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CELTA Assignment Cover Sheet

To be completed by CELTA candidate

Submitted by: Duaa Rabeha.

Assignment title: Language Related Task.

Assignment number: 2

Number of words: 993

Submitted on (date): 31/12/2020.

This assignment is my original work and I have acknowledged all sources.

Full name: Duaa Rabeha.

To be completed by CELTA tutor

Overall grade: PASS

General comments: Overall a good, detailed assignment, well-supported with relevant references
that meets all of the pass criteria. Aim for at least 4 CCQs to clarify meaning in each section.

International House London Teacher Training

A MEMBER OF THE INTERNATIONAL HOUSE WORLD ORGANISATION


Grammar.

1: … everything that has happened to us during the


day.
Meaning and Use:
In this sentence has happened is a grammar structure used to express an action which
took place in the past, but still relates to the present and focuses on it. 

CCQs
1. Is the period of time finished? (No)
2. Is it still the same day? (Yes).
3. Do you think these things might continue up and include the moment? (Yes)
4. Are we talking about things in the future? (No) 
Form:
Have + past participle (regular verb: base form + ed).
Has + happened.
This structure is referred to as present perfect simple.
Has: form of present tense used with he, she, it or singular nouns. Has: indicative mood
of auxiliary verb: have, followed by past participle form of verb happen.
Contractions: have -- I‘ve.. has – he‘s
Happened: past participle of verb happen: action verb, (intransitive verb), ending with ed,
(regular verb), followed by preposition to.
Affirmative: this structure is in its positive form.
Negative: has not happened. Contraction: hasn’t happened.
Interrogative: has everything happened to us.? 

Pronunciation:

…. that has happened to us...

Has: 1 syllable, unstressed /həz/, link: between that and has.

Happened: 2 syllables. Stress on first syllable. /ˈhæpənd/, link: between happened to and to us. 

1
Practical English Usage by Michael Swan. Third Edition, published by Oxford.

Concept Questions and Timelines by Graham Workman. Copy2teach. Chadburn Publishing.

www.tophonetics.com rely on your own knowledge.

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Anticipated problems and solutions

Problem1: Students may confuse present perfect with past simple.

Solution1: Differentiate between two tenses using timelines.

Now Future

Past
Everything that has happened to us during the day. (up to present) 
CCQs:

Is it still the same day? (Yes)

What do we ask tomorrow? (Did these things happen yesterday?)

WHY? (because yesterday has finished and there is no longer any connection with the present). 

Past Now Future


Everything that happened to us yesterday. (completed, finished past) 
CCQs

Are these things in the past? (Yes).

Are these things finished? (Yes)

Is there any connection with the present? (No) 


Try to make connect it to the context (situation) more but these are workable
Problem2: Students may pronounce thei -ed ending as /ɪd/ instead of /d/
Solution2: Clarify voiced, voiceless consonants, revise pronunciation of ED in past tense,
since it can be pronounced in 3 ways:/ id /, / t /, / d /. Start by modelling and drilling the
sound /d/ followed by /pənd/ then whole word /ˈhæpənd /. Elicit first but fine. 
Problem3: Students may use auxiliary verb have instead of has. Solution3: Clarify
usage of Have in the first person, here Everything (indefinite pronoun) is used with
singular verbs, thus Has should be used.
Appropriacy: neutral. 2

2
Concept Questions and Timelines by Graham Workman. Copy2teach. Chadburn Publishing.

Practical English Usage by Michael Swan. Third Edition, published by Oxford.

www.Cambridgedictionary.com

Page 3 of 7
2: But sooner or later we have to sleep.
Meaning and Use: A grammar structure used to express necessity of sleeping, there is no choice
for us except sleeping even if we delayed it. We use “have to” when there is obligation to do
something. Ex: to succeed we have to study well.

CCQs:

Is sleeping a necessity? (Yes)

Do we have a choice? (No). workable but aim for 2 more.

Form: Subject + semi-model verb: have + to- infinitive

Pronoun: We + have + to sleep

This structure refers to as future simple, present tense obligations and plans already agreed.
(passive form).

Have to: auxiliary verb used with another verbs to form tenses, passive forms, etc.. but here: main
verb used to talk about obligation acting like semi-model, followed by to-infinitive. 
Any other category ‘have’ falls into?

Negative: We do not have to sleep. Contraction: don’t.

Interrogative: do we have to sleep? 

Pronunciation:

Have to: 1 syllable, /ˈhæftəˈsliːp/. link: between have and the weak form to. 

Anticipated problems and solutions:


Problem1: Students might not comprehend the obligation and take as an advice.

Solution1: Clarify meaning: have to expresses impersonal, external obligation (facts) like school
laws are not personal opinions.

Problem2: Students might pronounce /v/ instead of /f/ changing it to:  /hæv tuː/ ,

Solution2: Show linkage, letter symbols, model pronunciation then drill.

Problem3: Students may think: sleep is the main verb in this context.

Solution3: Clarify the structure of have to.

Appropriacy: formal
.

Teaching English Grammar by Jim Scrivener MACMILLAN BOOKS FOR TEACHER Practical English Usage by Michael Swan. Third
Edition, published by Oxford.

Cambridge Dictionary | English Dictionary, Translations & Thesaurus.

Page 4 of 7
Lexis:
1.we suffer hallucinations, and eventually die.
Meaning: at the end, especially after a long time of effort or problems. It expresses that not being
allowed to sleep for long time will cause us death in sometime in the future. 
CCQs:

1. Will we die if we don’t sleep for a long time? (Yes)


2. Will we die immediately? (No)
3. When will we die? (Future) 

Form: ... Adverb + verb which ones exactly?

... eventually + die. This vocabulary is referred to as an adverbial form of eventual, ly is


added, it defines verb. 

Pronunciation:

Eventually: 5 syllables, /ɪˈven.tʃu.ə.li/, stress on second syllable.

Anticipated problems and Solutions:

Problem1: Students may comprehend eventually as a normal last stage in events without
considering efforts. Solution1: Provide examples, elicit with CCQs.

Problem2: Students may stress wrong syllables. Solution2: Highlight syllables, mark the stress,
model and drill.

Problem3: Students may miss an “L” in writing the word. Solution3: Write the word, clarify
spelling.

Appropriacy: neutral. 

2.We can put off sleeping for a limited period.


Meaning: Is a lexis used to make something happen later or delay doing something.

Here it is used to delay time of sleeping until sometime later. 


CCQs:

1.Do you want to sleep right now? (No)

2. Can you delay going to sleep? (Yes)

3. Will you finally go to sleep? (Yes) 

Form: Put: verb off: adverb

This lexis is referred to as transitive separable phrasal verb, followed by object. Present simple,
present participle: putting. Past tense, past participle put. 

Pronunciation:

Put off: 2 syllables /pʊt ɒf/, link: between put and off, stress: on the particle. 3 

3
Practical English Usage by Michael Swan. Third Edition, published by Oxford.

English Grammar in Use by Raymond Murphy. First published by Cambridge University Press.

Page 5 of 7
Anticipated problems:

P: Students may stress put instead of off for put is the verb.

S: Clarify stress in phrasal verbs, model and drill.

P: Students may have problem with phrasal verb order if the object is pronoun. Ex: we can put off
it.

S: Give examples, elicit with different word order. I put off it, I put it off.

P: Students may confuse phrasal verb meaning, by comprehending it as to save something for
later.

S: Use the concept of postponing in both examples and CCQs. 

Appropriacy: informal. 

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i
Practical English Usage by Michael Swan. Third Edition, published by Oxford.

English Grammar in Use by Raymond Murphy. First published by Cambridge University Press.

www.forum.wordreference.com