− Advertisements  in  contemporary  newspapers  (http://trove.nla.gov.au);    together  with  information  from  
− Bizzaca,  K.,  City  of  Subiaco  Thematic  History  and  Framework  (City  of  Subiaco,  February  2014);  and    
− Taylor,  John  J.,  ‘Austin  Bastow  (1867-­‐1942)',  Western  Australian  Architect  Biographies  
(http://www.architecture.com.au/i-­‐cms?page=13453,  accessed  9  December  2014).    
 

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Road.    Lots  37  to  42  of  this  subdivision  were  later  laid  out  as  116  to  122  
Heytesbury  Road.  
• PSL  274  appears  to  have  initially  been  subdivided  as  Deposited  Plan  2405  with  
a  1-­‐acre  lot  on  the  SE  corner  of  Heytesbury  and  Hensman  Roads,  designated  
as  Lot  1.    This  was  sold  to  James  Chesters  in  March  1904,  and  one  residential  
lot  (115  Heytesbury  Road)  had  been  subdivided  off  and  sold  by  January  1906.    
Interestingly,  on  the  ward  map  in  the  Subiaco  Rate  Books  of  this  period  (pre  
1908),  the  remaining  portion  of  the  large  corner  lot  was  marked  as  'Roman  
Catholic  Church'.      However,  Church  development  did  not  proceed  and  by  
1913  the  residential  lots  that  form  117-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road  had  been  
created  under  Deposited  Plan  3758.  
• PSL  275  was  purchased  by  the  Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  Building  
Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    By  August  1891  the  company  had  
subdivided  this  land  as  Deposited  Plan  374,  with  30  lots  laid  out  around  Union  
Street.    Lots  1  to  3  of  this  subdivision  (which  were  subsequently  developed  as  
109  and  113  Heytesbury  Road)  were  sold  to  John  Lowe  of  Toowoomba,  
Queensland,  in  June  1892.  They  were  finally  sold  as  separate  lots  by  the  next  
owner,  Florence  Edgcumbe  of  Perth,  in  the  period  1899  to  1905.    
The  first  site  to  be  developed  was  116  Heytesbury  Road,  where  a  house  was  built  
in  c.1899  for  Austin  Bastow,  an  architect  and  former  partner  in  the  firm  of  James  
Peet  and  Bastow  of  Melbourne,  Estate  Agents.    This  was  a  period  of  transition  for  
Subiaco,  as  outlined  in  the  following  article  in  The  West  Australian  in  March  1903:  
Any  one  visiting  Subiaco  for  the  first  time  would  doubtless  consider  it  a  town  
which  had  grown  somewhat  gradually,  but  in  1897  the  buildings  were  little  
better  than  hessian  "shanties",  two  or  three  wooden  cottages  housed  the  
more  affluent,  while  the  man  who  would  venture  to  put  bricks  in  the  sand  
became  an  object  of  curiosity.  In  the  following  year  (1898)  the  population  fell  
off.  Times  were  bad,  some  of  the  better  class  houses  were  to  let,  while  the  
poorer  ones  were  abandoned,  and  people  were  in  doubt  as  to  whether  it  was  
better  to  stay  here  or  return  to  the  Eastern  colonies.  However,  as  the  months  
passed  on  it  was  noticeable  that  the  buildings  were  increasing,  that  people  
were  building  places  for  living  in,  not  for  renting,  and  that  a  better  type  of  
structure  was  being  raised.  In  April  1898,  the  Council  started  issuing  building  
permits  and  the  hessian  had  to  go.  There  was  some  outcry,  but  the  Council  
was  firm.  Twenty-­‐five  building  permits  were  issued  in  this  year,  the  houses  
were  mainly  of  wood  and  the  lot  valued  at  £6,000.  In  the  following  year  a  
better  class  of  building  was  in  favour  again,  and  25  houses,  valued  at  £7,000,  
were  put  up.2  
Autin  Bastow’s  brick  villa  was  one  of  these  early  examples  of  a  ‘better  class  of  
building’  and  was  also  part  of  the  early  development  of  the  higher  land  away  from  
the  railway  line  and  existing  tramline.      
Listings  under  the  entry  of  ‘Heytesbury  Road’  were  first  included  in  the  Post  Office  
Directories  in  1901,  and  at  that  time  there  were  only  4  houses  along  the  whole  
length  of  the  street  (from  Thomas  Street  to  the  railway).  A  review  of  later  listings  
has  confirmed  that  these  were  #s  42  (W  Finagoe)  (since  demolished),  61  (Francis  
Day  Lockwood,  civil  servant)  (since  demolished),  63  (Caleb  William  Whately,  
bricklayer/builder)  (since  demolished)  and  116  (Austin  Bastow,  architect).      
#116  is  therefore  the  oldest  house  still  remaining  along  Heytesbury  Road.  

                                                                                                                       
2
    The  West  Australian  2  March  1903  p  3  
 

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  In  the  period  1901-­‐1906  seven  more  houses  were  erected  in  the  study  area,  being  
118  (c.1901,  since  demolished),  111  (c.1904),  109  &  113  (c.1905),  and  115,  120  &  
122  (c.1906).    All  of  these  were  well-­‐built  brick  villas  suitable  for  the  families  of  
skilled  tradesmen,  business  owners  and  professional  men.      
There  was  then  a  pause  until  more  residential  lots  were  released  on  the  southern  
side  of  the  street,  which  was  quickly  followed  by  the  construction  of  brick  houses  
at  117,  119,  121  and  129  Heytesbury  Road  in  1913-­‐1915.    Infill  development  took  
place  at  110  and  123  in  1918-­‐1919,  and  this  firmly  established  a  good  ‘middle-­‐
class’  standard  for  the  street.    
All  of  these  houses  were  initially  built  for  owner/occupiers,  but  as  the  original  
owners  moved  away  some  became  rental  properties  and  the  occupations  of  the  
residents  gradually  changed  to  include  general  tradesmen  and  labourers.    Local  
residents  who  were  prominent  in  community  and  business  life  are  discussed  
under  Associations  (below).  
The  final  development  to  take  place  was  the  construction  of  a  general  store  on  
the  small  lot  on  the  corner  of  Heytesbury  and  Hensman  Roads  in  1922.  A  
precursor  to  the  supermarket,  corner  shops  provided  the  local  community  with  a  
wide  range  of  essential  daily  items,  from  bread  and  milk  to  soap  and  sewing  
needles.    Traditionally,  they  were  not  only  a  place  to  shop,  but  also  a  place  to  
meet  and  exchange  greetings  and  gossip,  either  in  the  shop  or  under  the  shade  of  
the  verandah  that  would  have  originally  extended  over  the  footpath  along  both  
frontages.  
Sequence  of  
development    

 
Figure  3  
 

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Associations  -­‐   • Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  Building  Company    
Developers   This  firm  purchased  Perth  Suburban  Lots  255,  256  and  275  in  August  1890.    
  Two  of  these  land  parcels  were  later  on-­‐sold,  but  by  August  1891  the  
company  had  subdivided  PSL  275  with  30  residential  lots,  laid  out  around  
Union  Street  (Deposited  Plan  374).  This  included  the  area  later  developed  as  
109-­‐133  Heytesbury  Road.    
The  Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  Building  Company  was  a  Sydney  based  
firm,  which  purchased  land  for  development  purposes  in  various  locations  
around  Australia.    During  the  1890s  and  early  1900s  they  acquired  a  number  
of  the  5-­‐acre  Perth  Suburban  Lots  in  Subiaco  and  either  subdivided  them  into  
residential  or  commercial  allotments,  or  held  them  as  investment  properties.      
By  1891,  the  firm  was  advertising  building  lots  in  Subiaco  for  sale  to  Australia-­‐
wide  investors,  although  relatively  little  building  development  took  place  
during  that  decade.  
• Peet  &  Bastow,  real  estate  agents,  of  Melbourne,  Victoria  
The  firm  of  Peet  &  Bastow  was  responsible  for  the  subdivision  of  Perth  
Suburban  Lot  256  into  42  residential  allotments  (Deposited  Plan  938).    This  
included  the  area  later  developed  as  116  to  122  Heytesbury  Road.  
The  real  estate  agency  of  Peet  &  Bastow  had  been  established  by  James  
Thomas  Peet  and  Austin  Bastow  in  Melbourne  in  the  early  1890s.    With  the  
growth  promised  by  the  gold  discoveries  in  Western  Australia,  the  firm  
developed  an  interest  in  residential  subdivision  in  Perth  and,  in  around  1892,  
they  began  marketing  Wanneroo  Park  (now  Bayswater),  North  Perth  and  part  
of  northern  Dianella).  They  also  expanded  into  Subiaco  and  in  1895  Peet  
moved  to  Perth  and  established  a  real  estate  business  in  his  own  name.    A  
year  later,  Bastow  also  moved  west,  establishing  the  architectural  practice  of  
Bastow  and  Son,  architect  (along  with  other  business  ventures).  
• James  Chesters      
James  Chesters  was  responsible  for  the  subdivision  of  Perth  Suburban  Lot  255  
into  42  lots  laid  out  around  Queen  Street  (soon  renamed  Union  Street)  
(Deposited  Plan  889).    This  included  the  area  later  developed  as  108  and  110  
Heytesbury  Road.  
Chesters  also  acquired  land  on  the  corner  of  Heytesbury  and  Hensman  Roads  
(part  Perth  Suburban  Lot  274).  This  included  the  area  later  developed  as  115-­‐
135  Heytesbury  Road.  
James  Chesters’  obituary  in  The  Daily  News,  27  June  1929,  included  the  
following  information  about  his  early  years  and  his  activities  in  Western  
Australia:  
One  who  had  faith  in  Western  Australia,  even  before  he  had  seen  it,  
passed  away  yesterday  in  the  person  of  Mr.  James  Chesters.    Mr.  Chesters  
was  an  Englishman,  having  been  born  in  the  Midlands.    At  an  early  age  he  
came  to  Australia,  landing  at  Melbourne,  where  he  followed  his  trade  as  a  
printer.  In  the  early  nineties  he  purchased  a  large  tract  of  land  in  Subiaco  
from  Messrs  Peet  and  Bastow,  who  were  in  business  in  Melbourne,  at  a  
price  between  £25  and  £30  an  acre.  Some  of  this  he  sold  before  coming  
West.  In  1894  he  paid  his  first  visit  to  Western  Australia,  proceeding  to  the  
goldfields,  where  he  was  only  moderately  successful.  He  remained  there  a  
year  or  two,  and  returned  to  Melbourne,  residing  at  St.  Kilda.  In  1905  he  
again  returned  to  this  State,  and  commenced  speculative  building  on  his  
Subiaco  property,  which  was  situated  between  Heytesbury  and  Hamersley  
 

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roads.  That  portion  is  now  fully  built  upon,  with  streets  running  through  it.  
….  In  1906,  when  the  new  central  ward  was  created  in  Subiaco,  he  
contested  the  election  and  was  returned,  as  a  councillor  ….  in  November,  
1910,  he  beat  Mr.  White  by  69  votes,  and  filled  the  office  of  Mayor  for  the  
next  two  years.  
Associations  -­‐   Records  identifying  the  builders  of  early  twentieth  century  suburban  houses  are  
Builders   sparse,  but  local  builders  who  may  have  undertaken  developments  within  the  
study  area  include:  
• Phillip  Henry  Vibert,  cabinet  maker  and  builder.    
The  readily  available  information  suggests  that  118  Heytesbury  Road  was  
constructed  in  c.1901  and  occupied  by  Phillip  Vibert  and  his  wife,  Florence,  by  
1902.    This  house  was  demolished  in  c.1980.  
• Peter  Marcussen,  carpenter  
The  readily  available  information  suggests  that  120  Heytesbury  Road  was  
built  in  c.1906,  and  occupied  by  Peter  and  Ann  Marcussen  until  c.1909.    Given  
that  Peter  was  a  carpenter  and  two  of  his  sons,  Albert  and  Louis,  were  
carpenter/builders,  it  seems  likely  that  the  house  was  constructed  by  
members  of  this  family.  
• Francis  Robbins,  builder    
It  is  possible  (but  not  certain)  that  the  corner  shop  at  135  Heytesbury  Road  
was  constructed  by  local  builder,  Francis  Robbins,  in  1922.    
Associations  -­‐   The  residents  of  the  Study  Area  in  the  early  to  mid  twentieth  century  included  
Residents   small-­‐business  owners,  professional  men  (such  as  company  secretaries,  company  
managers,  accountants,  an  architect  and  a  dentist),  junior  professional  men  (such  
as  clerks,  teachers,  salesmen  and  a  cashier),  senior  employees  (such  as  a  
manufacturing  foreman  and  WAGR  signalman),  skilled  tradesmen  (such  as  an  
industrial  pattern  maker,  stationery  machinist,  piano  tuner,  painter  and  
carpenter),  plus,  in  latter  years,  general  labourers.    A  number  of  single  women  
and  widows  (with  no  identified  profession)  also  lived  in  the  area  (particularly  in  
rental  accommodation).  
Some  of  the  residents  who  were  relatively  prominent  in  the  local  community  
included:  
• Charles  Ball,  pastoralist/squatter.  A  north-­‐west  pioneer,  who  held  the  lease  
for  Muccan  Station  in  the  Marble  Bar  region  in  partnership  with  Michael  
Corbett  from  the  1890s  until  1912.      
Family  residence  at  116  Heytesbury  Road,  c.1907-­‐1911  and  1928-­‐1939.  
• Austin  Bastow,  partner  in  the  real  estate  agency  of  Peet  &  Bastow  of  
Melbourne  in  the  early  to  mid  1890s.    Practicing  architect  in  Perth,  c.1896-­‐
1907.  Mayor  of  Subiaco,  1900-­‐1902  and  1905-­‐1906.  
Family  residence  at  116  Heytesbury  Road,  c.1899-­‐1906.  
• Lionel  Tobias  Boas,  Secretary  Karrakatta  Cemetery  Board.    Councillor  of  
Subiaco,  including  a  term  as  Mayor  from  1917-­‐1920.  Also  closely  associated  
with  the  Young  Australia  League  from  its  inception  in  1905  (serving  in  various  
roles,  including  General  President).  
Family  residence  at  111  Heytesbury  Road,  c.1905-­‐1922.  
• Robert  Wallace  Burns,  master  baker,  Brown  and  Burns  Bakery,  Subiaco,  
Family  residence  at  111  Heytesbury  Road,  c.1925-­‐1931.  

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  • Henry  Daglish,  politician  and  estate  agent.    
Family  residence  at  122  Heytesbury  Road,  c.1908-­‐1928.  
Prior  to  moving  to  122  Heytesbury  Road  served  terms  as  the  Mayor  of  Subiaco  
(1903-­‐1904  &  1906-­‐1907)  and  as  the  first  Labor  Premier  of  Western  Australia  
(1904-­‐1905).  
After  moving  to  122  Heytesbury  Road  Daglish  served  as  an  independent  and  
then  Liberal  member  of  parliament,  and  was  minister  for  works  in  the  Frank  
Wilson  ministry  in  1910-­‐11.    After  he  was  defeated  in  the  1911  election,  
Daglish  became  an  estate  agent  and  served  as  an  employers'  representative  
on  the  State  Arbitration  Court.  
• Victor  De  Fue,  manager  of  J.P.  De  Feu  and  Co  Ltd,  spouting  and  metal  
fabrication  manufacturers  of  Roe  Street,  later  Railway  Parade,  Perth.  
Family  residence  at  110  Heytesbury  Road,  c.1920-­‐1949.  
• Joseph  Osborne  Stephenson,  company  manager,  H.A  Stephenson  &  Son,  chaff  
and  produce  merchants.  
Family  residence  at  129  Heytesbury  Road,  c.1920-­‐1927.  
• John  George  Schnitzler  (later  known  as  John  George  Thornton),  owner  and  
manager  of  Commonwealth  West  End  Tailors,  843  Hay  Street,  Perth.  
Family  residence  at  108  Heytesbury  Road,  c.1903-­‐1923.  
• Philip  Henry  Vibert,  builder  
Family  residence  at  118  Heytesbury  Road,  c.1902-­‐1923  (since  demolished).  
Historic  Themes   • Federation  &  Late  Gold  Boom  Period  (1890s  –  1910s):  Land  allocation  &  
subdivision;  depression  &  boom;  consolidation;  local  famous  &  infamous  
people.  
• A  time  of  Uncertainty  (World  War  One,  Inter-­‐War  &  World  war  Two)(1910s-­‐
1940s):  Consolidation;  depression  &  boom;  local  famous  &  infamous  people.  
References   • Perth  18-­‐52.  Suburb  of  Subiaco.  Plan  of  Subiaco  showing  all  subdivisions  &  DP  
Nos.,  series  235,  cons  3868,  item354  
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  33  Folio  86    
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  33,  Folio  100  
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  45,  Folio  127  
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  111,  Folio  178  
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  111,  Folio  291  
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  299  Folio  56  
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  358  Folio  71  
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  383  Folio  145  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  
February  2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (information  provided  by  the  City  
of  Subiaco,  February  2015,  and  www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Western  Australian  Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• Contemporary  newspaper  articles  relating  to  the  professional  and  public  
activities  of  local  residents  and  builders.  (trove.nla.gov.au)    
• Who  Built  Subiaco?  An  unpublished  research  project,  Annette  Green  (January  
2015)  
 

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City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     13  
 
Description  of  the   The  study  area  includes  good  representative  examples  of  the  mixture  of  early  
Study  Area   twentieth  century  housing  that  was  developed  in  a  ‘desirable’  part  of  Subiaco,  as  
defined  by  its  close  proximity  to  the  civic  and  business  centres  and  to  the  tramline  
to  the  city.    
While  the  street  cannot  be  described  as  an  intact  or  uniform  early  twentieth  
streetscape,  the  building  envelopes,  materials,  setbacks  and  the  Federation  era  
architectural  styles,  provide  an  overall  sense  of  consistency,  while  the  individual  
designs  and  detailing  add  a  richness  and  complexity.  Some  of  the  key  
characteristics  of  the  original  housing  stock  include  single  storey  frontages,  tuck-­‐
pointed  face-­‐brick  walls,  stepped  facades,  front  verandahs  and  hipped-­‐gabled  
roofs.    A  more  detailed  list  of  the  characteristic  features  and  elements  is  included  
below.  
All  of  the  residential  sites  were  developed  in  the  period  1899  to  1918,  while  the  
small  site  on  the  south-­‐west  corner  of  Heytesbury  and  Hensman  Roads  was  
developed  with  a  local  shop  in  c.1922.    The  original  houses  date  from  two  primary  
periods  of  development,  c.1899-­‐1906  (when  seven  of  the  existing  houses  were  
built)  and  c.1913-­‐1919  (when  six  more  were  built).  Despite  this  separation,  the  
style  of  the  houses  did  not  change  greatly  and  Federation  Queen  Anne  remained  
the  primary  influence.    
Of  the  sixteen  properties  within  the  Study  Area,  eight  have  been  assessed  as  
making  a  considerable  contribution  to  its  heritage  character,  while  six  have  been  
assessed  as  making  some  contribution  (the  latter  having  undergone  alterations  
such  as  changes  to  the  original  finishes  and/or  additions  which  have  impacted  to  
some  degree  on  the  streetscape  character  of  each  place).    Only  two  houses  have  
been  assessed  as  making  little  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  street.    
Of  these,  #108  was  extensively  rebuilt  and  extended  in  2011,  while  #118  was  fully  
replaced  in  c.1980.    
More  detailed  descriptions  and  photographs  of  each  house  have  been  included  in  
Section  4  (Place  Records).        
Key  Features/   • Regular  plantings  of  street  trees  –  including  mature  Eucalypts,  peppermint  
Elements   trees,  (Agonis  flexuosa),  and  bottlebrush  (Callistemon).      
Note:  the  overlay  of  various  planting  regimes  means  that  the  street  trees  
create  a  pleasant  green  avenue,  but  lack  an  overall  sense  of  unity  (relating  to  
both  age  and  species).  
• Wide  grassed  verges;  
• Open  streetscape  with  typically  low  or  open  front  fences  –  with  the  exception  
of  #115,  which  has  a  high  masonry  wall  to  the  front  boundary;  
• Well-­‐maintained  front  gardens;  
• Varied  block  widths  of  approximately  10.5  to  21.5m;  
• Generally  consistent  front  setbacks  of  approximately  5.2  to  6.7m  along  the  
southern  side  of  the  street  –  with  the  exception  of  135  Heytesbury  Road,  
where  the  shop  had  a  zero  setback  around  the  corner  frontage.    
General  setbacks  of  between  about  4  to  5m  along  the  northern  side  of  the  
street,  with  the  exception  of  Nos  110  and  122  which  have  larger  setbacks  of  
approximately  6.8  and  8.7m  respectively.  
Zero  streetscape  setback  to  the  Heytesbury  Road  (side)  facade  of  the  house  at  
98  Hensman  Road  (which  addresses  Hensman  Road  and  falls  outside  of  the  
study  area);  

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  • Typically  narrow  side  setbacks  with  the  exception  of  129  Heytesbury  Road,  
which  has  a  spacious  side  garden;  
• Single  storey  houses  (with  some  modern  second  storey  additions);  
Note:  In  c.1980  a  two-­‐storey  dwelling  replaced  the  original  house  at  #108.  
• Predominance  of  Federation  Queen  Anne  styles  and  detailing;  
• Predominantly  asymmetrical  facades;  
• Gable-­‐hipped  roof  forms  with  tall  chimneys;  
• Terracotta  tile  or  corrugated  metal  roof  cladding;  
• Prominent  street-­‐facing  gables  with  varied  detailing,  including  timber  battens,  
roughcast  rendering,  pressed  metal  panels,  stucco  decoration,  timber  screens  
and  fretwork;  
• A  breakdown  of  the  apparent  bulk  of  the  main  façades  through  the  varied  use  
of  design  elements  such  as  projecting  wings,  faceted  window  bays,  shallow  
rectangular  window  bays  and  return  or  straight  verandahs;  
• A  traditional  use  of  red  face  brick  for  the  main  facades,  generally  with  
restrained  rendered  detailing  including  tuck-­‐pointing  to  the  main  façade(s)  
and  contrasting  rendered  finishes  to  gable  ends,  string  courses,  window  sills  
and/or  selected  panels;    
Note:  the  authenticity  of  #s  113,  115,  116,  119  &  120  has  been  diminished  
by  the  rendering  or  painting  of  the  original  brick  façades.  
• Raked,  bull-­‐nosed  or  hipped  verandahs  to  the  main  façade;  
• Varied  timber  detailing  to  verandahs;  
• Vertical  window  proportions  (typically  double  hung  or  triple  casement  
windows);  
• Leadlight  detailing  to  the  main  windows,  sidelights  and  highlights;  
• Use  of  French  doors  or  full-­‐height  double  hung  windows  (some  with  half-­‐
height  sidelights)  as  secondary  openings  onto  the  verandahs.    
• Panelled  entry  doors  with  moulded  timber  architraves,  located  under  the  
front  verandah  or  facing  the  side  boundary  under  a  return  verandah.  
 
   

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Pedestrian  views  of  street  trees,  verges,  footpaths  and  fences    

     

     

     

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Pedestrian  views  of  building  details    

     

     

     

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4. PLACE  RECORDS  
 
   

 
 

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Page  Left  Blank  Intentionally

 
 

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Address   108  Heytesbury,  Subiaco    
Lots  20  &  21    
Other  Names:    Tooradin  (house  name  used  when  John  and  Isabella  Schnitzler’s  
youngest  son  was  born  in  1905  and  when  their  oldest  son  died  in  1908)  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1902   Architectural   This  place  no  longer  represents  a  particular  
date   Style   architectural  style  
Contributory   Little  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  The  major  alterations  and  additions  undertaken  since  the  1980s  have  largely  
obscured  the  original  design  and  detailing  of  this  house.      
Only  the  doors  and  windows  to  the  front  façade  and  the  verandah  detailing  still  
reflect/interpret  the  detailing  of  a  traditional  early  twentieth  century  house.    

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City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     20  
 
Historical   Perth  Suburban  Lot  255  was  purchased  by  the  Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  
Notes  and   Building  Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    Two  years  later  it  was  transferred  to  
Associations   James  Chesters  of  155  Elizabeth  Street,  Melbourne,  estate  agent.    By  1894  Chesters  
had  subdivided  this  land  as  Deposited  Plan  899,  with  42  lots  laid  out  around  Queen  
Street  (soon  renamed  Union  Street).      
Lots  20  &  21,  with  frontages  to  Heytesbury  Road,  were  transferred  from  James  
Chesters  to  John  George  Schnitzler  on  16  July  1901.      John  Schnitzler  had  married  
Isabella  Broadbent  in  Victoria  in  1888  and  they  moved  to  Western  Australia  in  c.1900,  
with  their  three  children,  Norman  (born  1899),  Frank  (1891)  and  Mary  (1894).    A  fourth  
child,  John  William,  was  born  in  1905.  
The  1902  Post  Office  Directory  gave  J.  G.  Schnitzler’s  address  as  Irvine  Street,  Subiaco,  
but  by  1903  the  family  had  moved  into  their  new  house  at  108  Heytesbury  Road  
(which  was  one  of  the  first  two  houses  constructed  in  Chesters’  subdivision,  together  
with  104  Heytesbury  Road,  since  demolished).  
Schnitzler  established  the  Commonwealth  Trading  Company  in  c.1904  and  in  1910  it  
was  announced:  
Some  six  years  back  the  Commonwealth  Trading  Company  set  up  business  in  Perth,  
and  yearly  their  turn  over  has  increased.  Last  year's  business  improved  to  that  
extent  that  eventually  larger  premises  had  to  be  secured.  With  the  new  address,  
the  management  decided  to  alter  the  name  of  the  firm,  which  will  in  future  be  
known  as  the  Commonwealth  West  End  Tailors.  The  new  premises  are  situated  at  
843  Hay-­‐street  (three  doors  west  of  His  Majesty's  Theatre).  
At  the  beginning  of  1917  the  Schnitzler  family  changed  their  surname  by  deed  poll  to  
Thornton  -­‐  probably  in  response  to  community  feelings  about  Germanic  names.    The  
notice  of  this  change  of  name  stressed  that  Schnitzler  was:  a  natural  born  British  
subject,  having  been  born  at  Inglewood,  in  the  State  of  Victoria.  
Isabella  Thornton  died  in  March  1919  and  John  Thornton  had  remarried  and  moved  to  
Nedlands  by  1924.    He  continued  to  manage  Commonwealth  West  End  Tailors  until  his  
death  in  1940.  
The  next  owners  were  John  Tyson  Jones  and  his  wife  Bridget.    In  the  late  19th  century,  
Bridget  Coleman  (a  widow  with  6  children)  was  the  owner  of  the  Federal  Hotel,  Collie.    
By  the  early  20th  century  John  Jones  (a  widower  with  at  least  one  child)  had  taken  over  
as  the  licensee,  and  it  was  about  this  time  that  the  couple  married.    In  c.1924  they  
retired  to  Subiaco,  sharing  108  Heytesbury  Road  at  various  times  with  members  of  the  
blended  family,  including  one  of  Bridget’s  daughters,  Nora  Josephine  Coleman,  and  
John’s  son,  John  Neville  Jones.  
In  the  mid  1930s  Bridget  moved  to  West  Subiaco  to  live  with  her  son,  Edward  
Coleman,  while  John  moved  to  Wembley  to  live  with  his  son,  John,  jnr.    The  next  
occupant  was  a  Martha  Euphemia  Jones  (wife  of  Charles  Edwin  Jones,  prospector),  but  
it  is  not  known  if  the  two  Jones  families  were  related.  
The  next  longer  term  occupants  were  John  Joseph  Hamilton  (a  retired  machinist)  and  
his  wife,  Cecelia,  who  were  listed  at  this  address  from  1942  until  the  mid-­‐1950s.  
Historical  aerial  photographs  indicate  that  a  former  tiled  roof  was  replaced  in  
corrugated  metal  sheeting  in  the  period  1985-­‐1995.    The  roof  structure  was  fully  
removed  and  reconfigured  as  part  of  major  alterations/extensions  undertaken  in  2008.  
   

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  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  c.1954  included:  
1903-­‐1923   John  George  Schnitzler  (aka  John  George  Thornton),  commercial  
traveller,  later  Manager  of  Commonwealth  West  End  Tailors,  and  his  
wife,  Isabella  Schnitzler  (until  her  death  in  1919)  
1924-­‐1935   John  Tyson  Jones,  retired,  and  his  wife,  Bridget  Jones  
1936-­‐1939   Mrs  Martha  Euphemia  Jones,  wife  of  Charles  Edwin  Jones,  prospector  
1940-­‐1941   Mrs  Alice  Gough  
1942-­‐c.1954   John  Joseph  Hamilton,  retired  machinist,  and  his  wife,  Cecelia  Marion  
Hamilton  

Physical   Historical  aerial  photographs  suggest  that  108  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  with  a  
Description   simple  symmetrical  façade,  a  ‘U’  shaped  hipped  roof  and  a  verandah  extending  across  
(based  on   the  Heytesbury  Road  frontage.    The  symmetrical  form  of  the  main  façade  has  been  
external   retained,  but  the  roofline  has  been  raised  and  reconfigured  to  accommodate  a  second  
inspection   floor,  with  prominent  gable  dormers  facing  west,  south  and  east.    The  external  walls  
only)   are  fully  rendered  and  the  modern  verandah  returns  along  the  western  side  of  the  
house.    This  verandah  has  traditional  detailing  with  a  curved  battened  valance  and  
chamfered  posts.  The  main  façade  has  an  early  twentieth  century  style  central  
entrance  door,  flanked  by  sidelights  and  highlights  (all  with  stained  glass  detailing).    To  
either  side  of  the  entrance  there  is  a  pair  of  traditional,  full-­‐height  double  hung  
windows  with  moulded  timber  kick  panels.  
The  house  is  set  back  approximately  4.5m  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  
by  a  low  timber  picket  fence  with  capped  posts  and  scalloped  panels.    
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  very  good  condition.  
References   • Heritage  Assessment  of  James  Chesters’  Union  Street  Subdivision  –  2-­‐22  Union  
Street,  5-­‐21  Union  Street,  159-­‐177  Hamersley  Road  &  98-­‐110  Heytesbury  Road,  
Subiaco  (prepared  by  Greenward  Consulting  for  the  City  of  Subiaco,  December  
2014)  
Citing:  
− Certificate  of  Title  Volume  33  Folio  85  (copy  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  
October  2014)  
− City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books,  1903,  1916/17  and  1929/30  (information  provided  
by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  October  2014)  
− Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  
Subiaco,  October  2014,  with  additional  research  by  Greenward  Consulting)  
(www.slwa.wa.gov.au/find/wa_resources/post_office_directories)  
− Sewerage  Plan,  Sheet  193,  MWSS  &  DD,  SROWA,  drawn  1923,  Revised  1941  &  
1955  (copy  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  October  2014)  
− Electoral  Rolls  (selected  years  at  ancestry.com.au)  
− Family  trees  for  John  George  Schnitzler  (ancestry.com.au)  
− Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Map  Viewer  
(www.landgate.wa.gov.au/bmvf/app/mapviewer/)  
− The  Daily  News  22  April  1910  p  3  (trove.nla.gov.au)  
− The  West  Australian  3  February  1917  p  1  (trove.nla.gov.au)  
−  The  West  Australian  11  May  1940  p  20  (trove.nla.gov.au)  
− Various  other  newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  108  
Heytesbury  Road  and/or  its  occupants  (trove.nla.gov.au)  
 
 

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Page  Left  Blank  Intentionally  
   

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Address   110  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco    
Lots  18  &  19    
Other  Names:    Coronada  (name  used  in  newspaper  advertisements  when  the  house  
was  offered  for  sale  in  1934).  A  slight  variation  of  this  name,  
‘Coronado’,  is  now  painted  on  a  timber  garden  arch  on  the  western  
side  of  the  house  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1919   Architectural   Federation  Queen  Anne  (late  example,  with  some  
date   Style   detailing  influenced  by  the  Federation  Bungalow  
style)  

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Contributory   Some  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  The  external  streetscape  character  and  finishes  of  the  original  part  of  the  house  
are  largely  consistent  with  its  original  design  (albeit  with  some  modified  detailing  to  he  
doors  and  windows).    However,  the  scale  and  presentation  of  the  place  to  the  street  
has  been  significantly  modified  by  the  prominent  double  garage  on  the  eastern  side  of  
the  house.    
Historical   Perth  Suburban  Lot  255  was  purchased  by  the  Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  
Notes  and   Building  Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    Two  years  later  it  was  transferred  to  
Associations   James  Chesters  of  155  Elizabeth  Street,  Melbourne,  estate  agent.    By  1894  Chesters  
had  subdivided  this  land  as  Deposited  Plan  899,  with  42  lots  laid  out  around  Queen  
Street  (soon  renamed  Union  Street).      
The  City  of  Subiaco  Rates  Book  of  1915/16  records  the  owner  of  Lots  18  &  19  as  the  
Subiaco  Town  Clerk,  Chris  Luth.    However  the  Certificate  of  Title  shows  that  ownership  
was  not  officially  transferred  from  James  Chesters  until  July  1919,  when  a  new  
Certificate  of  Title  was  issued  in  the  name  of  Victor  Albert  Du  Feu.    It  therefore  seems  
possible  that  Chesters  had  taken  a  deposit  on  the  property  in  c.1916,  but  that  the  
initial  purchaser  had  moved  on  before  finalising  the  transaction.  
Victor  De  Fu  had  moved  to  Western  Australia  from  Victoria  in  the  early  20th  century,  to  
work  with  his  father,  James  Peter  Du  Feu,  and  brother,  Edward  James  Du  Feu,  at  J.  P.  
Du  Feu  and  Co.  Ltd.    When  Edward  died  in  1923  it  was  reported  that:  
After  leaving  school  he  joined  his  father  in  business  in  Latrobe-­‐street,  Melbourne,  as  
spouting  manufacturers.  In  1903,  his  father  came  to  this  State  and  opened  a  similar  
business  in  Roe-­‐street.  The  deceased  joined  him  in  Perth  about  a  year  later.  On  the  
death  of  their  father  in  1917  the  deceased  and  his  brother  Victor  entered  into  
partnership,  and  had  since  carried  on  the  business  under  the  name  of  J.  P.  Du.  Feu  
and  Co.,  spouting  manufacturers,  Roe  street,  Perth.  
Victor  continued  to  manage  and  develop  the  firm  and  in  1933  J.  P.  Du  Feu  and  Co.  Ltd  
was  described  as  follows:  
This  local  progressive  firm  is  well  known  throughout  Western  Australia,  having  
been  established  in  this  State  for  over  30  years.  With  the  recent  additional  
installation  of  modem  machinery  they  are  now  producing  numerous  household,  
farming,  mining  and  building  requisites,  etc,  among  which  are  tanks,  cyanide  vats,  
sheep,  cattle  and  pig  troughing,  downpipes,  ridgecap  and  gutter  elbows,  angles,  
hopper  heads,  bell  mouths,  cowls,  sewerage  vents,  bore  casing,  irrigation  pipes  
wheat  bins,  brine  tanks,  fowl  coops,  ice  moulds,  fireplaces,  baths,  skylights,  
"VicKan"  buckets,  billycans,  bins,  dippers,  cream,  fruit,  jam,  honey,  oil,  paint  and  
pulp  tins,  etc  
Victor  married  Mabel  Mercy  Hutchinson  in  1914  and  they  had  three  children,  Maurice  
Albert  James  Du  Feu  (1917),  Valmai  Marcia  Du  Feu  (1919),  and  Faye  Therese  Du  Feu  
(1923).    When  they  purchased  Lots  18  &  19  the  family  were  living  at  91  Heytesbury  
Road,  but  had  moved  into  their  new  house  at  110  Heytesbury  Road  by  1920.      
In  1934  the  house  was  offered  for  sale,  as  below,  but  it  appears  to  have  been  
withdrawn  from  the  market  as  the  De  Feu  family  remained  here  until  the  children  
were  adults,  finally  moving  to  West  Perth  in  about  1949  (shortly  before  Victor’s  death  
in  1950,  aged  70  years).  
HODD,  CUTHBERTSON  and  NORTH,  LTD.,  have  been  favoured  with  instructions  to  
OFFER  by  PUBLIC  AUCTION  as  above  Portion  of  Perth  Suburban  Lot  255,  and  being  
Lots  18  and  19  on  Plan  889,  being  the  whole,  of  the  land  comprised  in  Certificate  of  
Title  Volume  713,  Folio  121.    THE  LAND  has  a  frontage  of  100  links  to  Heytesbury-­‐  
road,  by  a  depth  of  174.2  links  to  a  r.o.w.  THE  IMPROVEMENTS  include  that  

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  faithfully  built  Brick  Residence,  with  tiled  roof  ,  known  as  Coronada,  No.  110  
Heytesbury-­‐road,  Subiaco,  containing  wide  verandahs,  entrance  hall,  3  bedrooms,  
dining  room,  lounge,  maid's-­‐  room,  well  arranged  kitchen,  with  gas  stove,  interior  
bathroom,  enamelled  bath,  basin,  gas  water  heater,  laundry,  and  all  conveniences.  
The  property  is  in  perfect  order.  Rooms  are  tastefully  decorated.  It  is  a  perfect  
home.  
Members  of  the  De  Fue  family  were  often  mentioned  in  the  social  pages  of  The  West  
Australian  from  the  time  of  their  marriage  through  until  at  least  the  early  1950s,  
referencing  local,  interstate  and  overseas  holidays,  social  events  and  family  
celebrations.  
After  their  departure,  110  Heytesbury  Road  was  owned  for  at  least  a  short  time  by  
Robert  George  Taylor  (a  steward),  but  a  newspaper  notice  suggests  that  he  sold  it  in  
1954.  
Historical  aerial  photographs  indicate  that  major  rear  additions,  plus  a  new  garage  at  
the  front,  were  constructed  in  the  period  1985-­‐1995.    
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  c.1954  included:  
1920-­‐1949   Victor  Albert  Du  Feu,  ironworker/manager,  and  his  wife  Mabel  Mercy  
Du  Feu    
c.1954   Robert  George  Taylor,  steward  

Physical   110  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  as  a  late  example  of  a  Federation  Queen  Anne  
Description   villa,  with  some  detailing  (such  as  the  verandah)  influenced  by  the  Federation  
(based  on   Bungalow  style.    
external   Key  elements  include:  
inspection  
• Asymmetrical  plan,  with  a  stepped  façade.  
only)  
• Gabled-­‐hipped  roof  with  terracotta  tiles  and  curved  terracotta  finials.    
Note:  No  chimneys  are  visible  from  the  street.  
• Gabled  bay  on  the  western  side  of  the  main  façade.  
This  features  a  projecting  rectangular  bay  window  with  a  bank  of  three  casement  
windows  set  over  a  projecting  rendered  sill.      The  highlights  each  have  four,  small,  
timber-­‐framed  panes  which  are  consistent  with  the  period  and  style  of  the  house.    
The  narrow  casement  windows  have  curved  leadlight  detailing  accented  with  
textured  glass,  which  is  more  consistent  with  later  inter-­‐war  detailing.    
The  flying  gable  end  has  a  roughcast  face  with  vertical  battens.  
• Tuck-­‐pointed  brickwork  to  the  main  façade  with  two  contrasting  rendered  string  
courses  under  the  verandah  –  one  at  window  sill  height  and  one  at  door-­‐head  
height.    Where  the  brick  walls  extend  above  the  height  of  the  verandah,  there  is  a  
third  rendered  string  course  immediately  under  the  eaves.  
• Entry  vestibule  
This  is  located  immediately  adjacent  to  the  rectangular  window  bay,  but  is  
distinguished  from  it  by  a  small  recess  to  the  main  façade,  the  western  end  of  the  
front  verandah  and  a  distinctive  roof  treatment  (comprising  a  small  louvered  
gablet).  
The  double  entrance  doors  have  large  glazed  panels  with  curved  leadlight,  
textured  glass  and  a  stepped  timber  frame  at  the  top  of  the  glazing.    Similar  to  
the  main  windows,  the  style  of  this  door  is  consistent  with  later  inter-­‐war  
detailing.  

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  • Stepped  façade    
To  the  east  of  the  entry  vestibule  the  façade  steps  back  to  create  a  deep  
verandah  area.    On  the  eastern  wall  of  the  vestibule  there  is  a  porthole  window  
with  a  wide  rendered  surround  and  leadlight  glazing.  
On  the  rear  wall  of  the  verandah  there  is  a  wide  pair  of  casement  widows  with  
leadlight  glazing  to  match  the  entrance  door  and  bay  window.  
• Stepped  front  verandah  
The  verandah  projects  forward  of  the  main  façade  and  extends  between  the  
western  gable  bay  and  the  modern  garage.    It  was  designed  in  the  style  of  a  wide  
front  porch,  and  steps  back  near  the  eastern  end.  
The  raked  verandah  roof  continues  in  a  broken-­‐back  alignment  from  the  main  
roofline  and  is  supported  by  half-­‐height  paired  timber  posts  with  simple  
geometric  brackets.    The  posts  are  set  on  rock-­‐faced  stone  piers  with  rendered  
caps  and  the  whole  of  this  element  is  influenced  by  the  Bungalow  style.  
The  late  twentieth  century  double  garage  is  located  at  the  eastern  end  of  the  house,  
aligning  with  the  main  façade  (and  enclosing  the  eastern  side  of  the  verandah).  
The  house  is  set  back  approximately  6.8m  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  
by  a  scalloped  timber  picket  fence.    
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  good  condition.  
References   • Heritage  Assessment  of  James  Chesters’  Union  Street  Subdivision  –  2-­‐22  Union  
Street,  5-­‐21  Union  Street,  159-­‐177  Hamersley  Road  &  98-­‐110  Heytesbury  Road,  
Subiaco  (prepared  by  Greenward  Consulting  for  the  City  of  Subiaco,  December  
2014)  
Citing:  
− Certificate  of  Title  Volume  33  Folio  85  (copy  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  
October  2014)  
− City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books,  1915/16,  1918/19  and  1929/30  (information  
provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  October  2014)  
− Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  
Subiaco,  October  2014,  with  additional  research  by  Greenward  Consulting)  
(www.slwa.wa.gov.au/find/wa_resources/post_office_directories)  
− Sewerage  Plan,  Sheet  193,  MWSS  &  DD,  SROWA,  drawn  1923,  Revised  1941  &  
1955  (copy  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  October  2014)  
− Electoral  Rolls  (selected  years  at  ancestry.com.au)  
− Family  trees  for  Victor  Albert  Du  Feu  (ancestry.com.au)  
− Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Map  Viewer  
(www.landgate.wa.gov.au/bmvf/app/mapviewer/)  
− The  Daily  News  17  May  1923  p  7  (trove.nla.gov.au)  
− Sunday  Times  21  May  1933  p  7  (trove.nla.gov.au)  
− The  West  Australian  3  December  1934  p  19  (trove.nla.gov.au)  
− Various  other  newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  the  Du  Feu  
family  and/or  110  Heytesbury  Road  (trove.nla.gov.au)  
   

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Address   116  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lots  18  &  19  
Other  Names:    Wendoree  (name  used  in  advertisements  place  by  Mrs  Bastow  in  1903-­‐
1904,  and  in  family  notices  placed  by  the  Ball  family  in  1910).  
Photograph  

 
Construction   1899   Architectural   Federation  Queen  Anne  
date   Style  
Contributory   Considerable  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  This  place  has  specific  historical  values  as  the  home  of  Austin  Bastow  (architect  
and  Mayor  of  Subiaco,  1900-­‐1902  and  1905-­‐1906);  as  part  of  the  earliest  phase  of  the  
development  of  Subiaco  with  brick  villas;  and  as  the  oldest  remaining  house  along  the  
full  length  of  Heytesbury  Road.    However,  the  rendering  of  the  main  façade  and  the  
extension  under  the  return  verandah  have  impacted  on  the  authenticity  and  
traditional  character  of  the  place.  
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  be  made  
Associations   available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  256  was  purchased  by  the  Intercolonial  
Investment  Land  and  Building  Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    However,  no  
development  was  undertaken  at  that  time  and,  in  June  1896  the  whole  of  the  property  
was  transferred  to  James  Thomas  Peet  and  Austin  Bastow  of  Melbourne,  Estate  
Agents.    By  September  of  that  year,  Peet  and  Bastow  had  subdivided  this  land  as  
Deposited  Plan  938,  with  42  residential  allotments  laid  out  along  parts  of  Hensman  
Road,  Hamersley  Road,  Beryl  (later  Redfern)  Street  and  Heytesbury  Road.    Lots  37  to  
42  of  this  subdivision  were  later  developed  as  116  to  122  Heytesbury  Road.  
Austin  Bastow  moved  to  Perth  in  c.1896  and  in  1899  was  working  as  an  architect,  with  
an  office  in  the  city  and  a  private  residence,  ‘St  Helens’,  in  Rokeby  Road.    However,  in  
April  of  that  year,  ‘St  Helens’  was  advertised  for  sale  and  in  June  the  family  advertised  
for  general  staff  using  the  address  “Bastow,  Hetyesbuty  Road’.    The  readily  available  
evidence  therefore  suggests  that  Austin  Bastow  built  a  new  house  for  himself  on  Lots  
41  and  42  (116  Heytesbury  Road)  in  1899.      

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  In  1901,  when  street  listings  were  first  provided  in  the  Post  Office  Directory  for  
Heytesbury  Road,  this  was  one  of  only  four  houses  identified  for  the  full  length  of  the  
street  (the  other  three  of  which  have  since  been  demolished).  
Austin  Bastow  lived  here  with  his  wife,  Mary,  until  1906.    During  this  time  the  house,  
which  was  named  ‘Wendoree’,  served  as  the  mayoral  residence  in  1900-­‐1902  and  
1905-­‐1906.    In  December  1906,  116  Heytesbury  Road  was  sold  to  Christina  Ellen  Ball.    
It  was  then  occupied  for  about  five  years  as  the  home  of  Christina  and  Charles  Ball,  
who  had  been  married  in  the  Pilbara  region  in  1901  and  had  five  children:  Stanley  
(1902),  Herbert  (1903),  Iris  (c.1906),  Alec  (1908),  and  Mena  (1910).      
Charles  was  a  pastoralist,  who  held  the  lease  for  Muccan  Station  in  the  Marble  Bar  
region  in  partnership  with  Michael  Corbett  from  the  1890s  until  1912.      His  wife,  
Christina,  was  the  daughter  of  another  North-­‐West  pioneer,  Christopher  Coppin  of  Eel  
Creek  station.  
In  late  1910  Charles  Ball  purchased  a  large  house  on  an  estate  along  the  Swan  River  at  
Redcliffe,  and  116  Heytesbury  Road  was  subsequently  rented  out.    By  1916  it  had  been  
divided  into  two  flats  and  there  were  various  occupants  over  the  years,  but  in  c.1928  
Charles  and  Christina  returned  to  the  house,  sharing  it  at  that  time  with  Alec  (a  law  
clerk)  and  Mena  (home  duties).    
Charles  Ball  died  in  April  1940  aged  77,  and  from  c.1941-­‐1949  the  house  was  occupied  
by  Walter  McNamara  (a  railway  employee),  his  wife,  Ethel,  their  son  Walter,  jnr  (tiler)  
and  their  daughter  (or  daughter-­‐in-­‐law)  Phyllis  (home  duties).    For  at  least  part  of  this  
time  they  also  shared  the  house  with  Ethel’s  mother,  Mrs  Sarah  Plummer  (who  died  in  
1946).  
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  of  which  is  
dated  1948)  suggests  that  the  building  envelope  at  the  front  of  the  house  has  
remained  largely  the  same,  with  the  exception  of  a  carport  added  on  the  western  side  
of  the  house  in  the  period  c.1985-­‐1995.    Over  time,  additions  have  been  made  to  the  
rear  of  the  house,  including  major  works  in  c.2001.  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  c.1949  included:  
1901-­‐1906   Austin  Bastow,  architect,  and  his  wife  Mary  
1907-­‐1911   Charles  Ball,  pastoralist/squatter,  and  his  wife  Christina    
1912-­‐1914   James  Campbell  Muir,  manager,  telephone  exchange  
1915-­‐1916   Rev  Arthur  S  J  Fry,  Methodist  minister  
1917   Robert  Vincent  Butler,  clerk,  and  Annie  Jane  Bulter  (home  duties)  
1918   ž William  Ernest  Shelton,  schoolmaster    
ž Mrs  Annie  Jane  Butler    
1919   ž William  Ernest  Shelton,  schoolmaster    
ž Archibald  Gilchrist  Clayton  
1920-­‐1922   ž William  Ernest  Shelton,  schoolmaster    
ž Oliver  Charles  Young,  linotype  operator  
1923   ž James  V  Carruthers  
ž W  H  Bond  
1924   Horace  L  Dobble  
1925-­‐1926   ž Henry  Whitehead,  agent,  Edith  Adelaide  Whitehead,  home  duties,  
and  Kenneth  Whitehead,  salesman    
ž Thomas  William  Scott,  tailor,  and  Ivy  Jeanette  Scott,  home  duties  
1927-­‐1928   Henry  Whitehead,  agent,  Edith  Adelaide  Whitehead,  home  duties,  and  
Kenneth  Whitehead,  salesman  
1928-­‐1939   Charles  Ball,  retired,  and  his  wife  Christina    
1940-­‐1949   Walter  Joseph  McNamara,  railway  employee,  and  his  wife  Ethel  

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Physical   116  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  in  the  Federation  Queen  Anne  style.    Key  elements  
Description   include  the:  
(based  on   • Asymmetrical  façade.  
external  
• Gable-­‐hipped  roof  clad  with  corrugated  metal  sheeting.  
inspection  
only)   The  flying  gable  to  the  main  facade  has  battened  eaves,  shaped  bargeboards,  and  
a  swirl-­‐rendered  face  set  with  vertical  battens.  At  the  centre  of  the  gable  there  is  
a  large,  rectangular  louvered  vent  
• Painted  brick  chimney  with  contrasting  rendered  detailing  to  the  face,  projecting  
cornice  and  cap.  
• Rendered  façade    
This  was  almost  certainly  originally  tuck-­‐pointed  face-­‐brick,  probably  with  
contrasting  rendered  stringcourses.  
• Projecting  wing  on  the  western  side  of  the  main  façade  (set  under  the  flying  gable).  
This  features  a  projecting  rectangular  window  bay,  with  a  bank  of  three  casement  
windows  set  over  a  rectangular  rendered  sill.      The  highlights  have  multi-­‐paned  
leadlight  panels,  while  the  casement  windows  have  plain  glazing.    
• Bullnose  verandah  with  turned  timber  posts,  abutting  the  projecting  wing  and  
extending  across  the  remainder  of  the  façade.  
This  verandah  was  designed  to  return  along  the  eastern  side  of  the  house,  but  
the  main  façade  has  since  been  extended  across  the  side  verandah.  
• Entrance  door  abutting  the  projecting  wing.  
This  is  flanked  by  narrow  highlights  and  set  under  a  full  width  highlight,  
The  sidelights  and  highlights  have  stained  glass  panels  designed  with  a  geometric  
floral  motif.  
• French  doors  opening  onto  the  verandah  from  the  room  on  the  eastern  side  of  the  
entrance  hall.  
These  have  robust  timber  detailing  to  the  lower  panels  and  plain  glazing  to  the  
upper  panels.    The  doors  are  flanked  by  half-­‐height  sidelights  (with  plain  glazing)  
and  capped  by  highlights  (with  stained  glass).  
• Eastern  extension  of  the  main  façade  (under  the  line  of  the  return  verandah)  
This  has  a  single  narrow  leadlight  window  facing  the  street.  
• Secondary  projecting  wing,  facing  east.  
This  side  wing  has  later  panelling  to  the  face  of  the  gable,  which  sits  over  a  triple  
casement  window  with  coloured  glass  highlights.    
The  house  is  set  approximately  4.5m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  
by  a  scalloped  timber  picket  fence.  
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  fair-­‐good  condition.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  33  Folio  86  
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  383  Folio  145  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• The  West  Australian  7  April  1899  p  8  
• The  West  Australian  21  June  1899  p  8  
 

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• The  West  Australian  March  1916  p  11  
• The  West  Australian  8  December  1921  p  12  
• Great  Southern  Herald  24  August  1929  p  3  
• Various  other  newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  116  Heytesbury  
Road  and/or  the  occupants  of  the  house  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 
   

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Address   118  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lot  40  
Photograph  

 
Non   No  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Contributory     Current  house  built  in  1977-­‐85  
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  be  made  
Associations   available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  256  was  purchased  by  the  Intercolonial  
Investment  Land  and  Building  Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    However,  no  
development  was  undertaken  at  that  time  and,  in  June  1896  the  whole  of  the  property  
was  transferred  to  James  Thomas  Peet  and  Austin  Bastow  of  Melbourne,  Estate  
Agents.    By  September  of  that  year,  Peet  and  Bastow  had  subdivided  this  land  as  
Deposited  Plan  938,  with  42  residential  allotments  laid  out  along  parts  of  Hensman  
Road,  Hamersley  Road,  Beryl  (later  Redfern)  Street  and  Heytesbury  Road.    Lots  37  to  
42  of  this  subdivision  were  later  developed  as  116  to  122  Heytesbury  Road.  
The  readily  available  information  suggests  that  the  original  house  at  118  Heytesbury  
Road  was  constructed  in  c.1901  and  occupied  by  Philip  Henry  Vibert  (a  cabinet  
maker/builder)  and  his  wife,  Florence,  by  1902.    When  the  family  moved  to  West  
Leederville  in  c.1923  and  their  Subiaco  house  was  offered  for  rent  and  there  were  
various  occupants  over  the  years,  including  the  Vibert’s  son,  Victor,  who  lived  here  
with  his  wife,  Elma,  from  c.1927-­‐1937.  
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs,  together  with  the  physical  
evidence,  indicates  that  this  house  was  demolished  and  replaced  in  1977-­‐85.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  33  Folio  86  
• The  West  Australian  23  April  1901  p  1    
• The  West  Australian  20  May  1901  p  2  
• The  West  Australian  3  November  1923  p  19  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
   
 

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Page  Left  Blank  Intentionally  
   

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Address   120  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lot  39  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1906   Architectural   Federation  Queen  Anne  
date   Style  
Contributory   Some  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:    The  rendering  of  the  façade,  alterations  to  the  windows  and  construction  of  a  
front  carport  have  impacted  on  the  authenticity  and  traditional  character  of  the  place.    
However,  the  original  design  can  still  be  readily  understood.      
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  256  was  purchased  by  the  
Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  Building  Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    No  
development  was  undertaken  at  that  time  and,  in  June  1896  the  whole  of  the  property  
was  transferred  to  James  Thomas  Peet  and  Austin  Bastow  of  Melbourne,  Estate  
Agents.    By  September  of  that  year,  Peet  and  Bastow  had  subdivided  this  land  as  
Deposited  Plan  938,  with  42  residential  allotments  laid  out  along  parts  of  Hensman  
Road,  Hamersley  Road,  Beryl  (later  Redfern)  Street  and  Heytesbury  Road.    Lots  37  to  
42  of  this  subdivision  were  later  developed  as  116  to  122  Heytesbury  Road.  
Information  in  the  Subiaco  Rates  Books  indicates  that  120  Heytesbury  Road  was  built  
in  c.1906,  at  which  time  the  owner/occupier  was  listed  as  Ann  Marcussen.        Peter  
Daniel  Marcussen  (carpenter)  was  identified  as  the  primary  occupant  until  c.1909  and,  
given  that  two  of  Peter’s  sons  (Albert  and  Louis)  were  carpenter/builders,  it  seems  
likely  that  the  house  was  constructed  by  members  of  this  family.  
The  next  owner  was  another  builder,  William  Phippard,  who  lived  here  until  his  death  
in  1913  (aged  about  54  years).  The  other  occupant  at  that  time  was  Miss  Daisy  
Phippard  (dressmaker)  who  continued  to  live  here  until  the  early  1920s,  sharing  the  
house  with  her  brother  William,  jnr,  until  around  the  time  of  his  marriage  in  1918.  

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  120  Heytesbury  Road  appears  to  have  been  divided  into  two  flats  in  around  1920  and  
it  was  still  being  advertised  in  this  manner  in  1930.    The  occupants  changed  every  few  
years  and  when  the  property  was  offered  for  sale  as  a  deceased  estate  in  June  1952  
the  wording  of  the  advertisement  suggests  that  it  was  still  in  two  parts:  
120  HEYTESBURY  RD.  This  comfortable  brick  home  is  offered  with  part  vacant  
possession  and  comprises  5  rooms  plus  kitchen  and  bathroom  and  usual  
conveniences.  Well  situated  and  in  good  order  throughout.  
By  1954  the  house  had  been  occupied  by  Colin  Smith  and  his  mother,  Clara.    120  
Heytesbury  Road  subsequently  became  the  family  home  of  Colin  and  his  wife  Mae,  
who  were  married  in  the  mid-­‐1950s  and  remained  here  until  the  late  1970s  (after  
which  they  moved  in  with  their  son  at  110  Heytesbury  Road).  
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  of  which  is  
dated  1948)  suggests  that  the  building  envelope  at  the  front  of  the  house  has  
remained  largely  the  same,  with  the  exception  of  a  carport  at  the  front  of  the  house  
(first  added  in  the  1960s).    Over  time,  additions  have  been  made  to  the  rear  of  the  
house,  including  major  works  in  c.2006.  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  the  late  1970s  included:  
1907-­‐1909   Peter  Daniel  Marcussen,  carpenter  
1910-­‐1913   William  Phippard,  builder,  and  Miss  Daisy  Annie  Phippard,  dressmaker  
1915-­‐1918   William  Henry  Phippard,  clerk,  and  Miss  Daisy  Annie  Phippard,  
dressmaker  
1919   Miss  Daisy  Phippard,  dressmaker  
1920-­‐1921   Mrs  G  A  Burkett    
Miss  Daisy  Phippard,  dressmaker  
1922-­‐1923   Frederick  T  Black  
1924   William  Henry  Phippard,  clerk  
1925-­‐1934   Mrs  Catherine  Bonnar,  home  duties  
1934-­‐1939   Ellen  Jane  Pearson,  home  duties,  Edith  Mable  Pearson,  clerk,  Evelyn  
Irene  Pearson,  typiste,  and  Ivy  Lillian  Pearson,  milliner  
1940-­‐1945   Mrs  M  Mofflin  
1946   Mrs  Haynes  
1947-­‐c.1953   Frances  Mabel  Cleland,  home  duties  
1954   Mrs  Clara  Edith  Smith,  home  duties,  and  Colin  Arthur  Smith,  window  
dresser  
Mid  1950s  to   Colin  Arthur  Smith,  window  dresser/shop-­‐fitter,  and  his  wife,  Mae  
late  1970s   Smith,  tailoress  

Physical   120  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  in  the  Federation  Queen  Anne  style.  Key  elements  
Description   include  the:  
(based  on   • Asymmetrical  façade.  
external  
• Gable-­‐hipped  roof  clad  with  corrugated  metal  sheeting.  
inspection  
only)   This  features  a  short,  east-­‐west  ridgeline  with  louvered  gablets  and  a  prominent  
street  front  gable  with  a  timber  finial  and  a  highly  decorative  pressed  metal  and  
mini-­‐orb  panelled  face.  
• Painted  brick  chimney  with  a  projecting  rendered  cap.  
• Rendered  façade.    
This  was  almost  certainly  originally  tuck-­‐pointed  face-­‐brick,  probably  with  
contrasting  rendered  stringcourses.  

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  • Parapet  wall  along  the  western  side  of  the  house  (where  the  house  abuts  the  side  
boundary).  
• Projecting  wing  on  the  western  side  of  the  main  façade  (set  under  the  gable  end).  
This  features  a  pair  of  casement  windows  flanking  a  wider  central  panel  of  fixed  
glass,  over  a  tiled  raked  sill.    The  detailing  of  this  opening  is  consistent  with  a  mid-­‐
twentieth  century  renovation.  
Over  the  window  there  is  a  raked  awning  with  larger  carved  bracket  panels.  
• Raked  verandah  (springing  from  the  eaves  line),  which  abuts  the  projecting  wing  
and  returns  towards  the  street  as  a  gabled  carport.      
This  has  square  timber  posts  and  carved  brackets.      
The  face  of  the  carport  has  a  simple  battened  gable  end  with  a  timber  finial.  
• Entrance  door  abutting  the  projecting  wing.  
This  is  flanked  by  a  single  narrow  sidelight  (with  no  highlights).  
• Rectangular  window  opening,  divided  as  a  single  casement  and  a  wide,  fixed  pane  
of  glass,  and  set  over  a  raked  tiled  sill.  
Like  the  other  front  window,  the  detailing  of  this  opening  is  consistent  with  a  
mid-­‐twentieth  century  renovation.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  4m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  by  a  
timber  picket  fence.  
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  good  condition.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  33  Folio  86  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• The  West  Australian  22  October  1921  p  12  
• The  West  Australian  19  July  1930  p  20  
• The  West  Australian  27  June  1952  p  22  
• Various  other  newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  120  Heytesbury  
Road  and/or  the  occupants  of  the  house  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 

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Address   122  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lots  37  &  38  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1906   Architectural   Federation  Queen  Anne  
date   Style  
Contributory   Considerable  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  This  place  has  specific  historical  values  as  the  long-­‐term  residence  of  Henry  
Daglish,  a  prominent  local  and  state  politician.  
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  256  was  purchased  by  the  
Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  Building  Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    No  
development  was  undertaken  at  that  time  and,  in  June  1896  the  whole  of  the  property  
was  transferred  to  James  Thomas  Peet  and  Austin  Bastow  of  Melbourne,  Estate  
Agents.    By  September  of  that  year,  Peet  and  Bastow  had  subdivided  this  land  as  
Deposited  Plan  938,  with  42  residential  allotments  laid  out  along  parts  of  Hensman  
Road,  Hamersley  Road,  Beryl  (later  Redfern)  Street  and  Heytesbury  Road.    Lots  37  to  
42  of  this  subdivision  were  later  developed  as  116  to  122  Heytesbury  Road.  
Lots  37  and  38,  Perth  Suburban  Lot  256,  were  purchased  by  James  Horrigan  in  July  
1905.      Horrigan,  a  telegraphist,  was  the  first  resident  listed  for  122  Heytesbury  Road  in  
the  Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (1907),  which  suggests  that  it  was  built  
as  his  family  home  around  the  time  of  his  marriage  to  Josephine  Farrelly  in  September  
1905.    Newspaper  announcements  confirm  that  it  had  been  occupied  prior  to  the  birth  
of  their  first  child,  John,  at  122  Heytesbury  Road  in  July  1906.  
However,  Horrigan’s  work  with  the  post  and  telegraph  service,  firstly  as  a  telegraphist  
and  later  as  a  Post  Master,  soon  required  him  to  move  to  other  locations  and  by  1907  
he  had  been  transferred  to  Roebourne.    Until  his  retirement  in  1933  the  family  lived  in  
accommodation  at  or  near  the  post  offices  where  he  worked,  and  from  c.1908  the  
house  in  Heytesbury  Road  was  leased  out.  
The  first  known,  and  longest  staying,  tenant  was  Henry  Daglish.    Previous  assessments  
have  stated  that  Daglish  lived  at  122  Heytesbury  Road  during  his  tenure  as  Mayor  of  
Subiaco  (1903-­‐1904  &  1906-­‐1907)  and  Premier  of  Western  Australia  (1904-­‐1905).      
 

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  However  further  research  has  found  that  his  address  during  that  period  was  61  
Heytesbury  Road  (a  site  that  has  now  been  redeveloped  with  a  modern  office  
building).    After  moving  to  122  Heytesbury  Road  in  c.1908,  Daglish  (who  had  been  the  
first  Labor  Premier  of  the  State)  served  as  an  independent  and  then  Liberal  member  of  
parliament,  and  was  minister  for  works  in  the  Frank  Wilson  ministry  in  1910-­‐11.    After  
he  was  defeated  in  the  1911  election,  Daglish  became  an  estate  agent  and  served  as  
an  employers'  representative  on  the  State  Arbitration  Court.  
During  this  period  the  house  was  also  used  for  social  and  community  events,  
particularly  associated  with  Henry’s  political  activities  and  with  social  causes  supported  
by  his  wife,  Edith.  
Henry  Daglish  lived  at  122  Heytesbury  Road  until  his  death  in  1920  and  the  house  
continued  to  be  occupied  by  his  widow,  and  their  children  Edith,  jnr,  and  Henry,  until  
c.1928.    Edith,  snr,  and  her  daughter  then  moved  to  the  suburb  of  Daglish,  which  had  
been  named  after  their  husband  and  father  in  that  year.  
During  the  final  years  of  James  Horrigan’s  working  life  (when  he  was  based  at  
Katanning  and  then  Claremont)  122  Heytesbury  Road  was  occupied  by  an  accountant,  
George  Reynold  Galbraith.  
In  1933  the  Horrigan  family,  including  James,  Josephine  and  their  children  John  (known  
as  Bryan)  and  Moya,  finally  returned  to  their  first  family  home.  
Josephine  died  in  1953  and  James  in  1965.    The  house  then  passed  to  their  unmarried  
daughter,  Moya,  who  lived  here  until  the  1980s.  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  the  1980s  included:  
1906-­‐1907   James  Horrigan,  Telegraphist,  and  his  wife  Jospehine  
1908-­‐1920   Henry  Daglish,  politician  and  estate  agent,  and  his  wife,  Edith  
1920-­‐1928   Edith  Daglish,  widow  
1929-­‐1932   George  Reynold  Galbraith,  accountant  
1933-­‐1953   James  Horrigan,  retired,  and  his  wife  Jospehine  
1953-­‐1965   James  Horrigan,  retired  
To  the  1980s   Moya  Horrigan,  home  duties  

Physical   122  Heytesbury  Road  was  constructed  in  the  Queen  Anne  style  and  displays  key  
Description   elements  of  that  style  in  its:  
(based  on   • Asymmetrical  plan.  
external  
• Complex  roof  form  of  intersecting  hips  and  gables  (clad  in  corrugated  metal  
inspection  
sheeting).  
only)  
• Tall  face-­‐brick  chimneys  decorated  with  slim,  vertical  rendered  panels,  projecting  
cornices,  and  rendered  caps  featuring  moulded  ‘leaves’  to  each  corner.  
• Decorative  paired  eaves  brackets.  
• Prominent  street  front  gable  with  a  bracketed  (‘flying’  gable)  end  to  the  apex,  
turned  timber  finial,  decorative  timber  gable  boards,  half-­‐timbered  effect  and  
rough  cast  render  face.  
• Tuck-­‐pointed  face  brick  façade,  with  a  plain  rendered  string  courses  at  window  sill  
and  window  head  height.  
• Boxed  window  bay  under  the  projecting  gable.    
The  bay  window  is  set  under  a  raked  awning  and  has  a  curved  rendered  panel  
under  the  projecting  rendered  sill.  It  has  vertically  proportioned  windows  across  
the  front  face  and  one  either  side,  all  with  square  highlights  (probably  originally  
casement  windows  but  now  top-­‐hinged  awning  windows).    

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• Wide  verandahs  including  a  small  main  entry  verandah  on  the  eastern  side  of  the  
projecting  bay  and  a  larger  return  verandah  which  provides  an  external  living  area  
around  the  south-­‐west  corner.  
• Curved  timber  valances  and  turned  timber  posts  to  the  verandahs.  
• French  or  panelled  doors  accessing  the  font  verandahs  from  the  adjacent  rooms.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  8.7m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  and  the  front  yard  
is  finished  with  lawn,  shrubs,  roses  and  flower  beds  behind  a  modern  timber  picket  
fence  with  face  brick  piers.    A  pedestrian  gate  and  pathway  near  the  eastern  boundary  
leads  to  the  main  entrance  while,  along  the  western  boundary,  a  paved  driveway  leads  
to  a  modern  timber  carport  (set  back  behind  the  façade  of  the  house).  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  33  Folio  86  
• Heritage  Assessment:  Home  of  Henry  Daglish,  122  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
(prepared  by  Greenward  Consulting  for  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  2015)  
Citing:  
− Certificate  of  Title  Volume  341,  Folio  108  
− Australian  Dictionary  of  Biography  (http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/daglish-­‐
henry-­‐5862)  
− Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories,  1900  to  1949  
(www.slwa.wa.gov.au)  
− Western  Australian  Electoral  rolls  (ancestry.com.au)  
− Various  newspaper  articles  referencing  122  Heytesbury  Road  and/or  the  
known  residents  of  the  house  (trove.nla.gov.au)  
− Various  newspaper  articles  referencing  James  Horrigan’s  career  in  the  post  
and  telegraph  service  (trove.nla.gov.au)  
− History  of  metropolitan  suburb  names  (http://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 
   

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Address   109  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lot  3  
Other  Names:    Avarua  (house  name  used  for  family  notices  placed  in  1909  and  1916)    
Note:  Avarua  is  a  Maori  word  meaning  two  harbours  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1905   Architectural   Federation  Queen  Anne  
date   Style  
Contributory   Considerable  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  This  place  has  undergone  some  alterations  (including  major  additions  at  the  rear  
along  Union  Street)  but,  overall,  the  main  façade  retains  a  moderate  to  high  level  of  
authenticity.  
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  be  made  
Associations   available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  275  was  purchased  by  the  Intercolonial  
Investment  Land  and  Building  Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    By  August  1891  
the  company  had  subdivided  this  land  as  Deposited  Plan  374,  with  30  lots  laid  out  
around  Union  Street.    Lots  1  to  3  of  this  subdivision  (which  were  later  developed  as  
109  to  113  Heytesbury  Road)  were  sold  to  John  Lowe  of  Toowoomba,  Queensland,  in  
June  1892,  but  remained  as  vacant  land  until  the  early  twentieth  century.  The  next  
owner,  Florence  Edgcumbe  of  Perth,  sold  the  lots  individually  in  the  period  1899  to  
1905,  with  Lot  3  being  transferred  to  Edward  Randell  (*spelling  not  clear  on  the  title  
document)  in  1899.  
Information  in  the  Subiaco  Rates  Books  indicates  that  a  house  was  finally  built  at  109  
Heytesbury  Road  in  c.1905,  when  Frank  Wildy  (a  machinist)  was  the  owner.  Frank  
subsequently  lived  here  with  his  wife,  Clara,  who  he  married  in  Subiaco  in  1907,  and  
they  named  the  house    ‘Avarua’.      Their  daughter,  Eva,  was  born  here  in  1909,  but  they  
had  moved  by  1910  and  in  1911  the  family  relocated  to  America  (at  which  time  they  
identified  Frank’s  mother,  Mrs  Eliza  Wildy  of  115  Heytesbury  Road,  as  their  closest  
relative  in  Australia).  Migration  records  referred  to  Frank  Wildy’s  occupation  as  
stationery  manufacturing  and  he  was  later  referred  to  as  a  paper  ruler  (which  was  a  
skilled  operator  of  a  machine  that  drew  lines  on  paper).  

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  The  next  owner  was  Alexander  Joseph  Cable  (a  pattern  maker  with  the  Western  
Australian  Paper  Bag  Co),  who  had  also  been  married  in  Subiaco  in  1907.    Alexander  
and  his  wife,  Lena,  established  109  Heytesbury  Road  as  their  family  home  and  brought  
up  three  daughters  in  the  house  –  Phyllis  (born  1909),  Noreen  (1912)  and  Betty  (1920).    
Sadly,  their  youngest  daughter  died  in  1934  and  the  family  moved  away  at  that  time.      
John  and  Margaret  Cruse  then  lived  at  109  Heytesbury  Road  for  part  of  their  
retirement  years,  from  c.1935-­‐1940,  sharing  the  house  for  some  of  that  time  with  at  
least  four  of  their  10  adult  children.  
The  final  occupants  during  the  early-­‐mid  twentieth  century  were  a  bank  officer,  Hugh  
Johnston,  and  his  wife  Grace  who  remained  here  until  around  the  time  of  their  deaths  
in  c.1965  and  c.1955  respectively.    Like  the  Cruse  family,  they  also  shared  the  place  
with  adult  children  for  at  least  part  of  this  time.  
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  of  which  is  
dated  1948),  together  with  the  physical  evidence,  suggests  that  the  building  envelope  
at  the  front  of  the  house  has  remained  largely  the  same,  although  some  modifications  
appear  to  have  been  made  to  the  roof  over  the  bay  window.  Over  time,  various  
additions  have  been  made  to  the  rear  of  the  house,  including  major  works  in  c.2005.  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  c.1965  included:  
c.1906-­‐1910   Frank  Herbert  Wildy,  machinist,  and  his  wife  Clara  
1911-­‐1934   Alexander  Joseph  Cable,  pattern  maker  (Western  Australian  Paper  Bag  
Co),  and  his  wife,  Lena  
1935-­‐1940   John  Peter  Christian  Cruse,  retired  carpenter,  and  his  wife,  Margaret  
Other  residents  listed  in  the  Electoral  Rolls  at  various  times  during  this  
period  included  Catherine  Mary  Cruse  (home  duties),  Carmel  Cruse,  
clerk,  Kevin  Anthony  Mannion  Cruse  (labourer)  and  Theodore  Joseph  
Mannion  Cruse  (draper)  
1941-­‐c.1965   Hugh  Louis  Johnston,  bank  officer,  and  his  wife,  Grace  Annie  Johnston,  
home  duties  
Other  residents  listed  in  the  Electoral  Rolls  at  various  times  during  this  
period  included  Betty  Constance  Johnston  (home  duties)  and  Ruth  
Grace  Johnston,  (stenographer)  

Physical   109  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  as  a  picturesque  Federation  Queen  Anne  villa.  Key  
Description   elements  include  the:  
(based  on   • Asymmetrical  façade.  
external  
• Gable-­‐hipped  roof  clad  with  terracotta  tiles,  featuring  curved  (ram’s  horn)  
inspection  
terracotta  finials  to  the  gable  ends.  
only)  
• Pair  of  prominent  painted  brick  chimneys  (originally  face-­‐brick)  with  contrasting  
rendered  plinths,  bulbous  rendered  caps  and  terracotta  pots.    
• Tuck-­‐pointed  face-­‐brick  façade  with  two  plain  rendered  string  courses,  one  at  
window  sill  height  and  the  other  at  door  head  height.    
• Projecting  wing  at  the  western  end  of  the  main  (Heytesbury  Road)  façade.  
This  has  a  gabled  roof  set  over  a  5-­‐sided  bay  window.    The  facetted  tiled  roof  of  
the  bay  fills  the  face  of  the  gable  and  may  have  been  a  later  alteration  (possibly  
replacing  a  lower  pitched  roof,  similar  to  the  bay  to  111  Heytesbury  Road).  
Each  of  the  three  main  faces  of  the  bay  features  a  single  double  hung  window.    
These  are  set  over  a  continuous  projecting  moulded  sill  (wrapping  around  all  five  
faces).    

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At  the  top  of  the  bay  there  is  a  deep  rendered  and  moulded  eaves  panel.  
• Projecting  wing  part  way  along  the  secondary  (Union  Street)  façade.  
This  rectangular  wing  has  wide  battened  eaves  over  a  rough  cast  rendered  face  
set  with  vertical  and  diagonal  battens.  
Below  the  gable  there  is  a  pair  of  double  hung  windows.  
• Return  verandah  extending  between  the  two  projecting  wings.  
The  raked  roof  of  the  verandah  extends  in  a  continuous  alignment  from  the  main  
roofline  and  returns  as  a  large  north-­‐facing  gable  at  the  corner.      
The  verandah  gable  has  an  open  face  fitted  with  closely  spaced  timber  battens  
and  is  supported  by  paired,  square  timber  posts  with  vertical  timber  valances  and  
wide  raked  brackets.    
The  bracket  detail  is  repeated  for  the  rest  of  the  verandah,  and  there  is  another  
set  of  paired  posts  abutting  the  front  wing.  
• Entrance  door  abutting  the  front  wing.  
The  architraves  of  this  opening  are  finely  detailed  with  stop  chamfered  edges  and  
moulded  heads  and  sidelight  sills.    The  narrow  sidelights  and  the  highlights  all  
feature  stained  glass  detailing.  
• Wide  window  opening  onto  the  verandah  from  the  front  room  on  the  eastern  side  
of  the  main  entrance.  
This  has  a  central  double  hung  window  flanked  by  two  narrow  double  hung  
windows,  separated  by  shaped  timber  panels  with  carved  central  ‘buttons’.  
The  opening  sits  over  a  projecting  rendered  sill  with  a  curved  under-­‐sill  panel.    
• French  doors  opening  onto  the  verandah  from  the  side  wing.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  6.7m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  
by  a  decorative  scalloped  picket  fence.    This  returns  part-­‐way  along  the  Union  Street  
frontage,  after  which  the  side  yard  is  fully  screened  by  a  high  picket  fence.  
To  the  rear  of  the  side  wing  there  is  a  small  rear  verandah  (with  matching  detailing)  
and  a  large  two  storey  addition  set  back  from  the  Union  Street  boundary.    
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  good  condition.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  111,  Folio  178  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• Family  trees  for  Alexander  Joseph  Cable  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• The  West  Australian  20  March  1909  p  1  
• The  West  Australian  24  April  1916  p  1  
• Various  other  newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  109  Heytesbury  
Road  and/or  the  occupants  of  the  house  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 
   

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Page  Left  Blank  Intentionally  
   

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Address   111  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lot  2  
Other  Names:    Coromandle  (house  name  used  for  family  notices  and  newspaper  
articles  in  the  period  c.1905-­‐1918)  
Photograph  

 
Construction   1904   Architectural   Late  example  of  Victorian  Italianate  
date   Style   Note:  the  primary  Italianate  features  are  the  
facetted  bay,  bracketed  eaves  and  the  label  
mouldings  over  the  bay  windows.  
Contributory   Considerable  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  The  detailing  of  this  place  is  consistent  with  the  late  application  of  the  Victorian  
Italianate  style  for  a  suburban  house.      
The  place  has  specific  historical  significance  as  the  home  of  Lionel  Boas,  a  prominent  
local  citizen  and  long-­‐term  Subiaco  councillor,  who  served  as  mayor  from,  1917-­‐1920.  
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  275  was  purchased  by  the  
Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  Building  Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    By  
August  1891  the  company  had  subdivided  this  land  as  Deposited  Plan  374,  with  30  lots  
laid  out  around  Union  Street.    Lots  1  to  3  of  this  subdivision  (which  were  later  
developed  as  109  to  113  Heytesbury  Road)  were  sold  to  John  Lowe  of  Toowoomba,  
Queensland,  in  June  1892,  but  remained  as  vacant  land  until  the  early  twentieth  
century.  The  next  owner,  Florence  Edgcumbe  of  Perth,  sold  the  lots  individually  in  the  
period  1899  to  1905,  with  Lot  2  being  transferred  to  Annie  Bertha  Boas  in  November  
1903.  
By  December  of  that  year  Annie’s  husband,  Lionel  Boas,  had  commissioned  J  H  Hunt,  
architect,  to  design  a  house  for  this  site:  
TENDERS  are  invited,  and  will  be  received  up  to  3pm.  on  Monday  the  28th  inst.  for  
the  ERECTION  of  a  Brick  Residence  in  Heytesbury-­‐road,  Subiaco,  for  Mr.  L.  T.  Boas.  
Plans  and  specifications  can  be  seen  at  my  Office  on  and  after  Monday,  the  21st  
inst.  J.  H.  HUNT.  Architect  
 

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  In  February  1904,  a  mortgage  was  taken  out  against  the  property  for  £410,  suggesting  
that  the  new  house  had  been  largely  completed  by  that  time.  
Lionel  Tobias  Boas  (1875-­‐1949)  was  the  Secretary  of  the  Karrakatta  Cemetery  Board,  
and  was  elected  as  a  councillor  of  Subiaco  in  1906,  where  he  served  for  thirty-­‐six  years,  
including  a  term  as  Mayor  from  1917-­‐1920.  He  was  also  closely  associated  with  the  
Young  Australia  League  from  its  inception  in  1905  and  served  in  various  roles  in  that  
organisation,  including  General  President.    
Annie  and  Lionel  had  been  married  in  Subiaco  in  1902  and  they  had  one  son,  Alfred,  
who  was  born  here  in  November  1905  –  at  which  time  the  house  was  referred  to  as  
‘Coromandle’.  
In  February  1922,  111  Heytesbury  Road  was  sold  to  James  George  McCallum  ‘of  
Finniston,  surveyors  assistant”  and  it  was  used  as  a  rental  property  for  the  next  ten  
years.    Following  the  death  of  James  McCallum  in  August  1931,  the  house  was  
inherited  by  his  wife,  Isabella,  who  lived  here  with  their  daughter,  Elsie,  until  they  
moved  to  Victoria  in  c.1950.  
111  Heytesbury  Road  was  then  purchased  by  the  matron  of  the  nearby  Kensington  
Hospital,  Winifred  Willington,  but  it  is  not  clear  if  she  ever  lived  here.    
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  of  which  is  
dated  1948)  suggests  that  the  building  envelope  at  the  front  of  the  house  has  
remained  largely  the  same,  with  the  exception  of  a  garage  at  the  side  of  the  house  
(added  in  the  1960s).    Over  time,  additions  have  been  made  to  the  rear  of  the  house,  
including  major  works  in  c.2001.  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  c.1949  included:  
1905-­‐1922   Lionel  Tobias  Boas,  Secretary  Karrakatta  Cemetery  Board,  and  his  wife  
Annie  
1923-­‐1924   Thomas  Bond  Coatham,  tailor,  and  his  wife  Ethel    
1925-­‐1931   Robert  Wallace  Burns,  Master  Baker,  and  his  wife  Matilda  
1932   Vacant  
1933-­‐1949   Mrs  Isabella  McCallum  (widow)  and  Miss  Elsie  Agnes  McCallum,  
tailoress/teacher  of  elocution  
Physical   111  Heytesbury  Road  appears  to  have  been  designed  as  a  late  example  of  the  Victorian  
Description   Italianate  style,  as  applied  to  a  suburban  house.  Key  elements  include  the:  
(based  on   • Asymmetrical  façade.  
external  
• Gable-­‐hipped  roof  clad  with  corrugated  metal  sheeting.  
inspection  
only)   This  features  a  short,  east-­‐west  ridgeline  with  louvered  gablets  to  the  hipped  
section,  plus  a  prominent  stepped  gable  with  a  rough-­‐cast  rendered  face  set  with  
three  vertical  battens  (a  Federation  Queen  Anne  detail).  
No  chimneys  are  visible  from  the  street  and  it  appears  that  they  have  all  been  
removed.  
• Parapet  wall  along  the  western  side  of  the  house  (where  the  house  abuts  the  side  
boundary).  
• Plain  rendered  façade.    
• Projecting  wing  at  the  eastern  end  of  the  main  façade,  featuring  a  five-­‐sided  bay  
window.  
This  has  a  shallow-­‐pitched  facetted  roof  set  under  the  base  plate  of  the  gable.    
The  battened  eaves  to  this  roof,  and  above  the  front  verandah,  sit  over  a  series  of  
closely  spaced  moulded  rendered  brackets,  which  in  turn  sit  over  a  curved  
moulded  stringcourse.    
 

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  Each  of  the  three  main  faces  of  the  bay  was  designed  with  a  double  hung  window  
(replaced  by  a  fixed  pane  to  the  central  opening).    These  have  moulded  window  
labels,  which  spring  from  moulded  cornices,  and  a  continuous  moulded  sill  with  
curved  under-­‐sill  panels.      
• Bullnose  verandah  abutting  the  projecting  wing  and  extending  across  the  
remainder  of  the  main  façade.  
This  has  been  reconstructed  with  turned  timber  posts,  carved  timber  brackets  
and  a  balustraded  frieze.  
• Entrance  door  abutting  the  front  wing.  
The  architraves  of  this  opening  are  finely  detailed  with  stop-­‐chamfered  edges  and  
moulded  heads  and  sidelight  sills.    The  single  narrow  sidelight  and  the  highlights  
all  feature  stained  glass  panels.  
• Pair  of  individual  double  hung  windows  opening  onto  the  verandah  from  the  front  
room  on  the  western  side  of  the  entrance.      
These  sit  over  a  continuous  moulded  sill  with  a  curved  under-­‐sill  panel.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  6m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  by  a  
stepped  picket  fence.  
The  western  side  abuts  the  boundary  and  the  space  along  the  eastern  side  has  been  
developed  with  a  flat-­‐roofed  single  garage.  
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  good  condition.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  111,  Folio  178  
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  291  Folio  113  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• The  West  Australian  19  December  1903  p  2  
• Information  about  Lionel  Boas  –  Obituaries:  Sunday  Times,  21  August  1949  and  The  
West  Australian,  17  August  1949  
• Various  other  newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  111  Heytesbury  
Road  and/or  the  occupants  of  the  house  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 
   

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Address   113  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lot  1  
Other  Names:  Balendoch  (house  name  used  for  the  announcement  of  the  birth  of  
Colin  Halkett-­‐Hay  in  1910)  
Note:  Balendoch  was  the  name  of  an  estate  in  Perthshire,  Scotland,  which  had  been  
inherited  by  John  Halkett-­‐Hay’s  father,  Charles,  in  the  late  1870s.  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1905   Architectural   This  was  a  designed  as  simple  suburban  house,  
date   Style   which  does  not  clearly  illustrate  any  of  the  key  
architectural  styles  of  the  period.  
Contributory   Some  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  The  painting  of  the  face-­‐brick  facade  has  impacted  on  the  authenticity  and  
traditional  character  of  the  place.    However,  the  original  design  can  still  be  readily  
understood.      
 

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Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  275  was  purchased  by  the  
Intercolonial  Investment  Land  and  Building  Company  Ltd  of  Sydney  in  August  1890.    By  
August  1891  the  company  had  subdivided  this  land  as  Deposited  Plan  374,  with  30  lots  
laid  out  around  Union  Street.    Lots  1  to  3  of  this  subdivision  (which  were  later  
developed  as  109  to  113  Heytesbury  Road)  were  sold  to  John  Lowe  of  Toowoomba,  
Queensland,  in  June  1892,  but  remained  as  vacant  land  until  the  early  twentieth  
century.  The  next  owner,  Florence  Edgcumbe  of  Perth,  sold  the  lots  individually  in  the  
period  1899  to  1905,  with  Lot  1  being  transferred  to  Mary  Isabella  Halkett-­‐Hay  in  June  
1905.    
Information  in  the  Subiaco  Rates  Books  indicates  that  the  house  was  built  during  that  
year  for  Mary  and  her  husband,  John  Halkett-­‐Hay  (an  accountant)  who  had  moved  to  
Western  Australia  shorty  after  their  marriage  in  Queensland  in  1902.    They  remained  
here  until  c.1913  and  their  son,  Colin,  was  born  at  ‘Balendoch’  (which  is  the  name  they  
gave  to  the  house)  in  1910.  
In  1913  the  family  moved  to  Albany  and  113  Heytesbury  Road  was  placed  on  the  
market:  
FOR  SALE,  Heytesbury-­‐road,  Subiaco,  Villa,  4  rooms,  bath,  pantry,  washhouse,  copper  
and  tubs,  vestibule,  back  and  front  verandah,  electric  light,  lawns,  garden,  etc.  Apply  
113  Heytesbury-­‐rd.  
The  house  may  have  then  been  used  as  a  rental  property,  as  the  occupants  changed  at  
least  every  one-­‐two  years  until  1933.      
113  Heytesbury  Road  then  became  the  long-­‐term  home  of  Arnold  Owen  Holst,  a  
dentist,  who  had  previously  worked  in  the  Goldfields  and  Geraldton  regions  
(advertising  as  a  ‘chemist  and  surgeon  dentist’  in  the  former  from  as  early  as  1899).      
Arnold  and  his  wife,  Phoebe,  lived  here  until  around  the  time  of  their  deaths  in  1949  
and  1941,  respectively  –  sharing  the  house  for  at  least  part  of  that  time  with  their  
daughter,  Jean  (born  1919)  and  possibly  with  their  son,  Alan  (born  1915).  
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  clear  image  
dated  1965)  suggest  that  the  building  envelope  at  the  front  of  the  house  has  remained  
largely  the  same,  with  the  exception  of  a  carport  at  the  front  of  the  house  (originally  
added  in  this  location  in  the  1960s).    Over  time,  additions  have  been  made  to  the  rear  
of  the  house,  including  major  works  in  c.1980.  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  c.1949  included:  
1907-­‐1913   John  Halkett-­‐Hay,  accountant,  and  his  wife  Mary  
1915-­‐1917   John  Joseph  Simons,  secretary    
1918-­‐1920   James  Garfield  Crawford,  contractor  
1921-­‐1923   Richard  Clarke,  engineer  
1924   -­‐  Kennedy  
1925   David  Wilson  Kirk,  traveller  
1926-­‐1927   Henry  William  Beck,  clerk  
1928   Wiliam  Wilfred  John  Skewes,  piano  tuner  
1929-­‐1930   Charles  A  Buckland  
1931-­‐1932   Dudley  Arthur  Martin  Rohan,  labourer  
1933-­‐1949   Arnold  Owen  Holst,  dentist,  and  his  wife,  Phoebe    

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Physical   113  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  as  a  simple  suburban  house,  without  any  overt  
Description   references  to  the  major  architectural  styles  of  the  period.  Key  elements  include  the:  
(based  on   • Symmetrical  façade.  
external  
• Hipped  roof  clad  with  corrugated  metal  sheeting.  
inspection  
only)   This  has  an  east-­‐west  ridgeline  with  what  would  have  originally  been  louvered  
gablets  at  either  end  of  the  ridge.      
• Pair  of  painted  brick  chimneys  with  projecting  rendered  caps.  
• Painted  brick  walls  with  clear  evidence  that  they  were  originally  tuck-­‐pointed  face-­‐
brick.    
• Plain  rendered  stringcourse  at  window  sill  height.  
• Full-­‐width,  raked  verandah,  with  turned  timber  posts  and  an  arched  timber  frieze.  
• Centrally  located  entrance  door,  with  narrow  sidelights  fitted  with  ripple  glass.    
• Set  of  triple  casement  windows  opening  onto  the  verandah  from  the  rooms  on  
either  side  of  the  main  entrance.  
Each  of  these  has  a  rectangular  projecting  sill  set  over  a  curved  under-­‐sill  panel.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  6m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  by  a  
timber  picket  fence.  Two  mature  citrus  trees  and  other  large  shrubs  in  the  front  yard  
largely  conceal  the  front  façade  from  casual  streetscape  views.  
On  the  western  side  of  the  front  yard  there  is  a  pipe  rail  fame  with  a  translucent  plastic  
sheeting  that  forms  a  carport  and  provides  a  frame  for  a  mature  wisteria  vine.    
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  fair-­‐good  condition.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  111,  Folio  178  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• Family  trees  for  John  Halkett-­‐Hay  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• The  West  Australian  17  February  1910  p  1  
• The  West  Australian  4  October  1913  p  5  
• Various  other  newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  113  Heytesbury  
Road  and/or  the  occupants  of  the  house  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 
   

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Address   115  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lot  1  
Other  Names:  Rotherwood  (house  name  used  for  family  notices  and  other  newspaper  
articles  in  c.1910  to  1922)  
Photograph  

 
Construction   1906   Architectural   From  the  detailing  visible  from  the  street,  this  
date   Style   house  does  not  appear  to  represent  any  of  the  key  
architectural  styles  of  the  period.  
However,  the  evidence  of  tuck-­‐pointed  brickwork  
suggests  that  it  may  have  been  at  least  partly  
influenced  by  the  Federation  Queen  Anne  style.  
Contributory   Some  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  The  high  front  fence  largely  conceals  the  main  façade  from  view  and  is  intrusive  
within  the  traditional  streetscape.  
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  274  appears  to  have  initially  been  
subdivided  as  Deposited  Plan  2405  with  a  one-­‐acre  lot  on  the  SE  corner  of  Heytesbury  
and  Hensman  Roads  designated  as  Lot  1.    This  was  sold  to  James  Chesters  (a  local  land  
developer)  in  March  1904,  and  one  residential  lot  (115  Heytesbury  Road)  had  been  
subdivided  off  and  sold  by  January  1906.  
This  was  purchased  by  Clara  Emily  Robinson  (the  sister  of  Frank  Wildy,  who  had  built  
109  Heytesbury  Road  in  c.1905).    A  new  house  was  built  almost  immediately  and  
occupied  by  Clara,  her  husband,  Christopher  Robinson  (a  salesman),  and  their  two  
daughters,  Clarice  and  Hilda.    During  this  time  the  place  was  named  ‘Rotherwood’.  
After  Christopher  died  in  September  1931,  Clara  moved  away  for  a  time,  but  was  living  
here  again  at  the  time  of  her  death  in  1935  (when  it  was  stated  that  she  had  been  a  
resident  of  Western  Australia  for  30  years).    

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  The  house  was  offered  for  sale  in  January  1936:  
Part  Lot  1,  plan  2405,  portion  Perth  Sub.  Lot  274,  frontage  76.7  links  Heytesbury  rd.,  
depth  200  links  right-­‐of-­‐way.  Improvements.  —  Brick  residence  with  entrance  hall,  
passage,  4  rooms  (19ft  6in.  x  13ft  6in.,  etc.),  vestibule,  kitchen,  well  appointed  
bathroom,  granolithic  verandahs  front  and  side,  washhouse,  interior  and  exterior  
sewerage.  e.l.  and  gas  installed.  Property  in  excellent  order,  grounds  tastefully  set  
out,  lawns,  gardens  with  cement  walks  front,  side,  back.  Convenient  bus  and  tram.  
Inspection  confidently  invited.  
However  it  does  not  appear  to  have  sold  immediately  and  in  September  1936  it  was  
transferred  to  Clarice  Martin  (nee  Robinson).  In  April  of  the  following  year  it  was  sold  
to  James  Withnall,  a  retired  pastoralist  of  South  Perth,  and  was  used  by  the  Withnall  
family  as  a  rental  property  until  1947.    
It  was  then  purchased  by  Ernest  William  Stattery  (carpenter),  who  retained  ownership  
until  1970  –  living  here  with  his  wife,  Amelia,  who  he  had  married  in  1941.    It  also  
appears  that,  for  a  short  time  at  least,  they  shared  the  house  with  Ernest’s  sister,  Elsa,  
and  brother-­‐in-­‐law,  Ronald  Thorpe.  
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  of  which  is  
dated  1948)  suggests  that  the  building  envelope  at  the  front  of  the  house  has  
remained  largely  the  same.    Over  time,  various  additions  have  been  made  to  the  rear  
of  the  house.  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  the  late  1960s  included:  
1906-­‐1931   Christopher  Adolphus  Robinson,  salesman  (later  warehouseman)  and  
his  wife,  Clara  
1932   Vacant  
1933-­‐1934   Claude  Gus  Strickland,  clerk  
1935   Mrs  Clara  Emily  Robinson  (widow)  
1936   Vacant  
1937-­‐1940   Eric  Victor  Teede,  clerk  
1941-­‐1942   Eric  Francis  duBoulay,  land  agent  
1944-­‐1946   Vacant  
1947   Mrs  Greta  Kemble,  home  duties  
1948-­‐1950   Ronald  Frederick  Thorpe,  commercial  traveller,  and  his  wife,  Elsa  (nee  
Slattery)  
c.1949-­‐late   Ernest  William  Slattery,  carpenter,  and  his  wife,  Amelia  
1960s  

Physical   The  key  elements  of  115  Heytesbury  Road  (as  visible  in  limited  views  from  the  street)  
Description   include  the:  
(based  on   • Symmetrical  main  façade.  
external  
• Gable-­‐hipped  roof  clad  with  corrugated  metal  sheeting.  
inspection  
only)   This  has  an  east-­‐west  ridgeline  to  the  main  hipped  section,  with  what  would  have  
originally  been  louvered  gablets  at  either  end.  
At  the  front  of  the  house,  over  the  main  entry,  there  is  a  decorative  gable  with  a  
timber  panel,  featuring  central  pattern  of  fretwork  ‘spokes’  that  are  framed  by  a  
semi-­‐circular  timber  moulding  and  flanked  by  a  pair  of  timber  ‘buttons’.      
Under  the  eaves  overhang  there  is  a  widely  spaced  series  of  paired  timber  
brackets.  
• Two  painted  brick  chimneys  with  projecting  rendered  caps  and  terracotta  pots.  
• Painted  brick  facade,  with  evidence  that  it  was  originally  tuck-­‐pointed  face-­‐brick.    
 

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• Centrally  located  entrance  door,  set  back  from  the  façade  under  a  semi-­‐circular  
arch.  
Glimpses  of  the  top  of  the  door  show  that  it  has  narrow  sidelights  on  either  side  
(with  stained  glass  detailing)  and  a  single  highlight  
• Single  double  hung  window  to  either  side  of  the  main  entrance.  
• Asymmetrical  return  verandah,  extending  across  the  main  façade  and  returning  
part  way  along  the  eastern  side  of  the  house  to  abut  a  projecting  side  wing.    
This  has  turned  timber  posts  and  simple  carved  timber  brackets.  
• Single  double  hung  window  at  the  southern  end  of  the  return  verandah.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  5.5m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  
by  a  high  rendered  masonry  wall  (which  largely  conceals  the  house  from  public  view).  
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  fair-­‐good  condition.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  299  Folio  56  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• The  West  Australian  23  March  1910  p  8  
• The  West  Australian  15  January  1936  p  21  
• Various  other  newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  115  Heytesbury  
Road  and/or  the  occupants  of  the  house  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 
   

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Page  Left  Blank  Intentionally  
   

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Address   117  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lot  36  
Photograph  

 
Construction   1913   Architectural   Federation  Queen  Anne  
date   Style  
Contributory   Considerable  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  The  original  external  detailing  of  the  building  is  largely  intact  and/or  
sympathetically  restored/extended,  and  the  place  has  been  well  maintained.    
The  place  is  a  good  representative  example  of  an  early  twentieth  century  Federation  
Queen  Anne  house,  designed  to  a  style  and  scale  suited  to  the  junior  professional  
classes.  
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  274  appears  to  have  initially  been  
subdivided  as  Deposited  Plan  2405  with  a  one-­‐acre  lot  on  the  SE  corner  of  Heytesbury  
and  Hensman  Roads  designated  as  Lot  1.    This  had  been  sold  to  James  Chesters  (a  local  
land  developer)  by  March  1904,  and  was  later  included  as  part  of  a  residential  
subdivision  under  Deposited  Plan  3758  (part  of  which  formed  115-­‐135  Heytesbury  
Road).  
117  Heytesbury  Road  appears  to  have  been  built  in  anticipation  of  the  marriage  of  
Bowen  Burke  Matthew  Jones  (1887-­‐1950)  to  Edith  May  Geddes-­‐Stubbs  (1889-­‐1985),  
which  took  place  on  2  August  1913.    Bowen  was  the  son  of  John  and  Elizabeth  Jones,  
who  are  believed  to  have  built  the  first  house  in  Subiaco  in  1886.  Edith  was  the  
daughter  of  William  and  Alice  Geddes  and  the  step-­‐daughter  of  Bartholomew  James  
Stubbs  (M.L.A.).    
Lot  36  on  Diagram  3758,  Perth  Suburban  Lot  274  (117  Heytesbury  Road)  was  officially  
acquired  by  Bowen  Jones  (clerk)  on  1  April  1913,  but  he  had  already  commissioned  
Edgar  Jerome  Henderson,  architect,  to  design  a  house  for  this  site  by  March  of  that  
year:  

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  TENDERS  are  invited  for  the  ERECTION  of  a  BRICK  VILLA  RESIDENCE,  Heytesbury-­‐
road,  Subiaco,  for  B.  Jones,  Esq.  No  tender  necessarily  accepted.  A  deposit  of  £25  
must  accompany  tender.  EDGAR  J.  HENDERSON  and  SON,  Architects,  Sun  Insurance  
Buildings,  70  St.  George’s-­‐terrace.  
Note:  Residential  work  undertaken  by  Henderson  during  1908-­‐1914  also  included  
projects  at  23  Coolgardie  Street,  Subiaco  (extant);  434  Newcastle  St,  West  Perth  
(demolished);  147  Beaufort  Street,  Perth  (demolished);  and  a  residence  in  St  Georges  
Terrace,  Perth.  Other  buildings  designed  by  Henderson  in  Subiaco  include  the  former  
St  Aloysius'  Convent  School-­‐Church,  21  Henry  Street,  Shenton  Park  (extant).  
In  May  1913  the  property  was  mortgaged  to  the  Workers  Homes  Board  to  secure  
£550,  and  Mrs  Jones  later  recalled:  
We  put  a  deposit  on  a  workers'  home  and  paid  15s  per  week  and  reared  a  family  of  
eight.  At  4  pounds  a  week  we  had  no  luxury.  
A  number  of  sources  claim  that  this  was  the  first  house  constructed  under  the  Workers  
Homes  Act  of  1911,  but  the  following  confirms  that  the  construction  of  at  least  one  
other  residence  had  been  commenced  in  Subiaco  under  this  scheme  by  August  1912:  
An  interested  little  group  of  spectators  gathered  around  the  foundations,  of  a  villa  
residence  in  Hensman-­‐road,  Subiaco,  yesterday  afternoon,  when  the  Premier  (Mr.  
Scaddan)  placed  in  position  the  first  brick  of  a  residence  that  is  being  erected  under  
the  provisions  of  the  Workers'  Homes  Act.  While  not  the  initial  undertaking  of  its  
kind  under  this  measure,  it  is  one  of  the  early  evidences  of  the  Government's  
operations  in  this  connection.  
Another  newspaper  article  in  September  1912  stated  that  19  Workers  Homes  Board  
loans  had  already  been  approved  for  the  construction  of  new  houses.    Therefore,  while  
117  Heytesbury  Road  was  an  early  example  of  a  house  funded  under  the  Workers  
Homes  Act  of  1911,  it  was  by  no  means  the  first  in  either  the  state  or  in  Subiaco.  
Bowen  and  Edith  Jones  had  seven  children  who  survived  infancy:  Mary  Josephine  
(Molly)(born  1915),  Sheila  Elizabeth  (Betty),  Nancy  Alicia,  James  Brian,  Kevin  Francis,  
Margaret  Cecelia  (Peggy)  and  Peter  John  Leon  –  all  of  whom  grew  up  in  this  house.  
Bowen  Jones  died  in  his  early  60s  in  August  1950:  
The  friends  of  the  late  Mr.  Bowen  Burke  Jones  of  117  Heytesbury-­‐rd.,  Subiaco,  and  
of  the  Swan  Brewery,  Perth,  are  respectfully  invited  to  follow  his  remains  to  the  
place  of  interment,  the  Roman  Catholic  Cemetery,  Karrakatta.  
Edith  Jones  then  remained  at  117  Heytesbury  Road  until  the  house  was  sold  in  1981.    A  
photograph  dating  from  about  that  time  shows  the  house  in  a  dilapidated  condition.      
Physical   117  Heytesbury  Road  was  constructed  as  a  modest,  but  well  detailed,  Federation  
Description   Queen  Anne  house.    In  the  late  twentieth  century  it  was  renovated  and  extended  in  a  
(based  on   sympathetic  manner,  retaining  a  high  level  of  authenticity  to  the  detailing  of  the  main  
external   façade.  
inspection   Key  elements  include:    
only)  
• Simple,  symmetrical  facade.  
• Hipped  roof  with  gablets  at  either  end  of  an  east-­‐west  ridgeline.  
This  was  originally  clad  with  short  sheet  corrugated  iron  sheeting,  which  has  since  
been  replaced  with  long-­‐sheet  corrugated  Zincalume  sheeting.  
A  very  minor  variation  to  the  ridgeline  is  the  only  impact  that  the  rear  additions  
(undertaken  in  the  period  between  1981  and  1995)  have  had  on  the  main  
(northern)  façade.  

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  • Two  face-­‐brick  chimneys,  each  finished  with  a  rendered  projecting  base,  narrow  
rendered  cornice,  layered  rendered  cap  and  terracotta  pot.  
An  additional  tall,  face  brick,  chimney  has  been  added  towards  the  rear  as  part  of  
the  late  twentieth  century  additions.    This  is  clearly  visible  in  views  along  the  west  
elevation.    
• Face  brick  walls  with  a  contrasting  rendered  plinth  and  rendered  stringcourse  to  
the  main  façade.  
• Centrally  located,  traditional,  five-­‐panel  entrance  door  with  moulded  timber  
architraves,  low-­‐waisted  stained  glass  sidelights  and  stained  glass  highlights.  
• Full-­‐height  double  hung  window  at  the  centre  of  each  of  the  front  rooms  flanking  
the  entrance  hall.    
Each  of  these  windows  has  a  moulded  panel  at  the  base  and  is  flanked  by  narrow  
sidelights,  with  low-­‐waisted  bottom  panels.  
• Dropped  bull-­‐nosed  verandah  roof.  
The  verandah  is  supported  by  paired,  turned-­‐timber  posts.  Between  each  pair  
there  is  a  ‘cross  curve  and  circle’  panel  springing  from  a  simple  timber  cornice.    This  
detail  is  also  interpreted  in  the  curved  timber  brackets  that  extend  as  a  valance  and  
then  curve  back  down  to  form  a  drop,  mid-­‐way  between  the  main  post  positions.    
• Gabled  entry  porch.  
At  the  centre  of  the  verandah  a  small  gable  projects  slightly  out  from  the  main  
bullnose  roof.    
The  gable  has  a  roughcast  rendered  face,  with  vertical  and  curved  timber  battens,  
and  is  framed  by  timber  barge  boards  decorated  with  carved  timber  ‘buttons’  at  
the  bottom  ends.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  6.7m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  
by  a  low  rendered  brick  wall,  with  low  rendered  piers  and  scalloped  timber  picket  
panels.    
The  surrounding  streetscape  is  largely  made  up  of  houses  of  a  similar  era  and  provides  
an  attractive  and  appropriate  setting  for  the  place.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  299  Folio  56  
• Heritage  Assessment:  117  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  (prepared  by  Greenward  
Consulting  for  the  City  of  Subiaco,  October  2014)  
Citing:  
− Certificate  of  Title  Volume  549,  Folio  9    
− Kalgoorlie  Miner,  31  August  1912,  p  4  
− The  West  Australian,  11  March  1913,  p  1  
− The  West  Australian,  2  September  1912,  p  6  
− The  West  Australian,  18  August  1950,  p  2  
− Various  contemporary  newspaper  articles  and  advertisements  referring  to  the  
Jones  family    (trove.nla.gov.au)  
− Traces  of  the  Past,  The  National  Trust  Register  of  the  Built  Heritage  of  Western  
Australia,  National  Trust  of  Australia  (WA),  1996  -­‐  Jones  House,  117  
Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
(http://traces.duit.uwa.edu.au/list_property?id=1005)  
This  includes  a  photo  of  the  place  prior  to  its  conservation  in  the  late  
twentieth  century.    

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− Stannage  ,  C.T.,  The  people  of  Perth:  a  social  history  of  Western  Australia's  
capital  city,  1979,  p.250  (http://www.oocities.org/braljo/edith.html)  
− Taylor,  Dr  John  J.,  ‘Edgar  Jerome  Henderson  (1861-­‐1928)',  Western  Australian  
Architect  Biographies,  http://www.architecture.com.au/i-­‐cms?page=13453,  
accessed  22  September  2014.    
− Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Locate  WA,  1948  and  1995  
(http://www.locate.wa.gov.au)  
 
   

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Address   119  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lot  35  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1913   Architectural   Federation  Queen  Anne  
date   Style  
Contributory   Some  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  The  painting  of  the  face-­‐brick  facade  has  impacted  on  the  authenticity  and  
traditional  character  of  the  place.    However,  the  original  design  can  still  be  readily  
understood.      

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Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  274  appears  to  have  initially  been  
subdivided  as  Deposited  Plan  2405  with  a  one-­‐acre  lot  on  the  SE  corner  of  Heytesbury  
and  Hensman  Roads  designated  as  Lot  1.    This  had  been  sold  to  James  Chesters  (a  local  
land  developer)  by  March  1904,  and  was  later  included  as  part  of  a  residential  
subdivision  under  Deposited  Plan  3758  (part  of  which  formed  115-­‐135  Heytesbury  
Road).  
Lot  35  of  DP  3758  was  transferred  to  Ernest  George  Read  (an  accountant)  in  March  
1913  and  the  available  evidence  suggests  that  a  house  was  built  on  the  site  in  that  
year.    During  the  early  years,  Ernest  and  his  wife,  Elizabeth  (who  he  had  married  in  
Adelaide  in  1891),  shared  the  house  with  two  of  their  children,  May  (a  clerk,  born  
1894)  and  Doris  (also  a  clerk,  born  1897).    For  at  least  part  of  this  time  Ernest  worked  
for  Hugo  Fischer  Ltd  (manufacturers  of  leather  goods),  who  also  employed  his  
neighbour,  William  Thamm.  
Ernest  died  in  May  1945  and  the  house  was  then  sold  to  Mrs  Marion  Wallace,  who  
lived  here  from  c.1946  until  around  the  time  of  her  death  in  1966  (aged  about  90  
years).      During  that  time  she  shared  the  house  with  her  daughter,  Heba  (who  had  
been  born  in  1907  and  married  in  1928).      Heba  Brooks  then  continued  to  live  at  119  
Heytesbury  Road  until  at  least  1980.  
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  of  which  is  
dated  1948)  suggests  that  the  building  envelope  at  the  front  of  the  house  has  
remained  largely  the  same.  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  post  1980  included:  
c.1913-­‐1946   Ernest  George  Read,  accountant  (later  company  secretary)  and  his  
wife,  Elizabeth    
1947-­‐c.1966   Marion  Wallace,  widow,  and  her  daughter  Heba  Coralie  Brooks  
To  post  1980   Heba  Coralie  Brooks,  home  duties  
Physical   119  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  in  the  Federation  Queen  Anne  style.  Key  elements  
Description   include  the:  
(based  on   • Asymmetrical  façade.  
external  
• Gable-­‐hipped  roof  clad  with  corrugated  metal  sheeting.  
inspection  
only)   This  has  an  intersecting  hipped  roof  over  the  main  house,  with  a  louvered  gablet  
vent  facing  the  street.      
At  the  main  façade,  a  gable  end  sits  over  the  projecting  section  of  the  stepped  
front  wall.    The  face  of  this  gable  has  a  rendered  face  with  a  separate  timber  
battened  screen  that  aligns  with  the  front  of  the  projecting  eaves.    
• Three  face-­‐brick  chimneys,  each  with  a  projecting  roughcast  panel  at  the  top.  
• Tuck-­‐pointed  brick  walls,  now  painted  to  the  area  under  the  line  of  the  verandah  
(and  unpainted  to  the  small  area  above  the  verandah).  
• Raked  verandah  roof,  extending  across  the  main  façade  and  returning  part-­‐way  
along  the  eastern  side  of  the  house.    
This  has  turned  timber  posts  and  a  solid  arched  valance  with  circular  holes  
adjacent  to  the  posts.  
• Main  entrance  opening  off  the  eastern  wall  at  the  end  of  the  side  verandah.  
• Full  height  double  hung  window  to  the  southern  wall  at  the  end  of  the  side  
verandah.  

109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Place  Records  (southern  side  of  the  street)     21  April  2015      
 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     63  
 
  • Triple  casement  window  with  a  projecting  moulded  sill  to  the  projecting  section  of  
the  front  facade.  
• French  doors  opening  onto  the  recessed  (western)  end  of  the  front  façade.  
These  doors  are  flanked  by  highlights  and  half-­‐height  sidelights  (the  latter  with  
leadlight  detailing  and  projecting  moulded  sills).  
Note:  this  section  of  the  verandah  forms  a  garden  porch  that  is  visually  separated  
from  the  main  entry  to  the  house.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  5.5m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  
by  a  picket  fence  with  a  pipe  rail  and  wire-­‐mesh  gate.  
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  fair  condition.  
Note:  The  detailing  of  this  house  has  many  similarities  with  121  Heytesbury  Road,  
which  was  built  at  about  the  same  time.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  299  Folio  56  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• Newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  119  Heytesbury  Road  and/or  
the  occupants  of  the  house  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 
 
   

109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Place  Records  (southern  side  of  the  street)     21  April  2015      
 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     64  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     65  
 
 
Address   121  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Other  names:  Gwinear  (current  nameplate  on  the  house)  
Lot  34  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1913   Architectural   Federation  Queen  Anne  
date   Style  
Contributory   Considerable  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  The  original  external  detailing  of  the  building  is  largely  intact  and/or  
sympathetically  restored/renovated,  and  the  place  has  been  well  maintained.  
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  274  appears  to  have  initially  been  
subdivided  as  Deposited  Plan  2405  with  a  one-­‐acre  lot  on  the  SE  corner  of  Heytesbury  
and  Hensman  Roads  designated  as  Lot  1.    This  had  been  sold  to  James  Chesters  (a  local  
land  developer)  by  March  1904,  and  was  later  included  as  part  of  a  residential  
subdivision  under  Deposited  Plan  3758  (part  of  which  formed  115-­‐135  Heytesbury  
Road).  
Lot  34  of  DP  3758  was  transferred  to  Frederick  William  Thamm  in  April  1913  and  the  
available  evidence  suggests  that  a  house  was  built  on  the  site  in  that  year.    William  and  
his  wife,  Kate,  remained  here  until  c.1944,  sharing  the  house  for  part  of  this  time  with  
their  son,  John  (a.k.a.  Jack,  born  1910,  married  1936).    
Kate  died  in  August  1940  and  William  in  July  1944  (aged  69  years).    The  house  was  
then  occupied  for  1-­‐2  years  by  the  Thamm’s  daughter-­‐in-­‐law,  Molly,  and  grand-­‐
daughter,  Robin,  following  the  death  of  John  in  March  1944.    In  1947,  Molly  remarried  
and  moved  to  Goomalling,  ending  the  34-­‐year  association  of  the  Thamm  family  with  
121  Heytesbury  Road.  
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  of  which  is  
dated  1948)  shows  that  the  building  envelope  at  the  front  of  the  house  has  remained  
largely  the  same.    Over  time,  additions  have  been  made  to  the  rear  of  the  house,  
including  major  works  in  the  period  c.1985-­‐1995.  

109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Place  Records  (southern  side  of  the  street)     21  April  2015      
 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     66  
 
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  c.1949  included:  
1914-­‐1944   Carl  Frederich  Wilhelm  Thamm  (aka  Frederick  William  Thamm),  
foreman,  and  his  wife,  Kate  
During  at  least  part  of  this  time  Frederick  worked  for  Hugo  Fischer  Ltd  
(manufacturers  of  leather  goods),  who  also  employed  his  neighbour,  
Ernest  Read.  
1945-­‐1946   Mrs  Molly  Thamm  (Frederick’s  daughter-­‐in-­‐law)(widow)  
1947   Wilfred  Thorpe  
1949   Vacant  
Physical   121  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  in  the  Federation  Queen  Anne  style.  Key  elements  
Description   include  the:  
(based  on   • Asymmetrical  façade.  
external  
• Gable-­‐hipped  roof  clad  with  corrugated  metal  sheeting.  
inspection  
only)   This  has  an  intersecting  hipped  roof  over  the  main  house,  with  a  louvered  gablet  
vent  facing  the  street.        
Note:  The  detailing  of  the  façade  suggests  that  there  may  have  originally  been  a  
gable  over  the  shallow  projecting  bay  to  the  stepped  front  wall  (similar  to  119  
Heytesbury  Road).    
• Two  face-­‐brick  chimneys,  each  with  a  roughcast  panel  at  the  top,  framed  by  
projecting  rendered  mouldings.  
• Tuck-­‐pointed  brick  walls  with  a  plain  rendered  string  course  at  window  sill  level.  
• Roughcast  rendered  eaves  panel.  
• Bullnose  verandah  roof,  extending  across  the  main  façade  and  returning  part-­‐way  
along  the  eastern  side  of  the  house.    
This  has  turned  timber  posts  and  an  open  arched  valance  with  square  balusters.  
• Main  entrance  opening  off  the  southern  end  of  the  side  verandah.  
The  architraves  of  this  opening  are  finely  detailed  with  stop-­‐chamfered  edges  and  
moulded  heads  and  sidelight  sills.    The  opening  is  fitted  with  a  five  panel  door,  
narrow  sidelights  and  the  highlights  (all  featuring  stained  glass  panels).  
• French  doors  opening  onto  the  front  verandah.  
These  are  flanked  by  highlights  and  half-­‐height  sidelights  (the  latter  with  leadlight  
detailing  and  projecting  moulded  sills)  
• Triple  casement  window  with  a  projecting  moulded  sill  to  the  shallow  projecting  
section  of  the  front  facade.  
These  have  multi-­‐panes  leadlight  windows,  small  highlights  and  a  projecting  
moulded  sill.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  5.2m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  
by  a  scalloped  timber  picket  fence.  
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  good  condition.  
Note:  The  detailing  of  this  house  has  many  similarities  with  119  Heytesbury  Road,  
which  was  built  at  about  the  same  time.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  299  Folio  56  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  

109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Place  Records  (southern  side  of  the  street)     21  April  2015      
 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     67  
 
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• Newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  121  Heytesbury  Road  and/or  
the  occupants  of  the  house  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 
   

109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Place  Records  (southern  side  of  the  street)     21  April  2015      
 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     68  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page  Left  Blank  Intentionally  
   

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City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     69  
 
 
Address   123  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Part  Lot  32  and  Lot  33  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1918   Architectural   Federation  Queen  Anne  
date   Style  
Contributory   Considerable  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  The  original  external  detailing  of  the  building  is  largely  intact  and/or  
sympathetically  restored/renovated,  and  the  place  has  been  well  maintained.  

109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Place  Records  (southern  side  of  the  street)     21  April  2015      
 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     70  
 
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  274  appears  to  have  initially  been  
subdivided  as  Deposited  Plan  2405  with  a  one-­‐acre  lot  on  the  SE  corner  of  Heytesbury  
and  Hensman  Roads  designated  as  Lot  1.    This  had  been  sold  to  James  Chesters  (a  local  
land  developer)  by  March  1904,  and  was  later  included  as  part  of  a  residential  
subdivision  under  Deposited  Plan  3758  (part  of  which  formed  115-­‐135  Heytesbury  
Road).  
Part  Lot  32  and  Lot  33  of  DP  3758  were  transferred  to  Janey  Ford  in  March  1918  and  
the  available  evidence  suggests  that  a  house  was  built  on  the  site  in  that  year.      
Jane  (known  as  Janey)  Ford  had  moved  to  Western  Australia  from  Victoria  after  she  
was  deserted  by  her  husband,  James  Augustus  Ford,  in  1907.    She  quickly  settled  in  
this  part  of  Subiaco  and  is  known  to  have  been  living  at  94  Hensman  Road  in  c.1910-­‐
1915  and  at  118  Heytesbury  Road  when  her  youngest  child,  Thomas  (a  bank  officer)  
died  in  1916.  
Mrs  Ford  shared  123  Heytesbury  Road  with  her  other  two  children,  John  (a  bank  clerk,  
who  was  born  in  c.1886,  married  in  1913  and  widowed  in  1916)  and  Mary  (who  was  
born  in  c.1888  and  remained  unmarried).    Mary  had  studied  music  and  was  listed  as  a  
music  teacher  in  the  Electoral  Rolls.    However,  she  also  managed  the  store  on  the  
corner  of  Heytesbury  and  Hensman  Roads  in  1923-­‐1927.      
After  Jane  Ford  died  in  January  1944  (aged  78),  her  children  continued  to  live  at  123  
Heytesbury  Road  until  around  the  time  of  their  deaths  -­‐  John  in  1961  and  Mary  in  
1969.  
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  of  which  is  
dated  1948)  shows  that  the  building  envelope  at  the  front  of  the  house  has  remained  
largely  the  same.    Over  time,  additions  have  been  made  to  the  rear  of  the  house,  
including  major  works  in  the  period  c.1985-­‐1995.  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  c.1969  included:  
1918-­‐1944   Mrs  Janey  Ford,  widow;  her  son,  John  William  Ford,  bank  officer;  and  
daughter,  Mary  Rankin  Ford,  music  teacher    
To  c.1961   John  William  Ford,  bank  officer,  and  Mary  Rankin  Ford,  music  teacher  
To  c.1969   Miss  Mary  Rankin  Ford  

Physical   123  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  in  the  Federation  Queen  Anne  style.  Key  elements  
Description   include  the:  
(based  on   • Asymmetrical  façade.  
external  
• Gable-­‐hipped  roof  clad  with  corrugated  metal  sheeting.  
inspection  
only)   This  has  an  intersecting  hipped  roof  over  the  main  house,  with  a  louvered  gablet  
vent  facing  the  street.        
At  the  main  façade,  a  gable  end  sits  over  the  slightly  projecting  section  of  the  
stepped  front  wall.    The  face  of  this  gable  has  roughcast  rendered  face  overlayed  
with  vertical  timber  battens  and  carved  timber  ‘brackets’.    A  separate  timber-­‐
battened  screen  aligns  with  the  front  of  the  projecting  eaves.    
• Two  painted-­‐brick  chimneys,  each  with  a  bulbous  roughcast  panel  at  the  top,  
framed  by  projecting  rendered  mouldings  and  a  rendered  skirt.  
• Tuck-­‐pointed  brick  walls  with  a  plain  rendered  string  course  at  window  sill  level.  
• Roughcast  rendered  eaves  panel,  commencing  at  window-­‐head  height.  
• Hipped  verandah  roof,  extending  across  the  main  façade  and  returning  part-­‐way  
along  the  eastern  side  of  the  house  (where  it  abuts  a  stepped  side  wing).    
 

109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Place  Records  (southern  side  of  the  street)     21  April  2015      
 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     71  
 
This  has  square  timber  posts  with  decorative  chamfers  and  grooved  detailing,  
which  are  set  in  pairs  at  the  corners.    The  paired  posts  are  linked  by  square-­‐  
baluster  frieze  panels  and  the  posts  are  framed  by  elongated  carved  timber  
brackets.  
• Main  entrance  opening  off  the  eastern  wall  of  the  house,  at  the  end  of  the  side  
verandah.  
• Rectangular  wall  niche  with  a  rendered  head  and  projecting  rendered  sill  along  the  
side  wall,  to  the  north  of  the  main  entrance.  
• French  doors  at  the  southern  end  of  the  side  verandah.  
The  glazed  panels  to  the  doors  and  the  highlight  have  leadlight  panels  with  
variations  of  the  same  floral  motif.  
• Triple  double  hung  window  with  a  projecting  moulded  sill  to  the  shallow  
rectangular  bay  near  the  eastern  end  of  the  main  facade.  
• French  doors  to  the  slightly  recessed  section  at  the  western  end  of  the  main  
facade.  
The  detailing  of  these  doors  matches  that  to  the  French  doors  at  the  southern  
end  of  the  side  verandah.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  5.2m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  
by  a  scalloped  timber  picket  fence  with  face-­‐brick  posts.  
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  good  condition.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  299  Folio  56  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• Newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  123  Heytesbury  Road  and/or  
the  occupants  of  the  house  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 
   

109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Place  Records  (southern  side  of  the  street)     21  April  2015      
 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     72  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page  Left  Blank  Intentionally  
   

109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Place  Records  (southern  side  of  the  street)     21  April  2015      
 
City  of  Subiaco  –  Community  Heritage  Survey     73  
 
Address   129  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Part  Lot  32  and  Lot  37  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1915   Architectural   Federation  Queen  Anne  
date   Style  
Contributory   Considerable  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  The  original  external  detailing  of  the  building  is  largely  intact  and/or  
sympathetically  restored/renovated,  and  the  place  has  been  well  maintained  
(acknowledging  that  the  western  end  of  the  front  verandah  has  been  enclosed  and  
later  balustrades  added).  
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  274  appears  to  have  initially  been  
subdivided  as  Deposited  Plan  2405  with  a  one-­‐acre  lot  on  the  SE  corner  of  Heytesbury  
 

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  and  Hensman  Roads  designated  as  lot  1.    This  had  been  sold  to  James  Chesters  (a  local  
land  developer)  by  March  1904,  and  was  later  included  as  part  of  a  residential  
subdivision  under  Deposited  Plan  3758  (part  of  which  formed  115-­‐135  Heytesbury  
road).  
Lot  37  of  DP  3758  was  transferred  to  Harry  Pratt  (a  railways  signalman)  in  March  1914,  
and  in  March  1918  he  also  acquired  the  adjacent  Part  Lot  32.    The  first  entry  for  this  
address  in  the  Post  Office  Directories  dates  from  1917,  but  Harry  was  already  listed  
here  in  the  Electoral  Roll  of  1916,  which  suggests  that  the  house  was  built  in  c.1915-­‐
1916.  
Other  adults  listed  at  this  address  in  1916  included  Harry’s  wife,  Maud  Mary  Pratt  (nee  
Casey),  William  Pratt  (railway  porter)(possibly  Harry’s  father  or  brother)  and  Mrs  Mary  
Elizabeth  Casey  (Maud’s  mother).    The  Pratt’s  remained  here  until  1920  and  during  this  
period  the  house  was  also  occupied  by  their  three  young  daughters,  Ida,  Phyllis  and  
Jean  (the  youngest  of  whom  was  born  in  1917).  
The  Pratt  family  had  moved  away  by  August  1920,  when  129  Heytesbury  Road  was  
given  as  the  address  of  newly-­‐weds,  Joseph  Stephenson  (a  company  manager)  and  
Kathleen  Henrietta  Hodge.    Two  children  were  born  here  over  the  next  few  years,  a  
son  in  1921  and  a  daughter  in  1923.        
After  the  Stephenson’s  moved  to  Claremont  in  the  late  1920s,  129  Heytesbury  Road  
became  the  long-­‐term  family  home  of  Frank  Ellis  (a  clerk/cashier),  who  had  been  
married  in  July  1921  and  had  three  young  children.    Frank  and  Ella  remained  here  until  
around  the  time  of  their  deaths  in  1962  and  1970,  respectively.    After  that  time  the  
house  continued  to  be  occupied  by  one  of  their  daughters,  Barbara  (a  nurse).    
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  of  which  is  
dated  1948)  shows  that  the  building  envelope  at  the  front  of  the  house  has  remained  
largely  the  same.    A  freestanding  garage/carport  was  built  on  the  eastern  side  of  the  
wide  block  in  the  1970s.  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  post  1980  included:  
c.1916-­‐1920   Harry  Pratt,  signalman,  WAGR,  and  his  extended  family  
1920-­‐1927   Joseph  Osborne  Stephenson,  company  manager,  H.A  Stephenson  
&  Son  (chaff  and  produce  merchants),  and  his  wife,  Kathleen  
1928-­‐c.1962   Frank  Ellis,  cashier,  and  his  wife,  Ella  
To  c.1970   Ella  Ellis  (widow)  and  Barbara  Ellis,  nurse  
Post  1970   Barbara  Ellis,  nurse  

Physical   129  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  in  the  Federation  Queen  Anne  style.    Key  elements  
Description   include  the:  
(based  on   • Asymmetrical  façade.  
external  
• Gable-­‐hipped  roof  clad  with  corrugated  metal  sheeting.  
inspection  
only)   This  has  a  high  hipped  roof  over  the  central  part  of  the  house,  with  a  louvered  
gablet  vent  facing  the  street.        
Prominent  gable  ends  extend  over  two  projecting  wings,  one  on  the  eastern  side  
of  the  main  façade  and  the  other  part  way  along  the  eastern  side  of  the  house.  
Both  of  these  gables  have  a  roughcast  rendered  face  and  a  centrally  located  
stucco  detail  of  a  ‘shield’  flanked  by  acanthus  leaves.      These  gables  have  retained  
a  high  degree  of  authenticity,  including  shaped  barge  boards,  rolled  facing  to  the  
roof  sheeting,  timber  scotias,  battened  eaves  and  moulded  timber  trim  under  the  
base  plate.  
• Two  face-­‐brick  chimneys,  each  with  a  projecting  rendered  cap  and  terracotta  pots.  

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• Tuck-­‐pointed  brick  walls  with  two  plain  rendered  string  courses  –  one  at  window  
sill  height  and  the  other  at  door  head  height.  
• Bullnose  verandah  roof,  extending  across  the  main  façade  and  returning  part-­‐way  
along  the  eastern  side  of  the  house  (where  it  abuts  the  side  wing).    
This  has  square-­‐baluster  frieze  panels  and  shaped  timber  posts  (with  deep  
chamfers,  grooved  detailing  and  turned  timber  elements).  
At  the  eastern  end  of  the  main  façade,  the  deeper  section  of  the  verandah  
(adjacent  to  the  projecting  wing)  has  been  enclosed  with  flush  panel  sheeting  and  
aluminium  framed  windows.  
Other  parts  of  the  verandah  have  been  variously  framed  by  a  pipe  rail  and  wire  
mesh  balustrade  (front),  a  timber  lattice  balustrade  (part  east  side)  and  plastic  
mesh  (part  east  side).  
Canvas  awnings  have  also  been  added  along  both  sides.  
• Main  entrance  opening  off  the  eastern  wall  of  the  house,  at  the  end  of  the  side  
verandah.  
This  has  traditional  highlights  and  narrow  sidelights  
• Full-­‐height  double  hung  window,  flanked  by  half-­‐height  sidelights,  opening  onto  
the  side  verandah  from  the  side  wing.  
• Full-­‐height  double  hung  window,  flanked  by  half-­‐height  sidelights,  opening  onto  
the  front  verandah  under  the  gable.  
The  sidelights  have  small-­‐paned  leadlight  glazing  and  projecting  rendered  sills.  
The  house  is  set  approximately  5.2m  back  from  the  front  boundary,  which  is  defined  
by  a  low  rendered  masonry  wall,  with  high  rendered  masonry  posts  and  open,  steel  
infill  panels.  The  wide  side  yard  provides  a  setback  of  approximately  9m  from  the  
eastern  boundary,  which  creates  a  spacious  garden  setting  for  the  house.    Near  the  
north-­‐east  corner  of  the  site  there  is  a  simple  timber  framed,  flat  roofed  carport.  
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  fair-­‐good  condition.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  299  Folio  56  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• Newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  129  Heytesbury  Road  and/or  
the  occupants  of  the  house  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 
   

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Page  Left  Blank  Intentionally  
   

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Address   135  Heytesbury  Road,  Subiaco  
Lot  31  
Photograph  

 
Construction   c.1922   Architectural   This  simple  corner  shop  does  not  represent  any  of  
date   Style   the  major  architectural  styles.  
Contributory   Some  contribution  to  the  heritage  values  of  the  area  
Significance   Note:  While  this  place  has  been  altered  as  part  of  its  adaptation  as  a  private  residence,  
the  original  use  can  still  be  readily  understood.        
The  removal  of  the  verandah  has  diminished  its  authenticity  at  the  street  corner.  
Historical   On  13  March  1883,  the  Western  Australian  government  announced  it  would  survey  a  
Notes  and   section  of  the  Perth  Commonage  into  suburban  lots  and  that  these  would  then  be  
Associations   made  available  for  private  sale.    Perth  Suburban  Lot  274  appears  to  have  initially  been  
subdivided  as  Deposited  Plan  2405  with  a  one-­‐acre  lot  on  the  SE  corner  of  Heytesbury  
and  Hensman  Roads  designated  as  Lot  1.    This  had  been  sold  to  James  Chesters  (a  local  
land  developer)  by  March  1904,  and  was  later  included  as  part  of  a  residential  
subdivision  under  Deposited  Plan  3758  (part  of  which  formed  115-­‐135  Heytesbury  
Road).  
Lot  31  of  DP  3758  remained  undeveloped  until  after  it  was  transferred  to  Miss  Mary  
Rankin  Ford  in  October  1920.    Mary  (then  aged  32  years)  was  living  with  her  mother  at  
123  Heytesbury  Road  and  an  inheritance  of  £320  when  her  brother,  Thomas,  died  in  
1916  may  have  helped  her  save  towards  this  investment.  
The  available  evidence  suggests  that  the  corner  store  was  built  on  this  site  in  1922  and  
it  may  have  been  the  property  referred  to  in  the  following  advertisement  (which  
appears  to  have  been  placed  by  local  builder  Francis  Robbins  in  August  of  that  year):  
BRICKLAYERS  wanted.  Robbins,  corner  Heytesbury  and  Hensman  rds.,  Subiaco.  
From  1923  until  1927  the  Post  Office  Directories  listed  the  occupant  of  the  corner  
store  as  Miss  Mary  Rankin  Ford,  although  she  had  placed  it  on  the  market  in  as  early  as  
1924:  

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  MIXED  Business  and  Freehold  for  sale,  corner,  and  excellent  position,  leading  
suburb.  Clean  stock,  up-­‐to-­‐date  premises  and  fixtures.  Apply  Comer  Heytesbury  and  
Hensman  rds.,  Subiaco.  
It  was  re-­‐advertised  at  various  times  during  1927,  but  in  January  1928  Mary  placed  an  
advertisement  withdrawing  the  ‘property  and  store  business’  from  sale.    In  1928-­‐1929  
the  occupant  was  listed  as  John  Campbell,  storekeeper,  and  the  property  was  formally  
transferred  to  him  in  March  1929.      
In  July  1929  it  was  on-­‐sold  to  Albert  Henry  Thomas  Smith  and  his  wife,  Frances  Ellen  
Smith  -­‐  who  had  previously  operated  a  newsagency  in  Woolwich  Street,  West  
Leederville.    Albert  (Bert)  and  Frances,  who  had  married  in  1920,  remained  here  until  
1949  and  for  at  least  part  of  this  time  they  shared  the  residence  with  their  three  
children,  Shirley,  Audrey  and  Neil.  
The  property  then  changed  hands  six  times  over  the  next  five  years  and  one  of  the  
advertisements  placed  during  that  period  provided  the  following  information:  
FOR  SALE  BY  AUCTION.  FREEHOLD.  VALUABLE  BRICK  AND  TILE  SHOP  AND  
DWELLING  together  with  the  General  Mixed  Business,  including  Plant,  Fixtures  and  
Fittings,  etc.  Sale  -­‐  Saturday,  5th  April,  [1952]  at  10.30  a.m.  ON  THE  PREMISES:  135  
HEYTESBURY  RD.,  SUBIACO  (Cor.  HENSMAN  STREET).  Property  comp.  large  Shop,  
Lounge,  Kitchen,  2  Bedrooms,  Bathroom  (gas  heater),  Garage,  Deep  Sew.,  all  cons.,  
and  is  particularly  sound  and  well  kept.  Plant  includes  Counter,  Refridge,  Scales,  
Slicer,  etc.  Stock  approximately  £350  to  be  purchased  at  valuation.  
A  later  notice  relating  to  this  sale  stated  that  it  had  sold  after  auction  for  more  than  
£4,000.  
In  advertisements  placed  in  the  late  1940s  and  early  1950s,  135  Heytesbury  Road  was  
variously  referred  to  as  a  ‘Handy  Food  Store’,  ‘General  Mixed  Business’  and  ‘Freehold  
Mixed  Business’  –  which  confirms  that  it  was  a  typical  corner  store  that  stocked  a  wide  
range  of  goods  for  the  local  community.  
A  comparison  of  current  and  historical  aerial  photographs  (the  earliest  of  which  is  
dated  1948)  suggest  that  the  place  was  designed  as  two  intersecting  hipped  pavilions  
with  a  skillion  roofed  area  at  the  NE  corner  (possibly  part  of  the  original  attached  
residence).    The  place  also  had  a  verandah  that  wrapped  around  the  corner  of  building  
and  extended  over  the  footpath  (this  was  clearly  in  a  1964  aerial  photograph,  but  the  
area  is  obscured  by  trees  in  later  views  so  it  is  not  clear  when  it  was  removed).    
Major  additions  were  undertaken  in  c.2006,  which  retained  the  former  corner  shop,  
but  extensively  redeveloped  the  remainder  of  the  site.    These  works  included  the  
removal  of  the  skillion  roofed  section  and  major  alterations  and  additions  on  the  rear  
portion  of  the  site  (facing  Hensman  Road).  
  Occupants  of  the  property  from  its  time  of  construction  until  c.1950  included:  
1923-­‐1927   Mary  Rankin  Ford,  storekeeper/music  teacher  
1928-­‐1929   John  Campbell,  storekeeper  
1929-­‐1949   Albert  Henry  Thomas  Smith  and  his  wife,  Frances  Ellen  Smith,  
storekeepers  
Note:  In  1930-­‐1933  the  Post  Office  Directories  listed  the  occupant  as  
‘E  Smith,  grocer’,  but  the  only  listings  in  the  Electoral  Roll  of  1931  
were  for  Albert  and  Frances,  suggesting  that  the  initial  was  incorrect.  
1949-­‐1950   Charles  Austin  Frederick  Cross,  carpenter,  and  Freda  Reha  Cross,  
storekeeper  
 
 
 

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  Of  the  following  owners  it  has  not  been  determined  who  lived  at  135  Heytesbury  
Road:  
1950   Sold  to  James  Frederick  Hodge  (clerk)  and  Mary  Loretto  Hodge  
(December  1950)  
1951   Sold  to  David  Claude  O’Keefe,  salesman  (April  1951)  
1951   Sold  to  William  Charles  Simpson,  carpenter  (December  1951)  
1952   Sold  to  Arthur  Rothery,  grocer,  and  Rose  Ellen  Rothery  (April  1952)  
1953   Sold  to  Margaret  Campbell  Harvey  (December  1953).  
On-­‐sold  by  February  1954.  
Physical   135  Heytesbury  Road  was  designed  as  a  corner  store  and  residence.  Key  elements  
Description   include  the:  
(based  on   • Symmetrical  corner  façade.  
external  
This  features  a  splayed  corner  with  double  timber  doors  under  a  plain  highlight.    
inspection  
On  either  side  of  this,  facing  Heytesbury  Road  and  Hensman  Road,  there  are  large  
only)  
timber  framed  display  windows  with  narrow  highlights.  
• Zero  setback  from  both  street  boundaries.  
• Flat  parapet  with  a  slightly  projecting  moulded  cap,  which  partly  conceals  the  
hipped  roof  of  the  former  shop.  
• Plain  rendered  façade.    
• Plain  projecting  stringcourse,  which  would  have  formed  the  flashing  course  for  the  
return  verandah.  
The  remainder  of  the  external  facades  were  constructed  and/or  extensively  adapted  as  
part  of  the  development  of  the  place  as  a  modern  residence  in  c.2006,  but  are  of  a  
complementary  form  and  style.  
Based  on  a  streetscape  inspection  the  building  appears  to  be  in  good  condition.  
References   • Certificate  of  Title  Volume  299  Folio  56  
• Certificate  of  Title  Volume  519  Folio  8  
• City  of  Subiaco  Rate  Books  (information  provided  by  the  City  of  Subiaco,  February  
2015)  
• Western  Australian  Post  Office  Directories  (www.slaw.wa.gov.au)  
• Electoral  Rolls  (Ancestry.com.au)  
• The  West  Australian  19  August  1922  p  16  
• The  West  Australian  19  December  1924  p  14  
• The  West  Australian  8  February  1927  p  10    
• The  West  Australian  1  November  1927  p  11  
• The  West  Australian  10  January  1928  p  2  
• The  West  Australian  17  March  1952  p  17  
• The  West  Australian  8  April  1952  p  8  
• Various  other  newspaper  notices  and  advertisements  relating  to  135  Heytesbury  
Road  and/or  the  occupants  of  the  place  (trove.nal.gov.au)  
• Historical  aerial  photographs  at  Landgate  Mapviewer  
(https://www.landgate.wa.gov.au)  
 

109-­‐135  Heytesbury  Road:  Place  Records  (southern  side  of  the  street)     21  April  2015