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Student Resources

Response Logs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R1
Using a Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R7
Pronunciation Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R7
Glossary of Academic Vocabulary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R8
Glossary of Critical Vocabulary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R9
Index of Skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R13
Index of Titles and Authors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R21
Acknowledgments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R22

Online HMH Into Literature Studios


For more instruction and practice,
visit the HMH Into Literature Studios.

Reading Studio

Writing Studio

Speaking & Listening Studio

Grammar Studio

Vocabulary Studio
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UNIT 1 Use this Response Log to record your ideas

RESPONSE LOG about how each of the texts in Unit 1 relates to


or comments on the Essential Question.

? Essential Question:
What helps people rise up to face difficulties?

Rogue Wave

The Flight of Icarus

Icarus’s Flight

Women in Aviation
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Thank You, M’am

A Police Stop Changed


This Teenager’s Life

Response Log R1

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UNIT 2 Use this Response Log to record your ideas

RESPONSE LOG about how each of the texts in Unit 2 relates to


or comments on the Essential Question.

? Essential Question:
What can blur the lines between what’s real and what’s not?

Heartbeat

The Camera Does Lie

Two Legs or One?

The Song of
Wandering Aengus

Eldorado

© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company


The Governess from
The Good Doctor

from The Governess

R2 Response Log

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UNIT 3 Use this Response Log to record your ideas

RESPONSE LOG about how each of the texts in Unit 3 relates to


or comments on the Essential Question.

? Essential Question:
What does it mean to be in harmony with nature?

Never Retreat from


Eyes Wide Open

from Mississippi
Solo

The Drought

Allied with Green

Ode to enchanted
light

Sleeping in the
Forest
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

from Trash Talk

You’re Part of the


Solution

Response Log R3

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UNIT 4 Use this Response Log to record your ideas

RESPONSE LOG about how each of the texts in Unit 4 relates to


or comments on the Essential Question.

? Essential Question:
Why is the idea of space exploration both inspiring
and unnerving?

Martian Metropolis

Dark They Were, and


Golden-Eyed

Challenges for
Space Exploration

What If We Were
Alone?

Seven Minutes of
Terror

© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company


Space Exploration
Should Be More
Science Than Fiction

Humans Should
Stay Home and Let
Robots Take to the
Stars

R4 Response Log

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UNIT 5 Use this Response Log to record your ideas

RESPONSE LOG about how each of the texts in Unit 5 relates to


or comments on the Essential Question.

? Essential Question:
How do sports bring together friends, families,
and communities?

Ball Hawk

Get in the Zone: The


Psychology of Video
Game Design

It’s Not Just a Game!

from The Crossover


© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Double Doubles

Response Log R5

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UNIT 6 Use this Response Log to record your ideas

RESPONSE LOG about how each of the texts in Unit 6 relates to


or comments on the Essential Question.

? Essential Question:
What inspires you to make a difference?

Craig Kielburger
Reflects on Working
Toward Peace

from It Takes a Child

Sometimes a Dream
Needs a Push

A Poem for My
Librarian, Mrs. Long

Frances Perkins and

© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company


the Triangle Factory
Fire

from The Story of


the Triangle Factory
Fire

R6 Response Log

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Using a Glossary
A glossary is an alphabetical list of vocabulary words. Use Each word’s pronunciation is given in parentheses.
a glossary just as you would a dictionary—to determine A guide to the pronunciation symbols appears in
the meanings, parts of speech, pronunciation, and the Pronunciation Key below. The stress marks in the
syllabification of words. (Some technical, foreign, and Pronunciation Key are used to indicate the force given to
more obscure words in this book are defined for you in each syllable in a word. They can also help you determine
the footnotes that accompany many of the selections.) where words are divided into syllables.

Many words in the English language have more than one For more information about the words in this glossary
meaning. This glossary gives the meanings that apply to or for information about words not listed here, consult a
the words as they are used in the selections in this book. dictionary.

The following abbreviations are used to identify parts of


speech of words:

adj. adjective adv. adverb n. noun v. verb

Pronunciation Key
Symbol Examples Symbol Examples Symbol Examples
√ pat m mum ûr urge, term, firm,
∑ pay n no, sudden* (sud´n) word, heard
ä father ng thing v valve
âr care ≤ pot w with
b bib ∫ toe y yes
ch church ô caught, paw z zebra, xylem
d deed, milled oi noise zh vision, pleasure,
≈ pet ≥ took garage
∏ bee ◊ boot ∂ about, item, edible,
gallop, circus
f fife, phase, rough ≥r lure
∂r butter
g gag ôr core
h hat ou out
Sounds in Foreign Words
hw which p pop
kh German ich, ach;
∆ pit r roar
Scottish loch
π pie, by s sauce
n French, bon (bôn)
îr pier sh ship, dish
œ French feu, œuf;
j judge t tight, stopped German schön
k kick, cat, pique th thin ü French tu;
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

l lid, needle* (nēd´l) th this German über


≠ cut

*In English the consonants l and n often constitute complete syllables by themselves.
Stress Marks
The relevant emphasis with which the syllables of a word or phrase are spoken, called stress, is
indicated in three different ways. The strongest, or primary, stress is marked with a bold mark (´). An
intermediate, or secondary, level of stress is marked with a similar but lighter mark (´). The weakest
stress is unmarked. Words of one syllable show no stress mark.

Pronunciation Key R7

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GLOSSARY OF
ACADEMIC VOCABULARY

abnormal (√b-nôr´m∂l) adj. not typical, usual, or goal (g∫l) n. the object toward which your work and
regular; not normal planning is directed; a purpose

affect (∂-f≈kt´) v. to have an influence on or effect a inadequate (Δn-√d´Δ-kwΔt) adj. not enough or
change in something sufficient to fulfill a need or meet a requirement

aspect (√s´p≈kt) n. a characteristic or feature of interact (Δn´t∂r-√kt´) v. to act upon each other
something
participate (pär-tΔs´∂-p∑t´) v. to be active and involved
attitude (√t´Δ-t◊d´) n. a manner of thinking that in something or to share in something
reflects a person’s feelings; a particular state of mind
perceive (p∂r-sΠv´) v. to become aware of something
complex (k≤m´pl≈ks´) adj. consisting of many directly through any of the senses
interwoven parts that make something difficult to
potential (p∂-t≈n´sh∂l) adj. capable of doing or being
understand
something; having possibility
consume (k∂n-s◊m´) v. to buy things for your own
purchase (pûr´chΔs) v. to buy
use or ownership
rely (rΔ-lπ) v. to depend on something or someone for
contrast (k∂n-tr√st´) v. to show differences between
support, help, or supply
two or more things that are being compared
resource (re´-sors´) n. something that can be used for
cultural (kul´ch∂r-∂l) adj. of or relating to culture or
support or help
cultivation
specify (sp≈s´∂-fπ´) v. to state exactly or in detail what
despite (dΔ-spπt´) prep. in spite of; even though
you want or need
element (≈l´∂-m∂nt) n. a part or aspect of something
stress (str≈s) v. to put emphasis on something
ensure (≈n-sh≥r´) v. to make sure or certain
style (stπl) n. the combination of techniques that a
error (≈r´∂r) n. a mistake writer uses to make his or her work effective and unique

evaluate (Δ-v√l´yoo-∑t´) tr.v. to examine something task (t√sk) n. an assignment or work done as part of
carefully to judge its value or worth one’s duties

feature (fΠ´ch∂r) n. a prominent or distinctive part, text (t≈kst) n. a literary work that is regarded as an
quality, or characteristic object of critical analysis

© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company


focus (f∫´k∂s) v. to direct toward a specific point or valid (v√l´Δd) adj. convincing or having a sound reason
purpose for something

R8 Student Resources

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GLOSSARY OF
CRITICAL VOCABULARY

absolute (√b´s∂-l◊t´) adj. Something that is without burden (bûr´dn) v. If you burden someone, you create
qualifications or exceptions is absolute. a situation that is difficult or stressful for him or her.

absorb (∂b-zôrb´) v. Things that absorb you occupy capacity (k∂-p√s´∆-t∏) n. A person’s capacity is his or
your time or attention. her role or position.

accelerate (√k-s≈l´∂-r∑t´) v. When something clique (kl∆k) n. If you are part of a clique, you belong to
accelerates, its speed increases. a small group of friends that doesn’t allow outsiders.

accomplishment (∂-k≤m´pl∆sh-m∂nt) n. An collision (k∂-l∆zh´∂n) n. When the two things crash into
accomplishment is a task that you succeed in doing. each other, the result is a collision.

adaptability (∂-d√p´t∂-b∆l´∆-t∏) n. People who have colonize (k≤l´∂-nπz´) v. When you colonize a place, you
adaptability can change to survive and fit in with new send a group of people to a new place to establish a
circumstances. colony or settlement.

addiction (∂-d∆k´sh∂n) n. An addiction is a habit upon combustion (k∂m-b≠s´ch∂n) n. Combustion is the


which a person becomes physically or emotionally process of burning, which produces heat and light.
dependent.
commute (k∂-my◊t´) n. A commute is a person’s
administration (√d-m∆n´∆-str∑´sh∂n) n. A president’s travel to and from work or school.
administration is his or her term of office.
concession (k∂n-s≈sh´∂n) n. Sporting and
advancement (√d-v√ns´m∂nt) n. Something that is an entertainment events often feature concession stands
advancement is an improvement or step forward. where food and drinks are sold.

anxiety (√ng-zπ´∆-t∏) n. Anxiety is an uneasy, worried congestion (k∂n-j≈s´ch∂n) n. Congestion is


feeling. overcrowding, such as when too many vehicles cause a
traffic jam.
aquifer (√k´w∂-f∂r) n. An aquifer is an underground
layer of rock that contains water. consecutive (k∂n-s≈k´y∂-t∆v) adj. When things are
consecutive, they follow one after another without
arboretum (är´b∂-r∏´t∂m) n. An arboretum is a place
interruption.
where many trees are grown for educational or viewing
purposes. continuity (k≤n´t∂-n◊´∆-t∏) n. In the movies, continuity
refers to making sure that things that were filmed at
atmosphere (√t´m∂-sfîr´) n. An atmosphere is the
different times or out of sequence look as if they were
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

gaseous mass or envelope that surrounds a planet.


filmed at the same time or in the intended sequence.
avalanche (√v´∂-l√nch´) n. An avalanche is a large
convivial (k∂n-v∆v´∏-∂l) adj. A person who is convivial
mass of snow, ice, dirt, or rocks falling quickly down the
enjoys the company of others in a sociable manner.
side of a mountain.
corridor (kôr´∆-d∂r) n. A corridor is a narrow hallway or
barren (b√r´∂n) adj. Something that is empty and
passageway.
lacking interest or charm is barren.
crucial (kr◊´sh∂l) adj. Something that is crucial is
beneficial (b≈n´∂-f∆sh´∂l) adj. When something is
extremely important or significant.
beneficial, it is good or favorable.
deck (d≈k) n. The deck is the platform on a ship or boat
bogus (b∫´g∂s) adj. Something that is bogus is fake or
where people stand.
not genuine.

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GLOSSARY OF CRITICAL VOCABULARY

delirious (d∆-lîr´∏-∂s) adj. Someone who is delirious is federal (f≈d´∂r-∂l) adj. Something that is federal relates
temporarily confused, often because of fever or shock. to the U.S. government in Washington, D.C., and not to
state and local governments.
dignified (d∆g´n∂-fπd´) adj. Someone or something
that is dignified has or shows honor and respect. forlorn (f∂r-lôrn´) adj. Something that is forlorn
appears lonely or sad.
discrepancy (d∆-skr≈p´∂n-s∏) n. When there is a
discrepancy between two things, there is a difference or frantic (fr√n´t∆k) adj. If you do something in a frantic
disagreement. way, you do it quickly and nervously.

disorient (d∆s-ôr´∏-≈nt´) v. To disorient is to make fundamental (f≠n´d∂-m≈n´tl) n. A fundamental is a


someone or something lose a sense of direction. basic but essential part of an object or a system.

distinguish (d∆-st∆ng´gw∆sh) v. To distinguish one thing futile (fy◊t´l) adj. When something is futile, it has no
from another means perceiving them as being different useful or meaningful result.
or distinct.
geothermal (j∏´∫-thûr´m∂l) adj. Geothermal relates to
donate (d∫´n∑t´) v. To donate is to give, or contribute, the internal heat of the earth.
something to a person, cause, or fund.
habitat (h√b´∆-t√t´) n. In this instance, a habitat is a
dubious (d◊´b∏-∂s) adj. If something is dubious, it is structure that provides a controlled environment for
questionable or not to be relied upon. living in very hostile or even deadly locations.

elaborate (∆-l√b´∂r-∆t) adj. Something that is elaborate heirloom (âr´l◊m´) n. An heirloom is a valued
has been carefully planned and constructed with great possession that was passed down in a family.
attention to detail.
hideous (h∆d´∏-∂s) adj. When something is hideous, it
embarrass (≈m-b√r´∂s) v. To embarrass is to cause to is repulsive or revolting.
feel uncomfortable or self-conscious.
hoax (h∫ks) n. A hoax is something that is meant to
enact (≈n-√kt´) v. If you enact something, you make it trick or fool someone.
into a law.
idle (id´l) v. When you idle, you pass time without
encounter (≈n-koun´t∂r) n. An encounter is a short doing anything purposeful.
meeting that is unplanned or unexpected.
immerse (∆-mûrs´) v. If you immerse yourself in an
entail (≈n-t∑l´) v. To entail means to have or require. activity, that activity is the only thing that you are
focused on.
erupt (∆-r≠pt´) v. When something erupts, it develops
suddenly. indifferent (∆n-d∆f´∂r-∂nt) adj. Someone who is
indifferent has no feelings one way or another about
ethereal (∆-thîr´∏-∂l) adj. If something is ethereal, it is
something.
light and airy.

© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company


Inferior (∆n-fîr´∏-∂r) adj. If something is inferior, it is
exhibition (≈k´s∂-b∆sh´∂n) n. An exhibition is an
lower in value and quality.
organized presentation or show.
infinitely (∆n´f∂-n∆t-l∏) adv. Infinitely means to a great
exploitation (≈k´sploi-t∑´sh∂n) n. Exploitation is the
extent, or with no limits.
unfair treatment or use of something or someone for
selfish reasons. inquire (∆n-kwπr´) v. If you inquire about something,
you ask about it.
fatal (f∑t´l) adj. A fatal decision is a choice that results
in death. insulate (∆n´s∂-l∑t´) v. When you insulate something,
you prevent the passage of heat through it.

R10 Student Resources

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GLOSSARY OF CRITICAL VOCABULARY

interaction (∆n´t∂r-√k´sh∂n) n. An interaction occurs obituary (∫-b∆ch´◊-≈r´∏) n. An obituary is a public


when people speak or otherwise are in contact with one notice of a person’s death.
another.
obsess (∂b-s≈s´) v. If you obsess over something, your
inundate (∆n´≠n-d∑t´) v. To inundate is to overpower mind is filled with thinking about a single topic, idea, or
with a huge amount of something. feeling.

irrelevant (∆-r≈l´∂-v∂nt) adj. Something that is pendulum (p≈n´j∂-l∂m) n. A pendulum is a weight that
irrelevant is unrelated to the matter under consideration. is hung so that it can swing freely. Sometimes it is used
in timing the workings of certain clocks.
isolate (i´s∂-l∑t´) v. When you isolate something, you
separate it so that it is apart or alone. plague (pl∑g) v. To plague something is to cause
hardship or suffering for it.
latch (l√ch) v. To latch means to hold onto or get
hold of. porthole (pôrt´h∫l´) n. A porthole is a circular window
on a boat or ship.
lobby (l≤b´∏) v. To lobby is to attempt to influence
politicians to support the cause that you represent. possession (p∂-z≈sh´∂n) n. A possession is something
you own.
madame (m∂-d√m´) n. Madame is a form of polite
address for a woman. precaution (pr∆-kô´sh∂n) n. A precaution is an action
taken to avoid possible danger.
mascot (m√s´k≤t´) n. A mascot is a person, animal, or
object used as the symbol of an organization, such as a procession (pr∂-s≈sh´∂n) n. In a procession, people or
sports team. things move along in an orderly and serious way.

median (m∏´d∏-∂n) n. A median is a dividing area prominent (pr≤m´∂-n∂nt) adj. If something is


between opposing lanes of traffic on a highway or road. prominent, it stands out.

metabolism (m∆-t√b´∂-l∆z´∂m) n. A living thing’s prowess (prou´∆s) n. Prowess is the strength and
metabolism is the chemical processes that give it energy courage someone has.
and produce growth.
radiation (r∑´d∏-∑´sh∂n) n. Radiation is energy
mistrust (m∆s-tr≠st´) v. To mistrust is to be without transmitted in the form of waves or particles.
confidence or trust.
recede (r∆-s∏d´) v. To recede means to become fainter
moderate (m≤d´∂r-∆t) adj. When something is kept or more distant.
moderate, it is kept within a certain limit.
reformer (r∆-fôrm´∂r) n. A reformer seeks to improve or
moot (m◊t) adj. Something that is moot is correct practices or behaviors that cause harm.
unimportant or irrelevant.
reliable (r∆-lπ´∂-b∂l) adj. A person or object that can be
muse (my◊z) v. When you muse, you say something trusted, or depended on, is reliable.
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

thoughtfully.
remorseful (r∆-môrs´f∂l) adj. If you are remorseful, you
mutual (my◊´ch◊-∂l) adj. Something is mutual when feel very sorry about something that you have done.
everyone treats each other the same way or shares the
repulse (r∆-p≠ls´) v. Something that repulses you makes
same feeling.
you want to reject it because you find it disgusting.
navigation (n√v´∆-g∑´sh∂n) n. The navigation of a ship
restrictive (r∆-str∆k´t∆v) adj. When something is
or boat is the act of guiding it along a planned course.
restrictive, it is limiting in some way.
negotiate (n∆-g∫´sh∏-∑t´) v. When you negotiate, you
ruse (r◊z) n. A ruse is a plan meant to deceive
work with others to reach an agreement.
someone.

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GLOSSARY OF CRITICAL VOCABULARY

scarcity (skâr´s∆-t∏) n. When you experience a scarcity


of something, you have a shortage or lack of that thing.

scurry (skûr´∏) v. To scurry means to hurry along with


light footsteps.
sketchy (sk≈ch´∏) adj. If someone or something seems
sketchy, you doubt its authenticity or trustworthiness.

splinter (spl∆n´t≈r) v. To splinter means to break up into


sharp, thin pieces.

submerge (s∂b-mûrj´) v. To submerge is to descend


beneath the surface of the water.
subtly (s≠t´l∏) adv. To do something subtly means to
do it in a manner hard to notice or perceive—that is, not
obviously.
suede (sw∑d) n. Suede is leather that is treated to be
fuzzy and soft.

swell (sw≈l) n. A swell is a long, unbroken wave.


syringe (s∂-r∆nj´) n. A syringe is a medical instrument
used to inject fluids into the body.

talon (t√l´∂n) n. A talon is the claw of a bird of prey.


token (t∫´k∂n) n. A token serves as an expression or a
sign of something else.
turnover (tûrn´∫´v∂r) n. In basketball, a turnover is a
loss of possession of the ball.
upright (≠p´rπt´) adv. Someone or something that sits
or stands upright is in a strictly vertical position.
utilization (y◊t´l-∆-z∑´sh∂n) n. Utilization is when you
put something to use in an effective way.
wholly (h∫´l∏) adv. If a speech deals wholly with the
history of the solar system, that is the only topic the

© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company


speaker discusses.

R12 Student Resources

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Index of Skills
Key
Teacher’s Edition subject entries and page references are printed in boldface type. Subject entries and page references
that apply to both the Student Edition and the Teacher’s Edition appear in lightface type.

A mood, 136–137, 140, 279–295 humor, 127, 150–151, 153–154 introduction, 350, 353
abbreviations, 277 myths, 25, 27–28 inferences, 7, 14, 17, 417 plan, 263, 351–352
absolute language. See Extreme or odes, 229, 232 key ideas, 480–481, 484 publish, 355
Absolute Language (Notice & Note) organizational patterns, 267, 393, lyric poetry, 237 revise, 354
academic citations, 506 395, 397–398 memoirs, 199, 202 scoring guide, 356
Academic Vocabulary, 1, 21, 33, 43, 55, 67, plot, 5, 8, 10, 17–18 metaphor and personification, 408 writing prompt, 350
79, 97, 109, 121, 131, 143, 159, 167, point of view, 185, 188–189, as monitoring strategy, 217 arguments. See also argumentative essays
176, 181, 193, 205, 215, 225, 235, 239, 365–368, 373–376, 381–383, 386, mood, 137, 140, 281–295 analysis of, 185, 188, 190, 327, 329,
249, 258, 263, 275, 301, 311, 321, 325, 439–441 myths, 27–28 332, 338–339
335, 343, 354, 361, 377, 389, 401, 413, predictions, 385 odes, 232 claims in, 185, 305, 327
421, 430, 435, 447, 453, 465, 475, 487, punctuation and tone, 38, 39 organizational patterns, 270, 395, comparison of, 192, 310, 326, 346
497, 508 realistic fiction, 455, 458, 461–462 397–398 counterarguments, 185, 327
acknowledgments, 267 repetition, 305, 308 paraphrasing, 493–494 critique of, 342
active listening, 145, 241 rhetorical devices, 327, 330, 332, plot, 8, 10, 17–18 drawing conclusions from, 334
adjectives, 26, 29, 35 340, 342 poetic form, 40 evaluation of, 310, 332, 342
adverbs, 72, 75, 81 rhyme and rhyme scheme, 135, 137, point of view, 188–189, 367–368, evidence for, 192, 327, 334
Again and Again (Notice & Note), 3, 9, 140, 210, 212 373, 375, 383, 386, 441 Genre Elements, 185, 305, 327, 353
11, 15, 84, 99, 105, 170, 222, 231, science fiction, 279, 282, 285, 288, predictions, 385–386 inferences from, 190, 334
252, 293, 348, 418, 424, 502 296, 298 punctuation and tone, 39 reasons for, 327
Aha Moment (Notice & Note), 3, 15, 16, setting, 59, 61, 63 questions generated about text, 442 setting a purpose in, 187, 307
84, 98, 106, 129, 170, 252, 255, 290, sonnets, 209, 212 realistic fiction, 458, 461–462 summaries of, 192, 310, 342
348, 363, 372, 374, 424, 427, 502 sound devices, 136–137 repetition, 308 support for, 185, 327
alliteration, 37, 136, 144, 234, 469 text structure, 71–77, 267, 270, 273, rhetorical devices, 330, 332, 340 tracing reasoning of, 327
allusions, 474 491, 494–495 rhyme and rhyme scheme, 137, 140, articles
analysis. See also Analyze the Text themes, 217, 220, 222, 316, 318, 470, 212 author’s purpose in, 113, 115, 117
arguments, 185, 188, 190, 327, 329, 472 science fiction, 282, 285, 288, 296, informational, 465
332, 338–339 two-voice poetry, 415, 417 298 news, 45, 79
author’s purpose, 305, 308 verse novels, 405, 407–408, 410 setting and conflict, 61, 63 association appeals, 243
characters, 59, 61–63, 65, 101, 103, Analyze the Text, 20, 32, 42, 54, 66, 78, set a purpose, 368–369, 372–373, assonance, 136, 144
107 82, 108, 120, 130, 142, 144, 158, 192, 396, 398 audience
conflict, 59, 61, 63, 101, 104, 106 204, 214, 224, 234, 238, 240, 274, sonnets, 212 for arguments, 351
digital texts, 244 300, 310, 320, 334, 342, 346, 376, text structure, 73–77, 270, 273, eye contact with, 94
documentaries, 450 388, 400, 412, 420, 422, 446, 464, 494–495 for infographics, 109
drama, 147, 149–151, 153, 155–156 474, 486, 496, 500 themes, 30, 220, 222, 318, 472 for informational essays, 86
figurative language, 197, 200 Anchor Questions (Notice & Note), 2–3, traits of characters, 457–460, 463 for narratives, 255
folk tales, 125, 128 84, 98–99, 170, 182–183, 252, 264, two-voice poetry, 417 in panel discussions, 511
form in poetry, 37, 40 265, 348, 362–363, 424, 436–437, 502 verse novels, 407–408, 410 persuasive media and, 243
free verse poetry, 469, 472–473 animation, 244, 322 Annotation Model, 6, 26, 38, 46, 60, 72, for presentations, 173
graphical elements, 315, 318 annotate 102, 114, 126, 136, 148, 186, 198, 210, author’s message, 476, 490, 500
history writing, 477, 479, 481–482, arguments, 188, 190, 329, 332, 338–339 218, 230, 268, 280, 306, 316, 328, 366, author’s point of view, 439, 477
484 author’s purpose, 47, 50, 52, 115, 382, 394, 406, 416, 440, 456, 470, 478, author’s purpose
humor, 125, 127, 147, 150–151, 117, 308 492 analysis of, 305, 308
153–154 characters, 61–63, 65, 103, 107 antecedents, 123, 355, 478, 481, 489 in articles, 113, 115, 117
key ideas, 481 complex sentences, 220, 331 Applying Academic Vocabulary, 9, 28, comparison of, 476, 490, 500
lyric poetry, 230, 237 conflict, 104, 106 49, 105, 117, 152, 189, 201, 291, connections and, 52
media, 163–164, 166, 243, 248, 250, drama, 149–151, 153, 155–156 331, 385, 409, 459, 484 critiques of, 50, 117
324, 452 figurative language, 200 argumentative essay, 350–356 drawing conclusions regarding, 47,
memoirs, 199, 202 free verse poetry, 472–473 conclusion, 350 446
metaphor and personification, 406, graphical elements, 318 develop, 352–353 inferences regarding, 120
408 history writing, 479, 481–482, 484 edit, 355 in informational texts, 45, 47, 50, 52

Index of Skills R13


B claims, in arguments, 185, 305, 327 subordinating conjunctions in, 148, context clues, 80, 110, 194, 226, 390, 456
background reading, 87, 173, 255, 351, classification patterns, 267 161, 186, 195, 328 contradictions. See Contrasts and
427, 505 clauses, 23, 111, 337. See also dependent composition, 164 Contradictions (Notice & Note)
bandwagon appeals, 243 clauses; independent clauses compound sentences, 6, 23 contrast clues, 80
bias, 243 climax, 5, 428 comprehension monitoring, 217, Contrasts and Contradictions (Notice &
Big Questions (Notice & Note), 84, 170, Close Read Screencast, 10, 155, 200, 219–220, 393 Note), 74, 76, 84, 99, 105, 116, 170,
183, 190, 252, 265, 271, 348, 424, 232, 397, 442 conclusions. See also drawing 183, 187, 202, 252, 284, 348, 408,
437, 443, 480, 502 coherence of ideas, 350, 504 conclusions 424, 459–460, 502. See also compare
biography, 45 Collaborate & Compare, 82–83, 144–145, argumentative essay, 350 and contrast
brainstorming, 83, 87, 169, 251, 321, 377 168–169, 240–241, 250–251, friendly letter, 131 controlling ideas
346–347, 422–423, 500–501 informational essay, 86 of documentaries, 452
commas personal narrative, 159, 254 in explanatory paragraphs, 33
in compound sentences, 23 research report, 504 in film adaptations, 21
conjunctive adverbs and, 81 short story, 426 in history writing, 477
C coordinate adjectives and, 35 conflict identifying, 439
capitalization
effective use of, 26, 440, 444 analysis of, 59, 61, 63, 101, 104, 106 in informational essays, 55, 86, 89
as graphical element, 315
interpretation of, 29, 128 comparison of, 20 in informative reports, 275
in poetry, 209, 469
for introductory phrases, 306, 307, in drama, 147 in literary analysis, 205
proper nouns, 60, 268, 272, 277
313, 449 external, 59, 101 in multimodal presentations, 172,
uses of, 62, 69
in pace of stories, 126 foreshadowing, 20 175
cause-and-effect relationships, 78, 267,
for pauses, 133 internal, 59, 101 in play versions, 169
324, 388, 400, 446
uses of, 449 in realistic fiction, 455 of news articles, 79
characterization, 59, 168, 365
comma splices, 227, 345, 382, 391 resolution of, 5, 101, 428 in research reports, 504
characters
commonly confused words, 259, 366, 379 setting as influence on, 5, 101 coordinate adjectives, 26, 29, 35
analysis of, 59, 61–63, 65, 101, 103,
compare and contrast in short story, 427 coordinating conjunctions, 23, 81, 449
107
characters and characterization, 108, conjunctions. See also subordinating correlative conjunctions, 114, 123,
cast of, 147, 163
168 conjunctions 186, 195
comparison of, 32, 42, 82, 300
narrators, 452 coordinating, 23, 81, 449 correspondence. See letters
connections and, 224
comparisons. See also Collaborate & correlative, 114, 123, 186, 195 counterarguments, 185, 327
costumes of, 166
Compare; compare and contrast conjunctive adverbs, 72, 75, 81 couplets, 209
critique of, 224
arguments, 192, 310, 326, 346 connect credibility of sources, 192, 347
discussion of, 67
author’s purpose and message, 476, in arguments, 188 Critical Vocabulary, 6, 22, 26, 34, 46, 56,
inferences regarding, 103, 464
490, 500 author’s purpose and, 52 60, 68, 72, 80, 102, 110, 114, 122,
interpretations and, 61, 108, 300
characters, 32, 42, 82, 300 characters and, 224 126, 132, 148, 160, 186, 194, 198,
motivations of, 101
conflict, 20 in comparison of texts, 82 206, 218, 226, 268, 276, 280, 302,
personality of, 59, 101, 455
genres, 58, 70 in folk tales, 128 306, 312, 328, 336, 344, 366, 378,
predictions regarding, 66, 300
graphical elements, 318 foreshadowing and, 20 382, 390, 394, 402, 440, 448, 456,
in realistic fiction, 455
in informational texts, 54 to graphical elements, 214 466, 478, 488, 492, 498
setting as influence on, 5
media, 242, 250 in informational texts, 78 critique
in short story, 427
memoir, 202 in media, 250 arguments, 342
traits of, 59, 101, 167, 455, 457–460,
moods, 134, 144 metaphors and, 412 author’s purpose, 50, 117
463
poetry, 228, 240–241, 320, 404 as monitoring strategy, 217 characters, 224
chronological order, 71, 254, 256, 393,
sources, 486 in organizational patterns, 398 history writing, 486, 496
491
text structure, 274 questions generated about text and, memoirs, 199
citations, academic, 506
themes, 422–423 442 metaphor and personification, 408
Cite Evidence
versions, 146, 162, 168 in setting a purpose for texts, 396 oral, 43, 169
for arguments, 192, 334
complete predicates, 23 research, 20, 54, 67, 78, 108, 120, play, 169
for drawing conclusions, 54, 113,
complete subjects, 23 128, 158, 188, 214, 224, 238, 274, poetry, 43, 142, 238, 421
117–118
complex sentences 324, 396, 408, 412, 452, 474, 480, 500 point of view, 188, 368, 383
for fake videos, 120
annotations, 220, 331 themes and, 220 posters, 248–250
in history writing, 486, 496
comma splices, 227, 345, 382, 391 connotations, 56, 243, 336, 498 production images, 163, 164, 166,
from informational texts, 45, 48, 50,
complete, 345 consistent verb tenses 169
274
dependent clauses in, 6, 195, 218, analysis of, 461 realistic fiction, 458
for key ideas, 484
227, 328, 337 exceptions to, 57, 207, 303, 467 rhymes, 214
for memoir, 204
independent clauses in, 6, 23, 161, importance of, 46, 198, 280, 456 setting a purpose for texts, 398
from myth, 32
195, 218, 227, 337 in sentences and paragraphs, 91 supporting evidence, 446
from short story, 108
subject-verb agreement in, 227, 345, consonance, 136, 144 text structure, 495
of structure informing readers of
394, 397, 403 constructive feedback, 55, 131 themes, 30
events, 78

R14 Student Resources


verb tense, 52 drama, 147, 149–151, 153, 155–156 290, 292, 299, 302, 303, 306, 307, F
videos, 93–94, 324, 465 dramatic readings, 143 309, 312, 316, 317, 318, 322, 324, facial expressions, 94, 143, 163, 164, 169,
draw conclusions 325, 328, 329, 331, 333, 338, 341, 177, 358, 512
from argument, 334 344, 345, 346, 348, 351, 352, 353, falling action, 5, 428
from author’s purpose, 47, 446 354, 355, 357, 360, 366, 367, 369, feedback
D for characters, 63, 107 371, 373, 375, 378, 379, 382, 383, constructive, 55, 131
denotations, 56, 336, 498 for conflict, 104 384, 385, 386, 387, 389, 390, 391, listening to, 90, 176, 258, 354, 430,
dependent clauses in drama, 151, 158 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 402, 508
in complex sentences, 6, 195, 218, evidence for, 54, 113, 117–118 406, 407, 409, 410, 411, 413, 416, positive, 321
227, 328, 337 in folk tales, 130 417, 418, 419, 421, 422, 424, 427, fiction. See also short story
subordinating conjunctions in, 23, from mood, 291 428, 429, 430, 431, 434, 440, 441, historical, 497
328, 337 in myth, 27 442, 444, 445, 448, 449, 450, 453, realistic, 5, 455, 458, 461–462, 464
descriptive patterns, 393 in plot analysis, 17 456, 457, 458, 459, 462, 463, 466, science fiction, 279–282, 285, 288,
details in poetry, 214 467, 470, 471, 472, 473, 478, 479, 296, 298
evaluation of, 45, 48, 50 in short story, 66 483, 485, 487, 489, 492, 495, 498, figurative language
supporting, 89, 477 from themes, 318, 320 499, 500, 502, 506, 507, 508, 509, analysis of, 197, 200
dialogue from videos, 248, 250, 324 511 annotations, 200
essays. See also argumentative essays; evaluation of, 204
in drama, 147, 163
informational essays metaphors, 197, 240, 406, 408, 412
humor in, 125
opinion, 121 mood and, 125
punctuation of, 431
personal, 439, 441, 453
in realistic fiction, 455 E personification, 197, 240, 406, 408
etymology, 160, 312, 378, 448 in poetry, 37, 229, 240
writing, 167 edit
diction, 135, 144, 230 evaluate films. See videos
argumentative essay, 355
dictionary, 122, 206, 344 argument, 310, 332, 342 first-person point of view, 365, 439
informational essay, 91
direct address, nouns/pronouns of, 133, 327 details, 45, 48, 50 folk tales, 125, 127–128
multimodal presentation, 176
direct quotations, 431 drama, 158 footage, 244, 322, 450
personal narrative, 259
disadvantages and advantages pattern, 267 figurative language, 204 footnotes, 267, 274
research report, 509
discuss folk tales, 130 For Struggling Students, 358
short story, 431
informational text, 54, 400 foreshadowing, 5, 20, 376
advertisements, 55 emotional appeals, 243
media, 166 form of poetry, 37, 40, 43, 209
characters, 67 encyclopedias, 324
poetic, 234, 238 free verse poetry, 225, 230, 315, 469,
explanations, 33 endnotes, 267
primary sources, 496 472–473, 475
informational texts, 55 end rhyme, 135, 225
realistic fiction, 461–462, 464
opinions, 79, 225 enunciation, 94, 177, 205, 358, 512
rhetorical devices, 340
panel discussions, 511–512 English Learner Support, 1, 2, 6, 9, 10,
tone, 474
plot, 21 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22,
presentations, 145 23, 24, 25, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, videos, 324 G
visual elements, 248 gathering information
primary sources, 487 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 45, 46,
evidence. See also Cite Evidence argument, 275, 301, 311, 321, 325,
research reports, 447 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 55, 56, 57, 59,
for arguments, 192, 327, 334 335, 343
rules for, 512 62, 63, 64, 67, 68, 69, 71, 73, 75, 76,
for controlling ideas, 439 informational essay, 21, 33, 43, 55,
storyboard, 121 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 84, 87, 88, 89,
critique of, 446 67, 79
sustainability, 193 90, 91, 93, 96, 97, 101, 102, 103,
for drawing conclusions, 54, 113, multimodal presentation, 109, 121,
timelines, 275 104, 107, 109, 110, 111, 113, 114,
117–118 131, 143, 159, 167
video games, 389 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 121, 122,
for inferences, 5, 416, 420 personal narrative, 193, 205, 215,
Word Networks, 1, 97, 181, 263, 361, 123, 125, 127, 128, 129, 132, 133,
for panel discussion, 511 225, 235, 239, 249
435 137, 138, 139, 141, 143, 144, 145,
supporting details as, 89 research, 224, 251, 347, 501
documentary, 450–452 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 154,
for theme, 470 research report, 447, 453, 465, 475,
draft 156, 157, 159, 160, 161, 163, 164,
exaggeration, 125 487, 497
argumentative essay, 352–353 165, 167, 168, 169, 170, 173, 174,
exposition, 5, 428 short story, 377, 389, 401, 413, 421
edit, 91, 259, 355 175, 176, 177, 180, 186, 189, 191,
expository essays. See informational generalizations, 243, 327
informational essay, 88–89 194, 195, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202,
essays; writing activities generating questions, 166, 388, 439,
multimodal presentation, 174–175 203, 206, 207, 210, 211, 212, 213,
external conflict, 59, 101 442, 505
peer review of, 90, 176, 258, 354, 215, 219, 221, 223, 226, 227, 229,
Extreme or Absolute Language (Notice Genre Elements
430, 508 230, 231, 232, 233, 235, 236, 237,
& Note), 84, 170, 182, 188, 190, 252, argument, 185, 305, 327, 353
personal narrative, 256–257 239, 240, 244, 245, 247, 248, 250,
332, 348, 424, 436, 443, 502 comparison of, 58, 70
research report, 506–507 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 262, 268,
eye contact, 94, 169, 177, 358, 512 documentary, 450
revise, 90, 176, 258, 354 269, 271, 272, 273, 275, 276, 277,
short story, 428–429 280, 281, 283, 284, 285, 286, 289, drama, 147
two-voice poetry, 421 folk tale, 125

Index of Skills R15


informational text, 45, 71, 113, 267, imagery, 37, 125, 135, 229 cite evidence and evaluate details, 45, L
381, 393, 477, 491 Improve Reading Fluency, 40, 50, 138, 48, 50, 274 Language Conventions. See also
media, 163, 243, 322 153, 222, 232, 288, 372, 408, 461, comparison, 54 capitalization; clauses; commas;
memoir, 197 481 connections, 78 complex sentences; subject-
myth, 25, 27–28 indefinite pronouns, 355 discussion, 55 verb agreement; subordinating
personal essay, 439 independent clauses evaluation, 54, 400 conjunctions; tense of verbs
personal narrative, 257 in complex sentences, 6, 23, 161, 195, Genre Elements, 45, 71, 113, 267, comma splices, 227, 345, 382, 391
poetry, 37, 135, 209, 229, 315 218, 227, 337 381, 393, 477, 491 commonly confused words, 259,
realistic fiction, 455 in compound sentences, 6 interpretation, 54 366, 379
research of, 300 conjunctive adverbs in connection prediction, 381, 385–386 conjunctive adverbs, 72, 75, 81
science fiction, 279 of, 72, 81 structure, 71–77, 267, 270, 273, 491, coordinate adjectives, 26, 29, 35
short story, 5, 59, 101, 217, 365, 429 Independent Reading, 84–85, 170–171, 494–495 correlative conjunctions, 114, 123,
two-voice poetry, 415 252–253, 348–349, 424–425, information gathering. See gathering 186, 195
verse novel, 405 502–503 information introductory phrases, 306, 307, 313,
gestures, 94, 143, 167, 169, 177, 358, 512 inference information requests, 67, 193, 413 449
glittering generalizations, 243 annotations for, 7, 14, 17 informative report, 275 prepositional phrases, 102, 105, 111,
glossaries, 132, 344 argument, 190, 334 Instructional Overview and Resources, 133, 492, 499
Glossary of Academic Vocabulary, R8 author’s purpose, 120 1A–1D, 96A–96D, 180A–180D, pronoun-antecedent agreement, 123,
Glossary of Critical Vocabulary, R9–R12 characters, 103, 464 262A–262D, 364A–364D, 355, 478, 481, 489
graphical elements comparison of texts, 82 436A–436D proper nouns, 60, 268, 272, 277
analysis of, 315, 318 defined, 416 internal conflict, 59, 101 punctuation of dialogue, 431
in poetry, 209, 214, 315, 415 documentary, 452 interpret relative pronouns, 328, 331, 337, 339
in verse novels, 405 drama, 150, 158 allusions, 474 run-on sentences, 227, 345, 382, 391
in videos, 322 evidence to support, 5, 416, 420 argument, 329, 338 sentence structure, 6, 13, 23
graphic novels, 497 from footnotes, 274 author’s purpose, 308 Language X-Ray: English Learning
graphic organizers, 279, 301 history writing, 479, 481, 484, 486 character, 61, 108, 300, 459 Support, 86B, 172B, 350B, 426B,
Greek roots, 276 humor, 151, 153 conflict, 106, 130 504B
group work. See discussions interpretation of, 7, 14, 17 history writing, 482 Latin roots, 22, 34, 302, 488
mood, 286, 293 inference, 7, 14, 17 Learning Mindset, 2, 4, 5, 20, 45, 58, 66,
myth, 28 informational text, 54, 120 84, 86, 95, 96, 100, 134, 135, 136,
plot, 18 lyric poetry, 237 142, 146, 158, 166, 170, 172, 179,
H poetry, 40, 214, 320, 416–417 memoir, 204 180, 184, 192, 196, 204, 252, 254,
haikus, 37 punctuation and tone, 39 mood, 137, 140, 281, 284, 287, 289 261, 262, 266, 274, 278, 300, 348,
historical fiction, 497 from repetition, 310 ode, 232 350, 359, 360, 364, 376, 392, 400,
historical sources, 142, 166 rhetorical devices, 340 paraphrasing, 493–494 424, 426, 433, 434, 454, 464, 476,
history writing, 477, 479, 481–482, 484, setting and conflict, 63 poetry, 42, 142, 234, 238, 320, 420 486, 502, 504, 513
486, 496 short story, 66 production images, 166 letter
how-to instructions, 45 speaker, 142, 412 rhetorical devices, 342 expression of opinion, 249, 301, 475
human-interest stories, 79 text structure, 73–74, 77 rhyme and rhyme scheme, 137, 140, formal, 335
humor theme, 25, 224, 474 212 friendly, 131, 193, 301, 413
in drama, 147, 150–151, 153–154 traits of characters, 458, 460 science fiction, 282 request, 67, 193, 413
in folk tales, 125, 127 verse novel, 408 short story, 66 lighting, 164
in production images, 164 infographic, 109, 401 theme, 222, 472 limerick, 37
opinions on, 131 informational article, 465 titles, 376, 400 lines in poetry, 37, 209, 315, 469
informational essay, 86–94 video, 324 listening
conclusion, 86 visual elements, 248 active, 145, 241
develop, 88–89 interview, 450 alliterative sounds, 37
edit, 91 introductory phrases, 306, 307, 313, 449
I feedback, 90, 176, 258, 354, 430, 508
introduction, 55, 86, 89 irony, 125, 147 group discussions, 55, 79
ideas. See also controlling ideas
plan, 1, 87–88 Italian sonnet, 209, 210 poetry, 235, 239, 311, 321
clarification of, 94, 225
present, 93–94 presentations, 94, 145, 177,
coherence of, 350, 504
publish, 91 241, 358
key ideas, 477, 480–481, 484
revise, 90 retelling, 131
organization of, 88, 174, 256, 352,
428, 506 scoring guide, 92 K sonnet, 215
writing prompt, 86 key ideas, 477, 480–481, 484 loaded language, 243, 327, 335
transitions between, 33, 55, 121, 159,
informational text logical appeals, 243
161
author’s purpose, 45, 47, 50, 52 logical fallacies. See loaded language;
illusions, 121, 172–175
illustrations, 109 sweeping generalizations

R16 Student Resources


loyalty appeals, 243 narrators, 59, 365 opinion essays, 121 plagiarism, 501, 506, 509
lyric poetry, 229, 230, 237, 239 natural gestures, 143, 169, 177 opinions plan
negative connotations, 336, 498 in arguments, 185 argumentative essay, 263, 351–352
nonverbal techniques, 94, 177, 358, 512 discussion of, 79, 225 film critique, 93
Notice & Note on humor, 131 informational essay, 1, 87–88
M Again and Again, 3, 9, 11, 15, 84, in letters, 249, 301, 475 multimodal presentation, 97,
main ideas and details, 79, 176, 178 99, 105, 170, 222, 231, 252, 293, 348, oral critiques, 43, 169 173–174
media. See also videos 418, 424, 502 oral traditions, 125, 130 personal narrative, 181, 255–256
analysis, 163–164, 166, 243, 248, 250, Aha Moment, 3, 15, 16, 84, 98, 106, organizational patterns, 267, 270, 393, podcast, 357
324, 452 129, 170, 252, 290, 348, 363, 372, 395, 397–398 poster, 251
comparison, 242, 250 374, 424, 502 organization of ideas, 88, 174, 256, 352, research report, 435, 505–506
digital text, 244 Anchor Questions, 2–3, 84, 98–99, 428, 506 short story, 361, 427–428
documentary, 450–452 170, 182–183, 252, 264–265, 348, organizations, 277, 464 video, 251
Genre Elements, 163, 243, 322 362–363, 424, 436–437, 502 plays and playwrights, 147, 161, 163, 168
persuasive, 243, 250 Annotation Model, 6, 26, 38, 46, 60, plot
podcast, 205, 357–358, 413, 453 72, 102, 114, 126, 136, 148, 186, 198, analysis of, 5, 8, 10, 17–18
poster, 244, 248–251 210, 218, 230, 268, 280, 306, 316, P annotations, 8, 10, 17–18
media campaign, 201 328, 366, 382, 394, 406, 416, 440, panel discussion, 511–512 conflict in, 59
melody, 230, 239 456, 470, 478, 492 parallel structure, 123 discussion of, 21
memoirs, 197, 199, 202, 204 Big Questions, 84, 170, 183, 190, 252, paraphrasing, 491, 493–494, 509 in drama, 147
Memory Moment (Notice & Note), 2, 13, 265, 271, 348, 424, 437, 443, 480, 502 parts of speech, 122, 123, 206, 344. See draw conclusions, 17
16, 64, 84, 170, 236, 252, 348, 424, Contrasts and Contradictions, also specific parts of speech inferences, 18
471, 502 74, 76, 84, 99, 105, 116, 170, 183, past perfect tense, 57, 207 stages of, 5, 428
mental images, 125, 406, 412, 469 187, 202, 252, 284, 348, 408, 424, past tense, 52, 57, 201, 207, 290, 303 plural pronouns, 111, 123
Mentor Text, 44A, 86, 89, 112A, 172, 459–460, 502 patterns podcasts, 205, 357–358, 413, 453
175, 196A, 254, 257, 304A, 350, Extreme or Absolute Language, 84, descriptive, 393 poetic elements and devices. See also
353, 362A, 364, 426, 439, 490A, 170, 182, 188, 190, 252, 332, 348, identifying, 420 poetry; rhyme and rhyme scheme
504, 507 424, 436, 443, 502 organizational, 267, 270, 393, 395, alliteration, 37, 136, 144, 234, 469
message of author, 476, 490, 500 Memory Moment, 2, 13, 16, 64, 84, 397–398 capitalization, 209, 469
metaphors, 197, 240, 406, 408, 412 170, 236, 252, 348, 424, 471, 502 repetition, 136, 144, 305, 308, end rhyme, 135, 225
meter, 37, 209, 229 Numbers and Stats, 84, 170, 252, 310–311 figurative language, 37, 229, 240
monitoring comprehension, 217, 264, 270, 340, 348, 424, 502 structural, 71 lines, 37, 209, 315, 469
219–220, 393 Quoted Words, 48, 84, 170, 252, 348, peer review, 90, 176, 258, 354, 430, 508 meter, 37, 209, 229
mood 384, 396, 424, 437, 443, 494, 502 personal essays, 439, 441, 453 mood, 38, 134–137, 140, 144, 229,
analysis of, 136–137, 140, 279–295 Tough Questions, 84, 170, 252, 348, personal experiences 469
lighting and, 164 362, 371, 424, 502 for inferences, 416 punctuation, 38, 39, 43, 209, 469
of plays, 147 Word Gaps, 84, 170, 252, 265, 269, in memoirs, 197 refrain, 230
of poetry, 38, 134–137, 140, 144, 271, 348, 424, 502 in personal narratives, 254, 257 repetition, 136, 144, 469
229, 469 Words of the Wiser, 28, 84, 156, 170, use in essay planning, 87 rhythm, 37, 43, 136, 143–144, 209,
motivations of characters, 101 252, 317, 348, 363, 370, 409, 424, 502 personality of characters, 59, 101, 455 239
multimodal presentation, 172–178 nouns personal narrative, 254–260 stanzas, 37, 142, 316, 469
deliver, 177 of direct address, 133 conclusion, 159, 254 themes, 316–321, 422–423, 470
develop, 174–175 proper, 60, 268, 272, 277 develop, 256–257 poetry. See also poetic elements and
introduction, 175 novels, 405, 407–408, 410, 497 edit, 259 devices
plan, 97, 173–174 Numbers and Stats (Notice & Note), 84, genre characteristics, 257 comparisons, 228, 240–241, 320, 404
practice, 177 170, 252, 264, 270, 340, 348, 424, 502 introduction, 254, 257 critiques of, 43, 142, 238, 421
revise, 176 plan, 181, 255–256 draw conclusions, 214
scoring guide, 178 publish, 259 evaluation of, 234, 238
storyboard, 121 revise, 258 form of, 37, 40, 43, 209
write prompt, 172 O scoring guide, 260 free verse, 225, 230, 315, 469,
music, 244, 322 objective point of view, 185, 188–189, write, 159, 254–260, 325 472–473, 475
myths, 25, 27–28 381, 383, 386, 439, 477 personification, 197, 240, 406, 408 Genre Elements, 37, 135, 209, 229,
objective sources, 505 persuasive media, 243, 250 315
objective summaries, 79, 389 phrases inferences, 40, 214, 320, 416–417
odes, 229, 232, 235, 487 introductory, 306, 307, 313, 449 interpretations of, 42, 142, 234, 238,
N omniscient point of view, 365 prepositional, 102, 105, 111, 133, 320, 420
narration, 244, 322, 450, 452 492, 499
narrative structure, 254–260, 365,
426–432

Index of Skills R17


listen, 235, 239, 311, 321 primary sources, 477, 487, 496, relative pronouns, 328, 331, 337, 339 research report, 510
lyric, 229, 230, 237, 239 505–506 reports, 275. See also research reports short story, 432
narrative, 405 print elements, 244 research. See also search terms; sources run-on sentences, 227, 345, 382, 391
odes, 229, 232, 235, 487 problem-solution structure, 491 of author or publisher works, 42
present, 143, 145 production images, 163, 164, 165, 169 on careers of living people, 420 S
punctuation in, 38, 39, 43, 209 pronouns on charities, 446 science fiction, 279–282, 285, 288,
set a purpose, 39, 317, 471 antecedent agreement with, 123, 355, of contextual factors, 234 296, 298
sonnets, 37, 209–212, 215 478, 481, 489 encyclopedias for, 324 science writing, 267
sound devices in, 37, 135–137, 144, of direct address, 327 focused questions in, 20, 108 scoring guides
240 indefinite, 355 generalized, 238 argumentative text, 356
speaker in, 142 relative, 328, 331, 337, 339 generate questions, 166, 388, 505 informational text, 92
tone of, 38, 39, 43, 135, 229, 470, 474 singular vs. plural, 111, 123 of genres, 300 multimodal presentation, 178
two-voice, 415, 417, 421 pronunciation, 122, 132, 206, 344 job descriptions, 347 personal narrative, 260
voice in, 42, 135, 229, 415 pronunciation key, R7 leads for, 342 research report, 510
write, 43, 143, 225, 239, 311, 321, proper nouns, 60, 268, 272, 277 on organizations, 464 short story, 432
401, 421 publish of problems and solutions, 248 search terms
point of view argumentative essay, 355 recent, 334 general nature, 66
analysis of, 185, 188–189, 365–368, informational essay, 91 stay on topic, 120 online research, 32, 66, 214
373–376, 381–383, 386, 439–441 personal narrative, 259 trickster tales, 130 specificity, 54, 66, 158, 204, 474
author’s, 439, 477 research report, 509 research report subtopics, 320
first-person, 365, 439 short story, 431 conclusion, 504 secondary sources, 496, 506
objective, 185, 188–189, 381, 383, punctuation. See also specific types of develop, 506–507 self-sustained reading. See Independent
386, 439, 477 punctuation edit, 509 Reading
omniscient, 365 of dialogue, 431 introduction for, 504 semicolons, 23, 81, 391
in short story, 427 as graphical element, 315 plan, 435, 505–506 sensory language, 469
subjective, 185, 188–189, 381, 383, in poetry, 38, 39, 43, 209, 469 publish, 509 sentences. See also complex sentences
386, 439, 477 purpose. See author’s purpose; setting a revise, 508 comma splices, 227, 345, 382, 391
third-person, 365 purpose scoring guide, 510 compound, 6, 23
positive connotations, 243, 336, 498 write, 435, 447, 504–510 consistent verb tenses, 91
posters, 244, 248–251, 401 resolution of conflict, 5, 101, 428 fragmented, 195, 227, 345
predicates, complete, 23 Resource Logs, R1–R6 run-on, 227, 345, 382, 391
predictions revise
Q simple, 6, 23
author’s purpose and, 115 argumentative text, 354 structure, 6, 13, 23
qualities of characters. See traits of
characters, 66, 300 informational text, 90 variety, 86
characters
humor and, 127 multimodal presentation, 176 setting
questions
in informational texts, 381, 385–386 personal narrative, 258 analysis of, 59, 61, 63
about text, 439, 442
key ideas, 480 research report, 508 conflict and, 5, 101
as monitoring strategy, 217
in plot analysis, 8, 10 short story, 430 in drama, 147
focused, 20, 108
in science fiction, 298 rhetorical devices, 136, 144, 305, 308, mood and, 144
for research, 388, 505
prepositional phrases, 102, 105, 111, 133, 310–311,327, 330, 332, 340, 342, 469 in realistic fiction, 455
quotation marks, 431
492, 499 rhetorical questions, 185, 243, 327 in short story, 427
Quoted Words (Notice & Note), 48, 84,
presentations. See also multimodal rhyme and rhyme scheme set a purpose, 365, 368–369, 372–373,
170, 252, 348, 384, 396, 424, 437,
presentations annotations, 137, 140, 212 376, 393, 395–396, 398
443, 494, 502
deliver, 94, 177 critique, 214 setting a purpose, 7, 27, 39, 47, 103,115,
discussion of, 145 end rhyme, 135, 225 127, 187, 199, 211219, 269, 281,
infographic, 401 interpretation, 137, 140, 212 307, 317, 323, 367, 383, 441, 451,
informational essay, 93–94 mood and, 135, 144 457, 471
listen to, 94, 145, 177, 241, 358
R in odes, 229 Shakespearean sonnets, 209, 210
rate of speaking, 94, 177, 205, 358, 512
media campaign, 201 in sonnets, 210, 214 short story
reference resources
plan, 93 rhythm, 37, 43, 136, 143–144, 209, 239 characters, 59
dictionaries, 122, 206, 344
play version, 169 rising action, 5, 428 conclusion, 426
encyclopedias, 324
podcast, 205, 357–358 roots, 22, 34, 276, 302, 488 develop, 428–429
endnotes, 267
poetry, 143, 145 rubrics. See also scoring guides edit, 431
footnotes, 267, 274
poster critique, 249 argument, 356 Genre Elements, 5, 59, 101, 217, 365,
glossaries, 132, 344
practice, 94, 177, 358 informational essay, 92 429
thesaurus, 206, 402
timing in, 177 multimodal presentation, 178 introduction, 429
register, 79
present tense, 52, 57, 207, 303 personal narrative, 260 plan, 361, 427–428

R18 Student Resources


publish, 431 of informational texts, 71–77, 267, T V
revise, 430 270, 273, 491, 494–495 tense of verbs, 52, 57, 201, 207, 290, 303. verbal techniques, 94, 177, 358, 512
scoring guide, 432 parallel, 123 See also consistent verb tenses verbs. See subject-verb agreement; tense
set a purpose, 7, 103, 219, 367, 457 of narratives, 254–260, 365, Text Complexity, 2A, 24A, 36A, 44A, of verbs
theme, 217, 220, 222, 224 426–432 58A, 70A, 100A, 112A, 124A, verse novels, 405, 407–408, 410
write, 343, 361, 426–432 of poetry, 37, 38, 215, 228, 229, 230, 134A, 146A, 162A, 182A, 196A, version comparisons, 146, 162, 168
similes, 197, 240 315, 405, 415, 422 208A, 216A, 228A, 242A, 278A, video
simple sentences, 6, 23 of sentences, 6, 13, 23 304A, 314A, 322A, 326A, 362A, adaptation of, 21
singular pronouns, 111, 123 of texts, 381, 393, 491 380A, 392A, 404A, 414A, 436A, critique of, 93–94, 324, 465
small group discussions. See discussions style of poetry, 229 450A, 454A, 468A, 476A, draw conclusions, 248, 250, 324
sonnets, 37, 209–212, 215 subheadings, 393 490A informational, 322–324
sound devices, 37, 135–137, 144, subjective point of view, 185, 188–189, text features, 244, 267, 381 interpretation, 324
240, 469 381, 383, 386, 439, 477 Text in Focus, 7, 27, 115, 199, 231 plan, 251
sound effects, 163, 450 subjects, complete, 23 textual evidence. See evidence sound elements, 244, 322
sound elements, 244, 322, 325 subject-verb agreement Text X-Ray: English Language Support, visual elements, 244, 322
sources. See also research in complex sentences, 227, 345, 394, 2C–2D, 24C–24D, 36C–36D, visual elements, 244, 248, 322, 325
academic citations, 506 397, 403 44C–44D, 58C–58D, 70C–70D, Vocabulary Strategy. See also Academic
accuracy of, 505 correlative conjunctions and, 123 100C–100D, 112C–112D, Vocabulary; Critical Vocabulary
comparison of, 486 prepositional phrases and, 102, 105, 124C–125D, 146C–146D, connotations, 56, 243, 336, 498
credibility of, 192, 347 111, 492, 499 162C–162D, 182C–182d, context clues, 80, 110, 194, 226, 390,
current nature of, 412 subordinate clauses. See dependent 196C–196D, 208C–208D, 456
historical, 142, 166 clauses 216C–216D, 228C–228D, denotations, 56, 336, 498
newspapers, 83 subordinating conjunctions 242C–242D, 278C–278D, etymology, 160, 312, 378, 448
objective, 505 annotations, 150, 190 304C–304D, 314C–314D, glossaries, 132, 344
online research, 42, 78, 83, in complex sentences, 148, 186, 195, 322C–322D, 326C–326D, reference resources, 122, 206, 344,
192, 310 328 362C–362D, 380C–380D, 402
patience with, 130 in dependent clauses, 23, 161, 328, 392C–392D, 404C–404D, roots, 22, 34, 276, 302, 488
primary, 477, 487, 496, 505–506 337 414C–414D, 436C–436D, suffixes, 68
relevant, 505 suffixes, 68 450C–450D, 454C–454D, word origins, 160, 206, 312, 378, 448
reliability of, 83, 166, 192, 274, 310, summarize 468C–468D, 476C–476D, voice
347, 400 arguments, 192, 310, 342 490C–490D author’s point of view and, 439
reputable, 452, 474 history writing, 496 themes, 25, 30, 217, 220, 222, 224, author’s purpose and, 305
secondary, 496, 506 main ideas, 400 316–321, 405, 412, 422–423, 470, modulation of, 94, 177, 358
speaker objective, 79, 389 472, 474 of narrator, 59
inferences, 142, 412 paragraphs, 32, 388 thesaurus, 206, 402 pitch of, 94, 177, 358
mood and, 144 stanzas, 142 thesis statements. See controlling ideas of playwright, 147
in poetry, 142 support for arguments, 185, 327 third-person point of view, 365 in poetry, 42, 135, 229, 415
rate of, 94, 177, 205, 358, 512 supporting details, 89, 477 To Challenge Students. . ., 18, 29, 48, point of view and, 381
in verse novels, 405 supporting evidence. See evidence 63, 87, 130, 156, 169, 173, 214, 224, tone of, 21, 79
volume of, 94, 177, 205, 358, 512 suspense, 5, 21 241, 246, 255, 271, 287, 295, 340, voice-over narration, 450, 452
Speaking and Listening Task sweeping generalizations, 327 351, 374, 388, 412, 427, 458, 474, volume of speaking, 94, 177, 205, 358,
film critique, 93–94 syllabication, 344 483, 505 512
panel discussion, 511–512 synonyms, 206, 402 tone, 21, 38, 39, 43, 79, 125, 131, 135,
podcast, 357–358 synthesizing 147, 229, 305, 381, 439, 470, 474,
spelling, 259, 344, 366, 371, 379 character costumes, 166 477
Tough Questions (Notice &
stagecraft, 163, 164, 169 in comparison of texts, 82 Note), 84, 170, 252, 348, 362, 371,
stage directions, 147, 159, 163, 167, 168 informational texts, 120 W
424, 502
stanzas, 37, 142, 316, 469 myths, 32 When Students Struggle, 3, 11, 13, 30,
tracing reasoning of arguments, 327
statistics. See Numbers and Stats poetry, 420 42, 54, 60, 75, 83, 85, 88, 91, 94, 99,
traits of characters, 59, 101, 167, 455,
(Notice & Note) research information, 251 106, 108, 118, 140, 154, 164, 171,
457–460, 463
structure themes, 412 174, 177, 183, 190, 202, 210, 212,
transitions, 33, 55, 121, 159, 161
of argumentative text, 185, 188, 190, titles, 464 221, 234, 236, 251, 252, 253, 256,
243, 305, 327, 329, 332, 338, 339, 259, 265, 268, 283, 284, 294, 301,
346, 350–356 310, 320, 323, 332, 339, 347, 349,
of complex sentences, 6, 23, 161, 352, 355, 363, 370, 386, 398, 410,
218, 227

Index of Skills R19


418, 423, 425, 428, 431, 437, 444, suffixes, 68 poetry, 43, 143, 225, 239, 311, 321,
451, 460, 472, 482, 496, 501, 503, syllabication of, 344 401, 421
506, 509, 512 Words of the Wiser (Notice & Note), 28, research reports, 435, 447, 504–510
word choice 84, 156, 170, 252, 317, 348, 363, 370, short stories, 343, 361, 426–432
in informational essays, 86 409, 424, 502 sonnet, 215
mental images and, 125 writing activities text for infographic, 109
in poetry, 37, 135, 229 argumentative text, 350–356 writing process. See draft; edit; revise
point-of-view and, 185 dialogue, 167 writing prompts
rhetoric and, 305 epilogue, 377 argument, 350
Word Gaps (Notice & Note), 84, 170, explanation of expressions, 33 informational essay, 86
252, 265, 269, 271, 348, 424, 502 free verse poetry, 475 multimodal presentation, 172
Word Networks, 1, 97, 181, 263, 361, 435 historical fiction, 497 personal narrative, 254
words. See also word choice informational text, 86–92, 465 research report, 504
commonly confused, 259, 366, 379 informative report, 275 short story, 426
connotations, 56, 243, 336, 498 job description, 347
context clues for, 80, 110, 194, 226, letters, 67, 193, 249, 301, 335, 413,
390, 456 475
denotations, 56, 336, 498 literary analysis, 205
historical development of, 160, 344 multimodal presentation, 172–178
meaning of, 22, 34, 194, 226, 344, objective summaries, 79, 389
466 odes, 235, 487
origin of, 160, 206, 312, 378, 448 opinion essay, 121
pronunciation of, 122, 132, 206, 344 personal essay, 453
rhyming, 135 personal narratives, 159, 254–260,
roots, 22, 34, 276, 302, 488 325

R20 Student Resources


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INDEX OF TITLES
AND AUTHORS

A H O
Alarcón, Claudia, 329 Harris, Eddy, 199 Ode to enchanted light, 231
Alexander, Kwame, 407 Heartbeat, 103 Oliver, Mary, 236
Allied with Green, 219 Helfrich, Amy, 211
Hughes, Langston, 61 P
B Humans Should Stay Home and Let Poe, Edgar Allan, 140
Ball Hawk, 367 Robots Take to the Stars, 338 Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long, A, 471
Benson, Sally, 27 Police Stop Changed This
Bradbury, Ray, 281 I Teenager’s Life, A, 73
Brooks, David, 479 Icarus’s Flight, 39
Bruchac, Joseph, 367 It Takes a Child (documentary), 451 R
It’s Not Just a Game!, 395 Rogue Wave, 7
C
Caffall, Eiren, 338 J S
Calabrese, Lori, 395 Jackson, Judy, 451 Seven Minutes of Terror (video), 323
Camera Does Lie, The, 115 Sherman, Josepha, 127
Challenges for Space Exploration, 307 K Simon, Neil, 149
Craig Kielburger Reflects on Working Kent, Zachary, 493 Sleeping in the Forest, 236
Toward Peace, 441 Kielburger, Craig, 441 Sometimes a Dream Needs a Push, 457
Crossover, The, 407 Song of Wandering Aengus, The, 137
L Space Exploration Should Be More Science
D Leckie, Ann, 307 Than Fiction, 329
Dark They Were, and Golden-Eyed, 281 Lewis, J. Patrick, 417 Stafford, William, 317
Dobyns, Stephen, 39 Story of the Triangle Factory Fire, The, 493
Double Doubles, 417 M
Drought, The, 212 Martian Metropolis, 269 T
McKissack, Fredrick, 47 Taylor, Theodore, 7
E McKissack, Patricia, 47 Thacher, Meg, 269
Eldorado, 140 Millar, Aaron, 383 Thank You, M’am, 61
Mississippi Solo, 199 Trash Talk (video), 245
F Moss, Meg, 115 Two Legs or One?, 127
Fleischman, Paul, 187 Myers, Walter Dean, 457
Flight of Icarus, The, 27 W
Frances Perkins and the Triangle N Wang, Amy B, 73
Factory Fire, 479 National Aeronautics and Space What If We Were Alone?, 317
Administration, 323 Women in Aviation, 47
G National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Get in the Zone: The Psychology of Video Administration, 245 Y
Game Design, 383 Neruda, Pablo, 231 Yeats, W. B., 137
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Giovanni, Nikki, 471 Never Retreat, 187 Yoo, David, 103


Governess, The (drama), 149 Nye, Naomi Shihab, 219 You’re Part of the Solution (poster), 247
Governess, The (production images), 165

Index of Titles and Authors R21

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

“Allied with Green” from There is No Long Distance Now: Very “The Governess” from The Good Doctor by Neil Simon. Text
Short Stories by Naomi Shihab Nye. Text copyright © 2011 by copyright © 1974 by Neil Simon. Reprinted by permission of
Naomi Shihab Nye. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Gary N. DaSilva. Caution: Professionals and amateurs are hereby
Publishers. warned that The Good Doctor is fully protected under the Berne
Excerpts from The American Heritage Dictionary of The English Convention and the Universal Copyright Convention and is subject
Language, Fifth Edition. Text copyright © 2016 by Houghton to royalty. All rights, including without limitation professional,
Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Reprinted by permission of amateur, motion picture, television, radio, recitation, lecturing,
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. public reading and foreign translation rights, computer media
“Ball Hawk” by Joseph Bruchac from Baseball Crazy by Nancy rights and the right of reproduction, and electronic storage or
Mercado. Text copyright © 2008 by Joseph Bruchac. Reprinted by retrieval, in whole or in part and in any form, are strictly reserved
permission of Barbara Kouts, Literary Agent. and none of these rights can be exercised or used without written
permission from the copyright owner. Inquiries for stock and
“The Camera Does Lie” by Meg Moss from Muse, July/August
amateur performances should be addressed to Samuel French,
2013. Text copyright © 2013 by Carus Publishing Company.
Inc., 45 West 25th Street, New York, NY 10010. All other inquiries
Reproduced by permission of Carus Publishing Company. All
should be addressed to Gary N. DaSilva, 111 N. Sepulveda Blvd.,
Cricket Media material is copyrighted by Carus Publishing Company
Suite 250, Manhattan Beach, CA 90266-6850.
d/b/a Cricket Media, and/or various authors and illustrators. Any
commercial use or distribution of material without permission is “Heartbeat” by David Yoo. Text copyright © 2005 by David Yoo.
strictly prohibited. Please visit http://cricketmedia.com/licensing for Reprinted by permission of Writers House, LLC, on behalf of
licensing and http://www.cricketmedia.com for subscriptions. David Yoo.

“Chapter 2: The Summoned Self ” from The Road to Character by “Icarus’s Flight” by Stephen Dobyns. Originally appeared in
David Brooks. Text copyright © 2015 by David Brooks. Reprinted Ploughshares Winter 1996/1997. Text copyright © 1996 by Stephen
by permission of Random House, an imprint and division of Dobyns. Reprinted by permission of Harold Ober Associates
Penguin Random House LLC and Penguin Books Ltd. All rights Incorporated.
reserved. Any third party use of this material, outside of this “It’s Not Just a Game” by Lori Calabrese from Odyssey, July 2009.
publication, is prohibited. Interested parties must apply directly to Text copyright © 2009 by Carus Publishing Company. Reprinted
Penguin Random House LLC for permission. by permission of Carus Publishing Company. All Cricket Media
“Craig Kielburger Reflects on Working Toward Peace” (retitled material is copyrighted by Carus Publishing Company d/b/a Cricket
from “Reflections on Working Toward Peace”) from Architects Media, and/or various authors and illustrators. Any commercial use
of Peace by Michael Collopy. Text copyright © 2000 by Michael or distribution of material without permission is strictly prohibited.
Collopy. Used by permission of Michael Collopy. Please visit http://cricketmedia.com/licensing for licensing and
http://www.cricketmedia.com for subscriptions.
Excerpt from The Crossover by Kwame Alexander. Text copyright
© 2014 by Kwame Alexander. Reprinted by permission of Houghton “Martian Metropolis” by Meg Thatcher from Muse, July/August
Mifflin Harcourt. 2016. Text copyright © 2016 by Carus Publishing Company.
Reprinted by permission of Carus Publishing Company. All Cricket
“Dark They Were, and Golden-Eyed” by Ray Bradbury. Text
Media material is copyrighted by Carus Publishing Company
copyright © 1949 by Standard Magazines, renewed © 1976 by Ray
d/b/a Cricket Media, and/or various authors and illustrators. Any
Bradbury. Reprinted by permission of Don Congdon Associates,
commercial use or distribution of material without permission is
Inc. Photocopying, printing and other reproduction rights are
strictly prohibited. Please visit http://cricketmedia.com/licensing
strictly prohibited.
for licensing and http://www.cricketmedia.com for subscriptions.

© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company


“Double Doubles” from Vherses: A Celebration of Outstanding
Excerpt from Mississippi Solo by Eddy Harris. Text copyright ©
Women by J. Patrick Lewis. Text copyright © 2005 by J. Patrick Lewis.
1988 by Eddy L. Harris. Reprinted by permission of Lyons Press.
Reprinted by permission of the Creative Company.
“Never Retreat” from Eyes Wide Open by Paul Fleischman.
“The Drought” by Amy Helfrich. Text copyright © by Amy
Text copyright © 2014 by the Brown-Fleischman Family Trust.
Helfrich. Reprinted by permission of Amy Helfrich.
Reprinted by permission of Candlewick Press.
“Get in the Zone: The Psychology of Video Game Design” by
“Ode to Enchanted Light” from Odes to Opposites compiled
Aaron Millar from Muse, May/June 2015. Text copyright © 2015
by Ferris Cook. Originally published in Spanish as “Oda a la luz
by Carus Publishing Company. Reprinted by permission of Carus
encantada” by Pablo Neruda, translated by Ken Krabbenhoft.
Publishing Company. All Cricket Media material is copyrighted by
Translation copyright © 1995 by Ken Krabbenhoft. Text copyright
Carus Publishing Company d/b/a Cricket Media, and/or various
© 1995 by Pablo Neruda and Fundación Pablo Neruda. Text
authors and illustrators. Any commercial use or distribution of
compilation copyright © 1995 by Ferris Cook. Reprinted by
material without permission is strictly prohibited. Please visit
permission of Bullfinch/Hachette Book Group USA and Agencia
http://cricketmedia.com/licensing for licensing and http://www.
Literaria Carmen Balcells S.A. All rights reserved.
cricketmedia.com for subscriptions.

R22 Student Resources

R22 Student Resources 7_LTXESE973237_EMACK.indd 22 4/7/2018 5:53:23 AM


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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

“Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long” from Acolytes by Nikki Excerpt from The Story of the Triangle Factory Fire by Zachary
Giovanni. Text copyright © 2007 by Nikki Giovanni. Reprinted by Kent. Text copyright © 1989 by Children’s Press, Inc. Reprinted by
permission of HarperCollins Publishers. permission of Children’s Press, an imprint of Scholastic Library
Quote by Ann Cotton from “Leading Questions” by Alison Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.
Benjamin from The Guardian, March 28, 2007. Text copyright © “Thank you, M’am” from Short Stories by Langston Hughes.
2007 by Guardian News & Media Limited. Reprinted courtesy of Text copyright © 1996 by Ramona Bass and Arnold Rampersad.
Guardian News & Media Limited. Reprinted by permission of Hill and Wang, a division of Farrar,
Quote by Amelia Earhart. Text copyright © by Amelia Earhart. Straus & Giroux, Inc. and Harold Ober Associates, Inc.
Reprinted by permission of CMG Worldwide. “This Teenager Was Walking for Hours to and from Work -
Quote by Phiona Mutesi from “Game of her life” by Tim Crothers, Until a Police Stop Changed His Life” by Amy B. Wang from The
originally published in ESPN The Magazine, January 10, 2011. Text Washington Post September 30, 2016. Text copyright © 2016 The
copyright © 2011 by ESPN, Inc. Reprinted by permission of ESPN. Washington Post. Reprinted by PARS International on behalf of the
All rights reserved. Washington Post. All rights reserved. Protected by the Copyright
Laws of the United States. The printing, copying, redistribution, or
Excerpt from Red-Tail Angels: The Story of the Tuskegee Airmen of
retransmission of this Content without express written permission is
World War II by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack. Text copyright ©
1995 by Patricia and Frederick McKissack. Reprinted by permission prohibited. www.washingtonpost.com
of Bloomsbury Publishing Inc. “The 12 Greatest Challenges for Space Exploration” by Annie
Leckie from Wired February 16, 2016. Text copyright © 2016 by
“Rogue Wave” from Rogue Wave and Other Red-Blooded Sea
Stories by Theodore Taylor. Text copyright © 1996 by Theodore Condé Nast. Reprinted by permission of Condé Nast.
Taylor. Reprinted by permission of the Theodore Taylor Estate and “Two Legs of One?” from Forty Folk Stories from Around the
the Watkins/Loomis Agency. World retold by Josepha Sherman. Text copyright © 1996 by Josepha
“Sleeping in the Forest” from Twelve Moons by Mary Oliver. Text Sherman. Reprinted by permission of Marian Reiner on behalf of the
copyright © 1972, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979 by Mary publisher August House, Inc.
Oliver. Reprinted by permission of Charlotte Sheedy Literary Agency “What If We Were Alone?” from The Way It Is: New and Selected
on behalf of the author and Little, Brown and Company. All rights Poems by William Stafford. Text copyright © 1987, 1998 by William
reserved. Stafford and the Estate of William Stafford. Reprinted by permission
“Sometimes a Dream Needs a Push” from Flying Lessons by of The Permissions Company, Inc. on behalf of Graywolf Press,
Walter Dean Myers. Text copyright © 2017 by Walter Dean Meyers. Minneapolis, Minnesota, www.graywolfpress.org and Kim Stafford.
Reprinted by permission of DeFiore and Company. Flying Lessons
published by Crown Books for Young Readers/Random House
Children’s Books in partnership with We Need Diverse Books. The
story first appeared in Boys’ Life © 2007.
“The Song of Wandering Aengus” from The Wind in the Reeds
by William Butler Yeats. Text copyright © 1989 by Anne Yeats.
Reprinted by permission of United Agents, LLP, a subsidiary of A.P.
Watt, on behalf of Caitríona Yeats.
Excerpt from Stories of the Gods and Heroes by Sally Benson. Text
copyright 1940 and renewed © 1968 by Sally Benson. Reprinted by
permission of Dial Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin
Young Readers Group, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.
All rights reserved. Any third-party use of this material, outside of
this publication, is prohibited. Interested parties must apply directly
to Penguin Random House LLC for permission.
© Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company

Acknowledgments R23

7_LTXESE973237_EMACK.indd 23 4/7/2018 5:53:24 AM Acknowledgments R23