Sie sind auf Seite 1von 17

Large Grant

Proposal Application

Return copies to
Harlan Gradin
Please check below to indicate if this is a draft North Carolina Humanities Council
or a final application and the appropriate 122 N. Elm Street, Suite 601 • Greensboro, NC
proposal due date. 27401
Phone: (336) 334-5725236 • Fax: (336) 334-
Draft: Original only March 155052 August 15
Final: Original (with April 15 gradinh@nchumanities.org
September 15
signatures) + 30 copies

PART I: PROPOSAL COVER

Project Information
Project Title Dates of Project
Women, Gender and Justice: The 2010 UNCG From July 1, 2010 to Dec 31, 2010
Human Rights Film Series
Sponsor Information
Sponsoring Organization Is Sponsor a Nonprofit Organization?
UNCG Office of Sponsored Programs Yes No

Sponsor Address Sponsor Telephone


1713 Moore Humanities and Research (336) 334-5878
Administration Building
Sponsor City State Zip Sponsor’s County
Greensboro NC 27402 Guilford

NC and US Districts
North Carolina Legislative District(s) US Congressional District
District 57 (House); District 27 (Senate) 12th Congressional District

Project Director
Project Director Name Project Director Phone
Stephen Sills (336) 792-1191

Project Director Address Project Director Fax


Dept. of Sociology (336) 334-5283
337 Frank Porter Graham Building, UNCG
Project Director City State Zip Project Director City
Greensboro NC 27402-6170 Greensboro
Large Grant Proposal and Application 2

Fiscal Agent
Fiscal Agent Name Fiscal Agent Phone
Margaret Brown, UNCG Contracts and Grants (336) 334-5769

Fiscal Agent Address Fiscal Agent Fax


2511 Moore Humanities & Res Ad

Fiscal Agent City State Zip Fiscal Agent E-mail


Greensboro NC 27402-6170 mjbrown@uncg.edu

Project Summary
Briefly describe in 100-200 words what activities your project will include:

This fall our fourth annual International Human Rights Film and Speaker Series will focus on
“Women, Gender, and Justice” in international human rights. We will screen six films for the
campus and broader community with faculty discussants who seek to establish ties between the
film festival and issues of human rights that are both local in impact and global in reach. We
propose to augment the film festival with a series of guest speakers and reading discussion
groups. Building on the success of our previous three festivals, we will continue to screen films
with face-to-face instruction, linking our efforts to existing courses, and to coordinate efforts,
under the umbrella of the Human Rights Research Network, among multiple groups engaged in
these issues on campus and in the community. Funding from the North Carolina Humanities
Council will allow us to leverage our very limited resources. We are requesting a total of $7,110 to
cover the direct costs of this film and speaker series.

Project Budget Request

(Use totals from the “Proposed Budget” Worksheet” in PART III)

Total funds requested from the


$ 7110
North Carolina Humanities Council

Sponsor Cost-Share (in-kind and cash) $ 9619

Total Project Budget $ 16619

Signatures
Project Director Fiscal Agent

Head, Sponsoring Organization Grant Writer (if not Project Director)

Print Name of Head of Sponsoring Organization


The University of North Carolina - Greensboro

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 3

PART II: PROJECT NARRATIVE


As long as discrimination and inequities remain so commonplace around the world - as
long as girls and women are valued less, fed less, fed last, overworked, underpaid, not
schooled and subjected to violence in and out of their homes - the potential of the human
family to create a peaceful, prosperous world will not be realized.
Hillary Clinton - U.N. 4th World Conference on Women
Background
Over the past five years, UNCG’s Human Rights Research Network (HRRN) has brought together
scholars and activists from UNCG, the community, and neighboring universities to facilitate long-
term, on-going collaboration on human rights-related projects. This fall our fourth annual
International Human Rights Film and Speaker Series will focus on “Women, Gender, and Justice” in
international human rights. We will screen films for the campus and broader community with
faculty discussants who seek to establish ties between the film festival and issues of human rights
that are both local in impact and global in reach.

A central problem in the recognition of violations against women and gender-based abuses as
human rights claims is the division between public and private. Always gendered and always
politically-demarcated, that division is nonetheless enshrined in the Universal Declaration of
Human Rights (1948) and its two legal covenants (the International Covenant of Civil and Political
Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights, both 1976) in
three ways: the limit of human rights claims to abuses by state actors rather than private persons,
the “protection” of the institution of the family from the purview of international humanitarian law,
and the favoring of civil and political over social rights in pursuing human rights agendas. As
Donna Sullivan has noted, “Because the family is the site of many of the most egregious violations
of women’s physical and mental integrity, any blanket deference to the institution of the family or
privacy rights within the family has disastrous consequences for women” (127). The different
national and cultural inflections of the public/private divide compound these difficulties, as human
rights actors strive to guarantee equal protection from harm while attending to the far-reaching
implications of local values on potential claimants. More recent human rights tools, such as the
Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW, 1981),
include language that recognizes gender-based violence wherever it occurs as a matter of state
concern. Progress is still needed, however, in both the enforcement of such decrees as well as in
the development of legal mechanisms that address women’s structural inequalities that so often
lie at the core of violence and suffering.

We turn to film to present case studies of these often complex human rights issues because of its
ability to visually represent cultural difference while challenging conventional distinctions between
self and other in terms of desire and identification. Scholars in film studies have been at the
forefront of academic attempts to think critically about how we envision public versus private
spaces (through analysis of the differences between the gaze, the spectator, and the subject of
the film) and the stakes of those divisions. As Kaja Silverman argues in The Threshold of the
Visible World, the richness of film’s rhetorical and visual imagery make it possible for the viewer
to bestow “the active gift of love upon bodies which have long been accustomed to neglect and
disdain” (TVW, 227). When we follow Silverman to consider “not only the singularity, but also the
plurality of world spectatorship” (WS, 26), we begin to develop another way of imagining
ourselves in the world. Crucial to our project, then, is the use of film as a means of generating
discussion about the complex ways in which gender figures in contemporary human rights. At the
same time, by placing each film in an interdisciplinary context (including a faculty discussant,
participation of students from diverse courses and community members from diverse
backgrounds, paired readings, and panel discussions), each film does not serve as “evidence” so
much as a point of departure for critical thinking about what gender justice might mean in
international human rights.

Our Human Rights Research Network has been very successful over the past few years developing
the International Human Rights Film Series, the Asian Studies Film Festival, a workshop entitled
"The Implicated Viewer: Problems and Paradoxes in Spectatorship, Race, and Rights," and finally a

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 4

new Human Rights major and minor concentration housed within the International and Global
Studies Program. Our screenings rooms have often been filled beyond capacity with community
members as well as faculty and students from English, History, Sociology, Religious Studies,
Political Science, Anthropology, Romance Languages, Communications, Women’s and Gender
Studies, and German, Russian, and Asian Studies Programs. In conjunction with our screening of
Greensboro: Closer to the Truth (Fall 2008), we organized a panel (a faculty member, the
filmmaker, a community activist, and two members of Greensboro’s Truth and Reconciliation
Commission) that drew 250 people. We have worked with the organizers of UNCG’s Harriet Elliot
Lecture Series, Human Rights Week, the Honors College’s proseminar, and the Freshman Read to
pair human rights films with larger discussions of these issues on campus. Building on the success
of our Greensboro: Closer to the Truth event, this past fall (2009) we expanded the program to
include six films and four discussion panels all focused on the issue of global migration and human
rights. Our attendance has averaged around seventy students, faculty, and community members
per film showing and thirty participants at the panel discussions. We believe that these efforts
have encouraged meaningful, critical, interdisciplinary work in the humanities, and our present
application seeks to expand both the reach and depth of this work, particularly by making our
series more widely available to the larger community. We anticipate our film and speakers series
will lead to faculty research collaborations, public-private partnerships with community agencies,
and pedagogical innovations.

Unfortunately the state budget cuts have eliminated almost all of our discretionary funds and
threaten our ability to continue delivering a quality program. We are requesting assistance from
the North Carolina Humanities Council to defray the costs of public performance rights for the
films and to offer very modest honoraria to the speakers and discussants. In addition, some funds
will be used to provide a summer stipend to the organizers to develop promotional materials and
press-releases and to finalize the program for the fall.

This Fourth International Human Rights Film and Speaker Series has sought commitments from
participating faculty to integrate films into their syllabi and to serve as discussants for the films
shown to the public. Tentatively we have scheduled six films (one about every three weeks):
Daughters of Everest, Frozen River, Johnny Greyeyes, Persepolis, La Operación, and Very Young
Girls. We propose to augment the film festival with a series of guest speakers and reading
discussion groups. Building on the success of our previous three festivals, we will continue to
screen films with face-to-face instruction, linking our efforts to existing courses, and to coordinate
efforts, under the umbrella of the Human Rights Research Network, among multiple groups
engaged in these issues on campus and in the community.

After each set of films and readings, organized by topic, we will hold colloquia that bring scholars,
students, and community leaders together to discuss the key themes linked to the films: Gender
Equality and the International Human Rights Regime; Feminism, Homophobia, and War; Identity,
Reproductive Rights, and Women’s Health; and Media, Humanitarianism and Human Trafficking.
Reading groups of faculty, students, and community members will meet five times to discuss the
selected readings which are related to the films and panel series: these include Ebadi’s Iran
Awakening, Kirschner’s I Live Here, Turshen’s Women’s Health Movements, and several essays
and book chapters. Finally, we will construct an online forum (hosted at
http://groups.google.com/group/UNCG_HRRN) in which all participants may discuss texts, films,
and colloquia from the series.

We anticipate that, with proper funding for marketing and promotion, this year’s festival will grow
even larger. We project that each film will attract between 70 and 100 viewers (total between 420
and 600), discussions between 30 and 50 participants (total between 90 and 150), and the book
reading groups between 15 and 20 readers (total between 45 and 60). We currently have over
500 email addresses in our database and hope to build an online forum that allows for our
programs to reach well beyond the immediate community.

Participating Faculty

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 5

Organizers:
Stephen J. Sills, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, teaches in the Global Social
Problems concentration. His scholarship includes research on the feminization of labor migration,
transnational identity, and social networks. Specifically he has been investigating
transnationalism, transnational ties, and female migration among Filipino migrant workers in
Taiwan. He is also working on a documentary film about Filipina factory workers in Taiwan. Dr.
Sills’ research agenda includes current projects focusing on immigrant access to safe and
affordable housing, access to social and health services, and the protection of labor rights for
migrants in the United States and elsewhere.

Alexandra W. Schultheis, Associate Professor, Department of English and Program Faculty,


Women’s and Gender Studies, focuses her research and teaching on human rights in literature
and film and on postcolonial studies. Her publications include a monograph, Regenerative
Fictions: Postcolonialism, Psychoanalysis, and the Nation as Family, as well as scholarly articles
and book chapters. In her teaching, she has emphasized curriculum development, collaborative
teaching, and interdisciplinary courses cross-listed with Religious Studies, International and Global
Studies, Women's and Gender Studies, and African American Studies. Her current research is on
"Transnational Tibet: Readings in Gender, Human Rights and the Humanities." She is also co-
editing two collections on theorizing and teaching human rights and literature.

Faculty participants:
1. Katherine Jamieson, Associate Professor, Kinesiology
2. Danielle Bouchard, Assistant Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies Program
3. Elizabeth Bucar, Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies University
4. Sarah Cervenak, Assistant Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies and African American
Studies
5. Sherrill Hayes, Assistant Professor, Conflict Resolution
6. Julie Brown, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
7. Sharon Morrison, Associate Professor, School of Public Health
8. Gwen Hunnicut, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology
9. Mark Rifkin, Assistant Professor, Department of English
10. Veronica Grossi, Assistant Professor, Department of Romance Languages
11. Jeff Jones, Associate Professor, Department of History

Publicity Plan

We have successfully advertised our previous film festivals with print and email marketing
combined with press-releases to local news media, Yes! Weekly, The Greensboro News and
Record, the Carolina Peacemaker, ¿Que Pasa?, and the Carolinian. These campaigns have been
overseen by Drs. Sills and Schultheis. Dr. Sills has completed all graphic design and layout while
printing has been sent to Spartan Printing (http://ugp.uncg.edu/). This year we plan to add a
printed color postcard for distribution in coffee shops, galleries, and other local gatherings spots
as well as for direct marketing. We will also print an 8.5” x 11” flyers and 18” x 24” posters.
Examples of marketing campaign materials used last year are attached.

Additional Funding

Additional funding will be sought from the 2010-2011 Grants for Ashby Dialogues. The aim of the
grants is to implement the vision of the late Warren Ashby that the University should be a
community of inquiry, with faculty and students engaged in the pursuit of understanding both in
and out of the classroom. The Ashby Dialogues Program is an annual series of public events and
lectures sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences at UNCG. Programs sponsored by this
grant embody Ashby’s belief that a university is “freedom in the search for and service of truth.”
We believe that we are well positioned with this film and speaker series to compete for funding to
add a keynote speaker to our events schedule.

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 6

Evaluation

This project will be assessed both in its outputs and outcomes. Event feedback surveys will be
collected at each film, colloquium, and book discussion group. A head count as well as a sign-in
sheet will be used to track the number of participants. A post-session feedback narrative will be
sought from each to the participating scholars. The data will be used to assess program outputs
as well as short and long term outcomes. During the program implementation, formative
evaluation activities will be undertaken to allow continual fine-tuning of the implementation of the
program.

Recent North Carolina Humanities Council Grants to UNCG

In the past three years faculty at UNCG have received four grants from the North Carolina
Humanities Council. These include:
• Kim Quintal Gone to the Poorhouse: Film Screening and Discussion March 20, 2009
• Benjamin Filene UNCG Public History Program Cone Mill Villages: A Thread in Greensboro's
Past Jan - May, 2009
• Arndt Niebisch 20 Years Fall of the Wall - Germany, a Sustainable Democracy: A
Commemorative Conference Nov 6, 2009
• Andreas Lixl Carolinian Immigrants: Historical and Literary Perspectives Fall 2008

Events Schedule

SEPTEMBER
Reading
Discussant: Stephen J. Sills, Sociology
Charlotte Bunch, “Transforming Human Rights from a Feminist Perspective,” in Julie Peters and
Andrea Wolper (eds.), Women’s Rights/Human Rights: International Feminist Perspectives
(Routledge, 1995).
Uma Narayan, “Cross-Cultural Connections, Border Crossings, and 'Death by Culture,'"
Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism (Routledge, 1997).

Film
Daughters of Everest (2004)
Director: Sapana Sakya
Discussant: Katherine Jamieson, Kinesiology
Focusing on the first Sherpa women’s expedition to climb Everest, the film explores the physical
and mental challenges of the climb in the context of Sherpa culture’s frowning upon women
climbers. Read in the context of the 2008 Beijing Olympic climb of the world’s highest mountain,
when a Tibetan woman held the Olympic torch aloft on the summit, the film also allows us to
discuss how ostensibly universal icons of opportunity, fairness, and triumph may serve different
political and gendered ends.

Film
Frozen River (2008)
Director: Courtney Hunt
Discussant: Danielle Bouchard, Women’s and Gender Studies
Frozen River is the story of an upstate New York trailer mom whose desperate economic
circumstances and relationship with a Mohawk girl who lives on a cross-border reservation leads
her into the world of illegal immigrant smuggling. The film asks us to consider the role of gender
and ethnicity within and across national borders in defining human rights, identities, and
economic opportunity. It also underscores the structural inequalities that impact human rights
abuses.

Colloquium

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 7

Women, Gender, and Human Rights


Presenters: Jerry Pubantz Director, Lloyd International Honors College, Carrie Levesque, German,
Russian, and Japanese Studies, and Alexandra Schultheis, English
_____________________
OCTOBER
Reading
Selections from Jasbir K. Puar, Terrorist Assemblages (Duke UP, 2007) and
Amy Farrell and Patrice McDermott, “Claiming Afghan Women: The Challenge of Human Rights
Discourse for Transnational Feminism,” in Hesford and Kozol (eds.), Just Advocacy? Women’s
Human Rights, Transnational Feminisms, and the Politics of Representation (Rutgers UP, 2005).
Discussant: Mark Rifkin and Alexandra Schultheis, English

Film
Johnny Greyeyes, 2001
Director: Jorge Manzano
Discussant: Mark Rifkin, English
This film explores the connections between gender and sexuality-based discrimination in the
context of a women’s relationship that develops in a maximum security prison. Raising questions
about criminality and discrimination, it depicts Native North American Johnny Greyeyes who
negotiates her relationship with a fellow inmate and the challenges posed by the protagonist’s
release from prison.
Film
Persepolis, 2007
Director: Marjane Satrapi, Vincent Paronnaud
Discussant: Belinda Walzer, English and Women’s and Gender Studies
This cinematic adaptation of the graphic narrative by Marjane Satrapi tells of the author’s
upbringing and rebelliousness in Iran during the Iranian Revolution of 1979, her young adult years
in Europe, and then as an adult under the new Iranian regime.

Reading
Shirin Ebadi and Azadeh Moaveni, Iran Awakening: One Woman’s Journey to Reclaim Her Life and
Country (Random House, 2007)
Discussant: Gwen Hunnicutt, Sociology

Colloquium
Women, Islam, and Human Rights
Presenters: Dr. April Najjaj, Associate Professor of History & Director, International Studies
Program, Greensboro College and Elizabeth M. Bucar, Assistant Professor, Department of Religious
Studies
_____________________
NOVEMBER
Reading
Meredeth Turshen, Women's Health Movements: A Global Force for Change (Palgrave Macmillan,
2007)
Discussant: Sharon D. Morrison, Public Health

Film
La Operación (1982)
Director: Ana Maria Garcia
Discussant: Sarah Cervenak, African American and Women’s and Gender Studies
More than one-third of all Puerto Rican women of childbearing age have been sterilized. So
common is the procedure that it is simply called la ó. In this documentary exposé, the personal
testimony of sterilized women is conjoined with newsreels, excerpts from government propaganda
films and interviews with doctors, birth-control specialists and politicians to unmask the
controversial use of sterilization as a tool of social policy. Begun in the 1930s as a means of
curbing the “surplus population” and reinforced in subsequent decades, the sterilization of women
was tied to America's interventionist economic policies.

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 8

Colloquium
Women and Health
Presenters: Paige Hall Smith, PhD, MSPH Center for Women's Health and Wellness and Sharon D.
Morrison, MSPH, MHSE, Ph.D., Associate Professor Public Health Education
_____________________

DECEMBER
Film
Very Young Girls (2007)
Director: David Schisgall, Nina Alvarez
Discussant: Sherrill Hayes, Conflict Resolution
This film challenges familiar narratives of sex trafficking as a “foreign” problem by chronicling the
journeys of American-born young women (some as young as 12) through the underground world
of sexual exploitation and trafficking in New York City. The film is important given the recent
incident in Fayetteville NC, the legal loopholes around what is prostitution vs. tracfficking, and lack
of services to help young women from any country.

Reading
Mia Kirschner, I Live Here (Pantheon, 2008)
Ariella Azoulay, selections from The Civil Contract of Photography (Zone Books, 2008)
Discussant: Belinda Walzer and Alexandra Schultheis, English
I Live Here is a multi-authored, multi-media literary artifact that combines fiction, journal writing,
poetry, photography, painting, and graphic narrative to expose human rights violations against
women and children in Chechnya/Ingushetia, Burma, Cuidad Juárez, and Malawi. The book allows
us to consider the difference between human rights and humanitarian work, how gendered-based
abuses both occur in and are legible from different locations, and the role of cultural text in
promoting human rights.
PART III: Project Budget

Humanities
Expense Applicant Applicant
Council TOTAL
Items Cost-Share Cost-Share
Funds
Cash In-Kind

a) Salaries $ 3000 $       $ 49131 $ 7913

b) Employer’s
$       $       $       $      
Retirement

c) Employer’s FICA $       $       $       $      

d) Speaker’s Stipends $ 2000 $       $       $ 4500

e) Supplies and $ 1500 $       $       $ 2000


Equipment Rental

1
Includes UNCG fringe rat of 28%, see below.

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 9

f) Travel, Meals and


$       $       $       $      
Lodging

g) Rental of Facilities $       $       $       $      

h) Printing and
$ 610 $       $       $ 600
Publicity

i) Other
$4706
(please itemize)

TOTAL $ 7110 $       $ 9619 $ 16619

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 10

Budget Explanation

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA - GREENSBORO BUDGET


P.I.: Stephen J. Sills/ Alexandra Schultheis
FUNDER: NC Humanities Council
DURATION: July1, 2010 - Dec 31, 2010 FUNDER UNCG TOTAL
CONTRIB. CONTRIB. PROJECT
CUMULATIVE COSTS
PERSONNEL FTE
P.I.: Stephen Sills (Sociology) 0.03 $0 $1768 $1768
P.I.: Alexandra Schultheis (English) 0.03 $0 $2070 $2070
TOTAL PERSONNEL $0 $3838 $3838
FRINGE BENEFITS RATE
P.I.s AY Effort 28.00% $0 $1075 $1075
TOTAL FRINGE BENEFITS $0 $1075 $1075
SUMMER STIPEND
P.I.: Stephen Sills (Sociology) $1500 $0
P.I.: Alexandra Schultheis (English) $1500 $0
TOTAL STIPEND $3000 $0 $3000
OTHER EXPENSES

Film $300 $300


Film $300 $300
Film $300 $300
Film $300 $300
Film $300 $300
Flyers (1000) $240 $240
Posters 24 x 18 (10) $105 $105
Post Card (1500) $265 $265
$100.0
Film Discussant (Katherine Jamieson) 0 $100.00
$100.0
Film Discussant (Danielle Bouchard) 0 $100.00
$100.0
Film Discussant (Mark Rifkin) 0 $100.00
$100.0
Film Discussant (Sarah Cervenak) 0 $100.00
$100.0
Film Discussant (Sherrill Hayes) 0 $100.00
$100.0
Film Discussant (Belinda Walzer) 0 $100.00
Reading Discussant (Sharon D. $100.0
Morrison) 0 $100.00
Reading Discussant (Gewn $100.0
Hunnicutt) 0 $100.00
$200.0
Colloquium Speaker (Jerry Pubantz) 0 $200.00
Colloquium Speaker (Carrie $200.0
Levesque) 0 $200.00
$200.0
Colloquium Speaker (April Najjaj) 0 $200.00
Colloquium Speaker (Paige Hall $200.0
Smith) 0 $200.00
Colloquium Speaker (Elizabeth M. $200.0 $200.00

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 11

Bucar) 0
Colloquium Speaker (Sharon D. $200.0
Morrison) 0 $200.00

TOTAL OTHER EXPENSES $4110 $4110


TOTAL DIRECT COSTS $7110 $4913 $12023
FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS
UNCG F&A39.5% $4749
Humanities Council allowable 0% $0
Unrecovered indirect costs
(Difference between UNCG rate and $4749 $0 $4749 $4749
NCHC allowable)
TOTAL
COSTS $7110 $9662 $16772

a) Salaries
UNCG will cover the costs of:
1. Administrative assistance provided by members of the college staff (covered under UNCG
F&A donated in kind)
2. Project directors’ time needed to plan and implement the project during the Fall 2010
semester
a. Dr. Sills (3% FTE total) $1768 salary + $495 fringe
$2263
b. Dr. Schultheis (3% FTE total) $2070 salary + $580 fringe
$2650
NCHC will cover the costs of:
3. Project directors’ time needed to plan and implement the project during the Summer 2010
(second session)
a. Stipend Dr. Sills
$1500
b. Stephen Dr. Schultheis
$1500

Total Salaries........................................................................................................$7,913.00

b) Employer’s Retirement
See above
Total Retirement................................................................................. $0

C) Employer’s FICA
See above
Total FICA........................................................................................... $0

d) Speakers’ Stipends

Film Discussant (Katherine Jamieson) ..........................................................


........................................................$100.00
Film Discussant (Danielle Bouchard) ............................................................
........................................................$100.00
Film Discussant (Mark Rifkin) ...................................................................... $100.00
Film Discussant (Sarah Cervenak) . .............................................................. $100.00
Film Discussant (Sherrill Hayes) .................................................................. $100.00
Film Discussant (Belinda Walzer) . . .............................................................. $100.00

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 12

Reading Discussant (Sharon D. Morrison) ....................................................


........................................................$100.00
Reading Discussant (Gwen Hunnicutt) .........................................................
........................................................$100.00
Colloquium Speaker (Jerry Pubantz) .............................................................
........................................................$200.00
Colloquium Speaker (Carrie Levesque) ........................................................
........................................................$200.00
Colloquium Speaker (April Najjaj) ................................................................ $200.00
Colloquium Speaker (Paige Hall Smith) ........................................................
........................................................$200.00
Colloquium Speaker (Elizabeth M. Bucar) .....................................................
........................................................$200.00
Colloquium Speaker (Sharon D. Morrison) ....................................................
........................................................$200.00

Total Speakers’ Stipends......................................................................... $2,000.00

e) Supplies
Film Public Performance Rights. .................................................................. $300
Film Public Performance Rights. .................................................................. $300
Film Public Performance Rights. .................................................................. $300
Film Public Performance Rights. .................................................................. $300
Film Public Performance Rights. .................................................................. $300

Total Supplies................................................................................................... $1500.00

f) Travel
N/A
Total Travel...................................................................................................................$0.00

g) Rental of Facilities
N/A
Total Facilities................................................................................................$0

h) Printing and Publicity (Spartan Printing)


Flyers (1000)..............................................................................................................$240.00
Posters 24 x 18 (10)...................................................................................................$105.00
Post Card (1500)........................................................................................................$265.00
Total Printing......................................................................................................... .$610.00

i) Other - Facilities and Administrative Costs


UNCG will donate use of facilities and administrative costs in-kind (39.5% of direct cost total)
Total Other ........................................................................................................... $4706.00

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 13

One copy of the CV (curriculum vitae) of the scholars which is to be attached as


appendices to the original, signed copy of the proposal

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 14

A signed letter of intent from key participants to be attached as appendices in which


they confirm their specific role and responsibility in the project (Email confirmation
sent directly from the participants is acceptable.)

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


Large Grant Proposal and Application 15

Checklist for Submitting Completed Proposals for Large Grants

(For project director’s use: please do not submit with grant application)

□ Project Title

□ Dates of Project

□ Sponsor Organization Contact Information

□ Project Director’s Contact Information

□ Fiscal Agent’s Contact Information

□ Project Summary

□ Project Budget Request

□ Additional Fundraising Efforts

□ Required Signatures

□ Project Narrative, including Letters of Intent from Participants

□ Project budget

Does the grid match front block and budget explanation/narrative?


• Is North Carolina Humanities Council outright funding in the appropriate blocks?
• Is the total amount correct?

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE


{UNCG LETTERHEAD}

Harlan Gradin
North Carolina Humanities Council
122 N. Elm Street, Suite 601
Greensboro, NC 27401

RE: Large Grant Proposal

March 12, 2010

Harlan Gradin:

Over the past five years, UNCG’s Human Rights Research Network (HRRN) has
brought together scholars and activists from UNCG, the community, and
neighboring universities to facilitate long-term, on-going collaboration on human
rights-related projects. This fall our fourth annual International Human Rights Film
and Speaker Series will focus on “Women, Gender, and Justice” in international
human rights. We will screen films for the campus and broader community with
faculty discussants who seek to establish ties between the film festival and issues
of human rights that are both local in impact and global in reach. Unfortunately
the state budget cuts have eliminated almost all of our discretionary funds and
threaten our ability to deliver a quality program. We are requesting assistance
from the North Carolina Humanities Council to defray the costs of public
performance rights for the films and to offer very modest honoraria to the
speakers and discussants. In addition, some funds will be used to provide a
summer stipend to the organizers to develop promotional materials and press-
releases and to finalize the program for the fall. We are requesting a total of
$7,110 to cover the direct costs of this film and speaker series.

The Office of Sponsored Programs at the University of North Carolina at


Greensboro is the legal contracting entity for the team submitting this proposal.
The Office of Contracts and Grants at the University of North Carolina at
Greensboro will fulfill the accounting function for the financial terms of the
contract. The Human Rights Research Network (HRRN) falls under the
organizational auspices of Merge: A Network for Interdisciplinary and
Collaborative Scholarship (Dr. Greg Grieve, Director).

Sincerely,

Stephen J. Sills, PhD


Large Grant Proposal and Application 17

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology

NORTH CAROLINA HUMANITIES COUNCIL ●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●●● MANY STORIES, ONE PEOPLE