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gold coast
Destination
Management Plan
april 2005

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


w w w . t q . c o m . a u / k n o w l e d g e b a n k
Endorsement

The Gold Coast Destination Management Plan was endorsed by

Dennis Chant, Chairman of Gold Coast Tourism and

Terry Jackman, Chairman of Tourism Queensland in the presence of

Margaret Keech MP, Minister for Tourism, Fair Trading and Wine Industry Development

on 7th April 2005.

Margaret Keech MP Terry Jackman Dennis Chant


Minister for Tourism, Chairman Chairman
Fair Trading and Tourism Queensland Gold Coast Tourism
Wine Industry Development

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


Foreword

Since 1998, the Queensland Government has pursued a Smart State agenda, which promotes and
develops our strengths in science, research, education and innovation.
That agenda has no limits and we are using Smart State innovation to improve the way we do many
things.
Tourism embraces this ethos well by harnessing the skills, the experience and the knowledge of
Government, industry and the community to unite in driving one of the state’s largest job-creating
industries.
The Destination Management Planning initiative is a great example of innovative thinking.
It is Tourism Queensland’s smart plan for working closely with all tourism stakeholders to develop a
stronger, more robust tourism industry.
The Destination Management Planning program ensures Queensland is well-placed to maximise
tourism’s benefits by promoting a prosperous future, continued industry growth, wealth generation
and job creation.

Peter Beattie MP
Premier and Minister For Trade

Global tourism and travel are predicted to grow at an unprecedented rate over the next 20 years.
These visitors will be looking for new and different experiences.
If Queensland is to take advantage of such a dynamic and competitive environment, we need to
start the planning process now.
The Beattie Government, through Tourism Queensland, has embarked on an ambitious program
of reform, moving from destination marketing to destination management as the new driver of
sustainable tourism development.
This is an exciting new approach to strategic tourism planning.
Queensland’s 12 tourism destinations will have their own strategic planning tool, each individually
tailored for the destination.
Destination Management Plans will provide focus and direction through a collaborative approach to
planning and management.
They will ensure destinations mature and expand in a planned and managed way as we move to
meet increasing demands for services, infrastructure and new tourism experiences.
I commend this Destination Management Plan to you as an important platform for industry
cooperation and a sustainable tourism future.

Margaret Keech MP
Minister for Tourism, Fair Trading and Wine Industry Development

TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005 G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N


Executive Summary

In response to the changing, dynamic tourism business system Tourism Queensland (TQ)
has embarked on a new process of strategic planning. The process considers the alignment
“Tourism Queensland has and cohesion of corporate business with the needs of the tourism industry and key industry
stakeholders. The outcome of the program provides a new perspective on tourism industry
embarked on a new process
leadership, in keeping with the organisation’s goal to facilitate sustainable tourism growth and
industry profitability.
of corporate strategic
In practical terms, this strategy is being delivered through the production of a suite of
planning” Destination Management Plans (DMPs). Drawing on available research and a broad base of
knowledge, skills and experience, each DMP is tailored to meet the development and marketing
needs of each destination and tuned to meet the needs of target markets.
This document represents the outcome of destination management planning for the Gold Coast.
It is intended as directional rather than a prescriptive document, to be used as a guiding tool
for the development of strategies and business plans, and as a springboard for further planning
and discussion between partners and stakeholders. It has been developed in the context of
the Queensland Government priorities for the delivery of Government services, the Queensland
Government Strategy for Growing Tourism and the Tourism Queensland Corporate Plan.
The Gold Coast is one of Australia’s premier holiday destinations. It is famous for its beaches,
surf, theme parks, shopping, nightlife and hinterland and has been attracting Australian
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families for many decades. The region has capitalised on its attractive environment, climate
and lifestyle to develop a highly specialised economy that is dominated by the tourism industry.
Tourism Queensland will continue to strive to enhance the development and marketing of the
Gold Coast in partnership with the RTO, industry, Government and the community. Over the
next three years, TQ will focus efforts on the issues identified within this plan. Specifically
these issues are to:
■ Maintain the Gold Coast’s position as Australia’s premier holiday destination and increase
market share of high yield domestic and international market segments.
■ Strengthen partnerships with key stakeholders in the region to enable a more coordinated
and strategic approach to destination development.
■ Focus destination branding activities towards high yielding segments in the domestic
geographic markets of Sydney and Melbourne.
■ Ensure the effectiveness of the Gold Coast branding and its alignment with the
destination’s positioning.
■ Continue cooperative marketing programs to provide cost effective opportunities for
industry partners to benefit from working with the destination brand.
■ Encourage transport planners to consider the needs of tourists in future planning
activities.
■ Nurture growth opportunities within niche market segments such as education tourism,
backpackers, food and wine tourism, events and ecotourism.
The Gold Coast Destination Management Plan has been developed over a lengthy period of
research and consultation and will be used as the basis to engage regional tourism stakeholders
on tourism development and marketing issues. The key ideas and strategies in this plan will
be implemented through the annual business plans of TQ in partnership with the RTO and key
industry partners. It is envisaged that these ideas and strategies will also inform the action plans
of all stakeholders with an interest in a consistent, research based approach to the sustainable
and profitable development of tourism in the region.

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


Contents

Executive Summary .............................................................................................. 2

Section 1: Destination Management Planning

1.1 Introduction ........................................................................................ 4

1.2 Planning Context .................................................................................. 5

1.3 Queensland Tourism Business Environment ............................................ 8

1.4 The Queensland Tourism Industry .......................................................... 9

Section 2: Destination Analysis

2.1 Destination Description....................................................................... 10

2.2 Competitor Analysis ............................................................................ 12

2.3 Destination Performance ..................................................................... 15

2.4 Destination Market Analysis ................................................................ 23

2.5 Destination Marketing......................................................................... 28


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2.6 Tourism Services Analysis ................................................................... 32

2.7 Stakeholders and Partnerships ............................................................ 35

2.8 Community Services Analysis .............................................................. 37

2.9 Destination Development .................................................................... 39

2.10 SWOT Analysis................................................................................. 42

2.11 Summary and Strategic Implications .................................................. 46

Section 3: Strategic Vision


3.1 Destination Outlook ............................................................................ 47

3.2 Targeting Strategy .............................................................................. 48

3.3 Destination Positioning ....................................................................... 51

3.4 Operational Goals and Strategies ......................................................... 53

3.5 Implementation ................................................................................. 56

Appendices

Appendix 1. Data Sources ......................................................................... 57

Appendix 2. Acronyms .............................................................................. 58

Appendix 3. Market Segmentation ............................................................. 59

TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005 G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N


SECTION 1:
Destination Management Planning

1.1 INTRODUCTION
The Queensland tourism industry environment is a dynamic business system subject to the influences of global
circumstances, Government and business priorities, changing communities and market trends.

In response to this changing world Tourism Queensland (TQ) has embarked on a new process of strategic planning. The
process considers the alignment and cohesion of corporate business with the needs of the tourism industry and key
industry stakeholders. The outcome of the program provides a new perspective on tourism industry leadership, in keeping
with the organisation’s goal to facilitate sustainable tourism growth and industry profitability.

The cornerstone of the program is TQ’s commitment to a destination approach to the development and marketing of
Queensland visitor regions. This approach recognises that the State consists of a number of diverse tourist destinations,
each with distinctive and differing development and marketing needs.

In practical terms, this approach is delivered through the production of a suite of Destination Management Plans.
Specialist planning teams, working with industry input, have produced a Destination Management Plan (DMP) for each
designated Queensland destination. Drawing on all the available research and broad ranging knowledge, skills and
4 experience, each DMP is tailored to meet the development and marketing needs of the destination and tuned to meet the
needs of target markets.

This document represents the outcome of destination management planning for the Gold Coast. It has been developed in
the context of the Queensland Government priorities for the delivery of Government services, the Queensland Government
Strategy for Growing Tourism and the Tourism Queensland Corporate Plan.

1.1.1 This Plan


This Destination Management Plan is intended as directional rather than a prescriptive document, to be used as a guiding
tool for the development of strategies and business plans and as a springboard for further planning and discussion
between partners and stakeholders.

Section One of the plan outlines the background and purpose of Destination Management Planning and sets the planning
context as an aspect of the Queensland Government tourism agenda. Section Two embodies all the relevant research,
knowledge and experience that has been gathered and accumulated by the planning teams and refines this into a simple
SWOT table that represents a succinct situation analysis. Based on this analysis and the issues arising, Section Three
proposes a strategic direction and set of actionable strategies for the realisation of sustainable tourism growth and industry
profitability over the short to medium term.

The development of this plan has drawn on all the available research data and involved a range of people from within the
organisation as well as industry representatives associated with the destination. As a TQ planning initiative the document
substantially represents a TQ perspective. As such, the outcomes of this plan feed directly into TQ planning processes
where annual business plans become the annual action plans of the DMP. For partners and key stakeholders, the DMP is
intended as a guiding document to be used as a tool to inform decision-making and guide effective tourism development
and marketing at a destination level, consistent with an informed view of the needs and interests of visitors.

Destination Management Planning is a dynamic, ongoing planning process that takes a research based, integrated
perspective of destination development and marketing. To ensure currency and relevancy, the DMPs will be updated
regularly with the latest research, destination information and tourism trends.

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


1.2 PLANNING CONTEXT
Tourism Queensland is a statutory authority of the Queensland Government established under the jurisdiction of the
Department of Tourism, Fair Trading and Wine Industry Development. TQ provides leadership and guidance to the
State’s tourism industry and delivers the Queensland Government’s tourism agenda through an integrated approach to
tourism policy, destination development and marketing. Destination Management Planning occurs in the context of the
Queensland Government priorities for the delivery of Government services, the Queensland Government Strategy for
Growing Tourism and the Tourism Queensland Corporate Plan.

1.2.1 State Government Priorities


The Queensland Government is committed to a range of priorities to provide more focus for the delivery of Government
services. These are:
■ Priority One: Improved health care and strengthening services to the community
■ Priority Two: Realising the Smart State through education, skills and innovation
■ Priority Three: Protecting our children and public safety
■ Priority Four: Managing urban growth and building Queensland’s regions
■ Priority Five: Protecting the environment for a sustainable future
■ Priority Six: Growing a diverse economy and creating jobs
■ Priority Seven: Delivering responsive government

1.2.2 Queensland Government Strategy for Growing Tourism


The Queensland Government Strategy for Growing Tourism outlines the broad strategic direction for developing tourism in
a sustainable manner. The Strategy aims to incorporate industry’s needs into and across all areas of Government policy,
planning and operations and foster cooperation and collaboration between key agencies on tourism issues. It establishes
linkages with other whole-of-government policy initiatives and provides a mechanism for ensuring that the efforts of
individual Government Departments are directed towards the achievement of the Government’s priorities. Growing Tourism 5
is implemented through TQ and the Department of Tourism, Fair Trading and Wine Industry Development.

The objectives of the Growing Tourism Strategy are divided into four main categories:
1. Infrastructure
■ Foster strategic investment in ‘hard’, ‘soft’ and ‘innovation and technology’ tourism infrastructure and services
■ Gain recognition of the importance of tourism to economic development and employment growth
■ Deliver high quality tourism experiences to Queensland visitors

2. The Environment
■ Seek and promote the environmental, economic and social sustainability of the industry
■ Develop a sustainable nature-based sector built on the State’s natural advantages

3. Market Trends
■ Promote Queensland as a quality tourism destination to domestic and international visitor markets, based on timely
and accurate market data
■ Recognise and promote diversity in the development of the tourism industry

4. Government Leadership and Coordination


■ Provide strong and proactive leadership in the continuing development of the State’s tourism industry

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1.2.3 Tourism Queensland Corporate Plan
The TQ Corporate Plan outlines the organisation’s strategic direction for the next four years. It is formulated and
implemented through a process of business and financial planning and updated annually to ensure it is aligned with the
latest industry trends and Government priorities. The Plan’s main functions are to:
■ Provide a strategic framework for operations and resource allocation
■ Provide departments with a framework for the development of business (operational) plans
■ Communicate strategies to Government, the tourism industry and Queenslanders

TQ Vision: To be a recognised and respected international leader in Destination Management


and champion of world’s best practice in sustainable tourism values and services.

TQ Mission: To work in partnership with Government, Industry and Community stakeholders


to maximise sustainable tourism growth for the economic and
social benefit of all Queenslanders

TQ Corporate Priorities: Stakeholders; External Services; Our People; Processes and Systems

The Corporate Plan is implemented through the annual business plans of each department and business unit. Industry
and Government input into the planning process is sought through a variety of forums and committees.

1.2.4 Tourism Queensland Destination Management Planning


Following the success of the destination marketing initiative established in 1997, TQ remains committed to a destination
approach to the development and marketing of Queensland destinations. The destination approach is a proven and
effective management system that enables the organisation to best meet its market, industry and Government obligations.
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This approach recognises that Queensland consists of a number of discrete visitor destinations, each with distinct and
differing development and marketing needs. These destinations are identified as:
■ Brisbane, Bundaberg, Central Queensland, Fraser Coast, Gold Coast, Mackay, Outback, South East Queensland
Country, Sunshine Coast, Townsville, Tropical North Queensland, Whitsundays

Destination Management Planning is an evolution of the destination marketing initiative and represents a more integrated
approach to understanding destination needs and the delivery of services. Plans for each destination have been developed
after a lengthy process of planning, consultation, feedback and review. As indicated in the model below, it is intended that
the DMPs will directly link with TQ’s annual business plans and provide a strategic platform to guide the strategies and
business plans of industry stakeholders.

Destination Management Planning Model

TQ Business
Plans
1st Draft 2nd Draft Completed
DMP DMP DMP
Stakeholder
Internal Drivers Business Plans
External Drivers

Feedback TQ Planning Teams RTO Feedback TQ Sign Off


Research Stakeholder Feedback RTO Sign Off

Evaluation

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1.2.5 Tourism Queensland Whole-of-State Strategies
Whilst each Destination Management Plan focuses on the specific needs and interests of each destination, there are a
number of TQ policies and strategic issues that are addressed and advanced on a whole-of-state basis. The whole-of-state
strategies outlined below are relevant to all destinations and are identified and actioned in the annual business plans of
the appropriate TQ department or business unit. For a full explanation of the range of duties and responsibilities of TQ
departments log on to www.tq.com.au.

AREA OF BUSINESS WHOLE-OF-STATE STRATEGIES

Marketing Domestic and International destination based consumer and trade marketing
Government/industry liaison and advocacy
Road Tourism promotion
Food and Wine Tourism promotion
Where Else But Queensland State brand promotion
Special Interest Tourism Government/industry liaison; industry planning and promotion for special
interest tourism segments; product development
Cultural Tourism Government/industry liaison; industry planning and advocacy; product
development
Events Tourism Government/industry liaison; industry planning and advocacy; product
development
Cruise Shipping Queensland Cruise Shipping Plan
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Government/industry liaison and business development framework
Road Tourism Drive Tourism Program
Roads and Road Tourism product development
Policy and Planning Government/industry liaison; policy and regulation issues; industry standards
and accreditation; investment; tourism input into whole-of-government
strategies; Growing Tourism – coordination of TQ input and involvement; visitor
safety, including the National Visitor Safety Program, Tourist Oriented Policing,
and beach safety programs; training and skills development initiatives; Visitor
Information Centre accreditation and the Queensland Visitor Information
Centre Signage Policy; Tourism in Protected Areas
Aviation Queensland Commercial and Tourism Aviation Plan
Government framework focused on growing international and domestic air
services to Queensland destinations
Research Queensland performance monitoring; forecasting; consumer and market
trends; R-TAM
Sustainable Tourism Destination development; government/industry liaison; industry planning and
advocacy; product development
Queensland Ecotourism Plan 2003-2008
Tourism Queensland Indigenous Tourism Strategy

In addition to the strategies above, it is acknowledged that there are a range of whole-of-state strategies undertaken by
various Government Departments that have some impact on tourism and tourism service delivery. For further information
on these TQ whole-of-state strategies refer to the Destination Management Planning Knowledge Bank at
www.tq.com.au/knowledgebank.

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1.3 QUEENSLAND TOURISM BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
Tourism is an open dynamic system subject to variable global, national and regional influences and trends. While many of
these factors exist outside the destination’s direct sphere of influence, they can still impact on travel and tourism business
at the destination level. Depending on the issues and the response to them, influencing factors in the external operating
environment can pose a threat or offer an opportunity to enhance sustainable tourism business.

The table below outlines some of the issues in the macro environment that will have an impact on tourism in Queensland:

GLOBAL TRENDS

ECONOMIC TRENDS SOCIAL AND CULTURAL TRENDS


■ Globalisation ■ Changing family structure
■ Fluctuating global economy ■ Ageing population
■ Variable exchange rates and the ■ Increasing number of hours
value of the $AUD worked
■ Variable interest rates ■ Flexible work arrangements
■ Fluctuating fuel prices ■ Interest in balanced lifestyle
■ Decline in traditional industries ■ Safety and security
■ Polarisation of wealth ■ Population growth in developed
countries
NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ■ Population growth in urban and
■ Global warming/climate change coastal areas
■ Increased awareness of ■ Health risks
environmental sustainability Travel,
■ Increased interest in nature-based Tourism, Tourists TECHNOLOGY TRENDS
tourism & Host ■ Uptake of the internet
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■ Impacts of tourism on natural ■ Interactive TV
Communities
environments ■ Mobile technology
■ Natural disasters ■ Convergence of communication
■ Environmental degradation ■ Innovations in transport - speed,
comfort, safety
POLITICAL/LEGAL TRENDS
■ Recognition of tourism by COMPETITIVE TRENDS
Government and community ■ Global on-line revolution
■ Policies on environment ■ Competition for discretionary
■ Policies on Native Title income
■ Threat of war and terrorism ■ Greater number of substitutes for
■ Land clearing travel
■ Public Liability insurance costs ■ Greater competition in tourism

INDUSTRY TRENDS
■ Short break holidays ■ More frequent holidays ■ Drive holidays ■ On-line revolution for information & booking holidays
■ Unstable global environment and impacts on travel behaviour ■ Predicted growth in international travel
■ Relaxed travel impediments in developing international markets ■ Highly competitive national travel environment
■ Market fragmentation and the emergence of more special interest markets ■ Low cost air travel

The implications of these environmental issues for this destination have been summarised as part of the SWOT analysis
which appears in Section 2.10 of this plan.

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1.4 THE QUEENSLAND TOURISM INDUSTRY
As Queensland’s second largest industry and largest employer, tourism contributes significantly to the economic well being
of the State. As a multifaceted, many layered service industry tourism is made up of a wide variety of private and public
sector stakeholders that are either directly or indirectly engaged in the business of tourism. For Queensland to continue
to secure the benefits that tourism has to offer, it is important that there is strong coordination and linkages between the
various sectors of business and Government throughout the State.

The tourism business system is built around a core base of industry operators, Local Government Authorities and
regional and local tourism organisations. Tourism Queensland is the Government Agency responsible for guiding tourism
development and marketing at a State level. At the regional level, 14 Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) play a role in
partnering with regional stakeholders including industry, Local Government and community to coordinate tourism efforts.
The whole system is underpinned by customers and residents whose support is essential for the tourism industry to
function.

There are a number of organisations involved in the coordination of tourism in Queensland, each with complementary
roles and responsibilities. The framework below generally outlines the structure and function of the key coordinating
agencies.

Tourism Organisations

SUSTAINABLE
DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY, TOURISM & RESOURCES (DITR) TOURISM COOPERATIVE
RESEARCH CENTRE
NATIONAL

TOURISM DIVISION TOURISM AUSTRALIA (STCRC)


(in DITR) (Statutory Authority) (Research Partnership)
Develops and implements Responsible for international and domestic 9
Develops knowledge
Federal Government tourism marketing as well as the delivery of
and innovation for
policy and programs research and forecasts for the tourism sector
business, community and INDUSTRY
government ASSOCIATIONS
(NATIONAL, STATE,
SECTOR SPECIFIC)
DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM, FAIR TRADING & WINE INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT (DTFTWID) • Lobby voice - ensuring
government considers the
STATE

interests of tourism
GROWING TOURISM UNIT (GT) (in DTFTWID) TOURISM QUEENSLAND (TQ) (Statutory Authority)
•Industry leadership
Coordinates implementation of the Queensland Government’s • Markets Queensland internationally and domestically • Industry education and
Strategy for Growing Tourism • Facilitates destinational development - research, policy and industry planning training
• Facilitates product development and distribution • Professional advice
• Provides advice to industry and government • Raise industry standards
• Industry promotion
REGIONAL

REGIONAL TOURISM ORGANISATIONS (RTOs) • Networking opportunites


• Provides regional marketing, leadership and development
• Coordinates industry, Local Government and community destination marketing activities

LOCAL GOVERNMENT AUTHORITIES (LGAs) LOCAL TOURISM ORGANISATIONS (LTOs) VISITOR INFORMATION CENTRES (VICs)
LOCAL

• Provides tourism infrastructure and facilities • Aims to enhance visitor experiences • Provides current information on local attractions,
• Facilitates and supports development and • Conducts marketing activities activities and events
promotion of tourism • Liaises with community, Local Government and • Makes reservations for visitors
RTOs • Provides up-to-date advice on local travel

Contacts and further information on organisations involved in tourism can be found in the Queensland Tourism Industry
Directory available on the TQ web site: www.tq.com.au/qtid.

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SECTION 2:
Destination Analysis

2.1 DESTINATION DESCRIPTION

2.1.1 General Description


The Gold Coast is one of Australia’s premier holiday destinations. It is famous for its beaches, surf, theme parks,
shopping, nightlife and hinterland and has been attracting Australian families for many decades.

Located in southeast Queensland, Australia, just one hour south of Brisbane (Queensland’s capital city), the Gold Coast
stretches from Cabarita Beach in New South Wales, west to Beaudesert, north to Beenleigh and east to South Stradbroke
Island.

The region features 70 kilometres of uninterrupted coastline and is fringed by rainforest hinterland, including World
Heritage listed National Parks. The Gold Coast has a strong linear city base that reveals a close alignment with the
coastline, Pacific Highway and the mountain ranges that all run parallel to the coast.

The region has capitalised on its attractive environment, climate and lifestyle and has a highly specialised economy that
is dominated by the tourism industry.
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2.1.2 Community Profile and Economic Base
This destination profile incorporates data from a number of sources, including the Local Government Area Profiles
(OESR), Contribution of Visitor Expenditure to the Queensland Regional Economies (OESR), Tourist Accommodation
(ABS) and Regional Statistics (ABS). This analysis utilises the most recent data available at the time of printing. More
recent data will be available in the on-line version of this document at www.tq.com.au/knowledgebank.

The Gold Coast region incorporates the two Local Government Areas (LGAs) of the Gold Coast City and the Shire of
Beaudesert. The region covers only 0.25% (4,261 km2) of the total area of Queensland and yet is home to 13% of the
State’s population (479,671 persons at 31 December 2001). Within the region, the Gold Coast City contains most of
the region’s population (89% or 425,418 persons). The annual average rate of population change for the five years to
December 2001 was 3.5%, compared with 1.7% for the State.

The main industry on the Gold Coast1 is Finance, Insurance, Property and Business Services, which accounted for 16%
($1,143 million) of the Gross Regional Product (GRP) over the 1998 to 1999 financial year. The other main industry
contributors to the Gold Coast GRP in 1998-99 were Retail and Wholesale Trade (12%), and Government Administration,
Defence, Education, Health and Community Services (12%). The Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants sector
contributed 5% ($488 million) to the GRP of the Gold Coast.

In the Gold Coast region in 1998, the largest number of businesses were in the Finance, Insurance, Property and
Business Services sector (5,687 businesses or 24% of all businesses), followed by Retail and Wholesale Trade (5,605
businesses or 23%), and Construction (3,630 businesses or 15%).

In terms of employment the Retail and Wholesale Trade sector employed the largest share of people on the Gold Coast in
2001 (22% or 44,861 persons). The second largest employer was the Government Administration, Defence, Education,
Health and Community Services sector, which employed a further 17% of the workforce (34,963 persons).

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The Gross Regional Product (GRP) estimates are generated at the Statistical Division level. The Gold Coast is one region within the Brisbane-Moreton
Statistical Division. Economic GRP data specific to the Gold Coast region have been separated out by OESR.

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The Tourism Sector
During the 1998-99 period tourism contributed 14.5% ($1,388 million) to the GRP of the Gold Coast. This was
significantly higher than the Queensland average, with tourism contributing 6.4% ($6,292 million) to Gross State Product
(GSP) over the same period.

This contribution by tourism to the Gold Coast economy (14.5% of GRP) was similar to the economic contribution for
Tropical North Qld (14.4%), and was only surpassed by the significant role of tourism in the economy of the Sunshine
Coast (16%).

In terms of the total contribution of tourism to Queensland’s GSP, the revenue generated by tourism on the Gold Coast
($1,388 million), established the region as the second largest contributor (22% of GSP), placed only behind Brisbane
(28%).

The main industries that contributed to tourism revenue within the Gold Coast during 1998-99 were Accommodation,
Cafes and Restaurants, which contributed one quarter of the region’s tourism revenue ($355 million or 26%), and Retail
and Wholesale Trade, which accounted for almost another quarter ($311 million or 22%).

The Accommodation, Cafes and Restaurants sector was by far the most reliant on tourism, with 73% of its revenue
generated by tourism. Next most reliant was the Retail and Wholesale Trade sector (26%).

Tourism is an important industry for the region in terms of employment. On the Gold Coast 19% of all employment (or
27,690 full-time equivalent positions) over the period 1998-99 was related to tourism. In terms of the total amount of
tourism-related employment in Queensland, the level of employment generated by tourism on the Gold Coast established
the region as the second largest contributor to the State’s tourism employment (19%). The other main contributing
regions were the Sunshine Coast (20%) and Tropical North Queensland (16%).

Almost half of the tourism-related employment on the Gold Coast was within the Retail and Wholesale Trade sector 11
(11,873 positions, or 43%). An additional third of tourism employment was in the Accommodation, Cafes and
Restaurants sector (33% or 9,143 positions). In employment terms, this sector had the highest reliance on tourism, with
over two-thirds of all full-time equivalent positions in the industry attributable to tourism (72%).

There were 36,600 actual tourism-related positions in the region during 1998-99. At that time 8,416 persons were
employed in the Gold Coast’s accommodation establishments2. Most of those employed in these accommodation
establishments were employed in Gold Coast City (96%).

2
Tourist accommodation includes hotels, motels, guest houses and serviced apartments with 15 or more rooms or units.

TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005 G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N


2.2 COMPETITOR ANALYSIS
The following summary outlines the general domestic and international competitive environments in which the Gold
Coast operates. It describes the distinctive attributes and characteristics of the destination and identifies key competitor
destinations. This summary represents a Tourism Queensland perspective based on available research, consultation and
field experience.

2.2.1 Domestic Competitive Environment


The chief competitive strengths of the Gold Coast as identified by Roy Morgan research (2004) are its:
■ variety of theme parks
■ luxury accommodation
■ range of restaurants and dining options
■ accessibility
■ nightlife
■ variety of events and entertainment
■ vibrancy
■ beaches
■ shopping
■ variety of sightseeing opportunities
■ ability to accommodate children
■ tropical climate

Another competitive strength is that the Gold Coast is a well-established, mature holiday destination, supported by a
strong industry and distribution network, making the product very accessible. With regard to international competitors for
domestic markets, the destination has the advantage of proximity and relative safety.
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Some limitations to competitiveness in domestic markets centre around negative perceptions in the marketplace, including
views that the Gold Coast is busy and crowded, has too many tourists, is over-commercialised and over-developed,
expensive, has lots of teenagers and suffers from shadows on the beach cast by the high rise buildings.

In terms of the domestic market, the Gold Coast’s performance in recent years has been extremely strong. The weak
Australian dollar and world events has impeded Australians’ overseas travel and aided a surge in domestic tourism.
Queensland and particularly the Gold Coast have benefited from these conditions. However as the economy now shows
signs of slowing and the Australian dollar has strengthened, international travel has become more affordable, and it is
expected that Queensland and the Gold Coast will see a softening of the domestic travel market.

In view of the competitive strengths and weaknesses of the destination, the following regions are perceived to be primary
competitors for domestic markets:
■ Sunshine Coast
■ Northern New South Wales (NSW)
■ Tropical North Queensland/Whitsundays/Cairns
■ Sydney/Melbourne
■ South East Asia/Pacific (including Bali, Fiji, Vanuatu, Hawaii, Phuket)
■ Ski Holidays (NSW, Victoria, New Zealand)

The positioning map on the following page assists in placing the Gold Coast amongst the current competition in terms of
perceived appeal and ability to compete for key domestic markets. Competitor destinations are also ranked according to
their significance on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 represents an extremely significant competitor. This is intended as a guide
only, in order to gain an educated insight into where the Gold Coast is placed in relation to its perceived competitors.

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


MORE
Competitor Destination Overall Competitive Ranking
Sunshine Coast 1
I II
Northern NSW 2
Sydney (SYD) 3
Melbourne (MEL) 3
South East Asia/ Pacific 3
APPEAL

Tropical North Qld/


MORE
GC LESS Whitsundays/Cairns 3
Ski Holidays 5
SE Asia/Pacific Sunshine Coast
Nothern NSW
Tropical North Qld/ SYD/MEL
Whitsundays Ski holidays
Legend
IV III
I = More Appeal/More Competitive
II = Less Appeal/More Competitive
LESS III = Less Appeal/Less Competitive
IV = More Appeal/Less Competitive
COMPETITIVENESS

Competitiveness
With reference to the positioning map above, all identified competitor destinations rank below the Gold Coast in terms
of competitiveness. This is due to the fact that the Gold Coast is a well-established, mature holiday destination with a
diversity of quality accommodation and attractions, supported by good tourism services. The strength of its industry base, 13
distribution network and marketing resources enable the Gold Coast to compete effectively in the marketplace.

The Sunshine Coast and Northern NSW should not be discounted however, and remain strong competitors. The strong
competitive elements of the Sunshine Coast and Northern NSW are largely focused around the relaxed and natural appeal
of these destinations compared to the Gold Coast. The Sunshine Coast and Northern NSW both boast beautiful beaches
with a relaxed natural environment, a scenic hinterland, affordable low-rise accommodation, laid back and safe lifestyles,
and complementary arts and craft businesses. The proximity of these areas to the capital city markets of Brisbane and
Sydney is also a strong competitive point. In recent years, the Sunshine Coast has also increased its competitiveness
due to increasing infrastructure development, industry and Local Government investment, more active marketing and
improved air access. However, in view of the current considerable disparity in visitor numbers, it is not expected that either
the Sunshine Coast or Northern NSW would out-rank the Gold Coast in competitiveness in its target markets within the
next five years.

Appeal
Although the Gold Coast is one of Australia’s premier holiday destinations, South East Asia/Pacific and Tropical North
Queensland/Whitsundays rank higher in terms of appeal. Travel to these exotic destinations is accompanied by a high
aspirational element (or “brag” factor – where visitors like to boast that they have been there). In addition, the thrill of
shopping overseas, duty free shopping and experiencing new cultures is difficult for the Gold Coast to compete with in
terms of destination appeal.

TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005 G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N


2.2.2 International Competitive Environment
The table below illustrates the relative positioning and competitor sets for the major international source markets for
Queensland. This table is drawn from the TQ International Marketing Guide, which is based on available research,
consultation and field experience.

According to research, potential visitors from long-haul markets (US/UK/Europe) are primarily motivated for an overall
Australian experience. These visitors are more likely to take in a number of Australian and Queensland destinations during
their stay in the country. Conversely, potential visitors from short-haul markets (Asia/Japan/New Zealand) are more likely to
have a preference for a specific Queensland destination.

Source Market General Competitive Preferred Destination Brisbane Competitive


Region Environment (Aust/Qld) Strengths
US / Options within Australia. Australian Experiences • World Heritage listed
Americas The consumer’s competitive mindset is rainforest with easy access
based on an Australian content. Therefore Queensland Destinations • Surfing beaches
each QLD destination needs to consider its (appealing to 18-35 segment
competitive advantage in relation to • Climate (particularly
Australian competitors. appealing to “snow bird”
segment)
UK & Ireland / Options within Australia. Australian Experiences • World Heritage listed
Nordic Region The consumer’s competitive mindset is rainforest with easy access
basedon an Australian content. Therefore Queensland Destinations • Surfing beaches
each QLD destination needs to consider its (appealing to 18-35 segment)
competitive advantage in relation to • Climate (particularly
Australian competitors. appealing to “snow bird”
segment)
Europe Options within Australia. Australian Experiences • World Heritage listed
14
The consumer’s competitive mindset is rainforest with easy access
based on an Australian content. Therefore Queensland Destinations • Surfing beaches
each QLD destination needs to consider its (appealing to 18-35 segment)
competitive advantage in relation to • Climate (particularly
Australian competitors. appealing to “snow bird”
segment)
Japan International: Queensland Destinations: • Beaches
Hawaii / Guam / Saipan Cairns • Shopping
Gold Coast • Theme Parks
Domestic: Whitsundays
Sydney
Asia International: Queensland Destinations: • Beaches
Intra Asia Gold Coast • Shopping
Europe Other South East Qld • Casino
US Cairns • Theme Parks

Domestic:
Sydney / Melbourne / Perth
New Zealand International: Queensland Destinations: • Beaches
South Pacific / Fiji / Hawaii Gold Coast • Apartments
UK Cairns • “Glitz and Glamour”
Europe Brisbane • Rainforest
Sunshine Coast
Domestic:
Sydney / Melbourne / Adelaide / Perth

From an international market perspective, the Gold Coast has a wide range of competitors, depending on the particular
source market, as indicated in the above table. With regard to longer haul source markets, the Gold Coast is a key element
of an Australian and Queensland holiday experience and competes along with Australia and Queensland. In shorter haul
markets the Gold Coast’s main competitors are more immediate and definable. For Japanese visitors, Hawaii and Guam
are very real competitors. For Asians, other intra-Asian destinations offering a beach holiday experience, such as Thailand
and Indonesia are primary competitors. In the New Zealand market, the Gold Coast directly competes with a number of
international destinations in addition to Australian competitor destinations offering a similar beach holiday experience.

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


2.3 DESTINATION PERFORMANCE
This section presents a profile of the tourism performance of the Gold Coast based on available research sources. Drawn
from the Tourism Queensland Regional Updates, the report provides a synopsis of visitor trends in the destination.

The profile incorporates data from a number of different sources, including the National Visitor Survey (NVS), International
Visitor Survey (IVS), Survey of Tourist Accommodation (STA), Regional Tourism Activity Monitor (R-TAM), and the
Contribution of International and Domestic Visitor Expenditure to the Queensland Regional Economies 1998-1999.

2.3.1 Total Visitors


Origin
■ In the year ended June 2004, there were 4,284,909 visitors to the Gold Coast. Of these, 42% were interstate visitors
(1,805,000), 40% were intrastate visitors (1,727,000) and 18% were international visitors (752,909).
■ In the year ended June 2004, 22,507,078 visitor nights were spent at the Gold Coast, with 51% originating from the
interstate market (11,381,000), 28% from the international market (6,359,078) and 21% from the intrastate market
(4,767,000).

GOLD COAST MARKET PROPORTIONS


12 MONTHS TO JUNE 2004

Visitors
International
18%
Interstate
42%

15

Intrastate
40%

Purpose of Visit
■ The holiday/leisure market accounted for 64% of the total visitors to the Gold Coast (2,754,968) and 67% of all
visitor nights spent in the region (14,974,428) in the year ending June 2004. A further 26% of visitors (1,102,092)
and 21% of nights (4,727,069) were accounted for by the visiting friends and relatives market over the same period.
■ The business market represented 8% of the total visitors to the Gold Coast (348,984) and accounted for 7% of visitor
nights (1,521,689) in the year ending June 2004.

2.3.2 Domestic Market


Visitors
■ In the year ending June 2004, there were 3,532,000 domestic overnight visitors to the Gold Coast (21% of the total
domestic visitors to Queensland). Of these, 61% were holiday/leisure visitors (2,144,000).
■ The number of domestic overnight visitors to the Gold Coast increased at an average annual rate of 1.0% between
the year ending June 2001 and the year ending June 2004. By comparison, the average annual growth rate for
domestic visitors to Queensland was 1.3% over the period.
■ Domestic holiday/leisure visitors to the Gold Coast decreased at an average annual rate of 2.5% between the year
ending June 2001 and the year ending June 2004.

TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005 G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N


DOMESTIC VISITORS (‘000) GOLD COAST
2001-2004

4,000

3,542 3,544 3,551 3,632 3,625


3,432 3,532
3,000

2,000 2,312 2,315


2,313 2,331 2,224 2,188 2,144

1,000
All visitors
Holiday/leisure visitors
0
YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun
2001 2001 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004

Visitor Nights
■ In the year ended June 2004, the number of domestic visitor nights spent on the Gold Coast totalled 16,148,000
(21% of the total domestic visitor nights spent in Queensland). Of these, 69% were for the purpose of holiday/leisure
(11,179,000).
■ The Gold Coast has experienced an increase in domestic visitor nights since the year ending June 2001 (average
annual growth rate of 3.4%). The number of domestic visitor nights spent in Queensland over this period increased
at an average annual rate of 1.4%.
16 ■ The number of domestic holiday/leisure nights spent on the Gold Coast increased between the year ending June
2001 and the year ending June 2004 (average annual growth rate of 0.8%).

DOMESTIC VISITOR NIGHTS (‘000) GOLD COAST


2001-2004

20,000
17,434
16,844 16,366 16,853
15,949 16,148
16,000 14,596

12,000 13,336
11,986 12,308
10,904 11,156 11,349 11,179
8,000

4,000 All visitors


Holiday/leisure visitors
0
YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun
2001 2001 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004

Average Length of Stay


■ The average length of stay on the Gold Coast for all domestic visitors was 4.6 nights in the year ended June 2004.
The domestic holiday/leisure market had a longer average length of stay at 5.2 nights.
■ The average length of stay on the Gold Coast by the domestic business market increased from the year ending June
2001 to the year ending June 2004. There was a decrease in the average length of stay of the visiting friends and
relatives market during this period, while the average length of stay of the holiday/leisure market increased slightly.

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


DOMESTIC VISITORS AVERAGE LENGTH OF STAY (NIGHTS) BY PURPOSE OF VISIT
2001-2004

6.0
5.2 5.3 5.2 5.2
5.7 5.0
5.0 4.7
4.7 4.6
4.3 4.9
4.5 4.7 4.6
4.5
4.0 4.3
3.5 3.5
3.3 3.9 3.8
3.6
3.0 3.3 3.3
3.1 3.1
2.9
2.5
2.0
Holiday/leisure visitors
Business visitors
1.0
All visitors
VFR visitors
0.0
YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun
2001 2001 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004

Regional Dispersion
■ In the year ended June 2004, 14% of the overnight holiday/leisure visitors to the Gold Coast went on a daytrip within
the Gold Coast region. Twelve percent (12%) of the overnight holiday/leisure visitors to the Gold Coast went on a
daytrip to Brisbane.
■ A further 10% of the overnight holiday leisure visitors to the Gold Coast went on a day trip to the Gold Coast
hinterland and surrounding areas in the year ending June 2004.

Source Markets 17
■ The Gold Coast’s top five domestic markets in the year ending June 2004 were Brisbane (31%), Sydney (18%),
Queensland (excluding Brisbane, 18%), New South Wales (excluding Sydney, 11%) and Melbourne (11%).
■ The Queensland (excluding Brisbane) market showed the highest increase in visitation between the year ending
June 2001 and the year ending June 2004 (average annual growth rate of 9.7%). While most domestic markets
showed strong growth during this period, the Brisbane, New South Wales (excluding Sydney) and Victorian (excluding
Melbourne) markets showed negative growth (average annual declines of 4.1%, 3.0% and 2.1% respectively).
■ The Gold Coast’s top five source markets, in terms of total domestic visitor nights, were Sydney (3,281,000),
Melbourne (3,141,000), Brisbane (2,776,000), New South Wales (excluding Sydney, 2,522,000) and Queensland
(excluding Brisbane, 1,991,000).
■ The profile for domestic holiday/leisure visitors, in terms of major source markets, was similar to that for total
domestic visitors overall (see table below).

SOURCE MARKETS FOR DOMESTIC HOLIDAY/LEISURE VISITORS TO THE BRISBANE REGION

Place of Residence Holiday/Leisure % of Domestic Holiday/ Avg. Annual Growth Holiday/Leisure


Visitor Numbers (‘000) Leisure Visitors to Rate - Visitor Numbers Visitor Nights
the Gold Coast (YE Jun 01 (‘000)
- YE Jun 04)
Brisbane 689 32% -6.8% 2,058
Sydney 409 19% 0.2% 2,440
QLD (excl. Brisbane) 358 17% 4.1% 1,109
Melbourne 271 13% 6.9% 2,157
NSW (excl. Sydney) 186 9% -12.1% 1,749
Victoria (excl. Melbourne) 69 3% -4.8% 596
Other Australia 163 8% 0.2% 1,069

TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005 G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N


■ Visitors from Melbourne showed the greatest growth in holiday/leisure visitation to the Gold Coast between the year
ending June 2001 and the year ending June 2004 (average annual growth rate of 6.9%).
■ The Gold Coast’s top five source markets, in terms of holiday/leisure visitor nights, were Sydney (2,440,000),
Melbourne (2,157,000), Brisbane (2,058,000), New South Wales (excluding Sydney, 1,749,000) and Queensland
(excluding Brisbane, 1,109,000).

2.3.3 International Market


Visitors
■ In the year ended June 2004, there were 752,909 international visitors to the Gold Coast (39% of the total
international visitors to Queensland). Of these, 81% were holiday/leisure visitors (610,968).
■ The number of international visitors to the Gold Coast decreased at an average annual rate of 4.7% between the
year ending June 2001 and the year ending June 2004. The average annual growth rate for international visitation to
Queensland was –0.9% over the same period.
■ International holiday/leisure visitors to the Gold Coast also decreased between the year ended June 2001 and the
year ended June 2004, at an average annual rate of 6.0%.

INTERNATIONAL VISITORS GOLD COAST


2001-2004

1,200,000

1,000,000 869,750
861,037
770,776 764,027
800,000 752,909
709,635
678,215
736,033 721,941
600,000
647,891 654,085 610,968
606,493
18
400,000 555,397

All visitors
200,000
Holiday/leisure visitors
0
YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun
2001 2001 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004

Visitor Nights
■ In the year ended June 2004, there were 6,359,078 international visitor nights spent on the Gold Coast (23% of the
total international visitor nights spent in Queensland). Of these, 60% were from the holiday/leisure market (3,795,428).
■ The Gold Coast experienced an increase in international visitor nights between the year ending June 2001 and the
year ending June 2004 (average annual growth rate of 1.4%). Over the same period, the number of international
visitor nights spent in Queensland remained stable.
■ International holiday/leisure nights spent at the Gold Coast declined slightly between the year ending June 2001 and
the year ending June 2004 (average annual decline of 0.3%).

INTERNATIONAL VISITOR NIGHTS GOLD COAST


2001-2004
7,000,000
6,094,277 6,359,078
5,739,970
6,000,000 5,533,433
6,297,445
5,953,353
5,000,000
5,319,527
3,835,121 3,795,428
4,000,000 3,384,984 3,310,463
3,760,155
3,000,000
3,327,587 3,328,820

2,000,000
All visitors
1,000,000 Holiday/leisure visitors

0
YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun
2001 2001 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


Average Length of Stay
■ In the year ending June 2004, the average length of stay on the Gold Coast for all international visitors was 8.4
nights. This was a 1.4 night increase from the international average length of stay in the year ending June 2001.
■ The holiday/leisure market spent an average of 6.2 nights on the Gold Coast in the year ending June 2004, a 1.0
night increase from the year ending June 2001.

INTERNATIONAL VISITORS AVERAGE LENGTH OF STAY (NIGHTS)


BY PURPOSE OF VISIT - 2001-2004

10.0
8.8
8.4
8.1
8.0 7.3 7.2
7.0 7.0

6.0
6.0 6.2
5.5
5.2 5.2 5.2 5.1
4.0

2.0
All visitors

Holiday/leisure visitors
0.0
YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun
2001 2001 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004

19
Source Markets
■ The Gold Coast’s top five international markets in the year ending June 2004 were Japan (25% of visitors to the
region), New Zealand (19%), the United Kingdom (9%), China (8%) and Europe (excluding the United Kingdom and
Germany, 7%).
■ Of the top five source markets, the Chinese, United Kingdom and New Zealand markets showed an increase in
visitation to the Gold Coast between the year ended June 2001 and the year ended June 2004 (average annual
growth rates of 16.9%, 3.6% and 0.7% respectively). There were decreases in the number of visitors from Japan
and Europe (excluding the United Kingdom and Germany) during this period.
■ In terms of visitor nights, the Gold Coast’s top five international markets in the year ended June 2004 were Japan
(1,779,041 visitor nights), New Zealand (1,242,985 visitor nights), the United Kingdom (643,302 visitor nights),
Europe (excluding the United Kingdom and Germany, 618,193 visitor nights) and the United States of America
(408,853 visitor nights).
■ The profile for international holiday/leisure visitors, in terms of major source markets, was similar to that for
international visitors overall.
■ The Gold Coast’s top five international holiday/leisure visitor markets in the year ending June 2004 were Japan (27%
of international holiday/leisure visitors), New Zealand (16%), China (9%), the United Kingdom (9%) and Europe
(excluding the United Kingdom and Germany, 6%).
■ Similarly to the total international market, there was an increase in holiday/leisure visitors from China, the United
Kingdom and New Zealand to the Gold Coast between the year ending June 2001 and the year ending June 2004
(average annual growth rates of 18.5%, 5.3% and 1.1% respectively). There were declines in holiday/leisure
visitation to the Gold Coast from the Japan and Europe (excluding the United Kingdom and Germany) markets over
this period.
■ The Gold Coast’s top five source markets for international holiday/leisure visitor nights were Japan (1,345,174 visitor
nights), New Zealand (859,166 visitor nights), the United Kingdom (341,772 visitor nights), Europe (excluding the
United Kingdom and Germany, 192,887 visitor nights) and Singapore (135,435 visitor nights).

TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005 G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N


TOP 5 SOURCE MARKETS FOR INTERNATIONAL HOLIDAY/LEISURE VISITORS TO THE GOLD COAST

Country of Residence Holiday/Leisure % of International Avg. Annual Growth Holiday/Leisure


Visitor Numbers Holiday/Leisure Rate - Visitor Visitor Nights
Visitors to the Numbers
Gold Coast (YE Jun 01 - YE Jun 04)
Japan 167,859 27% -13.2% 1,345,174
New Zealand 100,122 16% 1.1% 859,166
China 54,490 9% 18.5% 122,252
United Kingdom 54,472 9% 5.3% 341,772
Europe (excl. UK & 37,750 6% -6.8% 192,887
Germany)

2.3.4 Commercial Accommodation3


Regional Occupancy and Yield
■ The Gold Coast’s stock of hotel, motel, guest house and serviced apartment guest rooms totalled 13,175 as at June
2004.
■ The number of room nights sold on the Gold Coast in the year ending June 2004 totalled 3,329,900, an increase of
4.0% from the year ending June 2003.
■ The average daily room rate for Gold Coast establishments was $116.21 in the year ending June 2004, $6.24 higher
than in the year ending June 2003.
20
COMMERCIAL ACCOMMODATION OCCUPANCY BY ESTABLISHMENT TYPE

Licenced Motels & Guest Serviced Total


Motels Houses Apartments Establishments
Rooms Available 6,169 1,672 5,334 13,175
Room Nights Sold 1,543,100 395,100 1,391,800 3,329,900
Avg. Daily Room Rate $134.15 $91.65 $103.29 $116.21
Change in Dollars - Avg +$3.27 +$8.21 +$6.16 +$6.24
Daily Room Rate
(YE Jun 03 - YE Jun 04)
Occupancy Rate 68.4% 62.7% 70.0% 68.3%
Percentage Point +6.8 -0.8 +1.0 +3.5
Change - Occupancy
(YE Jun 03 - YE Jun 04)

■ The average room occupancy in Gold Coast commercial accommodation has been trending slightly upwards
between the year ending June 2003 and the year ending June 2004.
■ Room occupancy in Gold Coast establishments averaged 68.3% in the year ended June 2004, up 3.5 percentage
points on the average room occupancy experienced in the year ended June 2003.
■ Between the year ended June 2003 and the year ended June 2004, there have been increases in the average room
occupancy experienced in Gold Coast serviced apartments and licensed hotels, whilst average occupancy in motels
and guest houses decreased slightly.

3
Note: The inclusion of additional establishments that were not included in previous STA data releases has resulted in a break in the time series between
the March 2003 and June 2003 quarters.

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


■ The average yield per room night available on the Gold Coast has been trending upwards from the year ending June
2001 to the year ending June 2004
■ The average yield was $79.37 per room night available in Gold Coast hotels, motels, guest houses and serviced
apartments in the year ended June 2004. This was higher than the average yield in Queensland ($75.31 per room
night available) in the year ended June 2004

COMMERCIAL ACCOMMODATION OCCUPANCY – GOLD COAST

6,000 80%

5,000 70%

4,000
60%
3,000
50%
2,000

40%
1,000

0 30%
YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun YE Dec YE Jun
2001 2001 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004

Rm nights occupied Rm nights avail Occupancy

Sub-Sector Occupancy
Overall, monthly room occupancy levels in Gold Coast 4 star hotels were similar to occupancy levels in Gold Coast 5 star
hotels over the year ending 2004.
The average room occupancy in Gold Coast 5 star hotels peaked at 80% in January 2004, while occupancy in Gold Coast
4 star hotels peaked at 90% during the same month. 21
The lowest average monthly occupancy in Gold Coast 4 star hotels occurred in May 2004 (64%), while the lowest
occupancy in the Gold Coast 5 star hotels occurred in June 2004 (51%).

Seasonality
■ Over the past three years, monthly occupancy levels in commercial accommodation on the Gold Coast were lowest
during the months of May and June.
■ During this period, the highest average monthly occupancy levels occurred in January.

COMMERCIAL ACCOMMODATION SEASONALITY – GOLD COAST


90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%
Jun-01

Aug-01

Oct-01

Dec-01

Feb-02

Apr-02

Aug-02

Jun-02

Oct-02

Dec-02

Feb-03

Apr-03

Jun-03

Aug-03

Oct-03

Dec-03

Feb-04

Apr-04

Jun-04

■ Domestic visitation to the Gold Coast was highest in the December 2003 quarter and the March quarter 2004.
Visitation was lowest in the June 2004 quarter.
■ Holiday/leisure visitors tend to follow a similar pattern of visitation as all domestic visitors to the Gold Coast.
■ The Gold Coast received the largest proportion of international visitors during the December 2003 quarter.
■ The lowest international visitation to the Gold Coast occurred in the September 2003 quarter.
■ International holiday/leisure visitors tend to follow a similar pattern of visitation as all international visitors to
the Gold Coast.

TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005 G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N


2.3.5 Economic Impacts
International and Domestic Visitor Expenditure
■ International and domestic visitor expenditure on the Gold Coast accounted for 23% of all tourism expenditure in
Queensland and amounted to a total of $3,108 million during 1998-1999.
■ The majority of the visitor expenditure on the Gold Coast (66%) was generated by domestic overnight tourism
($2,063 million).
■ The amount of expenditure generated by interstate overnight visitors ($1,421 million) to the Gold Coast was above
that generated by intrastate ($642 million) and international visitors ($723 million).
■ The expenditure generated by domestic day trip visitors to the Gold Coast totalled $322 million during 1998-1999.

PERCENTAGE OF VISITOR EXPENDITURE IN QUEENSLAND BY REGION

Brisbane

Gold Coast

Tropical North Qld

Sunshine Coast

Mackay/Whitsundays

Northern

Wide Bay/Burnett

Fitzroy

Darling Downs All visitors

Outback Holiday/leisure visitors

0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30%


22

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


2.4 DESTINATION MARKET ANALYSIS
This section profiles the current visitor markets for the Gold Coast and identifies a number of potential or emerging
market opportunities. The data is compiled by Tourism Queensland, based on available research, consultation and field
experience.

2.4.1 Domestic Markets


The following table outlines the profiles of the current domestic visitor market segments. The segments are characterised
by a range of variables including holiday type (based on the Brian Dermott and Associates (BDA) Holiday Typology
adopted by TQ) as well as demographic, geographic and other salient factors. For details on the market segmentation
variables refer to Appendix 3.

Holiday Geographic Demographic Length Travel Type of Destination


Type Source Characteristics of Stay Party Transport Experience
Beach Sydney Young parents 2 weeks Families Fly (interstate) Typical Aussie summer
Holiday Melbourne (under 45 years) Fly/drive holiday, 2 weeks of
Brisbane with school and (interstate) sun, surf and
pre-school aged children, Self-drive entertainment
AB demographic (regional)
Short Break Brisbane Young couples 1-3 nights Couples Fly (interstate) Short stay holiday,
South-east QLD (under 45 years) Families Fly/drive rest and relaxation,
Northern NSW with no children, (interstate) family time
Sydney Young parents Self-drive
Melbourne (under 45 years) (regional)
with children
Getaway Brisbane Young couples 1-2 weeks Couples Fly (interstate) Holiday to escape and
Sydney (under 45 years) Fly/drive unwind, 23
Melbourne with no children (interstate) a one stop holiday
Regional QLD Mid-life households Self-drive
Regional NSW (45 – 65 years) (regional)
with no children at home,
AB demographic
VFR Brisbane Young parents Varies Couples Fly (interstate) Low cost holiday
Sydney (under 45 years) Families Fly/drive with friends and relatives
Melbourne with children, (interstate)
Regional QLD Young and mid-life Self-drive
Regional NSW couples with no children (regional)
Special Brisbane Young singles, Up to 1 week Singles Fly (interstate) Away for an event –
Events Sydney Young couples Couples Fly/drive sports, motor or special
Melbourne (under 45 years) Groups (interstate) interest
Regional QLD with no children, Self-drive
Regional NSW Mid-life households (regional)
(45-65 years) with
no children at home,
AB demographic
Big Tour Sydney Mid-life households 2 weeks Couples Mostly by car Two weeks of touring
Melbourne Families
Business Nationwide Mid-life households 1-3 nights Singles Fly Business
/ MICE Groups

Interstate Markets5:
Beach Holiday – This holiday type accounts for 31% of Gold Coast interstate visitation and is a popular holiday for the
growing family group. This is a large and traditional market for the Gold Coast.

VFR – 14% of interstate visitors are on a VFR holiday. While it is a sizeable market, a gradual easing off since mid-2003
has been observed. TQ does not proactively seek to attract this low-spend market.

5
Source: Derived by BDA Marketing Planning from Roy Morgan Singles Source, March 2004

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Big Tour – 12% of interstate visitors to the Gold Coast are on a Big Tour holiday. There has been some drop off in this
market since mid-2003.

Getaway – This holiday type accounts for 15% of interstate visitors. There has been leverage with this market type since
September 2003.

Special Events – 9% of interstate visitors come to the Gold Coast for the purpose of a special event. Lexmark Indy 300,
held over one week each year in October, is the chief Gold Coast event which attracts interstate visitors.

Intrastate Markets6:
Short Break – 41% of the Gold Coast’s intrastate visitors are on a Short Break. There was some falling away of this market
in late 2003. The Gold Coast’s proximity to Brisbane makes it an ideal short break destination for Brisbane residents. Both
coastal and hinterland short break stays are popular with the intrastate market.

VFR – 26% of intrastate visitors are on a VFR holiday. There was strong growth in this market in 2003.

Beach Holiday – There has been some lift in this market which accounted for nearly 18% of visitation in December 2003.
This is a favourable sign in view of this market’s longer stays and high spend.

Business / MICE:
The destination is well resourced to meet the needs of the business traveller. The new Gold Coast Convention Centre,
which opened in 2004, will continue to bolster the already successful convention market to the Gold Coast. While TQ
currently does not actively pursue MICE business, Gold Coast Convention Bureau, a division of Gold Coast Tourism
performs this role.
24
Based on an understanding of the size and yield potential of each of the above markets, the chart below assists in
categorising visitor markets according to perceived productivity potential and identifying appropriate market development
strategies.

MARKET
YIELD
High POTENTIAL Low
I II

Business/MICE
Beach Holiday I= Maximise opportunities/
High Getaway invest for growth

II = Opportunistic market
MARKET development/selective investment
GROWTH
IV III III = Hold/prune/reconsider investment
POTENTIAL
VFR IV = Maintain position/
Short Break manage for earnings
Special Events
Big Tour

Low

The above chart indicates the following strategies are appropriate:


■ Maximise growth opportunities for the Beach Holiday, Getaway and Business/MICE markets.
• Convert more ‘Beach Holiday Couples’ - The Beach Holiday market is already strong but is mostly comprised of
families. There is potential to convert more couples within this market, particularly to fill the non-school holiday
periods.
• Convert more ‘Getaways’ - There is potential to convert more of the lucrative Getaway market. Particularly within
the Short Break market, there is potential to convert these 2-3 night stays into 4-5 night Getaways.
6
Source: Derived by BDA Marketing Planning from Roy Morgan Singles Source, March 2004

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• Maximise growth opportunities for Business Tourism - In view of this market’s high spend and the opening of the
Gold Coast Convention Centre in 2004, the growth potential of business tourism is significant.
■ Maintain position or investment in VFR, Short Break, Special Events and Big Tour markets.
• Maintain position in VFR market - While the VFR market generates expenditure on activities (eg. shopping, day
trips, restaurants), there is no benefit for the accommodation sector. Further, this market will continue for the Gold
Coast without requiring a specific strategy or investment and therefore is not a priority market.
• Maintain position in the Short Break market - The Short Break market will remain strong, largely because of the
Gold Coast’s proximity to Brisbane, so dedicating significant investment to pursuing this market is unnecessary.
• Maintain investment in Special Events - While Special Events are not necessarily the sole reason for motivating
consumers to holiday on the Gold Coast, they are an important component of the destination’s appeal to both the
interstate and intrastate markets and a strategy which continues to promote the Gold Coast’s substantial event
calendar is recommended.
• Maintain investment in Big Tour - Accounting for 12% of interstate visitation, the Big Tour market is significant
but there is less opportunity for leverage with this market compared to the priority markets, i.e. the larger Beach
Holiday market and the higher spend Getaway market.

2.4.2 International Markets


The following table provides information on the top five current international holiday/leisure source markets for the Gold
Coast, as identified through the International Visitor Survey (Section 2.3.3). For each source country or region, the main
market segments that currently visit the destination are identified and a brief description provided. It is recommended that
these market segments be realistically considered in terms of the significance of international visitation to the Gold Coast
(refer to Section 2.3.1) and the proportion of visitors from each of these primary international source markets (refer to
Section 2.3.3).
25
Source Market Visitor Desired
Country/Region Segments Characteristics Experiences
Japan Honeymooners Young couples Appeals are: natural wonders,experiencing
Aged: 18-34 years different customs, famous sights/places,
For honeymoons natural environment, special interest
& overseas weddings activities and quality beach resorts.
Office ladies (OLs) Single or married Are particularly attracted to “healing”/wellness
women without children eg. spa. Other interests are sightseeing,
Aged: 30 – 39 rejuvenation, relaxation, resorts, shopping,
Young office ladies Single or married women natural/scenic attractions, World Heritage
(YOLs) without children areas and education. The majority book a one
Aged: 20 - 29 week free-plan packaged tour.
Families Parents travelling with children
Wish to spend more time together as a family.
They are most interested in seeing natural
wonders, visiting wildlife parks/zoos, visiting
amusement/ theme parks. Focus on rest
and relaxation, at 1 or 2 destinations, with
standard hotel accommodation.
Education market • Language Study Tour Interested in the English language, skill
• School Excursion development and specialised courses. Other
(Junior/High School) desired activities include nature, interaction
• Mother/Child Study Programs with locals, adventure, homestay and other
• Short-term Technical sightseeing.
College/University
Jukunen Single or married See themselves as ‘young, active and healthy’
women and men and are interested in visiting natural/scenic
Aged: 50 - 64 attractions (eg. World Heritage areas), visiting
Silvers Single or married historic/cultural attractions and shopping.
women and men Long Stay/Slow Stay concepts are increasing
Aged: 65 - 79 in popularity.

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SIT Small or large groups travelling Includes birdwatching, hiking/walking, golf
for a key interest or pursuit and hobby-based clubs.
MICE Businessmen and professionals Company travel for meetings, incentives,
Aged: 35 - 60 years conventions and exhibitions. Includes pre
and post convention tourism experiences.
New Zealand Experienced Couples and singles Likely to visit gateways for a short break, eg.
youthful traveller Travel without children urban escape, event. Also seek beach and
Age: 30 - 45 years resort holidays for fun and outdoor activities.
Experienced FIT travellers They are influenced by price, familiarity and
climate.
Empty nesters Non-retired couples Likely to visit gateways for city excitement
Age: 45 - 64 years and events. They enjoy experiencing new
Travel without children destinations and interacting with the
Discerning & experienced travellers locals – looking for ‘the real Australia’.
Family Parents travelling with children, Generally travel during the school holiday
from toddlers to young adults periods to a mono destination for 7-10 days.
Desired attractions include theme parks,
shopping and beaches.
Convention and Businessmen and professionals Includes meetings, incentives, conventions
business Age: 35 - 60 years and exhibitions, although the focus is on
corporate meetings. Plus pre and post
convention tourism experiences.
United Kingdom Comfort adventures Predominantly post family Seek a combination of engaging in new
High income cultures and taking a holiday. Other appeals
Defined more by behaviour are sights and quality service.
Self challengers Pre & post family Desire immersion into a new culture to enable
High income self-development and growth, as well as
Defined more by behaviour getting close to nature and meeting new people.
26
Youth market Young people taking a gap year Seek adventure, meeting new people, trying
before or after university new things & often a working holiday
Long Stay Mature traveller Seek comfortable accommodation, often
Escaping the Northern winter apartment style. They want to live the
Stay over 3 weeks Australian lifestyle - food, wine & beach.
Europe Active explorers Aged: 30 - 64 years Like to experience unique and authentic
(excl. UK & No dependent children attractions that demonstrate the “real” Australia,
Germany) within a safe context, i.e. quality facilities.
Backpacker/Youth Age: 20 - 29 years Seek unique destinations that offer active,
No dependent children adventurous and exciting attractions. Like to
Long stay visitors immerse themselves in the destination,
Purpose: holiday, VFR, interact with the locals and get off the beaten
working holiday track.
Korea FIT Aged: 20-45 Utilise various types of accommodation, from
Have extensive travel experience backpackers to 4-star. They are longer stay
and bi-lingual language ability visitors who desire a relaxing experience, the
opportunity to mingle with the locals and often
travel by coach.
GIT Aged: 25 + Price driven segment that require a Korean-
Income: middle class speaking guide and stay in 3 to 4-star
accommodation. Desired package inclusions
are nature, wildlife and icon cities.
Honeymooners Aged: 25-35 Choose resort accommodation, with resort
Income: middle class honeymoons popular at Coran Cove Resort.
Desired experiences are theme parks, wildlife
and relaxation.
Golf tours Aged: 30-55 Often travel in small groups. They prefer to
Income: Upper income group play in signature courses and the focus is on
quality accommodation and meals.
Incentive groups Company paid trip for Range from budget to high quality depends
reward purposes on the corporation and the travelling group.
Desired experiences include golf, shopping,
Australian wildlife and Theme Parks.

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Potential International Market Segments
The following list identifies potential or emerging international visitor market segments which, after further investigation,
may offer prospects for development:
■ Health Tourism/Beach Break - Young Couples and Mid-life Households from Asia/Japan/US/Europe
■ Education Tourism - Young Single Women and Young Couples
■ Ecotourism - Mid-life Couples and Singles from Japan/Asia/ Germany
■ Backpackers - Singles and Small Groups from North Asia/US
■ Long stay - Mid-life and Older Households from North America
■ Long stay - Families from the Middle East

27

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2.5 DESTINATION MARKETING
This section represents a review of Tourism Queensland domestic and international marketing activities for the Gold Coast.
It does not represent all the marketing activity that might occur in or on behalf of the destination but only those activities
conducted or coordinated by TQ in association with the Regional Tourism Organisation (RTO) and industry partners. The
information is drawn from reports prepared by the TQ domestic and international marketing teams responsible for this
destination. TQ marketing activities are conducted in conjunction with Tourism Australia, the RTO, local tourism marketing
committees and industry operators.

2.5.1 Marketing Program and Campaign Tracking – Domestic


One of the goals of TQ is to facilitate industry growth through a strategic approach to the marketing of Queensland.

Tourism Queensland’s domestic marketing activities seek to implement a marketing strategy designed to enhance the
domestic leisure marketing of the Gold Coast region, in partnership with Gold Coast Tourism (GCT) and industry.

Since the launch of the initial domestic leisure marketing strategy in 1997, TQ has undertaken a comprehensive
campaign in target leisure markets, with the primary aim of raising awareness and preference for the destination. Tourism
Queensland conducts general destination awareness activities as well as providing opportunities for operators and industry
to participate in cooperative campaigns and partnership advertising.

In 2004, Gold Coast Tourism embarked on a process with the objective of producing a Gold Coast brand which could be
utilised in both the domestic and international leisure markets, as well as the business tourism market. The result of this
process is the creation of the “Very Gold Coast Very GC” brand, which aims to further differentiate the Gold Coast from its
competitor destinations by displaying the vibrant, sophisticated style of the region and enhancing its aspirational qualities.
The Very GC brand is designed to attract higher yield target markets and drive awareness of the Gold Coast as a complete
28 tourist destination with a full variety of experiences.

Tourism Queensland in partnership with Gold Coast Tourism will launch the Very GC campaign domestically to consumers
through a comprehensive marketing campaign beginning in March 2005. The campaign will incorporate cinema
advertising, newspaper supplements, magazines, outdoor advertising, and online marketing. The creative elements of the
campaign feature animation and imagery to communicate the distinguished and sophisticated personality of
the Gold Coast.

It should be noted that in addition to being part of the Gold Coast region and branding, in terms of marketing promotion
the Gold Coast hinterland area also falls within the South East Queensland (SEQ) Country destination – defined as the
non-coastal areas and ‘country experiences’ within a 200 to 250 kilometre drive radius of Brisbane. The initial SEQ Country
destination marketing strategy completed in 1997 identified that the non-coastal areas would benefit from a collaborative
approach rather than a competitive approach to marketing and development. SEQ Country marketing activity primarily targets
Brisbane residents. A separate destination management plan exists for SEQ Country. Gold Coast Tourism has expressed an
interest in developing a closer working relationship in the future with SEQ Country in co-operative marketing activities.

The Very GC campaign consists of brand advertising, stand alone advertising, cooperative advertising and media
relations activities. The brand strategy consists mainly of cinema, outdoor and print advertising in the key geographical
markets of Sydney and Melbourne. The main message of this brand activity is to increase awareness of the Gold Coast
as a sophisticated tourist destination and to bring the destination to the top of the consumers’ mind, motivating them to
investigate Gold Coast holiday options.

The second component of the marketing strategy consists of stand alone cooperative marketing activity whereby members
of the GCT can access TQ rates if they incorporate the branding elements into their advertising. This partnership helps in
extending the brand coverage in the market place. It also provides good value advertising to assist industry operators to
extend their marketing budgets. The success of this activity is demonstrated by the high level of commitment from Gold
Coast operators, with in excess of $1M invested in cooperative stand-alone advertising placements for the year 2003/04.

The third component of the marketing strategy is cooperative advertising campaigns. This activity provides industry with
the opportunity to participate in and benefit from the association of their product with the campaign. This is an ideal
method of generating awareness for the destination as well as generating bookings for industry.

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Within Tourism Queensland’s Marketing Department is the Media and Publicity Unit whose main responsibility is to
provide services to the RTOs and industry in the field of media relations, to ensure Queensland’s tourism products and
services are promoted positively and extensively in the media. Specifically, the Media and Publicity Unit offers professional
editorial assistance for stories on Queensland’s destinations, lifestyle and attractions including creative story angles and
information on new products for the TQ’s News Bureau On-Line Service. In 2003/04, in excess of $20M worth of publicity
was generated by the Media and Publicity Unit in relation to the Gold Coast.

2.5.2 Marketing Program - International


Tourism Queensland undertakes result driven international marketing primarily designed to deliver bookable Queensland
product into the hands of the travel trade and distribution networks. This is complementary to the consumer marketing
undertaken by Tourism Australia.

TQ operates nine international offices servicing the international travel industry in key overseas markets. Offices are
located in Los Angeles, Auckland, Munich, London, Singapore, Tokyo, Taipei, Hong Kong and Seoul. They actively
promote Queensland as a premier tourist destination in rapidly growing international markets. Emerging markets, such as
the Middle East and South Africa, are serviced by the International Department in Brisbane.

The TQ International Marketing Department seeks to enhance the international marketing efforts of industry partners by:
■ Providing advice and introduction to international travel trade contacts
■ Including products in Tourism Queensland brochures tailored to the specific needs of the international market
■ Participating in travel road shows that introduce Queensland product to international travel agents, wholesalers and
media
■ Helping to develop inbound itineraries and products for international distribution
29
Marketing activities in international marketing regions for the Gold Coast are summarised as:

Japan
■ Campaign activity by TQ is usually collaborative with GCT, the travel trade and airline partners. There is large degree
of familiarisation activity in the form of trade and Visiting Journalist Program (VJP) familiarisations.
■ Coop activity out of Australia as part of “Australia Gold 2010” has included photo shoots, product brochures and PR
initiatives aimed at stimulating demand and awareness of the Gold Coast.
■ The Gold Coast is also supported through TQ attendance at major trade shows such as JAM and JATA World Fair as
well as the TQ Japan Market Newsletter and the bi monthly TQ Tokyo E-Newsletter.
■ TQ collateral includes: Japanese language Gold Coast destination brochure; promotional postcards; Queensland golf
guide in Japanese; walking maps; posters; AO-produced video in Japanese; Education Manual in Japanese; and
other co-op brochures for the destination.

Asia
■ Campaign activity by TQ is almost always in the form of co-op marketing with GCT or as part of the Australian Airlines
campaign budgets.
■ Familiarisation activity is as follows: Australian (and other) Airlines – both Media and Trade, Golf familiarisations
(mostly Taiwan and Korea), Education familiarisations, Backpacker familiarisations (Korea), TQ’s VJP, and pre and
post Australian Tourism Exchange touring. Each of these markets also visits the Gold Coast yearly to do market
briefings.
■ TQ runs Missions into Market in which the industry participates. Tourism Australia also holds in market missions
and in market TQ representation helps to assist the industry with their attendance (generally South East Queensland
product and Tropical North Queensland product).
■ The Gold Coast is also promoted through TQ’s representation at the major trade shows annually in Singapore: NATAS
(National Association of Travel Agents Singapore) and MITF (Malaysia International Tourism Fair).
■ TQ hosts International gateway Websites promoting Gold Coast:
TQ Singapore - http://www.queensland.com.sg/tq.cfm
TQ Hong Kong (in Chinese Mandarin and English) - http://www.queensland.com.hk
TQ Korea - http://www.queensland.or.kr/

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■ There is currently little specific TQ collateral. TQ Hong Kong have produced a generic Queensland brochure for use
in the China Market.
■ Gold Coast Magazine is distributed for the Chinese Market.
■ All familiarisation itineraries are translated into relevant languages (Taiwanese, Korean and Chinese in particular).

Middle East
■ The “Gold Coast, Australia” branding is used for this market.
■ Generic Queensland trade publications and radio promotions are used. Product from this region has also been
incorporated into co-op campaigns including newspaper, radio and publications.
■ TQ and product are represented at the main trade show/mission undertaken in the market (Arabian Travel Mart and
Tourism Australia Roadshow). Approximately 10 Queensland product representatives attend the event each year.
■ The Qld Specialist Program, a distance-learning programme for the industry, is active in the region.
■ This region is also included in familiarisation itineraries (Trade, VJP and Qld Specialists familiarisations).

Western Hemisphere
■ “Southern Queensland” is the collective name used to market Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast, Brisbane and Fraser
Island in the long-haul markets (i.e. North America, UK and Europe).
■ Gold Coast product participates with TQ in familiarisation programs from the Western Hemisphere markets such as
Queensland on Stage and Discover Australia.
■ The Gold Coast is supported by the presence of TQ at major trade shows such as Queensland on Tour in Europe and
in the UK, Corroboree and ITB.
■ TQ organises specialised missions to market such as the US South East Queensland mission.
■ GCT and product participate in the Western Hemisphere module of ATE.

30 New Zealand
■ The Gold Coast region is very active in this market. Gold Coast Tourism visits New Zealand with members for
roadshows/movie nights and also attends OzTalk NZ. GCT undertakes a very active media campaign.
■ Sunlover Holidays are active sellers in the NZ marketplace.

2.5.3 Destination Image, Consumer Perception, Brand Health


Domestic market research undertaken by Roy Morgan (2004) showed that the Gold Coast is perceived as having the
following attractive features:
■ Beaches
■ Theme Parks
■ Shopping
■ Weather
■ Restaurants
■ Casino
■ Nightlife

There are also a number of negative perceptions of the Gold Coast. Although these perceptions exist in the domestic
market they also have implications for international market. These perceptions include:
■ The Gold Coast is too busy and crowded
■ The Gold Coast has too many tourists
■ The Gold Coast is too commercialised and overdeveloped
■ The Gold Coast is expensive

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2.5.4 Awareness, Preference, Conversion
Over half of respondents (62%) remember having seen, read or heard advertising for the Gold Coast (Roy Morgan 2004).

Twenty-two percent (22%) would like to spend a holiday at the Gold Coast in the next two years and 9% intend to spend
at least one night at the Gold Coast on their next trip. Nine percent (9%) of the respondents had spent at least one night at
the Gold Coast in the last 12 months.

The Gold Coast has a conversion rate of 40% (visitation/preference). This rate is the third highest of the major regions,
behind Brisbane (62%) and the Sunshine Coast (40%).

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

31
0%
Ad Recall Preference Intention Visitation Conversion

Brisbane Gold Coast Sunshine Coast

Whitsundays TNQ Queensland

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2.6 TOURISM SERVICES ANALYSIS
Based on Tourism Queensland research, consultation and field experience, the discussion below presents an overview of
the current status of tourism services in the coastal area and the hinterland of the Gold Coast destination. The gap analysis
has been conducted by TQ planning teams with input from the RTO and industry and is intended as a basis for further
discussion and engagement with stakeholders and tourism development interests. For ease of reference the analysis is
categorised into known and established tourism product and service categories.

2.6.1 Coastal Area


Accommodation – There is an extensive range of accommodation on the Gold Coast that caters well for the various
markets. The ageing of existing strata title accommodation has the potential to have a long-term negative impact on the
quality of accommodation and overall image of the destination if refurbishment programs are not in place or adhered
to. It should also be noted that accommodation stocks on the Gold Coast are shifting from tourism rental to longer term
residential rental.

Attractions – The region has a wide array of natural and built attractions. There is scope to capitalise on the increasing
interest in nature-based tourism experiences by encouraging the development of appropriate nature-based attractions.
The range and variety of Theme Parks and the world famous Gold Coast beaches assist in the overall competitive
advantage for the region.

Tours and Activities – There is a wide array of tours and activities available. However, there is scope for more specialised
tours that emphasise core attributes, such as nature, adventure, wine, food, arts and culture. In addition, there is a need
to develop night-time activities and tour options, particularly those which cater for the family market.

Access and Transport – Road and air access to the Gold Coast is good. There is easy connectivity with Brisbane and
32 excellent road connections to major southern markets. The region is well serviced by the major transport providers
including:
■ Qantas/JetStar, Virgin Blue, Australian Airlines, Freedom Air
■ QR
■ Coach Companies; the Bus Transit Centre

The Gold Coast Airport is well serviced with a number of direct connections with international markets in Asia and
increasing domestic services. Located only 50 minutes drive from the Gold Coast, Brisbane Airport is another option for
travellers and offers a rail service linking the airport with the Gold Coast’s six train stations.

Intra-destination access, however, is variable. The North/South transportation corridor needs to be improved and the East/
West links need to be better developed. Internal public transport is adequate, however, additional public transport services
would help alleviate many internal transportation issues, particularly East/West access from Robina to the Gold Coast, and
within the higher density coastal strip.

Domestic Air Services


Qantas
Adelaide-Gold Coast 2 services per week
Newcastle-Gold Coast 8 services per week
Sydney-Gold Coast 12 services per week (double daily)

Jetstar
Melbourne-Gold Coast 39 services per week
Sydney-Gold Coast 63 services per week (9 daily)

Virgin Blue
Adelaide-Gold Coast 7 services per week (daily)
Canberra-Gold Coast 4 services per week
Melbourne-Gold Coast 42 services per week (6 daily)
Perth-Gold Coast 3 services per week
Sydney-Gold Coast 65 per week

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International Air Services
Freedom Air operates nine services per week from New Zealand to the Gold Coast. These include five services per week
on the Auckland-Gold Coast route, one service on the Hamilton-Gold Coast route, two services from Christchurch and one
service from Dunedin each week. Freedom Air operates a Boeing 737-300 with 142 seats on all routes and provides a
total of 1,704 seats per week into the Gold Coast.

Australian Airlines operates a daily international service from Cairns to the Gold Coast using a Boeing 767-300 (271
seats), which connects to the airline’s network into Cairns. Australian Airlines currently provides 25 services per week from
six Asian destinations to Cairns.

Events and Festivals – The Gold Coast hosts several high profile national and international events, including Gold Coast
Indy, Magic Millions and the Gold Coast Airport Marathon.

Hospitality and Retail Services – The region is well catered for with hospitality infrastructure. The Gold Coast has a wide
range and quality of retail services. Trading hours are an issue and need to be extended to cater for the “after hours”
tourist trade despite the Surfers Paradise shopping precinct offering late night shopping with trading until 9pm seven days
a week.

Special Interest Pursuits – There are many opportunities for Special Interest Pursuits on the Gold Coast, such as soft
adventure, fishing, diving, surfing, marathons and motor sports (Indy). However more research, development and
marketing is required.

Tourist Information and Services – Tourism information and booking services are well catered for. There are two
accredited Visitor Information Centres (VICs) on the Gold Coast located at Coolangatta and Surfers Paradise.
33
Signage – The overall standard of signage on the coastal precincts is adequate, although variable. However directional
signage linking the coastal area to the hinterland needs improvement.

2.6.2 Hinterland
Accommodation – The Gold Coast Hinterland is well serviced with a range of accommodation options that are appropriate
for the current niche markets, including farm stays, B&B’s, motels, caravan parks, camp grounds, guest houses and
cottages/cabins. There are a small number of accommodation properties capable of servicing the C&I market, eg.
Kooralbyn Hotel Resort and Eagle Heights Hotel Motel at Tamborine. The R-TAM research conducted on the Gold Coast
does not currently cover the hinterland region. Finally, there are limited linkages between B&B operators and the wineries.

Attractions – The region contains the CERRA World Heritage Area, several National Parks and State Forests with good
visitor access and facilities as well as strong consumer appeal. The CERRA World Heritage area incorporates Lamington
National Park, Tamborine National Park, Mt Barney, Mt Maroon and Springbrook National Park. The region also boasts a
number of freshwater fishing creeks and rivers, eg. Darlington Park, Kerry, Glanagan Reserve Rathdowney and Bigriggen
Reserve Rathdowney. Consumer research indicates that the natural beauty and the unique landscape have strong appeal
for the current market. With the additional numbers of tourists predicted, there could be a time when the infrastructure
within the National Parks no longer meets the requirements of the visitors. This includes access to some sites, including
the Glow Worm Caves at Natural Arch. However such restrictions may also create an opportunity to develop a tourism
business to access non-National Park glow worms.

There are seven wineries within the Gold Coast hinterland region with variable tourism infrastructure, eg. restaurant and cellar-
door facilities. The region has positioned itself to capture the international day tour market off the Coastal strip, combining the
local wine, food and produce as a total niche experience. The region has also positioned itself well for the day trip market from
Brisbane and surrounds, as well as Gold Coast and Northern NSW hinterland, offering an alternative lunch/dinner experience
as well as a wedding or celebration site (for further information refer to the Tourism Queensland Wine Research 2003). There is
also a good variety of high quality local produce grown in the region, including avocado, rhubarb and kiwi fruit.

The Hinterland region is renowned for attracting high quality art and craft exhibitions at Gallery Walk, Tamborine Mountain.
In addition, the region has a number of heritage and historic attractions, eg. historic churches, unique country pubs and
various sites linked to the historic timber industry.

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Finally, there are a number of international standard horse studs as well as the general equestrian industry that provide
tourism opportunities.

Tours and Activities – There is a small number of commercial tour operators in the region who adequately service the
current market. The region is accessed by a number of coach operators from Brisbane, Gold Coast and Northern NSW.
In particular the café and gallery scene in Tamborine is a popular visitor experience. While key activities within the region
are bushwalking and bird watching, the stocked creeks and rivers provide a popular fishing activity. The fish types include
Australian Bass, Mullet, Spangled Perch and the endangered Mary River Cod. Horse trail riding is also a popular activity in
the region. Opportunities also exist to further encourage backpacker tour operators to service the hinterland region.

Access and Transport – Road access and conditions in the Hinterland region are generally good. Although the distances
between main attractions are reasonable, there is inadequate interpretive road signage at key points. A transport audit
may assist to identify non self-drive services and gaps. Opportunities also exist to develop self guided interpretive devices
such as maps, brochures and audio guides for the hinterland region.

The region also has access to Gold Coast and Brisbane Airports, which are serviced by a number of international and
domestic airlines.

Events and Festivals – Sports tourism, especially equestrian and rodeo exist in the region, eg. Beaudesert Country and
Horse Festival and Beaudesert Rodeo. There are also some winery/food/music events in the region that reflect the regional
culture, eg. Great Grape Guzzlers Gourmet and Gluttony Feast, Strings at Sunset and A Day on the Green. In addition,
there are a number of fresh produce markets in the region, eg. Jimboomba, Tamborine Mountain and Beaudesert.
Opportunities exist to further develop the events calendar.

34 Hospitality and Retail Services – While there is a range in the level of understanding of the principles and business and
tourism, the level of hospitality service is reasonable in the region, although there is room for improvement in some areas.
This provides an opportunity to develop a coordinated education plan – in the business of tourism.

Special Interest Pursuits – The key focus for visitation to the region is the CERRA World Heritage Area which allows
visitors to participate in a range of activities including bushwalking, bird watching and sightseeing. In addition food and
wine also provides a range of special interest activities and attractions. The region also has a number of historic buildings
and attractions, as well as a number of health resorts including Golden Door Health Retreat and Camp Eden Health
Retreat that are of interest to particular niche markets. Potential exists to grow niche markets for small meetings and
groups, fresh water fishing and sporting facilities.

Tourist Information and Services – There is a lack of understanding of the distribution network by the Hinterland region
industry, eg. payment of commissions. There are four accredited VIC’s in the Gold Coast Hinterland, two in Beaudesert,
one in Canungra and one on Tamborine Mountain. However there is limited networking between these VICs. There is also
an emerging visitor information centre booking facility on Tamborine through a non-accredited information centre.

Customer Service and Training – There is an inconsistency in the quality of service delivery, and the hours/days of
operation across the region. There is also a range in the level of understanding of the principles and business and tourism
that provides an opportunity to develop a coordinated education plan – in the business of tourism.

Signage – Directional signage to and within the hinterland region needs improvement. To address this issue the GCCC
and BS in partnership with DMR have produced directional signage for a food and wine touring route throughout the
Hinterland that was completed in mid 2004.

Welcome/gateway signage for the region also requires attention. There is currently potential to develop generic trail/route
markers similar to those used for walking trails.

An audit of all signage in the hinterland region would provide a base level of signage and enable a gap analysis and signage
strategy to be developed. Part of the audit could incorporate a review of the Scenic Rim and Northern Rivers signage.

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2.7 STAKEHOLDERS AND PARTNERSHIPS
This section represents a Tourism Queensland view of the key tourism stakeholders in the destination. It does not
represent all stakeholders in or outside the destination who may have an interest in tourism but only those who, in the
current view of TQ, have an important role to play in destination development and marketing.

TQ recognises Gold Coast Tourism (GCT) as the official Regional Tourism Organisation (RTO) and a vital link with local
tourist organisations, operators, Government and the community. GCT is TQ’s principle partner in destination marketing
activities. The RTO contributes financially to cooperative domestic marketing activity with TQ and is an important partner
in the planning and implementation of development initiatives. The region has embraced the destination approach to
marketing and development, and contributes significant investment to ensure success. There is room for GCT and TQ to
develop a better understanding of each other’s organisations to take better advantage of their resources and to ensure that
both organisations are working towards the same goals.

In addition to the RTO, other key stakeholders in the Gold Coast include:

Local Government – The GCCC has a designated tourism department within the Economic Development and Major
Projects portfolio and is a major stakeholder in tourism on the Gold Coast and significantly contributes to growing tourism
for the region through its strong focus on tourism development projects and its close working relationship with GCT.

BSC are involved in tourism development and have a designated tourism officer coordinating activities for the shire. There
is recognition of the value of the tourism industry, although there is always scope to improve regional coordination of
tourism planning and infrastructure development.

State Government Bodies – State Government representation in the Gold Coast region is strong and many departments
and agencies have recognised the importance of tourism to the development and growth of the region. A positive aspect 35
of this recognition is the provision funds for planning, infrastructure development and business expertise to emerging
tourism ventures. The RMCN is a key coordinating committee which brings together state government managers from a
range of industries to assist agencies in achieving economic, social and environmental benefits for Queensland regions by
coordinating priority cross agency initiatives. The RMCN aligns services with government priorities and community needs
by supporting collaboration across government agencies and with local government, businesses and communities.

Federal Government –
■ Area Consultative Committee (ACC) - The ACC works in partnership with the Department of Transport and Regional
Services to identify opportunities, priorities and development strategies for their regions. The ACC has resources that could
be utilised for regional tourism development priorities.
■ Tourism Australia - TQ works closely with Tourism Australia on marketing initiatives for this destination in
international markets and in domestic markets through the See Australia program.

Local Tourism Organisations (LTOs) – There are four LTOs in the Gold Coast Region: Beaudesert Tourism, Canungra
Information and Historical Association, Tamborine Mountain Natural History Association Inc and Tweed Coolangatta
Tourism Inc. The focus of these LTOs is at the local level.

Chambers of Commerce – Local lobby voice for business development in the region.

Industry – Opportunity exits to develop networks of tourism businesses throughout the region.

Industry Associations – Includes organisations including ATEC, QTIC, QBBA, QHA and AHA.

Transport Providers (QR, Qantas, JetStar, Virgin Blue, Australian Airlines, Freedom Air, Coach Companies, Gold Coast
Airport and the Bus Transit Centre) – The region heavily relies on the services of the aforementioned transport providers.
QR, Qantas and Virgin Blue each have divisions that sell holiday packages which include Gold Coast deals.

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Community – Outstanding community support for tourism, particularly on the coastal strip, is documented in Gold Coast
Visioning Project. Tourism is embraced by the local community and seen as a positive aspect of the Gold Coast lifestyle.
It should be noted that Primary Industries are still the dominant economic driver in the Hinterland and as a result
community support and involvement in tourism is not as high as on the coastal strip.

Overall relationships with each of these stakeholders or stakeholder groups vary and often develop on a project-by-project
basis. As any one of these groups, or stakeholders within each group, has the potential to influence or be influenced
by the destination management program, it is acknowledged that it is important to look for opportunities to enhance
relationships and develop synergies. Generally efforts should be made to raise the awareness and profile of tourism
amongst these groups to ensure the upmost consideration of the needs and interests of the industry.

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2.8 COMMUNITY SERVICES ANALYSIS
Based on Tourism Queensland research, consultation and field experience, the discussion below presents an overview of
the current status of community services in the coastal area and hinterland of the Gold Coast destination as they relate to
tourism issues. The gap analysis has been conducted by TQ planning teams with input from the RTO and industry, and is
intended as a basis for further discussion and engagement with stakeholders and community tourism interests. For ease
of reference the analysis is categorised into known and established service categories.

2.8.1 Coastal Area


Tourism Impacts and Support – Tourism contributes 14.5% towards the Gold Coast’s local economy, and 22.1% of
Queensland’s tourism GRP comes from the Gold Coast. Outstanding community support is documented in the Gold Coast
Visioning Project. Tourism is embraced by the local community and seen as a positive aspect of the Gold Coast lifestyle.

While tourism for the Gold Coast is a major economic contributor, some concern has been expressed by the local
community with respect to social impacts of some major events on the Gold Coast and the environmental impacts
associated with significant development activity on the Gold Coast.

Policy, Planning and Regulation – GCCC is supportive of appropriate and sustainable new tourism developments as
outlined in “Gold Coast – Our Tourism City” policy document. The introduction of the Integrated Planning Act will provide
the platform for effective and appropriate tourism development. In addition GCCC has a designated tourism department
- Tourism Branch, within the Economic Development and Major Projects portfolio. There is recognition of the value of the
tourism industry, although there is always scope to improve regional coordination of tourism planning and infrastructure
development.

Community Services and Amenities – The Gold Coast has well established community services in line with big city
infrastructure. Service providers will need to continue to monitor services to ensure the needs of the growing community 37
are met.

As a mature destination, the Gold Coast exhibits an abundance of utilities and amenities for the local community. Due to
ageing public infrastructure, utilities need to keep pace with tourist and community demand, eg. water, and integrated
planned development as opposed to incremental patch-work development.

2.8.2 Hinterland
Tourism Impacts and Support – Community support for tourism varies across the region, eg. ‘No Way Cable Way’
Community Group. It should be noted that primary industries are still the dominant economic driver in this region.

Many hinterland operators and businesses do not perceive there to be significant benefit in the branding that GCT
has developed for the region. They also do not relate to being known as a Gold Coast business. There is a lack of
understanding of how tourism impacts, both in a positive and negative way, on the economy, environment and community.
Gold Coast Tourism and Tourism Queensland are investigating ways to address these issues and increase industry
participation in Gold Coast marketing activities and create awareness in the community of the impacts of tourism.

Policy, Planning and Regulation – Beaudesert Shire Council and Gold Coast City Council are supportive of tourism
development in the hinterland, but the region would benefit from a more formal communication channel between
economic development officers, Council planning officers, the local tourism organisations and the RTO to identify tourism
product development, which could include a tourism advisory group consisting of Council representatives, a board
representative and industry.

Community Services and Amenities – Due to the geographic location of the region, the Gold Coast Hinterland is well
serviced with community services and facilities from the Gold Coast, Logan, Brisbane and Beaudesert regions. Although
there are fewer amenities available in smaller towns, in most cases, this is adequate for current market needs although
the increase of tourists into the region could lessen the availability of community services to local residents. Tamborine
Mountain has a number of art galleries and both Tamborine and Beaudesert have libraries, including an on-line library
facility. Currently, retail trading hours are limited on weekends and in the holiday season.

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Due to the aging public infrastructure, utilities need to keep pace with tourist and community demand, eg. water,
sewerage, and integrated planned development as opposed to incremental patchwork development, i.e. a strategic basis
for planning.

It will be important to ensure Local Governments are aware of possible future demands on services and infrastructure due
to increased tourism numbers, and plan accordingly.

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2.9 DESTINATION DEVELOPMENT
Tourism Queensland works closely with regional tourism stakeholders to identify, facilitate and progress strategic tourism
initiatives and development opportunities. This section outlines the key activities undertaken by TQ’s Destination
Management Department in facilitating the sustainable tourism potential of the Gold Coast region. It does not represent
all the development activity that might occur in or on behalf of the destination but only those activities conducted or
coordinated by TQ in association with the Regional Tourism Organisation (RTO) and/or industry partners.

2.9.1 Regional Coordination


TQ works with stakeholders in the region to gain the best possible tourism outcomes. Destination Management has a
good working relationship with the two Local Councils at the CEO and Mayor level, as well as Tourism and Economic
Development levels. There is also a good working relationship with the Area Consultative Committee (ACC) for the region.
Destination Management is able to assist the ACC by providing them with the region’s tourism priorities for use when
considering grant funding. TQ will in the future participate as a member of the RMCN to address regional issues affecting
businesses and the communities that require cross state department collaborative solutions. TQ is also a key participant in
the Gold Coast Tourism advisory panels which discuss marketing activities in domestic and international markets.

TQ, through the Destination Management Division, works to coordinate the tourism response on a range of initiatives to
foster sustainable tourism growth in the destination. Key issues include:
■ Regulation of inbound tourism operators - TQ has worked closely with the Queensland Office of Fair Trading, the
Australian Tourism Export Council, key Australian and Queensland Government agencies and industry associations to
develop and implement a range of initiatives aimed at improving standards in Queensland’s inbound tourism sector,
including the regulation of inbound tourism operators (through the Tourism Services Act 2003), an international
visitor consumer education program and extensive input into the development of the industry-based voluntary draft
Tourism Export Code of Conduct .
■ Tourism Skills Development Guide – This guide has been developed for use principally by tourism skills 39
development facilitators at regional and sectoral levels to improve the identification of skills needs in the tourism
industry and to assist in developing programs to meet those needs.
■ National Visitor Safety Program - Queensland has in place a range of initiatives to improve the safety of visitors to
Queensland, including the National Visitor Safety Program. This program includes a coordinated series of initiatives
aimed at improving the safety of international visitors to Queensland and Australia including the Safety Tips for
Visitors to Australia video and booklet.
■ Tourism Orientated Policing (TOP) - The TOP project is a joint initiative of TQ and the Queensland Police Service
(QPS). Stage one of TOP project was undertaken in 2002 and involved research of tourist safety and security issues
and the past and future potential responses to tourist-related crime. Specifically for the Gold Coast, stage two of the
project will include a range of Japanese-oriented initiatives amongst other activities
■ Tourism Assistance Database (TAD) – The TAD provides a list of funding grants and programs which may be
relevant to tourism businesses and organisations. Grants and payments include a variety of State, Federal and
Commonwealth sources. The TAD is available on line at www.tq.com.au/tad
■ Tourism in Protected Areas (TIPA) - A working group comprising Government and industry representatives has
developed a series of recommendations and is working with the QPWS to improve the management of commercial
tourism operations in Queensland’s protected area network of National Parks, state forests and marine parks.

2.9.2 Access
Domestic Aviation:
TQ’s Aviation Unit regularly monitors and assesses seat capacity levels into the Gold Coast and other Queensland
destinations and works with airport partners to address any shortage of seat capacity into destinations.

International Aviation:
In partnership with the various Queensland international airports, TQ’s Aviation Unit works to optimise seat capacity into
Queensland destinations from international airports. A significant part of this work involves the production of business
cases to airlines that contain detailed market information and analysis and highlight the opportunities available should
an airline either commence services or increase services to Queensland. In addition, TQ works in partnership with
Queensland international airports and airlines to identify potential opportunities for international charter services into
Queensland airports.

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Roads - Statewide Response:
Regional and operator tourism signage issues:
■ Review of the District Tourism Signage Committees (DTSCs) who are the lead agency for dealing with operator and
regional tourism signage issues
■ Membership of the National Tourism Signing Reference Group to ensure national consistency of signage
Road infrastructure impacting on tourism:
■ Input to DMR’s Road Infrastructure Program (RIP) at a state-level using the Visitor Flows Model
■ Assist RTOs to develop cases for input to DMR district Road Infrastructure Programs (April/May each year)
Understanding the drive market and our competitors:
■ Drive Market Fact sheet (www.tq.com.au)
■ Tourism Themed Routes Review
■ Niche market research (eg. fly/drive, 4WDs)
■ Visitor Road Safety - ongoing implementation of the National Road Safety Action Plan for International Visitors and
the Queensland Road Safety Strategy 2004-2011
One current project in progress is the Pacific Coast Touring Route.

2.9.3 Infrastructure
TQ works closely with stakeholders on furthering infrastructure development in the destination. There are a number of
important public infrastructure projects in the Gold Coast region that have recently been completed or currently under
construction, which will contribute significantly to the further growth of tourism, including:
■ Rainforest Way - The Rainforest Way is being developed as a key touring route in south east Queensland - northern
NSW. The Rainforest Way provides opportunities to travel through the area and visit many of the outstanding National
Parks that make up the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves of Australia (CERRA) World Heritage Area.
■ Rainforest Interpretative Centre - The concept for developing a World Heritage/Rainforest Interpretative Centre and
40 Visitor Information Centre located in Nerang began with community consultation in 2002. The GCCC in partnership
with TQ commissioned a pre-feasibility study to determine the best approach. The report was presented to Council
in May 2002. In June 2003 GCCC awarded a tender to develop a full feasibility study for the proposed Centre.
Following the completion of the feasibility study, GCCC formalised the establishment of a locally based steering
committee in December 2004 to take the project forward. The committee is under the chairmanship of the Mayor,
with representatives from the local community, environmental interests and industry. The objective of the steering
committee is to further develop the project with a focus on issues such as investment attraction, finalisation of site
selection and further refinement of the concept.
■ GCCC Signage Strategy - The Sustainable Development Unit has been working with the Gold Coast City Council
and other stakeholders including Main Roads, Beaudesert Shire Council, Gold Coast Tourism, Brisbane Marketing
and the Gold Coast Hinterland Wine Country Association to produce a workable signage strategy for the region. The
implementation of the Food and Wine Tourist Drive completed in July 2004 was an outcome of these discussions.
■ Gold Coast Convention Centre - Construction for the new Gold Coast Convention Centre was completed in mid 2004,
which has consolidate Broadbeach as a major business and tourism centre of the Gold Coast.

2.9.4 Product Development


TQ works closely with key stakeholders on product development initiatives.
Currently key initiatives include:
■ Backpackers Strategy - South Coast Hinterland Backpacker Initiative – GCCC, in partnership with the GCT, TQ,
Beaudesert Shire Council and the backpacker industry have applied for funding under the Federal Government’s
Regional Partnerships Program to implement the Gold Coast Backpacker Industry Development Plan. The Gold
Coast Backpackers Adventure Group has been formed to develop the capabilities of the Gold Coast Backpacker
industry and have recently appointed a project officer to manage the implementation of priority projects identified by
the Group.
■ Wine Industry (Tourism) Development - A wine tourism research project funded by TQ was completed in November
2003. The recommendations are being enacted in a series of strategies and workshops across the region. A second
research project was undertaken by Tourism Queensland, the results of which were presented to the stakeholders in
July 2004. In late 2004 a Queensland Wine Industry Development Strategy was developed in consultation with TQ
and other state government departments to create a blueprint for the future of the industry.

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■ Education Tourism Development - TQ is working with stakeholders including Education Queensland (EQ), GCCC,
Beaudesert Shire Council, DSDI and ACC to develop international and domestic education tourism product for the
region.
■ Numinbah Valley Tourism Development Initiative – TQ is working with stakeholders including GCCC, Beaudesert
Shire Council, local tourism and development officers, ACC, EQ, DSDI, DPI and local tourism operators and
education providers to develop a strategic framework to assist the Numinbah Valley region develop a sustainable
tourism operation.
■ Beaudesert Shire Tourism and Communication Strategy – TQ is working with Beaudesert Shire Council to formulate
a strategic communication and signage strategy. New tourism signage for the Beaudesert region was completed in
late 2004
■ Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk - The Gold Coast Hinterland Great Walk is on target to open by the end of 2005,
with the spectacular new Coomera Gorge Lookout a main attraction. The four-day hike through National Parks and
forest reserves in the Gold Coast Hinterland is part of the State Government’s $10 million Great Walks project that is
establishing long-distance tracks at six locations across Queensland. QPWS work crews are currently reconstructing
existing walking tracks between Green Mountains and Binna Burra in the World Heritage listed Lamington National
Park, and investigations are underway to continue the walk to Numinbah Valley and Springbrook National Park.
■ Other projects:
• The construction works for the Coomera Gorge Lookout and the reconstruction of the popular walking track out
to the site at a cost of nearly $200,000 has been completed.
• An additional $500,000 will be spent to provide a new visitor information centre at Springbrook National Park
under the State Government’s Smart Building Fund.

2.9.5 Research
TQ has a range of research and information which is made available to the tourism industry through the website
www.tq.com.au/research, including: 41
■ Research that tracks and forecasts tourism demand and supply for Queensland and its destinations
■ Estimates of the contribution of tourism to Queensland and its destinations
■ Tools that model the impact of shocks or tourism policy initiatives on the Queensland economy
■ Standard visitor surveys that profile visitors to Queensland destinations as well as identifying issues with tourism
infrastructure, and tourism product and services
■ Research that profiles market and accommodation sectors
■ Research that assists market segmentation, and the positioning and branding of destinations

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2.10 SWOT ANALYSIS
Based on all the preceding data and discussion the following tables are a summary of the main strengths and weaknesses
of the Gold Coast and the opportunities and threats posed by the dynamics of the external operating environment. It
represents the key issues that characterise the Gold Coast’s attractiveness and appeal as a visitor region and those issues
that may currently inhibit tourism growth and development.

STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES - GOLD COAST

Strengths Weaknesses
Community Profile Tourism contributes 14.5% towards the local There is a perceived risk of damage to the
economy environment and local pristine environment by
tourists and the tourism industry
Destination Domestic overnight visitors increased by an There was negative growth out of New South Wales
Performance average annual rate of 3.4% between year (ex Sydney), Victoria (ex Melbourne) and Brisbane
ending June 2001 and June 2004 in holiday/leisure visitation between the year
ending June 2001 and June 2004
Visitors from Queensland excluding Brisbane International visitors decreased at an average
showed the greatest growth in holiday/leisure annual rate of 4.7% between year ending June
visitation between the year ending June 2001 2001 and June 2004, with international holiday/
and June 2004 leisure visitors dropping by 6.0%
In the year ending June 2004, the average
length of stay for international visitors was 8.4
nights, an increase of 1.4 nights compared to
the year ending June 2001
42 The Chinese, UK and New Zealand showed
and average increase in visitation from the
period June 2001 and June 2004 (16.9%,
3.6%, 0.7% respectively)
An increase of 24% in passenger numbers to
Gold Coast Airport, from 2.23 million in the
year ending September 2003 to 2.773 million
in the year ending September 2004
Over the past 3 years, the highest average Over the past 3 years, monthly occupancy levels
monthly occupancy levels occurred in January were lowest during the May and June
Marketing Internationally Gold Coast is a well-known Internationally Gold Coast is not as aspirational for
destination for the short-haul markets due to the long-haul markets as similar experiences are
its diverse range of experiences available closer to home
Strong investment by Gold Coast operators in Not an aspirational destination for the domestic
TQ stand-alone advertising program - market
$1M in 03/04
Strong publicity generated via TQ’s Destination
Publicity Unit – valued at $20M in 03/04
Highest level of advertising recall (62%) and Conversion rate is moderate (36%)
highest preference level (22%) of all
Queensland destinations
Beach holiday market is strong
Strong capability to grow MICE business,
especially with the recent opening of
Convention & Exhibition Centre
Good distribution of Gold Coast product
Positive consumer perceptions, eg. carefree, Negative consumer perceptions, eg. all high rises,
fun, friendly, active, entertaining, warm, confident over-commercialisation, crime and safety issues
Councils, Government, Community Groups, A feeling in some organisations/departments that
organisations and agencies work well together the coastal section of the region is developed
enough and is not in need of more work

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Development Reasonable spend by Government Departments There is a focus on the coastal strip for
in development initiatives in the coastal area development dollars rather than the hinterland
of the region, with some expenditure in the area as there is a perceived better rate of return on
hinterland area dollar invested
Jetstar, Qantas and Virgin Blue have given
commitment to the Gold Coast which assists
in building a long term development profile for
the region
C&I market development in the Hinterland
Developing wine and food tourism industry
Transport audit has been carried out in the
coastal region and is due to be carried out in
the hinterland
There is a number of projects that enhance
the tourism experience in the Gold Coast
region, including:
• Rainforest Way
• Rainforest Interpretative Centre
• Backpackers Strategy
• Wine Industry (Tourism) Development
• Education Tourism Development
• GCCC Signage Strategy
• Numinbah Valley Tourism Development
Initiative
• Beaudesert Shire Tourism and 43
Communication Strategy

STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES - COASTAL AREA

Strengths Weaknesses
Tourism Services Good range of accommodation Ageing existing strata title accommodation
Good level of destination research data, Increasing proportion of accommodation stock
including R-TAM shifting from tourism to longer-term residential rental
Wide array of built and natural attractions Lack of night time activities and tour options
World class beaches Internal transport congestion, particularly on the
coastal strip and during peak periods
Access by road and air is good Intra-destinational signage is variable
Some tourism events have an international Tourism events such as Indy and Schoolies have
profile, such as Indy and Magic Millions. significant negative impacts
Other significant events include Schoolies.
Wide array of festivals and events appealing Trading hours and days do not always suit the
to a broad market base visitor market
Good hospitality infrastructure
Wide array of existing special interest activities
Existing relationship between wine and food
providers
Easy access to booking facilities
Community Services Strong community support for Tourism on the
Coastal strip as documented in the Gold Coast
Visioning Project
GCCC is supportive of appropriate new tourism
development as outlined in ‘Gold Coast, Our
Tourism City’ Policy document
Gold Coast has well established community
services

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Stakeholders and Well-established and professional tourism Low awareness of industry issues amongst
Partnerships industry residential managers
Strong investment by State and Local
Government in tourism
GCCC Tourism Branch within the Economic
Development and Major Projects Portfolio

STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES - HINTERLAND

Strengths Weaknesses
Tourism Services Good range of accommodation Low mid-week occupancy
Wide array of built and natural attractions No R-TAM research in the Hinterland
Increasing profile for Health Retreats Lack of understanding of the distribution network,
eg. commissions
Designated World Heritage Area (CERRA) Variable standard of National Park facilities and
maintenance
Increasing number of wineries with cellar doors The non coastal community is divided between
those involved in the tourism industry and those in
agriculture, horticulture and the equestrian industries
Growing number of niche tours and activities Trading hours and days do not suit the visitor
across the region market
Access by road and air is good Intra-destinational signage is variable
44 Gold Coast Hinterland themed route program Limited networking between the 4 accredited VICs
Wide array of festivals and events appealing No accurate tourism information provision in BSC
to a broad market base due the inability for accredited VICs to communicate
Good hospitality infrastructure
Wide array of existing special interest activities
Community Services GCCC is supportive of appropriate new tourism Community support for tourism varies within the
development as outlined in ‘Gold Coast, Hinterland, eg. NO Way Cableway
Our Tourism City’ Policy document
Due to the geographic proximity to major Primary industries are still the dominant economic
centers, the hinterland has access to well driver in this region
established community services
Many operators and businesses do not relate to the
branding that GCT has developed for the region
and do not relate to being a GC business
There is a lack of understanding of how tourism
impacts, both in a positive and negative way, on
the economy, community and general business
Less amenities available in the small towns and
this may decrease with increased tourists
Stakeholders and Strong investment by State and Local The industry in the Hinterland is emerging
Partnerships Government in tourism
GCCC Tourism Branch within the Economic
Development and Major Projects Portfolio

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EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS

Opportunites Threats
Industry Trends Tendency to short break holidays Continued travel market fragmentation
Trends in travel patterns for more Increasing expectations of quality experiences and
frequent holidays customer service
Internet and E-commerce developments – Increased competition through greater access to
implications for access, distribution and direct information due to internet
booking channels
Competitors The Gold Coast is more competitive than its Increasing competitiveness of competitor
key competitor destinations destinations, i.e. Sunshine Coast and Northern NSW
Stronger appeal of Gold Coast in relation to Stronger appeal of some competitor destinations,
key competitor destinations i.e. SE Asia, TNQ and Whitsundays
Yield potential of the growing Beach Holiday Strengthening Aussie dollar and increasing
market is high affordability of overseas travel
Legal/Political Instability in global political climate - threat of Instability in global political climate - threat of war
war and terrorism and terrorism
Federal/State/Local Government involvement Lack of coordination between all levels of
and policies on tourism and environment Government regarding tourism
Government recognition of the benefits of Native Title – potential impact on National Parks
tourism and key natural attractions
Public liability insurance - potential impact on
events, attractions and operators
Variable commitment level for tourism within Local
Government
Potential for the Commonwealth to bypass State 45
Governments and deal directly with regional bodies
Policies on environmental protection – limits
development options and tourist access
Socio Cultural Perception of domestic safety in the context High level of competition for disposable income
of the global threat of war and terrorism
Ageing population with increased disposable
income and leisure time
Interstate migration – increasing population
and VFR
Increased work pressures and desire for
work/life balance
Traditional family structure changing –
smaller family units and more couples
Population growth in urban and coastal areas,
eg. in the source markets of SEQ
Economic Increased consumer confidence and Variable value of Australian dollar and impact on
implications for holiday spending exchange rates
Availability of public funds – to enhance the
range, diversity and standard of tourism
infrastructure
Environmental Increased tourism leverage off the value of Impacts of natural disasters, including cyclones,
World Heritage and other protected areas fire and drought
Increased awareness of the values of the Land clearing – impacts on attractiveness and
natural environment and sustainability environmental reputation
Access and visitor infrastructure in National Parks
Technology Rapid innovation in Falling behind in communication and distribution
communication/distribution technologies technologies
Rapid innovation in transportation technologies

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2.11 SUMMARY AND STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS
The Destination Analysis has drawn on a range of information and data to gain a better understanding of the status of
the Gold Coast and the environment in which it operates. The resulting SWOT analysis provides a clear outline of the key
aspects of the Gold Coast that underpin current tourism performance and the perceived limitations and barriers that may
impede a sustainable tourism future.

Based on this analysis, the following section outlines Tourism Queensland’s strategic response to the situation with the
aim to recommend the most effective strategies that will better position the destination in the marketplace for longer-term
tourism benefit. It outlines market targeting and positioning strategies appropriate to the circumstances and a range
of specific operational strategies to better focus development and marketing efforts, and enhance the prospects for
sustainable tourism growth and development. Key strategic topics arising from this analysis that will be addressed in the
following section include: International Marketing, Domestic Marketing, Development and Partnerships.

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SECTION 3:
Strategic Vision

3.1 DESTINATION OUTLOOK


The Gold Coast is one of Australia’s premier holiday destinations. It is famous for its beaches, theme parks and subtropical
rainforests and has been attracting Australian families for many decades. The region has capitalised on its attractive
environment, climate and lifestyle to develop a highly specialised economy that is dominated by the tourism industry.

Tourism Queensland and GCT will strive to enhance the development and marketing of the Gold Coast in partnership
with industry, Government and the community. This will be achieved through the promotion of the Very GC marketing
campaign to key domestic and international markets. The development of the Gold Coast will be achieved through
identification of sustainable development opportunities and working with key stakeholders to advance these opportunities.

Over the next three years TQ will focus its efforts on the key issues identified within this plan. Specifically these issues are
to:
■ Maintain the Gold Coast’s position as Australia’s premier holiday destination and increase market share of high yield
domestic and international market segments.
■ Strengthen partnerships with key stakeholders in the region to enable a more coordinated and strategic approach to
destination development
■ Focus destination branding activities towards high yielding segments in the domestic geographic markets of Sydney
and Melbourne. 47
■ Ensure the effectiveness of the Gold Coast branding and its alignment with the destination’s positioning
■ Continue cooperative marketing programs to provide cost effective opportunities for industry partners to benefit from
working with the destination brand
■ Encourage transport planners to consider the needs of tourists in future planning activities
■ Nurture growth opportunities within niche market segments such as backpackers, food and wine tourism, events,
ecotourism education tourism

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3.2 TARGETING STRATEGY
Based on achieving a targeting strategy ensuring the highest potential return on investment, this section identifies and
prioritises those market segments, which, in the view of Tourism Queensland and key partners, offer optimum potential for
growth and development for the Gold Coast. These markets will be the focus of TQ development and marketing activities
and are a key reference for stakeholder planning initiatives. A full list of current markets can be found in Section 2.4.

3.2.1 Domestic Markets

Key Market
TQ utilises a Brian Dermott and Associates (BDA) targeting strategy that effectively filters out low yield travellers and
those who do not identify the Gold Coast as a preferable holiday destination. This filtering process identifies high yielding
segments referred to as most profitable prospects. By targeting these high yielding segments, TQ ensures its marketing
activities achieve the highest return on investment.

Holiday Type Holiday Description Source Markets Yield Target

Beach Holiday Typical Aussie summer Sydney Spent $200 or greater per Recommended
holiday, 2 weeks of sun, Melbourne night on last trip or a total of Target Market
surf and entertainment $2000 or greater on last trip
Big Tour 2 week touring, Sydney Spent $200 or greater per Not Recommended
mostly by car Melbourne night on last trip or a total of
$2000 or greater on last trip
Getaway 1-2 week holiday escape to Sydney Spent $200 or greater per Recommended
unwind, a one stop holiday Melbourne night on last trip or a total of Target Market
48 $2000 or greater on last trip
VFR Primary purpose of trip is Sydney Spent $200 or greater per Not Recommended
to visit friends or relatives Melbourne night on last trip or a total of
$2000 or greater on last trip
Short Breaks Short stay holiday, 1-3 Sydney Spent $200 or greater per Not Recommended
night stay, rest and relaxation Melbourne night on last trip or a total of
$2000 or greater on last trip
Fly and Stay Fly to resorts for a week of Sydney Spent $200 or greater per Not Recommended
indulgent and luxurious Melbourne night on last trip or a total of
relaxation $2000 or greater on last trip
Grand Tour The trip of a lifetime Sydney Spent $200 or greater per Not Recommended
Melbourne night on last trip or a total of
$2000 or greater on last trip

Emerging and Special Interest Markets

Market Segments Visitor Characteristics

Education Short haul international visitation based on short term English language classes.
Young single women, and couples aged between 25 and 34 years.
Long haul markets (eg. US.)
Food and Couples aged over 25 from Brisbane/SEQ for a short break or daytrip.
Wine Tourism May travel with friends or hire a tour bus.
They want to experience an authentic regional wine and food experience or event.
Backpacker International visitors staying in youth hostels or backpacker accommodation
Ecotourism Mid life couples and singles from Japan, NZ, US, UK, Europe and Asia

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3.2.2 International Markets
The following tables identify TQ’s current prioritisation of the top five international holiday/leisure source markets for the
Gold Coast as identified through the International Visitor Survey (Section 2.3.3). For information on the prioritisation of all
other source markets refer to the TQ International Marketing Guide 2004-2005.

Primary Markets

Source Market Market Segments Prioritisation Segment Characteristics

Japan Office ladies (OLs) Primary Aged: 30-39 Primarily women without children, who seek
“healing”/wellness, shopping, sightseeing, resorts,
Young office ladies Primary Aged: 20-29 rejuvenation, relaxation, natural/ scenic attractions
(YOLs) and education. Average stay is 1 week.
Families Primary Wish to spend family time together. See natural wonders, visit wildlife
parks/zoos and visit amusement/ theme parks. Rest and relax at 1 or
2 destinations and prefer standard hotel accommodation.
Honeymooners Primary Couples between 18-34 years, travelling for honeymoons/overseas
weddings. Appeals are natural wonders, experiencing different
customs, famous sights/ places, natural environment, special interest
activities and quality beach resorts.
Education market Primary Interested in the English language, skill development and specialised
courses. Other activities are interaction with locals, homestay, nature,
adventure and sightseeing.
MICE Primary Businessmen and professionals, aged 35-60 years. Includes
company travel for meetings, incentives, conventions and 49
exhibitions, and pre and post convention tourism experiences.
Special interest travel Secondary Small or large groups travelling for a key interest/pursuit, eg.
birdwatching, hiking/walking, golf, hobby-based clubs.
Jukunen Secondary Aged: 50-64 See themselves as ‘young, active and healthy’.
Silvers Secondary Aged: 65-79 Interested in visiting natural/scenic and historic/
cultural attractions. Long stay is on the increase.
New Zealand Experienced Primary Young couples and singles who like to visit for a short city break,
youthful traveller an event or a beach/resort holiday.
Empty nesters Primary Non-retired couples travelling without children who are looking to
experience ‘real Australia’. They are likely to visit city gateways,
experience new destinations, interact with locals and attend events.
Korea Honeymooners Primary Middle class couples aged 25-35 years. Desired experiences are
resort accommodation, theme parks, wildlife and relaxation.
GIT Primary Middle class group travellers aged over 25 years. Price driven
segment that stay in 3 to 4-star accommodation and require a
Korean-speaking guide. Desired package inclusions are nature,
wildlife and the icon cities.
FIT Primary Experienced travellers aged 20-45 years, with bi-lingual language
ability. Utilise accommodation from backpackers to 4-star and are
longer stay visitors. Desire a relaxing experience, the opportunity to
mingle with locals and travel by coach.
Golf tours Primary Upper income small groups aged between 30-55 years. They
prefer to play in signature courses and the focus is on quality
accommodation and meals.
Incentive groups Secondary Company paid trip for reward purposes. Range from budget to high
quality depends on the corporation and the travelling group. Desired
experiences include golf, shopping, Australian wildlife and Theme
Parks.

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Emerging Markets

Source Market Market Segments Prioritisation Segment Characteristics

United Comfort adventures Primary High income / post family.


Kingdom Seek engagement with a new culture, visiting sights and quality service.
Self challengers Primary High income / pre & post family. Seek immersion in the culture,
meeting new people and nature experiences.
Youth market Primary Young people who seek adventure, meeting new people, trying new
things & often a working holiday.
Long stay Primary Mature travellers escaping the Northern winter for the Australian
lifestyle - food, wine and beaches. Seek comfortable, often apartment
style accommodation.
Europe Active explorers Primary Aged 30 - 64 years with no dependent children.
(excl. UK Seek to experience the “real” Australia, within a safe context.
& Germany) Backpacker/Youth Primary Long stay visitors aged 20 - 29 years, who seek active, adventurous
and exciting destinations, interaction with locals, getting off the
beaten track & often a working holiday.

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3.3 DESTINATION POSITIONING
The core positioning strategy for the Gold Coast is to differentiate the destination clearly from key competitors by
establishing a distinctive and attractive brand based on its attributes, experience and appeal in relation to the perceived
needs and interests of target markets. This positioning will be the focus of Tourism Queensland development and
marketing activities and is a key reference for stakeholder planning initiatives.

Main Attributes and Appeals


■ Stunning beaches and waterways
■ Theme Parks
■ Shopping
■ Fantastic year round climate
■ Wide range of restaurants and dining options
■ Casino
■ Diverse Experiences
■ Hinterland
■ Exciting nightlife

Destination Image/Personality
■ Vibrant
■ Sophisticated
■ Confident
■ Chic
■ Luxurious
■ Entertaining 51
■ Engaging

Benefit of the Destination Experience


■ Entertaining/ Luxurious
■ Relaxing/Refreshing
■ Rejuvenating/Revitalising

Competitive Differences
The Gold Coast truly has a uniquely sophisticated style- world class beaches, an abundance of quality activities and
attractions, a range of theme parks, exciting nightlife, varied shopping experiences and a wide range of luxurious
accommodation options. Behind the dunes, the Gold Coast hinterland offers quaint country towns and villages, wineries,
art galleries and craft centres and World Heritage pristine rainforest.

Positioning Statement
“Australia’s Gold Coast, the most vibrant experience you will ever have. Australia’s Gold Coast is a microcosm of the
Australian lifestyle. Rich in colour and diversity, the region is synonymous with glorious weather, health, vitality and
life itself. The environment is as diverse as the people creating an atmosphere of freedom, excitement and passion.”

Destination Brand

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Local, Regional and National Positioning
In local, regional and national markets, the Gold Coast has been positioned as the “microcosm of the Australian lifestyle.
Rich in colour and diversity, the region is synonymous with glorious weather, health, vitality and life itself. The environment
is as diverse as the people creating an atmosphere of freedom, excitement and passion.” The positioning is encapsulated
in the brand “Very Gold Coast Very GC”. This branding theme promotes the Gold Coast as a vibrant destination possessing
distinction and sophistication and offering the most exciting Queensland holiday experience.

International Positioning
From an international market perspective the focus is on positioning “Australia’s Gold Coast” as a safe holiday experience
with amazing beaches, access to nature-based attractions and activities in the hinterland region, combined with a range
of shopping experiences and other built attractions such as theme parks. In short-haul Asian and Japanese markets,
the Gold Coast can be considered as a stand-alone destination as are therefore marketed under the Very GC branding
campaign. Research undertaken in Japan has revealed a high level of appeal for the Very GC brand. From the point of
view of longer haul markets, the Gold Coast is positioned as an intrinsic part of a diverse “Southern Queensland” holiday
experience. Further information on positioning for specific source markets can be found in the Tourism Queensland
International Blueprints.

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3.4 OPERATIONAL GOALS AND STRATEGIES
From a Tourism Queensland planning perspective, the following goals and strategies reflect the sustainable tourism
aspirations for the Gold Coast over the next three years. The actionable strategies are derived from key strategic issues
arising from the SWOT analysis. The strategies are the basis of TQ’s annual business/action plans and are a key reference
for stakeholder planning activities.

Marketing
- International
Goal: Enhance sustainable tourism industry growth and profitability through a strategic destination approach to the
distribution of tourism information, products and services in key international markets

Key Issues Strategies


Destination Awareness • Enhance awareness of and enhance the awareness of the Gold Coast destination
experience and its internationally significant product in target visitor markets
Market Growth • Implement marketing programs aimed at developing emerging and niche international and
Development markets, eg. snowbirds, backpackers
• Develop and implement marketing activities to exploit short term international diversion
opportunities, i.e. war, terrorism, natural disasters in other locations
• Allocate appropriate resources to international marketing in consideration of prevailing
economic conditions, eg. IRAM
• Identify specific opportunities to develop market share from New Zealand
Cooperative Marketing • Enhance the coordination of marketing investment by industry and the RTO in international
marketing programs
Trade Development • Enhance and continually update online access to destination information for both trade and
and Distribution consumers 53
• Encourage a high level of leisure product representation in international wholesale
programs, eg. Emirates Holidays Worldwide Brochure
• Increase the awareness of the Gold Coast within the “Southern Queensland” destination
with the international long haul trade
Product and • Identify and develop new product/package offerings tailored to the needs of emerging
Package Development and niche international markets
Industry/Government • Undertake industry education programs, eg.
Education ATEC Southern QLD seminars, TQ/TA In the Market Seminars
Research and Market • Undertake appropriate research to monitor brand health, determine the impact of marketing
Intelligence activities, and improve understanding of consumer preference, travel and economic trends
• Monitor feedback from International offices as to the relevance of the destination for their
market

Marketing
- Domestic
Goal: Enhance sustainable tourism industry growth and profitability through a strategic destination approach to
marketing in key domestic markets

Key Issues Strategies


Destination Awareness • Conduct destination awareness activities utilising the Gold Coast brand to build awareness
and preference for the destination
• Enhance the awareness of the Gold Coast as an attractive and diverse visitor destination
encompassing both coastal and hinterland experiences
• Ensure the positive and extensive promotion of the Gold Coast in the media via TQ’s Media
Publicity Unit in conjunction with industry
Market Growth • Increase exposure to high yield target markets
and Development
Cooperative Marketing • Continue to operate the stand alone advertising program and provide cooperative
advertising opportunities for Gold Coast operators

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Trade Development • Maximise the availability of destination and product information through traditional and
and Distribution on-line distribution systems
Product and • With GCT and industry, develop a product and package range suitable for target markets
Package Development
Industry/Government • Provide information to Gold Coast operators on marketing issues, research, initiatives and
Education media opportunities
Research and • Undertake appropriate research to monitor brand health, determine the impact of marketing
Market Intelligence activities, and improve understanding of consumer preference, travel and economic trends

Development - Coastal
Goal: Enhance sustainable tourism industry growth and profitability through a strategic approach to tourism research,
policy and planning and the enhancement of visitor products, services and infrastructure

Key Issues Strategies


Destination Access • Monitor future access for the coastal area when/if market demand changes
Local Access/Transport • Continue to work with GCCC to ensure the road and rail infrastructure is adequate for
tourists needs
• Facilitate development of internal transportation options to alleviate congestion on the
coastal strip and during peak periods
• Forge stronger relationships with appropriate agencies to help achieve more tourism related
transportation outcomes, including DMR and Council Public Works Divisions
Signage • Continue to work with GCCC and DMR to ensure the signage and collateral are best practice
and support the tourism opportunities in the region, eg. Food and Wine Trail signage and
54 accompanying collateral
Product Development • Continue to work with all stakeholders to identify product that is in need of a refresh to
ensure development across the region is appropriate and sustainable
• Work with QPWS to ensure amenities in the coastal National Parks are appropriate and
meet the needs of the tourist (eg. Burleigh Heads National Park)
• Work with key industry organisations to further investigate and support the development of
facilities and tours to suit emerging and special interest markets, such as Soft Adventure, eg
paragliding and bungee jumping
Hospitality and Retail • Continue to work with relevant stakeholders to review and implement strata title legislation
Products and Services regarding building maintenance, re-development and residential management
• Work with strata title groups and residential managers to encourage introduction of
regulations that limit the allocation of longer-term residential rental in traditionally short-term
holiday rental complexes
Public Infrastructure, • Work with local stakeholders to increase the number of appropriate night-time activities
Amenities and and tour options
Community Services • Work with relevant agencies to facilitate the upgrade of coastal National Park infrastructure,
eg. Picnic tables, lookouts, trails
Policy, Planning and • Work with GCCC to ensure the decisions effecting tourism are made in an informed in an
Regulation accurate and timely manner
Visitor Information and • Work with the GCT Information Centre Cavill Walk and the Coolangatta Visitor Information
Services Centre to continuously enhance visitor information services
• Ensure visitors have access to information on issues regarding visitor safety, such as safe
beach usage
Community Support • Work with relevant agencies to reduce negative impacts of events on the community, eg.
Schoolies Week and the Lexmark Indy Race
• Work with the Schoolies Review Committee to establish guidelines to minimise negative
impacts of this event
Industry/Government • Continue to work with GCCC, State Government, Federal Government, private and public
Education agencies and businesses to increase the coordination of tourism industry development such
as Rainforest Way, Gold Coast Light Rail Project and the Gold Coast Convention Centre

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• Work with QRAMA to initiate tourism industry training of residential managers
• Work to ensure ongoing industry awareness and education on community capacity issues
• Work to ensure ongoing industry awareness and education on visitor safety issues, eg.
Beach Safety
Research and • Continue to work with relevant stakeholders to ensure research is appropriate, accurate
Market Intelligence and timely
• Monitor destination performance and consumer trends in order to maintain competitive
advantage
• Encourage participation in the R-TAM research in the Coastal strip
• Enhance availability of the output from the R-TAM research
• Provide feedback to industry to assist in the targeting of the most productive source markets

Development - Hinterland
Goal: Enhance sustainable tourism industry growth and profitability through a strategic approach to tourism research,
policy and planning and the enhancement of visitor products, services and infrastructure

Key Issues Strategies


Destination Access • Continue to work with Beaudesert Shire Council and DMR to develop further access
options, including road and rail access
Local Access/Transport • Continue to work Beaudesert Shire Council, DMR and QR to ensure the road and rail
infrastructure is adequate for the tourists needs
Signage • Continue to work with Beaudesert Shire Council to ensure the signage and collateral are
best practice and support the tourism opportunities in the region
• Work with relevant agencies including Beaudesert Shire Council, DMR and local tourism 55
operators to identify and encourage improvements to directional and interpretative signage
Product Development • Continue to work with all stakeholders to ensure development across the region is
appropriate to the tourists needs and is sustainable
• Work with other Government Departments to ensure amenities in the CERRA World
Heritage Area including Lamington, Springbrook and Natural Arch National Parks are
appropriate to the needs of the tourist
• Work with key industry organisations to further investigate and support the development of
facilities and tours to suit emerging and special interest markets, eg. Agricultural Tourism,
Bird Watching, Food and Wine Tourism and Soft Adventure/Environmental Tourism.
Hospitality and Retail • Work with appropriate stakeholders to increase the trading hours/days available
Products and Services • Review accommodation supply to ensure alignment with market demands
Public Infrastructure, • Work with local stakeholders to increase the number of appropriate night-time activities
Amenities and and tour options, eg. climbing and walking trails, horse riding activities, night time markets
Community Services along Gallery Walk on Mount Tamborine
• Work with relevant agencies to facilitate the upgrade of tourist infrastructure in the CERRA
World Heritage Area including Lamington, Springbrook and Natural Arch National Parks,
eg. access, signage, walking trails
Policy, Planning • Work with Beaudesert Shire Council to ensure the decisions effecting tourism are made in
and Regulation an informed in an accurate and timely manner
• Work with relevant agencies to facilitate the development of CERRA World Heritage Area
including Lamington, Springbrook and Natural Arch National Parks management systems
that are more reflective of tourists needs from an policy, planning and regulation perspective
Visitor Information • Work with the Tamborine Mountain Visitor Information Centre, Canungra Information
and Services Centre, Beaudesert Historical Museum and Information Centre, Beaudesert Community Arts
and Information Centre to ensure the service provided is appropriate, accurate, professional
and timely
• Work with local tourism operators to educate them in the benefits of joining the commercial
distribution network and the GCT
• Ensure visitors have access to information on issues regarding visitor safety, eg. safe
movement in National Parks, including bush walking and rock climbing

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Community Support • Continue to work with the community to highlight the benefits of tourism to the region with
the aim of encouraging additional community support for tourism
Industry/Government • Continue to work with Government, private and public agencies and businesses to increase
Education the coordination industry development
• Continue to work with all agencies in the region to gain maximum development outcomes
• Work with Beaudesert Shire Council and local businesses to assist them to better
understand the benefits of tourism as a regional economic driver
• Work to ensure ongoing industry awareness and education on visitor safety issues, eg.
safety in National Parks
• Work to ensure ongoing industry awareness and education on community capacity issues
Research and • Continue to work with relevant stakeholders to ensure research is appropriate, accurate
Market Intelligence and timely
• Work with local stakeholders to increase awareness of the benefits of implementing R-TAM
for the region
• Monitor destination performance and consumer trends in order to maintain competitive
advantage
• Provide feedback to industry to assist in the targeting of the most productive source markets

Partnerships
Goal: Enhance sustainable tourism industry growth and profitability through effective partnerships and alliances with
key government, industry and community stakeholders

Key Issues Strategies


Industry Coordination • Work to grow strong partnerships in the region with relevant agencies
56 and Partnerships and the tourist industry
• Foster a stronger relationship between TQ and GCT
• Continue to strengthen relationships with Local Government and key State Government
agencies in both marketing and development
• Work to encourage continued involvement and investment by State and Local Government
in the tourism industry
• Focus on improving the effectiveness of existing mechanisms and communication
channels through Destination Australia Marketing Alliance (DAMA), Growing Tourism, and
Partnership Queensland Agreement
• Encourage continued engagement of industry in marketing and development planning

3.5 IMPLEMENTATION
The Gold Coast Destination Management Plan has been developed over a lengthy period of research and consultation and
will be used as the basis to engage regional tourism stakeholders on tourism development and marketing issues. It is not
intended as a regional tourism plan but as a strategic directional document to guide the planning processes and programs
of Tourism Queensland and key stakeholders.

The plan will be distributed through TQ and the RTO and will be available on-line through TQ’s Destination Knowledge
Bank, along with a range of supporting material. As discussion and development proceeds and as new research becomes
available, the plans will be reviewed and refreshed on a regular basis.

The key ideas and strategies in this plan will be implemented through the annual business plans of TQ in partnership with
the RTO and key industry partners. It is envisaged that these ideas and strategies will also inform the action plans of all
stakeholders with an interest in a consistent, research based approach to the sustainable and profitable development of
tourism in the region.

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Appendix 1 - Data Sources

National and International Visitor Surveys (NVS/IVS)


The NVS which is managed by the Bureau of Tourism Research (BTR), commenced in January 1998 replacing the
Domestic Tourism Monitor (DTM). This monitor is a household survey involving face-to-face interviews with an annual
national sample of approximately 80,000 Australian residents aged 14 years and over. The IVS involves a detailed single
purpose questionnaire which is administered by personal interviews with a sample of “overseas visitors” aged 15 years
and older, departing from Australia’s nine major international airports. These surveys use the ABS/BTR regions.

Survey of Tourist Accommodation (STA)


The Survey of Tourist Accommodation is a quarterly survey of all establishments providing predominantly short-term
accommodation (i.e. for less than two months) to the general public. It is conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics
(ABS). From January 1998 the survey includes establishments with 15 or more rooms and provides information relating to
the following categories: licensed hotels with facilities; motels and guesthouses with facilities; and serviced apartments (daily
servicing must be available, although this service may not necessarily be used). This survey uses the ABS/BTR regions.

Local Government Area Profiles


The Local Government Area (LGA) Profiles are standardised statistical reports generated by the Office of Economic and
Statistical Research (OESR - a division of Queensland Treasury). The LGA Profiles are customised reports generated for
the user selected region(s) and bring together recent and comprehensive data on the respective regional economies
using a variety of Government sources. Topics including population (including growth rates), business, building activity,
agriculture and employment are covered in each report.

Visitor Expenditure and Economic Contribution


Tourism Queensland, in conjunction with the Department of State Development and the Office of Economic and Statistical
Research (OESR - a division of Queensland Treasury), have been involved in a project aimed at quantifying the economic 57
contribution of tourism to Queensland. The first stage of this research was to determine the level of international and
domestic visitor expenditure in Queensland from 1985 to 1999, at both a state and regional level. The second stage of
this research was to determine the contribution of this expenditure to the Queensland economy in terms of Gross Regional
Product and Gross State Product for the 1998-1999 financial year.

Roy Morgan Research Holiday Tracking Survey (HTS)


Roy Morgan Research’s Holiday Tracking Survey is a component of Roy Morgan Single Source, which uses the same methodology
as the Morgan Gallup Poll. Roy Morgan Single Source uses a stratified random probability sample to ensure that all states, then
metropolitan and country areas, are correctly represented. A large sample collected continuously over the year means that
samples of lower incidence populations can be accumulated week by week to the desired size. Approximately 25,000 of these are
processed in each twelve-month period. These are weighted by age, sex and area to be representative of the Australian population.

Tourism Queensland Standard Visitor Survey (SVS)


Tourism Queensland developed the Standard Visitor Survey in response to the limited availability of tourism data for
smaller regions in Queensland. Information collected from the survey is used to profile visitors to a region in terms of
demographics and travel behaviours, understand motivations for visiting, measure visitor satisfaction and pinpoint
problems in services/ infrastructure. Both self-completion and face-to-face interviewing methods are used to collect the
data. Results from these surveys cannot be generalised and refer only to the point in time at which the data was collected.

Regional Tourism Activity Monitor (R-TAM)


The Regional Tourism Activity Monitor is a voluntary business survey managed by Tourism Queensland. R-TAM measures
a number of key indicators (daily and monthly occupancy levels, visitors to attractions, average room rate etc) in tourism
industry businesses. The project is currently in place in 12 of Queensland’s 14 major regions. Reports are generated
monthly and are disseminated back out to industry within four weeks of the end of the previous month.

Destination Positioning Research


The Destination Positioning Research is conducted every three years by Tourism Queensland to examine the positioning of
the established tourism regions in Queensland in the domestic marketplace. This research is an integral part of refining the
marketing strategies for the regions. The regions examined are the Gold Coast, the Sunshine Coast, Tropical North Queensland
and the Whitsundays. The research involves telephone surveys with residents in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne.

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Appendix 2 - Acronyms
MCC ..................................Mackay Chamber of Commerce
ABS .................................... Australian Bureau of Statistics MCR .......................Market and Communications Research
ACC ...................................... Area Consultative Committee MHCC.............. Mackay Highlands Coordinating Committee
AFTA ...................... Australian Federation of Travel Agents MICE ..... Meeting, Incentive, Conference, Exhibition Market
AHA......................................Australian Hotels Association MTL.............................................. Mackay Tourism Limited
ATC .................................... Australian Tourist Commission MWREDC ........... Mackay Whitsunday Regional Economic
ATDP .......................Australian Tourism Development Plan Development Corporation
ATDW .........................Australian Tourism Data Warehouse NATAS ....... National Association of Travel Agents Singapore
ATE ......................................Australian Tourism Exchange NEAP ..........Nature and Ecotourism Accreditation Program
ATEC .............................Australian Tourism Export Council NT .......................................................... Northern Territory
AUD ........................................................Australian Dollar NVS ................................................. National Visitor Survey
B&B ...........................Bed and Breakfast Accommodation OESR ..............Office of Economic and Statistical Research
BCC ................................................. Brisbane City Council OLs................................................................ Office Ladies
BCEC...............Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre OQTA ..................... Outback Queensland Tourism Authority
BDA.....................................Brian Dermott and Associates PQA .............................Partnership Queensland Agreement
BM ..................................................... Brisbane Marketing PVI ............................................. Product Viability Indicator
BRL ......................................... Bundaberg Region Limited QBBA ..................Queensland Bed & Breakfast Association
BTR ...................................... Bureau of Tourism Research QCSP.............................. Queensland Cruise Shipping Plan
BTRAC .....Brisbane Tourism Regional Advisory Committee QEC ................................... Queensland Events Corporation
C&I .......................................... Conference and Incentives QHA ................................... Queensland Hotels Association
CIA ...........................................Caravan Industry Australia QHTN ..........................Queensland Heritage Trails Network
CRC ......................................Cooperative Research Centre QPWS ..................... Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service
DAMA .................. Destination Australia Marketing Alliance QR ............................................................ Queensland Rail
DET ......... Department of Employment and Training (State) QRAMA ................Queensland Residents Accommodation
DITR........ Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources Managers Association
(Comm) QTIC ......................... Queensland Tourism Industry Council
DLGPSRQ...... Department of Local Government, Planning, RACQ ...................... Royal Automobile Club of Queensland
Sport and Recreation (State) REDC ........... Regional Economic Development Corporation
58
DMP .................................... Destination Management Plan RIP ........................................ Road Infrastructure Program
DMR .............................. Department of Main Roads (State) ROC................................ Regional Organisation of Councils
DOEH .... Department of Environment and Heritage (Comm) R-TAM ............................ Regional Tourism Activity Monitor
DOTARS ... Department of Transport and Regional Services RTN........................................... Regional Tourism Network
(Comm) RTO .....................................Regional Tourism Organisation
DPI&F ......Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries RTU...................................................... Road Tourism Unit
(State) SCICA.........Sunshine Coast Information Centre Association
DPW ............................ Department of Public Works (State) SD ..........................................................Statistical Division
DSDI .....Department of State Development and Innovation SDTA ...........................Southern Downs Tourist Association
(State) SEQ ................................................South East Queensland
DTM .......................................... Domestic Tourism Monitor SEQROC ......................... South East Queensland Regional
DTFTWID... Department of Tourism, Fair Trading and Wine Organisation of Councils
Industry Development (State) STA ................................ Survey of Tourist Accommodation
DTSC ........................... District Tourism Signage Committee STCRC... Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre
EPA .................................Environmental Protection Agency SVS ................................................Standard Visitor Survey
EYT ..................................... Experienced Youthful Traveller TA ...........................................................Tourism Australia
FCSBRTB .... Fraser Coast South Burnett Regional Tourism TEL ....................................... Townsville Enterprise Limited
Board TGWRTA ........ Toowoomba & Golden West Regional Tourist
FIT .................................... Free and Independent Traveller Association
G&L ............................................................. Gay & Lesbian TIPA ......................................... Tourism in Protected Areas
GAPDL .....Gladstone Area Promotion and Development Ltd TNQ.......................................... Tropical North Queensland
GBRMPA ............. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority TNSW ........................................ Tourism New South Wales
GCT ..................................................... Gold Coast Tourism TQ ......................................................Tourism Queensland
GRP............................................... Gross Regional Product TRRAC ...Tourism and Recreation Reef Advisory Committee
GSP .....................................................Gross State Product TSC .............................................. Tourism Sunshine Coast
GT ........................................................... Growing Tourism TTNQ........................... Tourism Tropical North Queensland
HTS .............................................. Holiday Tracking Survey TTQ .......................................Tourism Training Queensland
IRAM .................... International Resource Allocation Model WHA ................................................... World Heritage Area
ITO ................................................. Inbound Tour Operator WHAMB ......... Whitsundays Highlands and Mackay Bowen
IVS ............................................International Visitor Survey WSY ...............................................................Whitsundays
JAM ............................................... Japan Australia Mission WTMA ..........................Wet Tropics Management Authority
JATA ..............................Japan Association of Travel Agents VFR ...................................... Visiting Friends and Relatives
LGA ..................................... Local Government Association VIC ...........................................Visitor Information Centres
LTO .......................................... Local Tourism Organisation VJP .......................................... Visiting Journalists Program

G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005


Appendix 3 – Market Segmentation
Below is the guide used to assist the market profiling and segmentation process. This is not intended to be prescriptive
but to provide some assistance in defining holiday segments. Variables in each category are suggestions only.

Holiday Geographic Demographic


Type Source Characteristics
• Day Trip - day trip only, no overnight stay away from home • International • Age
• Short Break - city or country short break (1-3 nights) • Country of Origin • Gender
• Beach Holiday - extended holiday at beachside/coastal • National • Socio-economic
location (3 nights +) • State of Origin group (see below)
• Fly & Stay - fly and stay for a week’s resort indulgence • Regional • Occupation
(6-7 nights) • Education
• Getaway - city or country escape (1-2 weeks) • Lifecycle stage
• Short Tour - up to a week of touring – multi-destinational (3-7 nights) (see below)
• Big Tour - up to two weeks’ touring holiday – multi-destinational • Religion
(8-14 nights)
• Grand Tour - long touring holiday for more than two weeks –
multi-destinational (15 nights +)
• Special Interests - travellers motivated by a particular special
interest pursuit (see list)
• VFR - holiday specifically staying with friends/relatives
• Special Events - up to a one week stay for a special event
(1-7 nights)
• Other - as best described

59
Length Travel Type of Motivation or
of Stay Party Transport Special Interest
• Day trip • Single • Self drive • Rest/relax
• 1-2 nights • Couple • Fly • Action/adventure
• 3-7 nights • Young families • Fly/Drive • Health
• 8-14 nights • Family/friends with kids • Coach – Group • Social
• 15 nights + • Family/friends without kids • Coach – FIT • Family
• Group touring party • Train • Culture/heritage
• In transit • Sports
• Shopping
• Special event
• Eco/nature-based
• Type of special interest or
specific product appeal

Socio-economic Household
Groupings Lifecycle Stages
A - Higher managerial, admin or professional • Young singles (under 45 years)
$60,000 + p.a. no children
B - Middle managerial, admin or professional • Young couples (under 45 years)
$45,000 - $60,000 p.a. no children
C1 - Supervisor or clerical, jnr manager • Young parents (under 45 years)
$35,000 - $45,000 p.a. with children
C2 - Skilled workers • Mid-life families (45-64 years)
$25,000 - $45,000 p.a. children at home
D - Semi-skilled and unskilled workers • Mid-life household (45-64 years)
$25,000 - $35,000 p.a. no children at home
EF - Pensioners, unemployed, casual/part-time workers • Older households - Persons aged 65+ or retired
less than $25,000 p.a.

TOURISM QUEENSLAND 2005 G O L D C O A S T D E S T I N AT I O N M A N A G E M E N T P L A N