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Configuration instructions
ORION controller
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Table of contents
1 About configuration............................................................................................. 5
1.1 Overview of system configuration ............................................................ 5
1.2 User interface ........................................................................................... 6
1.2.1 Web user interface ..................................................................... 6
1.2.1.1 Name filter .................................................................. 6
1.2.2 User interface module UIM / local user interface UIL ................ 7
1.3 Connecting a computer to the ORION controller ..................................... 8
1.3.1 Introduction ................................................................................ 8
1.3.2 Direct connection to ORION Ethernet interface......................... 8
1.3.2.1 Connecting a computer with DHCP enabled
(automatically assigned IP address) .......................... 8
1.3.2.2 Connecting a computer with fixed IP address that the
user cannot change .................................................... 9
1.3.3 Direct connection to ORION serial port ..................................... 9
1.3.4 Integrating the ORION with a LAN .......................................... 11
1.3.4.1 Setting the network parameters manually ................ 11
1.3.4.2 Setting the network parameters automatically ......... 12
2 Configuration .................................................................................................... 13
2.1 Configuring ORION controller ................................................................ 13
2.1.1 Setup files ................................................................................ 13
2.1.1.1 Saving the setup file ................................................. 13
2.1.1.2 Restoring the setup file ............................................. 13
2.1.2 User interface language ........................................................... 14
2.1.2.1 Configuring the user interface language .................. 14
2.1.2.2 Loading language files ............................................. 14
2.1.2.3 Deleting a language file ............................................ 15
2.1.3 Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) ..................... 15
2.1.3.1 Configuring SNMP .................................................... 16
2.1.4 SMS alarming .......................................................................... 17
2.1.4.1 Configuring SMS alarming ....................................... 18
2.1.5 Meter panel .............................................................................. 18
2.2 Configuring batteries .............................................................................. 20
2.2.1 Float charge ............................................................................. 20
2.2.1.1 Web user interface ................................................... 20
2.2.1.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 20
2.2.2 Temperature compensation ..................................................... 20
2.2.2.1 Linear mode.............................................................. 21
2.2.2.2 Multi-stage ................................................................ 21
2.2.2.3 Thermal runaway protection ..................................... 22
2.2.2.4 Web user interface ................................................... 22
2.2.2.5 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 23
2.2.3 Battery current limitation .......................................................... 23
2.2.3.1 Web user interface ................................................... 23
2.2.3.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 23
2.2.4 Equalize ................................................................................... 23
2.2.4.1 Web user interface ................................................... 25
2.2.4.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 25
2.2.5 Boost charge ............................................................................ 25
2.2.5.1 Web user interface ................................................... 26
2.2.5.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 27
2.3 Supervision............................................................................................. 27
2.3.1 System voltage supervision ..................................................... 27
2.3.1.1 Web user interface ................................................... 28
2.3.1.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 28
2.3.2 Middle point measurement ...................................................... 29

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Table of contents


2.3.2.1 Web user interface ................................................... 29
2.3.2.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 30
2.3.3 Block voltage measurement .................................................... 30
2.3.3.1 Web user interface ................................................... 31
2.3.3.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 31
2.3.4 Temperature supervision ......................................................... 31
2.3.4.1 Temperature difference (Tdiff).................................. 31
2.3.4.2 High temperature alarm ............................................ 31
2.3.4.3 Web user interface ................................................... 32
2.3.4.4 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 32
2.3.5 Current difference (Idiff) ........................................................... 33
2.3.5.1 Web user interface ................................................... 33
2.3.5.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 34
2.3.6 Loss of backup time ................................................................. 34
2.3.6.1 Web user interface ................................................... 34
2.3.6.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 35
2.3.7 Low Voltage Disconnection ..................................................... 35
2.3.7.1 Web user interface ................................................... 35
2.3.7.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 36
2.3.8 Partial Load Disconnection (PLD) ........................................... 36
2.3.8.1 Web user interface ................................................... 37
2.3.9 Battery test ............................................................................... 39
2.3.9.1 Web user interface ................................................... 40
2.3.9.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 40
2.3.10 Separate charge and discharge............................................... 41
2.3.10.1 Web user interface ................................................... 42
2.3.10.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 42
2.3.11 Battery life prediction ............................................................... 43
2.3.11.1 Web user interface ................................................... 43
2.3.11.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 43
2.4 Configuring rectifiers .............................................................................. 44
2.4.1 Overview of configuring rectifiers............................................. 44
2.4.2 Rectifier parameters ................................................................ 44
2.4.2.1 Web user interface ................................................... 46
2.4.3 Rectifier alarms ........................................................................ 46
2.4.3.1 Web user interface ................................................... 47
2.4.3.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 47
2.4.4 Rectifier setup .......................................................................... 47
2.4.4.1 Web user interface ................................................... 47
2.4.4.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 48
2.4.5 Removing rectifiers .................................................................. 48
2.4.5.1 Web user interface ................................................... 48
2.4.5.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 48
2.4.6 Rectifier efficiency mode and cycling ...................................... 49
2.4.6.1 Rectifier efficiency mode .......................................... 49
2.4.6.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 50
2.4.7 Power limitation by event ......................................................... 50
2.4.7.1 Web user interface ................................................... 50
2.4.8 Recharge power supervision ................................................... 51
2.4.8.1 Web user interface ................................................... 51
2.4.8.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 51
2.4.9 Redundancy supervision ......................................................... 51
2.4.9.1 Web user interface ................................................... 51
2.4.9.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 52
2.4.10 Rectifier AC measurement....................................................... 52
2.4.11 Slot population ......................................................................... 52
2.5 Configuring DC/DC converters............................................................... 52
2.5.1 Overview of configuring DC/DC converters ............................. 52

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Table of contents


2.5.2 DC/DC converter parameters .................................................. 52
2.5.3 DC/DC converter alarms.......................................................... 54
2.5.3.1 Web user interface ................................................... 55
2.5.3.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 55
2.5.4 DC/DC converter setup ............................................................ 55
2.5.4.1 Web user interface ................................................... 55
2.5.4.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 56
2.5.5 Redundancy supervision ......................................................... 56
2.5.5.1 Web user interface ................................................... 56
2.5.5.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 56
2.6 Converter positioning ............................................................................. 57
2.6.1 Cabinet scheme ....................................................................... 57
2.6.1.1 Web user interface ................................................... 58
2.6.1.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 58
2.6.2 Shelf scheme ........................................................................... 58
2.6.2.1 Web user interface ................................................... 59
2.6.2.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 60
2.7 Configuring alarms ................................................................................. 60
2.7.1 Measurements ......................................................................... 60
2.7.1.1 Web user interface ................................................... 61
2.7.2 Measurement processing ........................................................ 62
2.7.2.1 Web user interface ................................................... 63
2.7.3 Event definitions ...................................................................... 63
2.7.3.1 Web user interface ................................................... 64
2.7.3.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 64
2.7.4 Event processing ..................................................................... 64
2.7.4.1 Web user interface ................................................... 68
2.7.4.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 68
2.7.5 Event blocking.......................................................................... 68
2.7.5.1 Web user interface ................................................... 68
2.7.6 Alarm setup .............................................................................. 69
2.7.6.1 Web user interface ................................................... 69
2.7.6.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 70
2.7.7 Inputs, outputs, LEDs and other indicators .............................. 70
2.7.7.1 Web user interface ................................................... 70
2.7.7.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 72
2.8 Configuring AC measurements .............................................................. 72
2.8.1 Selecting the AC measurement type ....................................... 72
2.8.1.1 Web user interface ................................................... 72
2.8.2 External AC measurement....................................................... 73
2.8.2.1 Configuring the AC measurement device and the
ACM1 gateway ......................................................... 73
2.8.2.2 Display of external AC measurements ..................... 73
2.8.2.3 Configuring the HPS module .................................... 74
2.8.2.4 Displaying the HPS module’s external AC
measurements .......................................................... 74
2.8.3 Internal AC measurement ........................................................ 75
2.8.3.1 Web user interface ................................................... 75
2.8.3.2 UIM/UIL interface...................................................... 75
3 Logging function ............................................................................................... 76
3.1 Setting up the default log via web user interface ................................... 76
3.2 Checking the log .................................................................................... 76
3.2.1 Web user interface ................................................................... 77
3.2.2 UIM/UIL interface ..................................................................... 77
4 User and session management........................................................................ 78
4.1 User management .................................................................................. 78
4.1.1 Default user profiles and access levels ................................... 79
4.1.2 Delta’s recommendation for user profiles ................................ 80

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Table of contents


4.1.2.1 Adding new user profiles .......................................... 80
4.1.2.2 Changing password .................................................. 80
4.1.2.3 Editing user profiles .................................................. 81
4.1.2.4 Deleting a user profile .............................................. 81
4.2 Session management ............................................................................ 81
4.2.1 Common parameters ............................................................... 82
4.2.1.1 Editing common parameters .................................... 82

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Table of contents


1 About configuration
This document has been created for ORION software version V5.10. The document is
updated only when necessary when new software versions are released.

This document describes the configuration procedures required to enable the ORION
controller to control and monitor a power system and associated components.

Each procedure is described in the following way:

• Feature purpose: a brief description of the feature to be configured.


• Steps: the steps required to configure the feature.
• Reference: references to other information which may be of interest.

The instructions are written for both user interface types under separate headings: “Web
user interface” and “UIM/UIL interface”.

1.1 Overview of system configuration


The ORION controller is used to control and monitor power systems and their
components. A typical power system includes rectifiers, batteries, and DC distribution to
the load. The ORION also provides alarm monitoring, AC measurement, and logging
functions.

The power system is configured when it is installed. The system may also require
reconfiguring during its lifetime, for example, if components are added or removed, or if
the physical configuration of the system is rearranged.

The ORION offers two user interfaces; a web user interface (web browser) and UIM/UIL
interface. The web user interface allows access to the full range of configuration and
supervision functions. The UIM/UIL allows local access to the most essential functions.

The web user interface is accessed through a web browser on a computer and made
through either a direct connection or over a network.

The local user interface UIL is integrated in the front panel of the ORION controller, while
the (optional) user interface module UIM can be located anywhere at the site, for example
at system cabinet door.

Note! The UIM/UIL user has no write access to the database while a WEB user
is logged in.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller About configuration 5


1.2 User interface

1.2.1 Web user interface

All configuration functions are available through the web user interface.

Access the web user interface with a standard browser and navigate with a normal
keyboard and mouse.

1.2.1.1 Name filter

The lists of Measurements or Events on the Signal Processing Engine pages can be very
long in case the system is large or complex. To help to maintain the events, the Name
Filter can be used to reduce the number of shown items. Only the names of the items
which match the filter string entered are listed.

Figure 1. Name filter

By entering special characters as filter string it is possible to have more advanced


filtering.

Syntax Meaning Examples (case sensitive) Remark


Filter String does match does not
match
^ Match ^U Usys usys
beginning of U1 _Usys
the name Ubatt vsys
sysU

$ Match end of amb$ Tamb TAMB


the name T_amb Tamb1
Tambient

[…] Match any Uin[12x] Uin1 Ui1 to control the


character Uin2 Uin number of
from set Uinx Uina occurrence, use
Uin21 UinX + or * and/or ?
Uin12

6 Configuration instructions, ORION controller About configuration


Syntax Meaning Examples (case sensitive) Remark
Filter String does match does not
match
[^…] Match any Tamb[^13] Tamb TAMB2
character but Tamb2 Tamb1
not from set Tamb99 Tamb03
\s or \S Match any U\s Usys U sys
non- U_sys usys
whitespace U1
\d or \D Match any T\d T1 T3
decimal digit T02 Tamb
(…) Grouping (Ta)+ Tamb Txy
+ Match one or m+ Tamb Tbatt to apply to more
more times Um UM than one
mUmm character/digit,
* Match zero or Ta* Ta ta use Grouping
more times Tamb
Tbatt
Txy
Taamb
? Match zero or Ua? U Uaa
once Ua Uba
x|y Match x or y U|t tamb Tamb
Usys
UT

Table 1. Advanced name filtering

1.2.2 User interface module UIM / local user interface UIL

The UIM/UIL provides access to all essential functions.

Press the up arrow and down arrow keys to navigate through the menu

structure to the required item. Press to select an item.

Press or to select a sub-menu.

Press to enter a sub-menu, change a parameter, or execute a command.

Press to quit a sub-menu.

If you do not press a key for 3 minutes, the controller reverts to the default menu.

To begin a configuration process, go to “6. CONFIGURATION”.

The modified parameters are automatically saved.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller About configuration 7


1.3 Connecting a computer to the ORION controller

1.3.1 Introduction

The ORION can be connected to computer either through an Ethernet port or RS232
serial port. The LAN connection is made through the RJ45 socket on the front panel of
ORION. The RS232 serial port is located inside ORION.

The connection through Ethernet is usually the easiest alternative and thus
recommended.

1.3.2 Direct connection to ORION Ethernet interface

The Ethernet port of ORION supports two different operating modes: static and dynamic.
In static mode the network parameters are set manually both in computer and in ORION.
In dynamic mode, IP address and Subnet Mask are automatically set according to RFC
3927 (Zeroconf).

1.3.2.1 Connecting a computer with DHCP enabled (automatically assigned IP


address)

Use this procedure to connect a computer directly to the Ethernet (LAN) interface of the
ORION:

Step 1 Make sure that the DHCP is enabled in the computer.

Step 2 Enable the dynamic mode in ORION in the menu Net Config → Mode.

Step 3 Connect the computer to ORION with an Ethernet cable.

Step 4 Wait for a while and let ORION and computer negotiate the network parameters.
This can take up to one minute.

Step 5 Open an internet browser.

Step 6 In the address bar of the internet browser, enter the IP address which is shown
in the menu Net Config → IP Address.

Note! If the displayed IP address is 169.254.113.000, enter the address in the


browser without leading zeros like this: 169.254.113.0
If the browser cannot connect to the ORION, check the proxy server setting in
the browser options. A proxy must not be used.

Step 7 When the ORION configuration and supervision tool login page loads, enter the
username and password, and click “Submit”.

Step 8 The web interface is now open and it is possible to change the configuration and
setting if necessary.

Step 9 Click “Logout” when you are ready.

8 Configuration instructions, ORION controller About configuration


1.3.2.2 Connecting a computer with fixed IP address that the user cannot change

Use this procedure to set the IP address of the ORION manually to enable
communication with computer. The IP address of the computer must be known.

Step 1 Enable the static mode in ORION in the menu Net Config → Mode.

Step 2 Set the IP address of the ORION in menu point Net Config → IP Address using
the local interface UIL/UIM to the same network area as the computer. Only the
numbers in the last section of the IP address can be different.

Example: The IP address of the computer is 170.20.110.101. The IP address of


the ORION can therefore be, for example, 170.20.110.102.

Step 3 Set the subnet mask of the ORION in menu point Net Config → Subnet Mask to
255.255.255.0

Step 4 Connect the computer to the ORION LAN connector with the appropriate cable.

Step 5 Open an internet browser and connect to the defined IP address of the ORION.

Step 6 Note! If the IP address contains a zero or zeros after a period, remove
the zeros, for example, 010.120.177.031 -> 10.120.177.31. When the
ORION configuration and supervision tool login page loads, enter the
username and password, and click “Submit”.

Step 7 The web interface is now open and it is possible to change the configuration and
setting if necessary.

Step 8 Click “Logout” when you are ready.

Note! If the browser cannot connect to the ORION, check the proxy server
setting in the browser options. A proxy must not be used.

1.3.3 Direct connection to ORION serial port

Use this procedure to connect a computer to the ORION through the RS232 interface:

Note! These instructions are written for the Windows XP operating system. The
setting names may be different in other versions and types of operating systems,
but the principle remains the same.

Step 1 Connect your computer to the serial port (RS232) of the ORION with the null-
modem adapter cable.
Details of the null-modem adapter cable are shown in Figure 2.

Step 2 Open Control Panel and open “Network and Connections” settings. Click “Create
a new connection”.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller About configuration 9


Step 3 In the Network Connection Type dialogue, select “Set-up an advanced
connection” and click “Next”.

Step 4 In the Advanced Connection Options dialogue, select “Connect directly to


another computer”, then click “Next”.

Step 5 In the Host or Guest dialogue, select “Guest”, then click “Next”.

Step 6 Enter a name for the computer name, for example: “ORION Serial Connection”.
Click “Next”.

Step 7 Select “Communications Port (COM1)”, click “Next”.

Step 8 In the new Connection Availability dialogue, select “Anyone’s use”, click “Next”.

Step 9 In the Completing the Network Connection Wizard dialogue, click “Finish”.

Step 10 The login page for the connection opens. Click “Properties”. From the new
window select the “General” settings and from the Select a device drop-down
menu select “Communication cable between two computers (COM1)”. At the
bottom left corner is a checkbox for “Show icon in taskbar when connected”,
which is useful as a check when in operation. Click “Configure...”.

Step 11 A new Modem Configuration dialogue opens. Select Maximum speed (bps) of
38400 and click “OK”.

Step 12 After returning to ORION Serial Connection Properties dialogue, select


“Networking” settings. Then select “PPP” as the type of dial-up server. Select the
checkbox “TCP/IP” and click “OK”.

Step 13 The view returns to Network Connections dialogue. To log in to the ORION
double-click “ORION Serial Connection” (or other name given for the
connection).

Step 14 The login page appears. To connect to the ORION, enter the username and the
password “psc3”. Click “Connect” to open the connection between ORION and
the computer.

The username and password are default values; they can only be modified via
Web user interface (menu Home → Configuration → System → Interface Setup
→ Modem PPP).

Step 15 The status “Connected” appears in the Network Connections dialogue.

Step 16 Start an internet browser and enter the local address followed by “Enter”.

When the Login Page loads, proceed as described in section 1.3.2 "Direct
connection to ORION Ethernet Interface".

10 Configuration instructions, ORION controller About configuration


Null-modem cable

The null-modem adapter cable must be constructed according to the following figure:

Figure 2. Null-modem adapter cable

1.3.4 Integrating the ORION with a LAN

The Ethernet port of ORION supports two different operating modes: static and dynamic.
In static mode the network parameters of ORION are set manually. In dynamic mode, the
network parameters are provided by the DHCP server and are set automatically to
ORION.

1.3.4.1 Setting the network parameters manually

Use this procedure to connect the ORION to the local area network, using fixed IP
address.

The following parameters can be set

• IP address
• Subnet mask
• Gateway address
• DNS
• Hostname

If MAC-address identification is used in the network, the unique address of the ORION
can be found from the UIM: Go to Net Config → MAC Address.

Step 1 Enable the static mode in ORION in the menu Net Config → Mode.

Step 2 Set the network parameters on the ORION in menu point Net Config using the
local interface UIL/UIM.

Step 3 Connect the ORION to the LAN with the appropriate cable.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller About configuration 11


Step 4 Connect the computer to the LAN with the appropriate cable.

Step 5 Open an internet browser and connect to the defined IP address of the ORION.

Step 6 When the ORION Configuration and Supervision Tool login page loads, enter
the username and password, and click “Submit”.

Step 7 The web interface is now open and it is possible to change the configuration and
setting if necessary.

Step 8 Click “Logout” when ready.

1.3.4.2 Setting the network parameters automatically

Use this procedure to connect the ORION to the local area network, using DHCP server.

The following parameters are automatically received from the DHCP server.

• IP address
• Subnet mask
• Gateway address

If MAC-address identification is used in the network, the unique address of the ORION
can be found from the UIM: Go to Net config → MAC Address.

Step 1 Enable the dynamic mode in ORION in the menu Net Config → Mode.

Step 2 If desired, enter the host name wished for this ORION (without domain name).
Allowed characters are “a-z”, “A-Z”, “0-9” and “-“ (hyphen).

Step 3 Connect the ORION to the LAN with the appropriate cable.

Step 4 Connect the computer to the LAN with the appropriate cable.

Step 5 Open an internet browser and connect to the IP address of the ORION. The IP
address is shown in the menu Net config → IP Address.

Step 6 When the ORION Configuration and Supervision Tool login page loads, enter
the username and password, and click “Submit”.

Step 7 The web interface is now open and it is possible to change the configuration and
setting if necessary.

Step 8 Click “Logout” when ready.

12 Configuration instructions, ORION controller About configuration


2 Configuration

2.1 Configuring ORION controller

2.1.1 Setup files

After the system has been configured, the settings can be saved to a setup file on a
computer. This file can be used to configure the system if the current settings are not
available, such as if the ORION controller has been replaced. The setup file can also be
used where identical systems have been installed, avoiding manual configuration in each
installation. The file type is .XML. It can only be saved and restored through the web user
interface.

2.1.1.1 Saving the setup file

Save the setup file in a specified directory on the computer.

Step 1 Go to Configuration →System → File Manager.

Step 2 Click “Save to PC” link beside the Setup file. The “Save As” dialogue appears.

Step 3 Specify the directory, where the file should be stored and, if desired, modify the
file name.

Step 4 Click “Save”.

2.1.1.2 Restoring the setup file

The setup file is loaded from the PC to the ORION.

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → File Manager.

Step 2 From “File type” drop-down list select “Setup”.

Step 3 Click “Load File from PC”.

Step 4 In the “Load File from PC” dialogue click “Browse” and choose the desired setup
file.

Step 5 Click “Start”.


The transfer progress as well as the result is displayed.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 13


2.1.2 User interface language

The user interface language can be selected from stored language files. The default
language is English. Two additional language files can be loaded.

2.1.2.1 Configuring the user interface language

2.1.2.1.1 Web user interface

The language of the web user interface can be set for each user.

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → User Management.

Step 2 Select the user account to change.

Step 3 Click “Edit User Parameter”.

Step 4 In the User Data Editor Window select the language from drop down list.

Step 5 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.1.2.1.2 UIM/UIL interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → Language. The actual language is displayed.

Press and enter password.

Step 2 Use the up and down arrow keys to select the desired UIL language.

Step 3 Press twice to set the language.

2.1.2.2 Loading language files

The language files can only be loaded through the web user interface. Besides English,
two more language files can be active. If a different language is needed, then one of the
residing ones must be deleted first (see next paragraph).

Go to Configuration → System → File Manager.

Step 1 From “File Type” drop-down list select “Language”.

Step 2 In the “Load File from PC” window click “Browse” and choose the language file
(.BIN) to be uploaded.

Step 3 Click “Start”.

14 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


2.1.2.3 Deleting a language file

Language files can only be deleted through the web user interface.

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → File Manager.

Step 2 Check the “Delete” of the language file to be removed, then click “Accept
Changes”.

2.1.3 Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)

Note! The SNMP functionality is an option and does not come as default with
the ORION controller.

Please contact your Delta representative for more information about the SNMP
functionality.

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is used for monitoring of distributed


network devices in heterogeneous networks. SNMP is the de facto standard for network
management. For this standardized protocol many commercial off-the-shell (COTS)
products are available, ranging from simple alarm monitoring tools to powerful network
management suites.

Alarm monitoring in DC power systems is performed using relay contacts. Using SNMP in
DC power systems with ORION allows remote monitoring with COTS applications. For
example, in the event of an alarm, a notification by email or SMS can be sent.
Additionally, vital system parameters, such as battery voltage or current, can be collected
over a period to ensure system interoperability.

SNMP-based management system components are distributed throughout IP-based


networks in the form of agents and managers. ORION represents an SNMP agent entity,
making DC power system parameters available to an SNMP manager entity.

The ORION controller, as an agent, sends trap messages to the SNMP manager. The
ORION controller is able to send traps to ten IP addresses (SNMP managers). For an
SNMP manager to understand a trap sent to it by an agent, the manager must have the
Management Information Base (MIB) for the specific traps loaded.

To activate the SNMP functionality see section Activating SNMP in the Upgrading
instructions of Controller ORION.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 15


2.1.3.1 Configuring SNMP

2.1.3.1.1 Global SNMP parameters

Use this procedure to specify the global SNMP parameters. Default values are: Read
community = public Write community = private.

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → Remote Monitoring → SNMP → Setup.

Step 2 If needed, modify the names of read and / or write community.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.1.3.1.2 Alarm IDs

This window shows the possible values of the dcUrgentAlarmIdentifier and


dcNonUrgentAlarmIdentifier SNMP MIB parameters that are transmitted with
SystemUrgentAlarm and SystemNonUrgentAlarm SNMP Traps.

Go to Configuration → System → Remote Monitoring → SNMP → Alarm IDs.

2.1.3.1.3 Trap destination addresses

To specify the SNMP trap destination addresses proceed as follows:

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → Remote Monitoring → SNMP → Trap


Destinations.

Step 2 Enter the IP address and Port number for each SNMP manager used.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

Step 4 Save the MIB file, provided by Delta, to the SNMP manager MIB file folder.

Step 1 Enable the SNMP connection to ORION.

When SNMP has been enabled the ORION controller sends information about the
system, and three alarms as default: Critical Alarm (CA), Urgent Alarm (UA) and Non-
Urgent Alarm (NUA).

2.1.3.1.4 Alarm table

The ORION has a generic alarm table with up to 16 entries. The user can map any of the
available events into this table. As this table is included in the MIB as a fixed place holder,
the status of the events in this table can be polled by the NMS any time.

16 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


To map the events into this table proceed as follows:

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → Remote Monitoring → SNMP → Alarm Table.

Step 2 Use the drop-down lists to select the events.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.1.3.1.5 Control events

The ORION has a configurable table for control events with up to 10 entries. The user
can map any RS Latch Event having no input events defined into this table. The status of
these events can be then changed remotely by using SNMP and locally via Maintenance
menu.

To map the events into this table proceed as follows:

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → Remote Monitoring → SNMP → Control


Events.

Step 2 Use the drop-down lists to select the events.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.1.4 SMS alarming

Note! The SMS Alarming functionality is an option and does not come as default
with the ORION controller.

Please contact your Delta representative for more information about SMS
Alarming.

To activate SMS Alarming, see section Activating SMS Alarming in the Upgrading
instructions of Controller ORION.

In case of “Critical Alarm” (CA), of Urgent Alarm” (UA) or of “Not Urgent Alarm” (NUA),
the controller ORION sends an SMS to up to 10 defined destination numbers. The SMS
language is the same as the one configured as local User Interface language (UIL, UIM).
The SMS contains following information, separated by a comma:

• Active or Cleared, depending on the alarm event source state, and alarm text

• CA Alarm State

• UA Alarm State

• NUA Alarm State

• Site Name

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 17


• System Name

• Date

• Time

• System voltage

SMS example:

Active Ulow,Critical Alarm=false,Urgent Alarm=true,Non Urgent Alarm=false,Site


Name,System Name,18.04.2010,09:53:15,Usys=44.32V

2.1.4.1 Configuring SMS alarming

2.1.4.1.1 Configuring modem

Go to Configuration → System → Interface Setup → Modem.

Select Modem, the SMS feature is only available using a GSM or a GPRS Modem.

2.1.4.1.2 Set SMS destination numbers

Go to Configuration → System → Remote Monitoring → SMS Alarming.

Set SMS destination numbers and operator names.

2.1.4.1.3 Enable SMS alarming

Go to Configuration → System → Remote Monitoring → SMS Alarming.

Enable function by checking the “Enable” check box.

2.1.5 Meter panel

The Meter Panel is a customizable page that allows the user to collect important events
and measurements for viewing on a single page. The measurements are also readable at
the UIM/UIL interface as a list.

To view the Meter Panel through the web user interface, go to Status → Meter Panel.

Each meter can be configured to represent almost any event or measurement required.
With optional Hour Meter setting also the active time of the events can be shown on the
Overview page.

18 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Parameter Value range Description

Name 1 to 15 characters Name of the new entry

Unit 0 to 15 characters Unit of the new entry

Input 1 -2147483.647 to Lower input value from the measurement


2147483.646 source.

Input 2 -2147483.647 to Upper input value from the measurement


2147483.646 source.

Output 1 -2147483.647 to Lower output value displayed on the


2147483.646 Meter panel.

Output 2 -2147483.647 to Upper output value displayed on the


2147483.646 Meter panel.

Fractional Digit(s) 0 to 3 Number of decimal places displayed.

Limit Values Boolean If the limit values are set, the output
values, which exceed the values set by
“Output 1” and “Output 2” are invalidated.

Table 2. Meter panel measurement parameters

Use this procedure to add measurements to the Meter Panel:

Step 1 Go to Status → Meter Panel.

Step 2 Select measurement from drop-down list.

Step 3 Click “Add Measurement”.

Step 4 Enter the required parameters described in Table 2.

Step 5 To save the changes, click “Accept Changes”.

Use this procedure to add events to the Meter Panel:

Step 1 Go to Status → Meter Panel.

Step 2 Select event from drop-down list.

Step 3 Click “Add Event”.

Step 4 Enable Hour Meter if necessary.

Step 5 To save the changes, click “Accept Changes”.

To view the Meter panel measurements at the UIM/UIL interface, go to


Status → Meter Panel.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 19


2.2 Configuring batteries

2.2.1 Float charge

After a battery has been fully charged, a slightly lower charge can be constantly applied
to compensate for self-discharge. This is the float charge. The parameters which affect
the usage of the float charge are described in Table 3.

Parameter Explanation

Usys@20°C Voltage to regulate to at 20 °C. If temperature


compensation is used, this voltage is variable.

Voltage Within Ufloat± Deviation from float temperature compensated float


voltage. When voltage deviation is within limits, the
voltage returns to Float Charge.

Max Recharge Duration Maximum allowed time for recharge, after which the
voltage returns to Float Charge.

Table 3. Battery float charge configuration parameters

2.2.1.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Select Configuration → Battery → Control → Float Charge.

Step 2 Set the battery float charge parameters according to the instructions of the
battery manufacturer. See Table 3.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.2.1.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Float (requires password).

Step 2 Set the required parameters.

2.2.2 Temperature compensation


The temperature compensation reduces the system voltage at high battery temperatures.
This function requires at least one temperature sensor into one of the battery racks. In
case of several temperature sensors, only the one returning the highest temperature will
be considered for compensation.

Two types of compensation are available: Linear and Multi-Stage. Additionally ORION
provides functionality for thermal runaway protection.

20 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


2.2.2.1 Linear mode

Linear mode is defined by four operating parameters:

Parameter Explanation

Slope Temperature compensation coefficient

Start Temp Temperature compensation limit, low temperature

Stop Temp Temperature compensation limit, high temperature

Max Voltage Maximum level where the temperature compensation


can increase the voltage

Table 4. Linear mode temperature compensation configuration parameters

2.2.2.2 Multi-stage

Type multi-stage is used when different slope is required at low and high temperatures.

The operation is defined by six operating parameters:

Parameter Explanation

Low Stop Voltage Maximum level where the temperature compensation


can increase the voltage at low temperature

Low Start Temp Temperature compensation limit, low temperature

Low Temp Slope Temperature compensation coefficient at low


temperatures

High Start Temp Temperature compensation starts at this temperature

High Temp Slope Temperature compensation coefficient at high


temperatures

High Stop Voltage Minimum level where the temperature compensation can
increase the voltage at high temperature

Table 5. Multi-stage temperature compensation configuration parameters

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 21


Low Stop Voltage

High Stop Voltage

Runaway Voltage

Low Start High Start Runaway


Temp Temp Temp

2.2.2.3 Thermal runaway protection

The operation is defined by two operating parameters:

Parameter Explanation

Runaway Temp The temperature at which the controller will activate the
thermal runaway prevention feature by lowering the
output voltage to the Runaway Voltage parameter

Runaway Voltage The voltage to which the controller will immediately


lower the output voltage if the Battery temperature
exceeds the Runaway Temp parameter

Table 6. Thermal runaway protection configuration parameters

2.2.2.4 Web user interface

Step 1 Select Configuration → Battery → Control → Temperature Compensation.

Step 2 Set the battery temperature compensation parameters according to the


instructions of the battery manufacturer.
NOTE: The temperature compensation type can be set only via web interface

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

22 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


2.2.2.5 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Temp Comp (requires password).

Step 2 Set the required parameters.

Note! The temperature compensation type can be set only via web interface.

2.2.3 Battery current limitation

After a mains failure or when some battery cells are permanently damaged, the battery
current can be extensive. To avoid overheating or further damages to the batteries, the
PSC has the possibility to limit the battery current by lowering the system voltage. If more
than one battery string is present, the limit is set individually for every string and the
current is regulated on the string with the highest current measurement.

2.2.3.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Select Configuration → Battery → String Settings.

Step 2 Set the nominal battery capacity and battery charge current limit for every string
according to the instructions of the battery manufacturer.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.2.3.2 UIM/UIL interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Batt Parame (requires password).

Step 2 Set the required parameters for each string.

2.2.4 Equalize

With flooded lead-acid batteries, it is possible to continue charging the batteries after they
are normally considered fully charged. This equalizes the voltages between battery cells
and stirs up the fluids within batteries, extending the battery life. This function is called
Battery Equalize. The parameters and settings which ensure that the procedure is carried
out safely and within certain limitations are described in Table 7.

Caution! Always check the battery specifications and instructions from the
battery manufacturer before setting the parameters.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 23


Parameter Explanation

Voltage Battery Equalize voltage. Battery Equalize uses the


same settings for temperature compensation as for float
charge.

Duration Specifies the duration of the Battery Equalize charging


process.

Use Battery Room Fan To enable lead and lag time, select this checkbox.

Lead Time (Fan) Lead time for S BatteryFan event.

Time Lag (Fan) Time lag for S BatteryFan event.

Max Battery Temperature To supervise the battery temperature and stop Battery
Equalize if the battery temperature exceeds the following
limit, select this checkbox.

Max Battery Temperature If the battery temperature exceeds this value, the
charging process is stopped.

Alarm Suppression Voltage Deviation from float voltage to stop the alarm
suppression.

Alarm Suppression Time Maximum delay for S EQinProgress event.

Interval (Start Condition) Specifies the time between two battery charging
processes.

Start window Within this time window, a programmed Battery Equalize


can be started.

Inhibit after Boost (Start Minimum time between boost charge and Battery
Condition) Equalize.

Forbidden Periods During the given time windows, the programmed Battery
Equalize is not executed.

Forbidden Weekday At the selected weekdays, a programmed Battery


Equalize is not started.

Table 7. Battery equalize parameters

24 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


2.2.4.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Select Configuration → Battery → Equalize.

Step 2 Click “Enable”, then “Accept Changes”.

Step 3 To open the Equalize Parameter dialogue, click “Edit parameter”.

Step 4 Set the parameters. See Table 7 for details of each parameter.

Step 5 Click “Accept Changes”.

Use this procedure for manual start/stop.

Step 1 Select Configuration → Battery → Equalize.

Step 2 To check the activity status, click “Info”.

Step 3 Click “Start”.

Step 4 To stop a running function, click “Stop”.

2.2.4.2 UIM/UIL interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Equalize

Step 2 The following parameters can be configured:

• Voltage
• Duration

Step 3 To start or stop the equalize manually, select Control → Equalize.

2.2.5 Boost charge

The battery can be boost charged automatically after a mains failure. With this procedure,
the system voltage is increased to a certain level to recharge the batteries faster. The
charging process is either controlled by time, current or energy depending on the
configuration.

Caution! Always check the battery specifications and instructions from the
battery manufacturer before setting the parameters.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 25


Parameter Boost Charge Explanation
based on

Voltage All Boost Charge voltage. Boost Charge uses


the same settings for temperature
compensation as for float charge.

Istart Current Battery current value at which Boost Charge


starts.

Istop Current Battery current value at which Boost Charge


stops.

Factor (k) Time Factor (k) to calculate the Boost Charge


duration.

Factor (q) Energy Factor (q) to calculate the capacity to


recharge into the battery.

Uboostlow Time Limit to calculate the discharge duration.

Max Duration All Maximum allowed time for Boost Charge, to


prevent continuous charging of the battery.

Inhibit Time All Minimal time after last boost stop.

Use Battery Room All To delay the battery fan event select this
Fan checkbox.

Time Lag (Fan) All Time lag for S BatteryFan event.

Max Battery All If the battery temperature exceeds this limit,


Temperature the boost process stops.

Alarm Suppression All Deviation from float voltage to stop the alarm
Voltage suppression.

Alarm Suppression All Maximum delay for S BCinProgress event.


Time

Table 8. Battery boost charge parameters

2.2.5.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Boost Charge.

Step 2 To select the Boost Type to be configured, click “Change”.

Step 3 Select the type of boost charge.

Step 4 Click “Accept Changes”.

Step 5 To open the parameter dialogue, click “Edit parameter”.

Step 6 Set the boost charge parameters according to the instructions of the battery
manufacturer. See 8 for details about the parameters.

26 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Step 7 Click “Accept Changes”.

Use this procedure for manual start/stop.

Step 1 Select Configuration → Battery → Boost Charge.

Step 2 To check the activity status click “Info”.

Step 3 Click “Start”.

Step 4 To stop a running function, click “Stop”.

2.2.5.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Boost.

Step 2 Set the parameters.

Step 3 To start or stop the boost charge manually, select Control → Boost.

2.3 Supervision
To recognize damages to the battery at an early stage, ORION provides different
methods to monitor the state of the batteries connected to the system.

2.3.1 System voltage supervision

The system voltage supervision function monitors the battery voltage and activates
events if the voltage exceeds the given limits.

S Ua high

Ua max
S Us high
Us max

Usys tc

Us min

S Us low
Ua min

S Ua low

Tbatt
Tc_low 20°C Tc_high

Figure 3. The behaviour of the system voltage supervision

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 27


Parameter Explanation

Ua max Upper limit for system alarm voltage. If system voltage


rises above this value the event S Ua high is activated.
Not temperature compensated.

Ua min Upper limit for system alarm voltage. If system voltage


falls below this value the event S Ua low is activated.
Not temperature compensated.

Us max Upper limit for system safety voltage. If system voltage


rises above this value the event S Us high is activated.
Temperature compensation optional.

Us min Upper limit for system safety voltage. If system voltage


falls below this value the event S Us low is activated.
Temperature compensation optional.

BoD S Battery on Discharge event is activated when the


system voltage falls below threshold “BoD”
Not temperature compensated.

Hysteresis Difference between the activated and deactivated level


for the events.

Suppress S Us low during If this checkbox is activated the event S Us low is


mains failure suppressed during mains failure. *

Suppress S Ua low during If this checkbox is activated the event S Ua low is


mains failure suppressed during mains failure. *

Temperature compensation Checkbox to enable the automatic temperature


for Us min and Us max compensation for the Us thresholds (Us min, Us max)

* Events already activated remain active until the system voltage exceeds the
corresponding limit, regardless of these settings.

Table 9. System voltage supervision parameters

2.3.1.1 Web user interface

Use this procedure to set parameters in web user interface.

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → System Voltage Supervision.

Step 2 Enter the required parameters and activate settings.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.3.1.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Select Configuration → Battery → USYS Supervi.

Step 2 Press (requires password).

28 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Step 3 Set the required parameters.

2.3.2 Middle point measurement

For the middle point measurement, the battery is divided into two blocks. The voltage of
the lower battery block is measured and compared with the calculated middle point value
computed out of the system voltage value “Usys”. If the difference exceeds a given limit,
the battery is considered as faulty. The battery middle point voltage can be measured by
ORION itself or through SENSN devices.

When the voltage difference exceeds the given limit for at least 20s, a log entry is
generated and the events S MP Failure and S BattFail MP are activated. The event
S MP Failure stays active as long as the voltage difference is too high. The event
S BattFail MP remains active until it is manually reset.

Parameter Explanation

Enable Checkbox. Enables battery middle point measurement.


To use this functionality, a battery string configuration
that supports middle point measurement must be
selected.

Number of Cells Total number of cells.


Note! Parameter located in the menu Battery →
Parameter.

Measure Point Number of cells below the measuring point.


Note! Parameter located in the menu Battery →
Parameter.

Udiff charge Maximum accepted voltage difference during float


equalize or boost.

Udiff discharge Maximum accepted voltage difference during discharge


or battery test.

Table 10. Middle point measurement parameters

The parameter setting and the results of the middle point measurements are available
through the UIM/UIL interface as well as the web user interface.

2.3.2.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration →Battery → Middle Point Measurement.

Step 2 Configure each parameter.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

Step 4 To check the middle point measurement status (or reset) go to Status → Battery
→ Middle Point Measurement.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 29


2.3.2.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Middle Point.

The following parameters can be configured:

• Udiff charge
• Udiff discharge

Step 2 To check the status of the failure event S BattFail MP (or reset), go to
Status → Battery → Middle Point.

2.3.3 Block voltage measurement

For the block measurement, the battery is divided into equally sized voltage blocks, which
are measured separately. These voltages are compared against the theoretical block
voltage calculated from the system voltage. If the difference exceeds a given limit, the
battery presents a symmetry failure and is considered as faulty.

Parameter Description

Enable Checkbox to enable battery block measurement.

Udiff charge Maximum accepted voltage difference during float,


equalize or boost.

Udiff discharge Maximally accepted voltage difference during discharge


or battery test.

Block Voltage Nominal voltage between two voltage tabs.

Table 11. Block voltage measurement parameters

To use block measurement for a battery, a block measurement must be defined. There
are 3 different types of block measurement:

Using BSM without Ref

The inputs of one or more BSM(s) are used for measuring the voltage tabs. The voltage
reference from the BSM(s) is used as reference for the measurements. The last voltage
tab represents the whole battery voltage.

Using BSM with Ref

The inputs of one or more BSM(s) are used for measuring the voltage tabs. An extra
voltage tab is used as voltage reference. The last voltage tab represents the whole
battery voltage.

30 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Using UM inputs

The UM inputs of ORION are used as voltage tabs and as voltage reference. The whole
battery voltage is not measured separately; it is taken from an already existing battery
string.

When configuring block voltage measurements, a unique block voltage name must be
given to each configuration. The name serves as the prefix for all measurements of that
block. A battery string assignment is only necessary for the battery measurement type
using UM inputs.

2.3.3.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Block Measurement.

Step 2 Enter values for Udiff charge / Udiff discharge. The value for Block Voltage is
common for all Blocks. It is editable only as long as no Block Measurements are
defined.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.3.3.2 UIM/UIL interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Block.

The following parameters can be configured:

• Ud charge
• Ud discharge

Step 2 To check the status of the failure event BMBatt1, go to Status → Battery →
Block.

2.3.4 Temperature supervision

2.3.4.1 Temperature difference (Tdiff)

Tdiff is the difference between battery temperature and ambient temperature. The
comparison is made continuously. If the two temperatures differ more than a certain value
for more than 2 minutes, a log entry is generated and the events S Tdiff Failure and
S BattFail T are activated. The event S Tdiff Failure remains active as long as the
temperature difference is too high. The event S BattFail T remains active until it is
manually reset.

2.3.4.2 High temperature alarm


S High Battery Temp event is activated when the highest battery temperature
measurement exceeds the” High Temp” threshold.
S High Battery Temp event is deactivated when the highest battery temperature
measurement falls below “High Temp” threshold minus” High Temp hysteresis”.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 31


Parameter Explanation

Enable Tdiff Checkbox to enable Tdiff measurement.

Tdiff max Maximum acceptable temperature difference.

Tamb Input for ambient temperature. A temperature


measurement has to be assigned to this input.

High Temp Threshold for High Temperature alarm

High Temp hysteresis Hysteresis for the threshold

Table 12. Temperature supervision parameters

The following information about the Tdiff measurement is displayed:

Parameter Explanation

Tdiff Current temperature difference between ambient and


battery temperature.

Status Status of the “Tdiff” measurement. The following terms


are possible: inactive, ok, occurred, fail.

Failure Event State of the event S BattFail T. The following terms are
possible: ok, active.
The event can be reset manually.

Table 13. Temperature difference measurement parameters

2.3.4.3 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Temperature supervision.

Step 2 To enable Tdiff measurement Check “Enable Tdiff”.

Step 3 Enter the value for the parameter “Tdiffmax”.

Step 4 Select “Tamb” from the Tamb drop-down list.

Step 5 To use High Temp alarm set the parameters “High Temp” and “High Temp
Hysteresis”

Step 6 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.3.4.4 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Temp Supervi.

The following parameters can be configured:

• Tdiffmax
• High Temp

32 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


• Hysteresis

Step 2 To check the status of the event S BattFail T or reset, go to Control → Battery
→ Tdiff.

Step 3 To check the Tdiff measurement information, go to Status → Battery → Temp


Supervi.

2.3.5 Current difference (Idiff)

The Current difference (Idiff) measurement calculates the deviation from the calculated
current for each battery string. The calculation assumes that the total battery current is
shared by the strings based on the nominal capacities. A current difference higher than
the given limit can indicate a faulty battery. Idiff is monitored during charge and discharge
of the batteries. The threshold values for charging and discharging are independent of
each other.

If the current difference exceeds the threshold for more than 20 seconds, a log entry is
generated and events S Idiff Failure and S BattFail I are activated. The event S Idiff
Failure remains active, as long as the current difference is too high. The event S BattFail
I remains active until it is manually reset.

Parameter Explanation

Enable Checkbox. Enables Idiff measurement.

Idiffmax charge Allowed percentage of deviation during charge.

Idiffmax discharge Allowed percentage of deviation during discharge.

Table 14. Current difference parameters

The following information about the Idiff measurement is shown in Table 15:

Parameter Explanation

Idiff Highest deviation between a battery string current and


calculated average of all battery string currents.

Status Status of the “Idiff” measurement. The following terms


are possible: inactive, ok, occurred, fail.

Failure Event State of the event S BattFail I. The following terms are
possible: ok, active.
The event can be reset manually.

Table 15. Current difference measurement parameters

2.3.5.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration →Battery → Idiff Measurement.

Step 2 Check “Enable”.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 33


Step 3 Enter values for the parameters Idiffmax charge and Idiffmax discharge.

Step 4 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.3.5.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Idiff.

The following parameters can be configured:

• Idm chrg
• Idm dischrg

Step 2 To check the status of the event S BattFail I or reset, go to Control → Battery →
Idiff.

Step 3 To check the Idiff measurement information, go to Status → Battery → Idiff.

2.3.6 Loss of backup time

The Loss of the Backup Time function provides an early warning in event an installed
battery does not provide the expected back-up time. Based on the set value for the
expected backup time and the calculated effective capacity, the ORION calculates a
corresponding maximum discharge current. If the average load current during a period,
which is equal to the backup time, exceeds this calculated value the event S Backup
Time Lost is activated. This event remains active until the average load current is within
the required range and the operator has manually reset it.

Parameter Explanation

Enable Checkbox to enable the “Monitoring Loss of Backup


Time” function.

Expected Backup Time The expected backup time.

Table 16. Loss of backup time parameters

Parameter Explanation

Status Status of the “Monitoring Loss of Backup Time”. The


following terms are possible: inactive, not ok and ok.

Estimated Backup Time The estimated backup time.

Table 17. Loss of backup time results

2.3.6.1 Web user interface

Use this procedure to set the parameters:

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Loss of Backup Time.

34 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Step 2 Check “Enable”.

Step 3 Define the parameter “Expected Backup Time”.

Step 4 Click “Accept Changes”.

Use this procedure to see the loss of backup time results:

Step 1 Go to Status → Battery → Loss of Backup Time.

Step 2 Read the Result “Estimated Backup Time” as well as the Status. If necessary,
reset the Failure Event.

2.3.6.2 UIM/UIL interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Backup Time to set the “BT exp” parameter

Step 2 To check the status of the event S Backup Time Lost or reset an active event,
go to Control → Battery → Backup Time.

Step 3 To check the status and backup time, go to Status → Battery → Backup Time.

2.3.7 Low Voltage Disconnection

The low voltage disconnection (LVD) function protects the battery from a deep discharge.
During a mains failure, if the battery voltage drops below a threshold, the ORION
activates an event that drives the relay of the battery disconnect. The battery is
disconnected from the load until the system voltage Usys rises back to acceptable
values.

The LVD is normally configured at the Delta factory. The following ORION configuration
instruction is intended as a guide to help understand and edit the parameters.

Low Voltage Disconnection can only be configured through the web user interface.

2.3.7.1 Web user interface

Use this procedure to configure LVD.

Step 1 First create an event and thresholds driving the LVD. Go to Configuration →
Signal Processing Engine → Event Definitions.

Step 2 In the Event Definition Overview dialogue, select “System voltage ("Usys")” from
the New Event(s) on Measurement drop-down menu. Then click “Add”.

Step 3 A new Threshold Editor dialogue opens. Name the LVD event, for example
“LVD [U]” to “Too Low Event”.

Step 4 Set the parameters “Lower Threshold” and “Lower Threshold Hysteresis”. The
parameter “Lower Threshold” is the voltage threshold for the LVD and the
“Lower Threshold Hysteresis” is the parameter for voltage returning to
acceptable values. Then click “Add New Definition”.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 35


Step 5 Define this event as a LVD event for the ORION, which enables special
functions such as “LVD inhibit”. Go to Configuration → System Architecture →
LVD.

Step 6 In the LVD Overview dialogue name the LVD event, such as “LVD_1”, and click
“Add”. A LVD Setup dialogue opens.

Step 7 Define the event that drives the LVD (defined earlier as “LVD [U]”) and give a
delay for activation if needed. Then click “Add LVD”. Now the event is shown in
the LVD Overview dialogue, with the “State” and an event “L LVD_1” appears to
event lists. The prefix “L” in the event name, describes it as LVD event.

When the event driving the LVD has been created, the output relay responsible
for the activation and deactivation of the LVD must be assigned. Check the
cabling.

Step 8 If an ORION output is assigned, go to Configuration → HW Setup → ORION

or

if a SSM Output is assigned, go to Configuration → SSM and click “Edit”.

Step 9 Select “L LVD_1” from the drop-down list to assign it the required output
number.

Step 10 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.3.7.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 In case you want to disable the LVD go to Control → LVD.

Step 2 To check and adjust the voltage threshold go to Configuration → Event →


Thresholds.

These Events are examples of user-defined events.

2.3.8 Partial Load Disconnection (PLD)

The partial load disconnection function is used to prioritize separate load strings (for
example, difference types of equipment) during mains failure and battery discharge.

In the simplest case, the disconnection is based on a low voltage threshold.

The following configuration example describes a case where the disconnection is based
on three conditions: mains failure, low voltage threshold, and time threshold from mains
failure. These three conditions are combined together to trigger an event driving the PLD
relay with “AND” and “OR” conditions. When the conditions are met, the combined event
and related relay are activated. If only the voltage threshold is used, only steps 1-6 and
18-19 of the example apply.

This function is enabled by the Signal Processing Engine of the ORION, using
measurements to create events, and further combine them to serve different functions, for
example, digital output relays.

36 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Partial Load Disconnection is normally configured at the Delta factory. The following
ORION configuration instruction is intended as a guide to help understand and edit the
parameters.

Partial Load Disconnection can only be configured through the web user interface.

2.3.8.1 Web user interface

Use the following procedure to create an event and set thresholds, based on system
voltage, to trigger the PLD:

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Signal Processing Engine → Event Definitions.

Step 2 In the Event Definition Overview dialogue, create an event by selecting the
“Usys” measurement from the drop-down menu New Event(s) on Measurement
as the base for the new PLD event.

Step 3 Click “Add”.

Step 4 A new Threshold Editor dialogue opens. Enter a name for the PLD event in “Too
Low Event”, for example “PLD [U]”.

Step 5 Set the parameters “Lower Threshold” and “Lower Threshold Hysteresis”.

The parameter “Lower Threshold” is the voltage threshold for the PLD.

The parameter “Lower Threshold Hysteresis” is the voltage returning to


acceptable values.

Step 6 Click “Add New Definition”.

Step 7 Additional voltage-based events for the other PLDs with different voltage
thresholds can be created. Use the same naming system, for example,
PLD2 [U], PLD3 [U] and so on.

Step 8 Create the time-based threshold. The ORION counts time from the mains failure
and if the defined time threshold is bypassed the event is activated.

Go to Configuration → Signal Processing Engine → Event Processing.

Step 9 In the Event Processing dialogue, select “Filter” from the Event Type drop-down
menu at the bottom of the window.

Step 10 Click “Add”.

Step 11 In the Filtered Event dialogue, enter a name for the new PLD event based on
time filtering, for example, “PLD[t]”.

Select the event “S Mainsfailure” from the drop-down menu as a base for the
time filtered event.

Define the TRUE and FALSE time thresholds.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 37


The TRUE value is the delay for the event activated after mains failure, for
example, 10 minutes for a UMTS system and 3 hours for a GSM system.

The FALSE value is the delay for the event deactivated after mains is back on.

Step 12 Click “Add New Definition”.

Step 13 Additional time filtered events for the other PLDs with different voltage
thresholds. Use the same naming system, such as “PLD2[t]”, “PLD3[t]” and so
on.

Step 14 Combine the voltage-based events with a mains failure condition. This
combination ensures that both the low voltage and mains failure conditions are
fulfilled (using an AND-condition) before partial load disconnection.

Step 15 This is done in the “Event Processing” menu as well.

Select the “Event Type” as “AND” from the drop-down menu at the bottom of the
window.

Step 16 Click “Add”.

Step 17 Name the new event as PLD1 [MF x U] (“x” is a symbol for AND). Select the
events “S Mainsfailure” and “PLD1 [U]” as inputs for the function. Then click
“Accept New Definition”. Add more similar events, if needed.

Step 18 Combine the previous event(s) with a time threshold from mains failure (with an
OR-condition).

Go to Configuration → Signal Processing Engine → Event Processing.

Step 19 Select “Event Type” as “OR” from the drop-down menu at the bottom of the
window. Then click “Add”.

Step 20 Enter a name for the new “OR Event”, for example, “PLD1 [MF x U + t]” (“+” is a
symbol for OR) for the new combined PLD event.

Select the events “PLD1 [MF x U]” and “PLD1 [t]” as OR conditions for the event
from the drop-down menus.

Create more combined events for the PLDs with the same method.

Step 21 Define these combined events as LVD events for the ORION, which enables
some special functions such as “LVD inhibit”.

Go to Configuration → System Architecture → LVD.

Step 22 In the LVD Overview dialogue enter a name to the PLD event, for example
“PLD_1”.

Step 23 Click “Add”.

Step 24 In the LVD Setup dialogue select the event “PLD1 [MF x U + t]” from the drop-
down menu for the setting “Event”.

38 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Step 25 Click “Add LVD”.

The event is shown in the LVD Overview dialogue with the “State” and an event
“L PLD_1” appears to the event list. The prefix “L” in the event name, describes
it as LVD event.

Step 26 Assign the correct output relay responsible for the activation and deactivation of
the PLD. Check the cabling.

Step 27 If a ORION Output is assigned, go to Configuration → HW Setup → ORION.

or

If a SSM Output is assigned, go to Configuration → HW Setup → SSM And click


“Edit”.

Step 28 Define the LVD event “L PLD_1” to the applicable output.

Assign the further PLDs by the same method.

Step 29 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.3.9 Battery test

ORION offers different procedures to check the state of the batteries. The user can select
between constant current and real load battery tests, depending on the system size and
the load conditions.

The Constant Current battery test discharges the battery with a constant current during
a certain time period. As an alternative, in systems with small or heavily varying load
currents, the real load battery test can be selected. The main difference is that during the
real load battery test the rectifiers do not deliver any current to load, as long as the
battery voltage remains above the support voltage.

During the Constant Current battery test, the battery is being discharged with a constant
current. Load changes are balanced by the rectifiers. For a successful test, the load
current must be greater than the desired battery discharge current.

During the Real Load battery test, the battery is being discharged with the real load
current. To make the testing safe the rectifier output voltage is programmed to Usupport
voltage level but the rectifiers remain in operation.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 39


2.3.9.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Battery Test.

Step 2 Click “Change”.

Step 3 To select the type of battery test (constant current or real load), select “Test
Type Selection”.

Step 4 Select the battery test from the drop-down menu and click “Accept Changes”.

Step 5 Click “Edit parameter”.

Step 6 Set the test parameters. See Table 18 for an explanation of each parameter.

Step 7 When all required parameters have been set, click “Accept Changes”.

2.3.9.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Battery Test.

The following parameters can be configured:

• Autostart
• Usupport
• Idischarge
• Duration
• Min Duration
• Interval
• ST From
• To

The list of configurable parameters depends on the battery test type. If natural
battery test type is configured, additional parameters can be configured in
menu Configuration → Battery → Natural Test:

• Voltage
• Period

Step 2 To start or stop the battery test or to reset the fail event, go to Control → Battery
→ Battery Test.

Step 3 To check the result of previous battery test go to Status → Battery → Battery
Test.

40 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Parameter Test type Explanation

Usupport Both Support charge voltage for the battery.

Idischarge Const. Current Battery discharge current.

Duration Both Battery test duration.

Minimal Duration Both The value represents the minimum battery test
duration in minutes. During that time a battery
test is not stopped if a voltage is below the
support voltage or a current difference is higher
than the specified value.

Battery Both A programmed battery test is executed only, if


Temperature the battery temperature is within this range.

Enable Auto Start Both Automatic start of the battery test at specified
intervals.

Voltage within Both To ensure that the battery is fully charged the
Ufloat system voltage must not differ for a certain time
from the float voltage before the battery test.

Interval Both Minimal time between programmed battery


tests. To enable the programmed battery test
select the “Enable AutoStart” checkbox in the
Battery Test Parameter dialog (or select “Yes” in
the local display).
After a manually started battery test the
measurement of the interval restarts.

Start window Both Within this time window, a programmed battery


test can be started.

Forbidden periods Both During the given time windows, the


programmed battery test is not executed.

Forbidden weekday Both At the selected weekdays a programmed


battery test is not started.

Table 18. Battery test parameters

2.3.10 Separate charge and discharge

For maintenance of the system, a battery can be separated from the system; then be
discharged with a separate load and finally be recharging with separated rectifiers while
the system is running normally with the remaining battery or batteries.

There are two types of separate charge in the ORION: manual and semi-automatic.

With the manual separate charge and discharge, the separated battery is fully charged
before it is reconnected to the system. The float voltage for the separated battery can be
set to a value different from the system float voltage (=> boost voltage). After the battery
is fully charged, the float voltage is set to the same value as the system float voltage (or
lower). After the voltage of the separated battery has settled to the system voltage, the
battery can be reconnected to the system.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 41


With the semi-automatic separate charge and discharge, the system voltage is reduced to
reconnect voltage “Urecon” during separate charging. After the voltage of the separated
battery has reached the system voltage, the system voltage tracks the separate charging
voltage for a short time and then the battery can be reconnected to the system. The
battery is then charged up to the system float voltage.

During separate charge mode, battery fuse alarms and Idiff measurement are
suppressed.

Note! Separate Charge and Discharge can only be configured through the web
user interface. The status of the Separate Charge and Discharge process can
be viewed at the UIM / UIL.

Parameter Explanation

Charge Voltage Charge voltage.

Reconnect Voltage Only with semi-automatic separate charge/discharge!


During the charge phase, the ORION reduces the
voltage of the remaining system to this value.

Max Ibatt Maximum charge current for separate battery.

Enable Input Input to activate separate charge and discharge.


Active: separate charge and discharge
Inactive: normal charge state
An event must be assigned to this input.

Mode Select Input Input to select the mode.


Active: separate discharge
Inactive: separate charge
An event must be assigned to this input.

Table 19. Battery separate charge and discharge parameters

2.3.10.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Separate Charge.

Step 2 To select the Separate Charge Type, click “Change”.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

Step 4 Enter the parameters for separate charge and click “Accept Changes”.

See Table 19 for parameter details.

2.3.10.2 UIM/UIL interface

To view the status of a separate charge, go to Status → Battery → Sep Charge.

42 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


2.3.11 Battery life prediction

The batteries are designed to last 10 years in optimal environmental conditions. However,
if the temperature is higher than 20 °C, the life time will be shorter. Also, if the battery is
frequently discharged and recharged, it may limit the battery life.

The battery life prediction function gives information on the expected life time of the
battery in the actual operating conditions and helps in budgeting and planning battery
replacements.

Parameter Explanation

Enable Enable function “Battery Life Prediction”.

Design Life Design life of the battery.

Expected Cycles @ 50 % Expected number of cycles at 50 % depth of charge


DoD (DoD).

Remaining Days Notification Notification’s threshold for “S Life Prediction Failure”


event.

Table 20. Battery life prediction parameters

2.3.11.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Life Prediction.

Step 2 Configure the parameters and click “Accept Changes”.

See Table 20 for parameter details.

2.3.11.2 UIM/UIL interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Battery → Life Predic

and configure the parameters. See Table 20 for parameter details.

Step 2 To reset the installation date, go to Control → Life Predicti. → Installati.

Step 3 To check the status and reset FAIL.EVENT, to Control → Life Predicti. → Fail
Event.

Step 4 To check the status of the remaining days measurement, go to Status → Battery
→ Life Predict.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 43


2.4 Configuring rectifiers

2.4.1 Overview of configuring rectifiers

The ORION offers a comprehensive set of functions to control and monitor different
rectifiers, enabling the user to adjust the behaviour of the rectifiers to meet the specific
requirements of the battery and load.

The following instructions describe the main functions from the ORION point of view, with
step-by-step instructions.

2.4.2 Rectifier parameters

After communication is first established between the rectifiers and the controller, it is
possible to adjust the parameters with the controller. Without initial communication to the
power system controller, Delta’s rectifiers use their own default parameters. With the
controller the user can also adjust the default parameters, after the communication is first
established. The following parameters control the behaviour of the rectifiers when the
power system is not in normal operating mode, such as start-up or low input voltage
mode. The parameters for normal operating mode (float charge mode), and for the whole
power system, are adjusted elsewhere (for example, battery menu).

These parameters can only be viewed or configured through the web user interface.

Parameter Explanation

Rectifier type Selection of the rectifier type, for example rectifier


DPR 2400B-48.

Table 21. Selection

Parameter Explanation

Voltage Output voltage of the rectifiers

Current limit Current limit of the rectifiers

Power limit Power limit of the rectifiers

Table 22. Default parameters (in use when no connection to the ORION)

44 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Parameter Explanation

Input low off Threshold (voltage) for shutting down the rectifiers when
input voltage is too low.

Input low on Threshold (voltage) for switching the rectifiers on, when
input voltage returns from low to acceptable values.

Input high on Threshold (voltage) for switching the rectifiers on, when
input voltage returns from high to acceptable values.

Input high off Threshold (voltage) for shutting down the rectifiers when
input voltage is too high.

Table 23. Input voltage limits

Parameter Explanation

Voltage Start-up voltage for the rectifiers

Current limit Start-up current limit for the rectifiers

Power limit Start-up power limit for the rectifiers

Limit time The duration of the start-up parameters. After this


period, the normal parameters (float charge voltage and
so on) are taken into use.

Table 24. Start-up parameters

Parameter Explanation

Powerup delay The delay in seconds, after which the first rectifier in the
group/system starts.

Group powerup time (Rectifier SW V1.xx): The total power-up time in


seconds, during which all rectifiers in the group/system
are started. ORION divides this time by the number of
rectifiers and starts each rectifier one by one with the
calculated delay.

Power up time (Rectifier SW V2.00 and higher): After power up delay,


all rectifiers start simultaneously delivering power. The
power limitation rises linearly from zero to the nominal
power during power up time.

Table 25. Sequential start-up / Ramp-up power start

Parameter Explanation

Umax off DC Voltage threshold to shut down rectifier.

Table 26. Overvoltage protection parameter

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 45


2.4.2.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Select Configuration → Rectifier → Parameter.

Step 2 Adjust the parameters and click “Accept Changes”.

2.4.3 Rectifier alarms

If a rectifier malfunctions or fails, the ORION raises a rectifier failure alarm:

RFA → internal events: S Non Urg RFA or S Urgent RFA.

A rectifier is considered as faulty if at least one of the following criteria is fulfilled:

• Rectifier shut down by over-temperature protection (OTP), over-voltage


protection (OVP) or air flow failure
• Load sharing error (voltage mode only)
• Input voltage outside range (open MCB or faulty AC cabling)
• Internal failure

The urgency of an alarm (Non-Urgent or Urgent) can be adjusted with thresholds


provided by the ORION.

Parameter Explanation

Failures for Non-Urgent A threshold for number of failed rectifiers that activates a
Alarm Non-Urgent Alarm for rectifier failure
(internal event: S Non Urg RFA)

Failures for Urgent Alarm A threshold for number of failed rectifiers that activates
an Urgent Alarm for rectifier failure
(internal event: S Urg RFA)

Table 27. Alarm urgency parameters

Rectifier Alarm State Cause

S Non Urg RFA Number of faulty rectifiers ≥ Failures for Non-Urgent


(Non-Urgent Rectifier Failure Alarm
Alarm) Number of working rectifiers → Number of configured
rectifiers
Number of working rectifiers ≤ Number of configured
rectifiers – Failures for Non-Urgent Alarm

S Urgent RFA Number of faulty rectifiers → Failures for Urgent Alarm


(Urgent Rectifier Failure Number of working rectifiers ≤ Number of configured
Alarm) rectifiers – Failures for Urgent Alarm

Table 28. Rectifier alarm state

46 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Note! If the event “S Urgent RFA” is activated, the “S Non Urg RFA” is
suppressed. During a mains failure both rectifier alarm events “S Urgent RFA”
and “S Non Urg RFA” are suppressed.

2.4.3.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → Setup.

Step 2 Define the number of rectifier failures that activate the Urgent Rectifier Failure
Alarm and Non-Urgent Rectifier Failure Alarm. Check that the number of
rectifiers is correct.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.4.3.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → Setup → RM Number.

Step 2 Define the number of rectifier failures that activate the Urgent Rectifier Failure
Alarm and Non-Urgent Rectifier Failure Alarm.

2.4.4 Rectifier setup

After installing new rectifiers, the new number of modules must be confirmed for the
ORION.

2.4.4.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → Setup.

Step 2 Click “Acknowledge”.

This dialogue summarizes the status of the whole rectifier system with numbers
for installed, working (ok) and faulty rectifiers.

After Acknowledgment, the “Rectifier installed” field shows the updated number;
“Rectifier new:” must be 0.

Step 3 To avoid unexpected behaviour of the system, verify that none of the rectifiers
show an error. Go to Status → Rectifier. The Rectifier dialogue displays the
status and configuration status of each rectifier.

Step 4 To identify each rectifier module, click “Show module”.

The “Com”-LED of the related rectifier module blinks for over a minute, to allow
the module to be physically located.

Step 5 To view more details about each rectifier module, click “Details”.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 47


2.4.4.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → Setup.

Step 2 Go to “.1 RM NUMBER” (requires password).

Increment “Number” by the number of added rectifiers

or

Go to “.2 RM NEW”.

The number of added modules is shown and “Acknowledge” is highlighted.

Step 3 Press and confirm again.

2.4.5 Removing rectifiers

After removal of rectifiers, the new number of modules must be confirmed for the ORION.
If this is not done within a certain time a non-urgent alarm arises.

2.4.5.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Configuration → Rectifier → Setup.

Step 2 Click “Acknowledge”.

Step 3 Verify that no rectifiers show an error.

Go to Status → Rectifier.

The Rectifier dialogue displays the status and configuration status of each
rectifier.

2.4.5.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → Setup.

Step 2 Go to “.1 RM NUMBER” (requires password).

Decrease “Number” by the number of removed rectifiers

or

Go to “.2 RM LOST”.

The number of removed modules is shown and “Acknowledge” is highlighted.

Step 3 Press and confirm again.

48 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


2.4.6 Rectifier efficiency mode and cycling

Rectifiers can communicate with the ORION using advanced communication protocols.
This allows optimising system performance by controlling the rectifiers individually. The
ORION software currently supports a Rectifier Efficiency Mode with Rectifier Cycling
to adapt the power supply to a momentary load, which reduces power losses and
increases the system efficiency. In addition, with the Forced Rectifier Cycling, it is
possible to avoid always using the same rectifiers to feed power to the system.

2.4.6.1 Rectifier efficiency mode

The Rectifier Efficiency Mode allows to run only as many rectifiers as needed for an
optimum overall system performance for a momentary load. Several parameters are
required to specify how many rectifiers are allowed to be turned off and still be able to
react on instantly increasing power demand. The rectifiers that are turned off are cycled
to make sure they are operating correctly, even if ORION has turned them off.

Rectifier Efficiency Mode can be configured through the web user interface and UIM/UIL
interface (some of the functions).

Parameter Explanation

Enable Checkbox for enabling the function.

Limit Switching Times Number of maximum “OFF” commands per day and per
rectifier.

Force Switching Once Per To force the efficiency mode at least once per month to
Month change the rectifiers currently switched on and off.

Sweet Spot Target Rectifier Loading


Optimum target loading of the rectifiers in %

Minimum Power Reserve This value must be set according to the load
requirements. With batteries, this value is not as critical.
But without batteries, it must be set to a value that the
load change within a period “T” never exceeds the value.
Otherwise the system power cannot be guaranteed.

Minimum Rectifier Power This value helps in case the system has no batteries.
It is the value the system can guarantee to deliver.

Inhibit Input The efficiency mode can be temporarily disabled by an


event

Table 29. Rectifier efficiency mode parameters

2.4.6.1.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → Efficiency Cycling and select the checkbox to
enable the function.

Step 2 Enter the parameters for “Minimum Power Reserve“, “Minimum Rectifier Power”
and “Sweet Spot”.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 49


If necessary, additional functions can be enabled. These are:

• “Limit Switching Times”


• “Force Switching Once per Month”
• “Inhibit Input”

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.4.6.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → EFF Cycling.

Step 2 Enter the values for “Min Res.” and “Min Power”.

Step 3 Enable the Rectifier Efficiency Mode function (password required).

2.4.7 Power limitation by event

Power Limitation by Event allows the possibility to save costs by using under-
dimensioned generator sets for power supply during mains outages. In this case the
generator supplies only a part of the power needed, while the battery delivers the rest.
The battery is partially discharged but the backup time can be extended. This is achieved
by decreasing the rectifier output power during genset operation.

There are two possibilities: “Fixed” or “Dynamic” rectifier power limitation. Both of them
can only be configured through the web user interface.

2.4.7.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → Power Limitation by Event.

Step 2 Select Type: “Fixed” or “Dynamic”, click “Add”.

Step 3 Check “Enable”.

Step 4 Enter the value for “Max Total Rectifier Power” (in case of “Fixed”).
Enter the value for “Max Generator Power (case of “Dynamic”).
Select Generator Power Measurement from drop-down list (case of “Dynamic”).
This measurement must be installed and configured first.

Step 5 Select “Activate input” from the drop-down list.


This input must be installed and configured first.

Step 6 Click “Accept Changes”.

The function starts and stops according the status of the specified “Activate Input”.

50 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


2.4.8 Recharge power supervision

The controller monitors the power demand and reacts if the system is unable to recharge
the battery within the expected time. This happens, for example, if additional equipment
has been installed but the increase of power requirement has not been realized. If the
Estimated Recharge Time is two times greater than the Expected Recharge Time, the
internal event S RM Lack of Power is set. Additional rectifiers are required to correct
this.

Recharge Power Supervision can only be configured through the web user interface. The
UIM/UIL interface can be used to view the status and the Estimated Recharge Time.

2.4.8.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → Recharge Power Supervision.
Select the checkbox to enable the function. Enter the Expected (minimum)
Recharge Time, and then click “Accept Changes”.

Step 2 The status of the function and the estimated (= computed) recharge time are
visible in the same window.

2.4.8.2 UIM/UIL interface

The function can only be enabled via Web user interface.

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → Recharge.

Step 2 Enter the Expected Recharge Time (Expect. RT).

Step 3 To read the Status and the Estimated Recharge Time, go to Status → Rectifier
→ Recharge.

2.4.9 Redundancy supervision

The controller measures the load power every minute and compares it to the available
power from the rectifiers and calculates the real number of redundant modules. If the
result falls in two adjacent samples below the given parameter Expected Number of
redundant RM, the internal event S RM Redundancy Lost is set and informs that
additional rectifiers are needed. The reason for lost redundancy could be the same as
mentioned in section 2.4.8 "Recharge Power Supervision".

2.4.9.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → Redundancy supervision.

Step 2 Select the checkbox to enable the function.

Step 3 Enter the Expected Number of redundant RM and click “Accept Changes”.

Step 4 The status of the function and the current number of redundant RM are shown in
the Redundancy Supervision dialogue.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 51


2.4.9.2 UIM/UIL interface

The function can only be enabled via Web user interface.

Step 1 To set the number of Expected Number of Redundant RM, go to


Configuration → Rectifier → Redundancy.

Step 2 To read Status and real number of Redundant RM, go to Status → Rectifier →
Redundancy.

2.4.10 Rectifier AC measurement

For information about AC Measurements using rectifiers, see section 2.8.3 "Internal AC
measurement".

2.4.11 Slot population

Each change in the rectifier slot population must be confirmed. The system controller
needs this information for error detection like incorrect cabling or faulty rectifiers. Click
“Acknowledge new” to mark a slot equipped with rectifier as populated. Click
“Acknowledge lost” to mark an empty slot as not populated. Commissioning, extending, or
reducing the system size, but also changing the physical position of a rectifier in the
system requires a confirmation of the slot population. Replacing rectifiers and using the
same slot does not require the confirmation.

2.5 Configuring DC/DC converters

2.5.1 Overview of configuring DC/DC converters

The DC/DC converters are configured to ORION by entering the number of DC/DC
modules into ORION.

The following instructions describe the main functions from the ORION point of view, with
step-by-step instructions.

2.5.2 DC/DC converter parameters

After communication is first established between the DC/DC converters and the
controller, it is possible to adjust the parameters with the controller. Without initial
communication to the power system controller, Delta’s DC/DC converters use their own
default parameters. With the controller the user can also adjust the default parameters,
after the communication is first established.

The following parameters control the behaviour of the DC/DC converters when the power
system is not in normal operating mode, such as start-up or low input voltage mode.

These parameters can only be viewed or configured through the web user interface.

52 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Parameter Explanation

Startup Delay Common delay for all DC/DCs for performing a


synchronized ramp-up. The range is from 0 to 60s. The
default is 0.

Table 30. Startup delay parameter

Parameter Explanation

DC/DC type Selection of the DC/DC converter type

Table 31. DC/DC type parameter

Parameter Explanation

U Min Off Low input voltage for shutdown

U Min On Low input voltage for startup

Uout Max Off Overvoltage protection

Table 32. Input characteristics

Parameter Explanation

Input low off Threshold (voltage) for shutting down the DC/DCs when
input voltage is too low.

Input low on Threshold (voltage) for switching the DC/DCs on, when
input voltage returns from low to acceptable values.

Table 33. Input voltage limits

Parameter Explanation

Voltage Start-up voltage for the DC/DCs

Current limit Start-up current limit for the DC/DCs

Power limit Start-up power limit for the DC/DCs

Limit time The duration of the start-up parameters. After this


period, the normal parameters (float charge voltage and
so on) are taken into use.

Table 34. Start-up parameters

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 53


Parameter Explanation

Startup Input

Stop Input

Reset Reset of fata failure (“Release Event”)

Table 35. Control parameters

2.5.3 DC/DC converter alarms

If a DC/DC converter malfunctions or fails, the ORION raises a DC/DC converter failure
alarm:

S Non Urg DFA or S Urgent DFA.

The DC/DC converter is considered as fault if at least one of the following criteria is
fulfilled:

• load share error


• input voltage outside range
• temporary internal off due to OVP or OTP
• internal off (latched, reason still present) due to OVP or OTP
• internal off (latched, reason not present) due to OVP, OTP or FF
• error (hardware defect)

The urgency of an alarm (Non-Urgent or Urgent) can be adjusted with thresholds


provided by the ORION.

Parameter Explanation

Failures for Non-Urgent A threshold for number of failed DC/DC converters that
Alarm activates a Non-Urgent Alarm for rectifier failure
(internal event: S Non Urg DFA). The default value is 1.

Failures for Urgent Alarm A threshold for number of failed rectifiers that activates
an Urgent Alarm for rectifier failure
(internal event: S Urgent DFA). The default value is 2.

Table 36. DC/DC alarm urgency parameters

54 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


DC/DC Alarm State Cause

S Non Urg DFA Number of faulty DC/DCs ≥ Failures for Non-Urgent


(Non-Urgent DC/DC Failure Alarm
Alarm) Number of working DC/DCs → Number of configured
DC/DCs
Number of working DC/DCs ≤ Number of configured
DC/DCs – Failures for Non-Urgent Alarm

S Urgent DFA Number of faulty DC/DCs → Failures for Urgent Alarm


(Urgent DC/DC Failure Number of working DC/DCs ≤ Number of configured
Alarm) DC/DCs – Failures for Urgent Alarm

Table 37. DC/DC alarm states

Note! If the event “S Urgent DFA” is activated, the “S Non Urg DFA” is
suppressed.

2.5.3.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → DC/DC → Setup.

Step 2 Define the number of DC/DC failures that activate the Urgent DC/DC Alarm and
Non-Urgent DC/DC Alarm. Check that the number of DC/DCs is correct.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.5.3.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → DC/DC → Setup.

Step 2 Go to “.1 DC/DC NUMBER”.

Step 3 Define the number of DC/DC failures that activate the Urgent DC/DC Failure
Alarm and Non-Urgent DC/DC Failure Alarm.

2.5.4 DC/DC converter setup

After installing new DC/DC converters, the new number of modules must be confirmed for
the ORION.

2.5.4.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → DC/DC → Setup.

Step 2 Click “Acknowledge”.

This dialogue summarizes the status of the whole DC/DC system with numbers
for installed, working (ok) and faulty DC/DCs.
After Acknowledgment, the “DC/DC installed” field shows the updated number;
“DC/DC new:” must be 0.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 55


Step 3 To avoid unexpected behaviour of the system, verify that none of the DC/DC
converters show an error. Go to Status → DC/DC. The DC/DC Monitor dialogue
displays the status and configuration status of each DC/DC converter.

Step 4 To identify each rectifier module, click “Show module”.

The “Com”-LED of the related DC/DC converter module blinks for over a minute,
to allow the module to be physically located.

Step 5 To view more details about each DC/DC converter module, click “Details”.

2.5.4.2 UIM/UIL interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → DC/DC → Setup.

Step 2 Go to “.2 DC/DC NEW”.

The number of added modules is shown and “Acknowledge” is highlighted.

Step 3 Press and confirm again.

2.5.5 Redundancy supervision

The controller calculates the number of redundant DC/DCs by requesting the load power
and reserve power from the DC/DCs once a minute and comparing it the total number of
DC/DCs. If the result falls in two adjacent samples below the given parameter Expected
Number of redundant Redundant DC, the internal event S DC Redundancy
Lost is set.

2.5.5.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → DC/DC → Redundancy Supervision.

Step 2 Select the checkbox to enable the function.

Step 3 Enter the Expected Number of redundant DC/DCs, then click “Accept Changes”.

The status of the function and the current number of redundant DC/DCs are shown in the
Redundancy Supervision dialogue.

2.5.5.2 UIM/UIL interface

The function can only be enabled via Web user interface.

Step 1 Go to Configuration → DC/DC → Redundancy and set the Expected Number of


Redundant DC/DC”.

To read the status and the actual number of redundant DC/DCs, go to Status → DC/DC
→ Redundancy.

56 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


2.6 Converter positioning
Each converter, for example, a rectifier or a DC/DC converter, can be assigned a physical
location in the system. This is especially helpful for remote supervision of the system.
When a faulty converter is detected remotely with the help of its exact physical location in
the system (for example, second rectifier from the left in the third shelf from the top),
people without knowledge of the system can be sent to the site to replace the module
(pull out the faulty unit and plug in the new one, no further action necessary).

The positioning is based on location information (cabinet, shelf, and slot if applicable)
which is stored on each converter backplane in a dedicated EEPROM or generated by an
RPAG board (Rectifier Positioning Address Generator). ORION supports positioning
using the data which it obtains via the converters.

2.6.1 Cabinet scheme

This type of arrangement is used if the shelf identification is not necessary (for example,
systems with DPR 7200B-48 rectifiers using one rectifier per shelf). With this scheme, up
to 43 cabinets are possible. Each cabinet has up to 16 slots. Although 256 different slot
addresses are possible, the system size is limited to 128 rectifiers. Each cabinet requires
its own RPGA board, or each backplane must be equipped with a memory device in which
the address is stored. The rectifier name consists of cabinet and slot address (for
example, DC 2.9, where DC is the name of the converter located in slot 9 of cabinet 2).

Cabinet 1 Cabinet 2 Cabinet 16

RM 1.1 RM 2.1 RM 16.1

RM 1.2 RM 2.2 RM 16.2

RM 1.3 RM 2.3 RM 16.3

RM 1.4 RM 2.4 RM 16.4

RM 1.5 RM 2.5 RM 16.5

RM 1.6 RM 2.6 RM 16.6

RM empty DC 2.7 DC empty

RM empty DC 2.8 DC empty

RM empty DC 2.9 not avail.

RM 1.10 DC 2.10 not avail.

not avail. DC empty not avail.

not avail. DC empty not avail.

Figure 4. Converter positioning – cabinet scheme

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 57


Parameter Explanation

Cabinet ID Identifier of the cabinet. This number is used to generate


the rectifier name.

Name Name of the cabinet. This parameter will be used for a


future graphical representation of the system.

Converter Slots Checkboxes for the available slots.

Table 38. Converter positioning – cabinet scheme parameters

2.6.1.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System Architecture → Power Module Positioning.

Step 2 Click “Change”.

Step 3 Select the Scheme Type “cabinet”.

Step 4 Click “Accept Changes”.

Step 5 To add a cabinet, click “Add cabinet”.

Step 6 In the Converter Positioning Editor dialog, select the Converter Slots that are
available for use in the cabinet.

Change the cabinet name by entering the new name in the Name field.

Step 7 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.6.1.2 UIM/UIL interface

Only new or lost converters can be acknowledged through the UIM/UIL interface.

2.6.2 Shelf scheme

Shelf Scheme is used for systems with the converters arranged in shelves, for example,
systems with FR 48V-2000W-E, DPR 1200B-48, or DPR 600B-48… rectifiers. With this
scheme, up to 43 shelves are possible. A cabinet can be assigned to each shelf. Each
shelf consists of up to 16 slots. Although 4096 different slot addresses are possible, the
system size is limited to 128 converters. Each cabinet requires its own RPGA board, or
each backplane must be equipped with a memory device in which the address is stored.
The converter name consists of the cabinet address, shelf address and slot address (for
example, RM 1.3.7, where RM is the name of the rectifier located in slot 7 on shelf 3 of
cabinet 1).

58 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Cabinet 1 Cabinet x

RM RM RM RM
1.1.1 1.1.2 1.1.7 1.1.8
Shelf 1

RM RM DC Not
1.2.1 empty 1.2.7 avail.
Shelf 2

DC DC RM RM RM RM RM RM
1.3.1 1.3.2 1.3.7 empty
Shelf 3 x.14.1 x.14.2 x.14.7 1.16.8
x.14.8
Shelf 14

RM RM RM RM
x.15.1 x.15.2 x.15.7 1.16.8
x.15.8
Shelf 15

RM RM RM DC
x.16.1 x.16.2 x.16.7 empty
Shelf 16

Figure 5. Converter positioning – shelf scheme

Parameter Explanation

Shelf ID Identifier of the shelf. This number is used to generate


the rectifier name.

Name Name of the shelf. This parameter will be used for a


future graphical representation of the system.

Cabinet ID Identifier of the cabinet. This number is used to generate


the rectifier name.

Module Slots Checkboxes for the available slots.

Table 39. Rectifier positioning – shelf scheme parameters

2.6.2.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System Architecture → Power Module Positioning.

Step 2 Click “Change”.

Step 3 Select Scheme Type “shelf”.

Step 4 Click “Accept Changes”.

Step 5 Select “Shelf ID” from the drop-down list and click “Add Shelf”.

Step 6 In the Converter Positioning Editor dialog, select the converter slots
(checkboxes) that are available for use in the shelf.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 59


Step 7 Select “Cabinet ID” from the drop-down list.
The shelf name can be changed by entering the new name in the Name field.

Step 8 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.6.2.2 UIM/UIL interface

Only new or lost rectifiers can be acknowledged through the UIM/UIL interface.

2.7 Configuring alarms


Alarms are an important aspect of the reliability of a power system. Well designed alarm
handling can notify the user of an unexpected behaviour of the power system, in case of
a mains failure, low voltage, rectifier failure and so on. The ORION controller offers
flexible alarm handling in a form of the Signal Processing Engine which consists of four
parts: Measurement, Measurement Processing, Event Definition and Event Processing.

2.7.1 Measurements

All signals that are processed by the ORION controller must be defined as
measurements. Some of them (so-called system measurements) are predefined and
others are generated automatically by defining other system components. There are three
different types of measurements available: Digital, Analogue, and Temperature
measurements.

Digital Measurement

A digital measurement has an adjustable switching level for both directions using the
threshold and hysteresis setting. This can be used for conditioning even noisy signal
sources.

Analogue Measurement

The analogue measurement is used to monitor voltage signals. The measured voltage
may be corrected in a certain range by calibration.

Temperature Measurement

A temperature measurement converts the signal directly to a temperature value. The


measured temperature may be calibrated if necessary.

Scaled Measurement

The scaled measurement is used to convert voltage signals into power signals. The
measured voltage can be scaled by a linear conversion, which is defined by two
measurement points. Each measurement point is described by an input value and an
output value.

60 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Note! Before creating a measurement to the ORION check that the hardware
supports the measurement.

Parameter Type Explanation

Name All Name of the measurement

Inverted Digital Check the checkbox, if inversion is required

Threshold Digital Switching level

Hysteresis Digital Hysteresis between activation and


deactivation

Table 40. Measurement type parameters

Measurements can only be created using the web user interface.

2.7.1.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Signal Processing Engine → Measurements.

From the New Measurement drop-down menu, select the measurement type:

• Digital
• Analogue
• Temperature
• Scaled

The following sequence describes the use of a digital measurement as


example. The treatment of analogue or temperature measurements is
accordingly.

Step 2 Click “Add”.

Step 3 Define the parameters in the Digital Measurement dialogue.

Step 4 Click “Accept Changes”.

Step 5 Go to Configuration → HW Setup.

Step 6 Select the ORION module that the measurement hardware is connected to, for
example, ORION.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 61


Figure 6. ORION I/O setup dialogue

Step 7 Select the measurement, created earlier, from the drop-down menu.

Step 8 Click “Accept Changes”.

2.7.2 Measurement processing

Measurement Processing is a generic block for applying different mathematical


operations to measurements (except digital measurements). An example of Measurement
Processing is the “Difference Measurement” of two measurements.

Difference measurement

The difference measurement calculates the mathematical difference of two


measurements and provides a measurement value as an output. The output can be
either the positive / negative difference or the absolute value of the difference according
to the selected option Absolute Difference.

62 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Output_Signed = Measurement1 – Measurement2

Output_Abs = |Measurement1 – Measurement2|

Only input measurements with equal units are allowed and the same unit is automatically
selected as well for the output. The output can be used for signal processing in the same
way as any other measurement. The output measurement keeps the properties
(measurement type) of the input measurements, i.e. a Difference Measurement of two
Analogue Measurements has still the properties of the Analogue Measurements.

2.7.2.1 Web user interface


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Signal Processing Engine → Measurement Processing.

Step 2 Click “Add Difference Operation”.

Step 3 Enter a name for the new measurement and select the required measurements
from the drop-down lists.

Step 4 Select “Absolute Difference” if absolute value is needed.

Step 5 Click “Add New definition”.

2.7.3 Event definitions

To use the signal processing engine together with analogue (including temperature)
measurements, they must be digitized first. This is done by defining a threshold and a
hysteresis value for the measurement. Each definition must have a unique name. The
result of this definition is an event. In the ORION some internal system events are created
by default at the Delta factory. The threshold editor within the Event Definition allows
defining both polarities of events. As many different thresholds as needed per
measurement can be defined.

Parameter Explanation

Too High Event Name of the Too High event

Upper Threshold Value of the Too High event

Upper Threshold Hysteresis Hysteresis to deactivate the Too High event

Lower Threshold Hysteresis Hysteresis to deactivate the Too Low event

Lower Threshold Value of the Too Low event

Too Low Event Name of the Too Low event

Table 41. Event definition parameters

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 63


2.7.3.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Signal Processing Engine → Event Definitions.

Step 2 Select the required measurement from the New Event(s) on Measurement
drop-down list.

Step 3 Click “Add”.

Step 4 In the Threshold Editor dialogue, enter a name or names for the new event(s)
and define the parameters (thresholds and hysteresis).

Step 5 Select the “UIM access” for the local user.

Step 6 Click “Add New Definition”.

2.7.3.2 UIM/UIL interface

The setting “UIM Access” defines if the parameters for the defined events can be seen
and/or edited through the UIM/UIL interface.

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Event → Thresholds.

Step 2 Select the event, and press .

Step 3 Adjust the threshold and hysteresis to desired values.

2.7.4 Event processing

All events, including the system defaults and user-defined events can be processed with
each other. Boolean Logic (AND, OR, Inversion), RS Latching, timer, filter, counter and
time counter functions can be used to process events together or separately.

AND event

The AND event is active, if both source events are active.

Parameter Explanation

Event Unique name for the AND event.


st
1 source event Mandatory. Unique source name (event) required.
nd
2 source event Mandatory. Unique source name (event) required.

Table 42. AND event parameters

64 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


OR event

The OR event is active, if one or more of the source events are active.

Parameter Explanation

Event Unique name for the OR event.


st
1 source event Mandatory. Unique source name (event) required.
nd
2 source event Mandatory. Unique source name (event) required.
rd th
3 to 8 source event If necessary. Unique source names (event) required.

Table 43. OR event parameters

Inverted event

The Inverted event is active when the source event is not active and vice-versa.

Parameter Explanation

Event Unique name for the RS Latch event.

Function source event Mandatory. Unique source name (event) required.

Table 44. Inverted event parameters

RS latch event

The RS latch combines any two different events to produce an output event state
according to the following truth table:

SET Event RESET Event Output Event

FALSE FALSE FALSE

FALSE → TRUE FALSE FALSE → TRUE

TRUE FALSE TRUE

TRUE FALSE → TRUE TRUE

FALSE FALSE → TRUE TRUE → FALSE

Table 45. RS latch logic

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 65


Parameter Name Range or Type Description

Event Identifier-Type Name of the new RS Latch Event.

Function Set Event-Type Event input to set the output Event.

Function Reset Event-Type Event input to reset the output Event. If the
input Event is still active, then the active
reset Event has no influence. Optional.

Table 46. RS latch parameters

The maximum amount of RS Latch Setup entries is 128.

If a latch event is defined without input events, it can be mapped to the SNMP Control
Event Table and controlled remotely by SNMP protocol.

Timer event

This function allows creating time controlled events. The Timer event is activated based
on the weekday and the time. The Event is activated on the defined Start Time on every
selected Start Days. It is stopped on the defined End Time on every Selected End Days.

The Start Time and End Time depend on the time settings of ORION. It means that the
times represent the same time zone and daylight savings as the ORION.

Parameter Range or Type Explanation

Event Identifier-Type Name of the new filter event.

Start Time Time-Type Time to set the event to TRUE.

Start Day Boolean Day of week to set the event to TRUE at


Start Time.

End Time Time-Type Time to set the event to FALSE.

End Day Boolean Day of week to set the event to FALSE at


End Time.

Table 47. Timer event parameters

The maximum amount of timer setup entries is 128.

If there are two or more consecutive start or end moments, the current event state is
maintained until a corresponding end or start moment occurs. If a start moment has the
same value as the end moment, the event state is maintained.

Filtered event

The event follows the state of a source event only if/when the time thresholds TRUE and
FALSE are passed.

66 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Parameter Explanation

Event Unique name for the filtered event.

Function source event Mandatory. Unique source name (event) required.

TRUE for min. When the source event remains active for the specified
time (TRUE) the filtered event is activated.

FALSE for min. When the source event has been deactivated for the
specified time (FALSE) the filtered event is deactivated.

Table 48. Filtered event parameters

Counter event

A Counter event is counting the false to true transitions of a configured Input event. When
the Counter value matches the counter threshold, the Counter event changes state.

The Counter event has an Enable event. As long as the Enable event is true, the Counter
event counts the false to true transitions of the Input event. If the Enable event is false,
transitions are not counted.

The Counter event has a Reset event. When the Reset event is true, the Counter event
state is set to false, it does not count transitions and the counter value is set to zero. If the
Reset event is false, the Counter event counts normally. The Reset Event has the priority
over the Enable event.

It is at anytime possible to reset the Counter event state and counter value from the Web
interface of the UIM. This kind of reset acts like the Reset event.

There are 2 modes of behaviour for a Counter event, standard and toggle. In standard
mode the Counter event counts until it reaches the threshold, then the Counter event
state is set to true and the counter does not count anymore. In toggle mode the Counter
event counts until it reaches the threshold, then the Counter event state is toggled, the
counter value is reset and the counting goes on.

Parameter Explanation

Event Unique name for the Counter event.

Input Event which false to true transitions are going to be


counted

Enable Event for enabling counting

Reset Event for resetting the state and counter value

Mode Standard or toggle

Threshold When the counter value reach this limit, then the
Counter event state is changed according to the mode

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 67


Time counter event

The Time counter event works exactly the same way the Counter event does, except it is
not counting any event transitions, but it is counting seconds. The operating parameters
are also the same except that there is no Input parameter.

Event processing can only be modified through the web user interface.

2.7.4.1 Web user interface

Use this procedure to configure event processing:

Step 1 Go to Configuration → Signal Processing Engine → Event Processing.

Step 2 In the Event Processing dialogue, select event type from the Event Type drop-
down menu (AND, OR, Inversion, Filter, RS Latch, Timer, Counter, Time
Counter).

Step 3 Click “Add”.

Step 4 In the open dialogue, enter a unique name for the new processed event and
define the parameters.

Step 5 Click “Add New Definition”.

Step 6 In the Event Processing dialogue, click “Accept Changes”.

2.7.4.2 UIM/UIL interface

Only the thresholds and hysteresis of source events can be edited.

2.7.5 Event blocking

It is possible to block an event from triggering an alarm. This may be required during
system upgrade, maintenance, or repair situations where events maybe triggered, but
alarms are not required. If an alarm is already active it is frozen in the active state unless
it is reset.

Alarm events can only be blocked through the web user interface.

2.7.5.1 Web user interface

Use this procedure to block alarm events:

Step 1 Go to Alarm → Maintenance.

Step 2 For each event, select “frozen”.

Step 3 To save the changes, click “Accept Changes”.

68 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Caution! When it is no longer necessary to block events or alarms, configure all
blocked events to “normal”. It this is not done, genuine alarm events may not be
raised.

2.7.6 Alarm setup

Defining an event as an alarm event adds additional functionality and behaviour to it:

• The alarm events are internally inverted for the relay outputs. An alarm event
(alarm active) releases the relay and therefore, if the system is not powered,
the alarm active status is also present. In other words, when alarm is not
active the relay is Normally Open (NO) and when alarm is activated the relay
switches to Normally Closed (NC).

• Only alarm events can be inhibited, in the output relays, with the function
Alarm Stop. This is useful during maintenance when alarms are normal, but
do not require any actions. The critical alarms are usually driving some relays
that activate external alarming systems. These alarms can be quickly inhibited
with the Alarm Stop function (button “Stop Alarms” at the top of the browser
window or menu “3.2 ALARM STOP” in the UIM/UIL interface).

Alarm events cannot be configured through the UIM/UIL interface.

Note! The “Non-Removable” list is a list of events that are defined as alarms,
and have been taken into use by some function. These events cannot be
removed from the alarm event list before they are disabled from the use of the
function or functions.

Note! The events defined as alarms receive automatically a prefix “A” in front of
the event name.

2.7.6.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Alarm → Setup.

Step 2 Select an event from the “Non-Alarm Events” list and click ”Add”.

The event appears on the “Removable” user alarm events list. It is possible to
select multiple events at same time by using “Shift” and “Ctrl” keys.

Step 3 Go to Alarm → Maintenance.

Step 4 Select the “Alarm Stop” checkboxes of the events affected by the Alarm Stop
function.

Step 5 Click “Accept Changes”.

To remove an alarm from the “Removable” user alarm events list:

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 69


Step 6 Select an event from the “Non-Alarm Events” list and click “Remove”.

2.7.6.2 UIM/UIL interface

The UIM/UIL interface can be used to display active alarms, LED assignment, and the
Alarm Stop function.

2.7.7 Inputs, outputs, LEDs and other indicators

The internally defined alarm events can be assigned a relay or an open collector output
for an external alarming system, and/or a LED integrated to the UIM/UIL interface.
External alarms can be connected to the ORION and to the signal processing engine for
further processing, using the digital input interfaces of the ORION.

Alarm events for I/O cannot be configured through the UIM/UIL interface.
OUT2 = Non-urgent Alarm NUA
OUT1 = Urgent Alarm UA

OUT3 = Mains Failure

OUT4

OUT5

OUT6

Relays in normal condition

Relays in alarm condition

Figure 7. ORION alarm relay connections

2.7.7.1 Web user interface

2.7.7.1.1 Assign inputs/outputs


Step 1 Go to Configuration → HW Setup → ORION (or SSM).

Step 2 Select the signals for Digital Inputs/Temperatures/Middle Point Inputs from the
respective drop-down menu.

70 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


Step 3 Select the events for the Digital Outputs/Open Collector Outputs/LVD Outputs
from the respective drop-down menu.

Step 4 Ensure the cabling for external equipment is according to the required
configuration.

Figure 8. ORION I/O setup dialogue

2.7.7.1.2 Assign LEDs and buzzer


Step 1 Go to Configuration → HW Setup → User Interface.

Step 2 Select the alarms or events that activate the LEDs.

Step 3 If a buzzer is required, (integrated in UIM but not in UIL), select the event that
activates the buzzer from the drop-down menu.

Step 4 To create a “Stop Alarms” button at the top of the browser page, select “Display
an Alarm Stop Button”.

Step 5 If required, disable Password for Battery Functions/Alarm Stop by means of the
appropriated checkbox.

Step 6 If required, activate numerical password for UIM / UIL by checking the
“Numerical” checkbox.

Step 7 Click “Accept Changes”.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 71


Note! Toggling from “Standard” to “Numerical” password and vice versa always
resets the default password.
(“Standard: Keys <↑> <↑> <↓> <EXIT> <EXIT> <ENTER>;
Numerical: Numbers <1> <2> <3> <4>).

Figure 9. User interface dialogue

2.7.7.2 UIM/UIL interface

The LED assignment of the ORION is displayed in the UIM/UIL.

Step 1 Go to “3.3 LED ASSIGNMENT”.

Step 2 Select external input events for the correct ORION interfaces in this menu
(Digital Inputs). For the external events to appear in the drop-down menu, they
must be created in the event definition menu.

2.8 Configuring AC measurements

2.8.1 Selecting the AC measurement type

AC measurements can only be configured through the web user interface.

2.8.1.1 Web user interface

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System Architecture → System Parameter.

Step 2 Select “external”, “internal - single phase RM”, “internal three phase RM” or
“HPS” from drop-down menu.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

If an AC Measurement Type is configured, Phase failure detection can be


enabled.

Step 4 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → AC Failure.

72 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


2.8.2 External AC measurement

The AC parameters can be measured either by a three phase AC measurement device


ACM which is connected over a gateway to the ORION or by a so-called “Healthy Phase
Selector Module” HPS.

2.8.2.1 Configuring the AC measurement device and the ACM1 gateway

The ACM1 is a gateway between the ORION and an external 3 phase AC-measurement
device, using RS 485 interface with MODBUS protocol. The commissioning procedure is
possible through the web user interface.

Step 1 Adjust the communication parameters on the AC measurement device. Set the
Hex switch on ACM1 accordingly.

Step 2 Check the installation.

Step 3 Go to Configuration → HW Setup → ACM.

Step 4 In the ACM Devices, enter name of the external AC measurement device.

Step 5 Click “Add ACM”.

Step 6 Click “Accept Changes”.

After a successful configuration/installation, the dialogue looks as shown in the following


figure and the measured values can be displayed.

Figure 10. ACM devices dialogue (after installation)

Click “Details” to view the IMBUS Device details.

2.8.2.2 Display of external AC measurements

2.8.2.2.1 Web user interface

Go to Status → AC Mains → Measurements to display the AC Voltages.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 73


2.8.2.2.2 UIM/UIL interface

Go to Status → AC Measuremen.

If an external AC measuring device is present, the measured values are displayed


according to the following menu:

• Phase Voltages, Currents, Power, Frequency, Power Factor, Phase to Phase


Voltage

2.8.2.3 Configuring the HPS module

The HPS module is used to select the optimum phase as mains input. While performing
this task, it also provides all interesting AC measurements.

Step 1 Set the ID switch on HPS module to the desired Imbus address (1 ... 4).

Step 2 Check the installation.

Step 3 Go to Configuration → HW Setup → HPS.

Step 4 In the HPS modules window enter name and Imbus address of the HPS module.

Step 5 Click “Add HPS”.

Step 6 Click “Accept Changes”.

After a successful configuration/installation, the measured values can be displayed.

2.8.2.4 Displaying the HPS module’s external AC measurements

2.8.2.4.1 Web user interface

Go to Status → AC Mains → HPS to display the AC measurements.

2.8.2.4.2 UIM/UIL interface

Go to Status → AC Measuremen.

If a HPS module is present, the measured values are displayed according to the following
menu:

• Line voltages, currents, apparent power, active power, reactive power,


frequency, power factor, line to line voltages, three line measurements (Ueq,
Ieq, PF, S, P, Q), line energies, total active energy and total reactive energy.

74 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration


2.8.3 Internal AC measurement

The rectifier modules measure the input AC voltage. These measurements are visible as
well with the Web user interface as on the local controller displays UIM/UIL.

2.8.3.1 Web user interface

2.8.3.1.1 Phase assignment


Step 1 Go to Configuration → Rectifier → AC Measurement.

Step 2 Click “Start assignment”.

Step 3 For the rectifier connected to phase 1, click “Config”*.

Step 4 Click “Finish assignment”.

Step 5 Verify that the status has changed to “ok”.

* Repeat for additional phases if present.

2.8.3.1.2 Measurements

Go to Status → AC Mains → Measurements to display the AC Voltages.

2.8.3.2 UIM/UIL interface

2.8.3.2.1 Phase assignment

Step 1 Go to “8.1.3 PHASE ASSIG.” and press .

Step 2 Select “Start” and press .

Step 3 For the rectifier connected to phase 1, click “Config”.

Step 4 When all phases have been assigned, select “Finish”.

Step 5 Verify that the Status has changed to “ok”.

* Repeat for additional phases if present.

2.8.3.2.2 Measurements

After successful phase assignment the AC Voltage is displayed in


“1.7 AC MEASUREME”.

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Configuration 75


3 Logging function
The Log function is used to store the system history in a persistent way. This functionality
writes measurements, events and built-in system messages to log files. The user has the
possibility to create several different log configurations. Each log configuration has a
name, a description, a set of measurements and events to be logged as well as the
sampling criteria and rules for the files management. The ORION can handle up to 18
user defined log configurations and additionally there is a Default Log to store system
messages. This document provides information about using the Default Log. To work with
user defined logs, see a separate logging manual.

Note! The logging function can only be configured through the web user
interface.

3.1 Setting up the default log via web user interface


Step 1 Go to Log → Setup.

Step 2 Click “Edit” button of the Default log.

Step 3 Click “Captured Events Selection”.

Step 4 Select the events to be captured and click “Add”.

Step 5 Click “Back” to return to the Log Editor page.

Step 6 Select the language from the drop-down list.

Step 7 Click “Accept Changes”.

3.2 Checking the log


When an event that has been defined as a Captured Event is activated, an entry is
recorded in the ORION log. The log can be read both from the web user interface and the
UIM / UIL display. The log entry records the date, time, and description of the event. The
description is in the form of the event name. The log differentiates between appearance
and disappearance of the event, as shown in Table 49.

Event Event state Description seen in the log of UIM & WEB

NameX True NameX

False NameX – ok

Table 49. Log event descriptions

76 Configuration instructions, ORION controller Logging function


3.2.1 Web user interface

Follow this procedure to see the content of the default log:

Step 1 Go to Log → Status.

Step 2 Click the “Files” button for the Default log.

Step 3 Click the “View” button.

Follow this procedure to export the log file to PC.

Step 1 Go to Log → Status.

Step 2 Click the “Files” button for the Default Log.

Step 3 Click “Save to PC” and follow the instructions on the screen.

Follow this procedure to clear the default log:

Step 1 Go to Log → Status.

Step 2 Click the “Files” button for the Default Log.

Step 3 Select the check box “Delete”.

Step 4 Click “Accept Changes”.

3.2.2 UIM/UIL interface

Step 1 Go to Log → System → Entries. Press to open the log entries.

Step 2 To clear the log, go to Log → System → Entries. Press .

Configuration instructions, ORION controller Logging function 77


4 User and session management

4.1 User management


To control access from different locations to the ORION Configuration and Supervision
Tool, ORION has a build in User and Session Management System. It enables creating
user profiles with different access rights, for example, for configuration, maintenance,
operator, and monitor.

Each login generates a session, which runs until the user logs out or until ORION
terminates it under certain circumstances.

The administrator can edit the user list and define the rules, which apply if more than one
session is running at the same time.

The User and Session Managements are located in the web user interface
(ORION Configuration and Supervision Tool) menus:

Configuration → System → User Management

and

Configuration → System → Session Management.

Figure 11. User management dialogue

78 Configuration instructions, ORION controller User and session management


4.1.1 Default user profiles and access levels

The ORION controller provides predefined user profiles for the Configuration and
Supervision Tool. The administrator can edit the default profiles (for example, reset the
password) as well as add new ones. Most user profiles can be deleted with administrator
rights. The default user profiles are for configuring and operating the power system.

Table 50 describes the default usernames and passwords with the corresponding access
profile. We recommend that at least the passwords are changed after commissioning the
system. Only the corresponding user can edit the password. The administrator can
restore the default passwords.

Username Default password Access Profile

Admin orion Configuration

configuration orion Configuration

maintenance orion Maintenance

operator orion Operating

monitor orion Monitoring

Table 50. Default usernames

Note! An additional user profile “Delta” is predefined. This is for use of Delta
employees only. This user profile cannot be deleted nor edited. With Delta user
profile, Delta employees can access to parameters and settings of ORION at the
factory. This user profile does not allow viewing or editing of the user profiles.

With different user profiles, the administrator can optimize the use of the ORION
Configuration and Supervision Tool for different user groups. The different access profiles
define the parameters and measurement displays editable/visible to the user. Table 51
explains the differences between the possible access profiles.

Access Profile User rights

Configuration Enables the user to configure the system and edit all the
parameters.

Maintenance Enables the user to edit some configuration menus and


all the parameters.

Operating Enables the user to edit some parameters.

Monitoring Only view rights to ORION Web user interface.

Configuration (Administrator) Unique user profile.


As “Configuration”, but the user can also edit, delete and
add user profiles.

Table 51. Access profiles and user rights

Configuration instructions, ORION controller User and session management 79


4.1.2 Delta’s recommendation for user profiles

Note! Delta recommends that the default user profiles are only used as access
profiles during commissioning. The administrator should then create new user
profiles according to the organization and delete the default ones.

Use the following procedure when commissioning ORION power system.

Step 1 Change the password for “Admin” user profile.

Step 2 Create new user profiles according to the organization requiring access to the
ORION.

Step 3 Delete the default user profiles.

Step 4 Distribute the new user profiles to the respective users, and instruct the users
how to log in and change their passwords.

4.1.2.1 Adding new user profiles


Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → User Management.

Step 2 In the “New User Profile Definition” section, enter the name of the new user
profile.

Step 3 Select “Access Profile” for the user.

Step 4 Select Language for the user (if other than English).

Step 5 Click “Add User”.

Note! The new user adopts the “Default Password” from the “Common
Parameter” settings. To change the password, log in as the new user.

4.1.2.2 Changing password


Step 1 Log in to the ORION Configuration and Supervision Tool as the user the
password change concerns.

Step 2 Go to Configuration → System → User Management.

Step 3 Click “Change Password”.

Step 4 In the Password Editor dialogue, enter the old password and the new password
(twice).

Step 5 Click “Accept Changes”.

80 Configuration instructions, ORION controller User and session management


4.1.2.3 Editing user profiles

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → User Management.

Step 2 Click “Edit User Parameter”.

Step 3 In the User Data Editor dialogue, select the “Access Profile” and the language
for the user.

Step 4 Click “Accept Changes”.

4.1.2.4 Deleting a user profile

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → User Management.

Step 2 Select the checkbox for the user profile you want to delete.

Step 3 Click “Accept Changes”.

4.2 Session management


At login, a set of parameters are collected and monitored by the session manager.
Depending on the access profile, the following information can be available for the user.
The information is viewed as read-only.

Parameter Description

Session Owner Username of the session.

IP address IP address of the client (that is the computer running the


Browser).

Session Type Currently only WEB sessions are available.

Session State Each session runs through a set of state between login and
cleanup by ORION.

DB Access Indicates what database access this session has. Only one
session can have read-write access at the same time!

Current Dialogue ID ID of the dialogue which is currently on display.

Last Access [s] Time in seconds since the last request for an object from the
web server.

Table 52. Available session manager information parameters

Configuration instructions, ORION controller User and session management 81


4.2.1 Common parameters

With Administrator rights, the user can edit the Parameters of Session Manager, shown in
Table 53.

Parameter Description

Max sessions Total number of (WEB) sessions running at the same time.

Session Inactive Determines the idle time to change from session state
“active” to “inactive”.

Session Timeout After Determines the (additional) idle time to change from session
state “inactive” to “timed-out”.

Assign Write Access At Determines if ORION should try to assign the read-write
Login Automatically access to a newly logged in session. Remember, that the
new session can not have read-write access if it is already in
possession of another session which is in the state “active”.

Withdraw Write Access Determines if the read-write access can be withdrawn if a


When Session Inactive session is “inactive” (default setting) or not until the session is
“timed-out”.

Save Setup Before Determines if the setup is saved if the read-write access is
Withdrawing Write withdrawn.
Access

Table 53. Session manager common parameters

4.2.1.1 Editing common parameters

Use the following procedure to edit a common parameter.

Step 1 Go to Configuration → System → Session Management.

Step 2 In the “Common Parameter” section, click “Edit Parameter”.

Step 3 In the Admin Parameter dialogue, click “Accept Changes”.

82 Configuration instructions, ORION controller User and session management


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