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Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide Release 12.2
Cisco IOS
Configuration Fundamentals
Configuration Guide
Release 12.2

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Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide, Release 12.2 Copyright © 2002, Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

CONTENTS
CONTENTS

About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

xxiii

Documentation Objectives Audience xxiii

xxiii

Documentation Organization

xxiii

Documentation Modules

xxiii

Master Indexes

xxvi

Supporting Documents and Resources

xxvi

New and Changed Information

xxvii

New Features in Cisco IOS Release 12.2

xxvii

Identifying Platform Support for Cisco IOS Software Features

Using Feature Navigator

Using Software Release Notes

xxviii

Document Conventions

xxix

xxviii

Obtaining Documentation

xxx

xxx

xxxi

World Wide Web

Documentation CD-ROM

xxx

Ordering Documentation

xxxi

Documentation Feedback

Obtaining Technical Assistance Cisco.com xxxi Technical Assistance Center

xxxi

xxxii

xxviii

Configuration Fundamentals Overview

Organization of This Guide Cisco IOS User Interfaces

FC-1

FC-1

FC-1

File Management System Management

FC-2

FC-2

Task-Oriented Documentation Approaches Overview of Router Configuration Tasks

FC-3

FC-3

Understanding the Cisco IOS Command-Line Interface

Storing or Obtaining Configuration Files or Images from a Server Changing the Image or Configuration File Loaded by the Router

FC-4

FC-4

FC-5

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Cisco IOS User Interfaces

Using the Command-Line Interface (CLI)

FC-9

Cisco IOS CLI Command Modes Overview

FC-9

User EXEC Mode Privileged EXEC Mode

Global Configuration Mode Interface Configuration Mode

Subinterface Configuration Mode

ROM Monitor Mode

Summary of Main Cisco IOS Command Modes

FC-10

FC-12

FC-13

FC-15

FC-15

FC-16

Cisco IOS CLI Task List

Getting Context-Sensitive Help

FC-19

FC-19

Displaying All User EXEC Commands

FC-22

FC-18

Using the no and default Forms of Commands

FC-23

Using Command History

FC-23

Setting the Command History Buffer Size

FC-24

Recalling Commands

Disabling the Command History Feature

FC-24

FC-24

Using CLI Editing Features and Shortcuts Moving the Cursor on the Command Line Completing a Partial Command Name

FC-25

FC-25

FC-26

Deleting Entries

Recalling Deleted Entries

Editing Command Lines that Wrap

Continuing Output at the --More-- Prompt

Redisplaying the Current Command Line

Transposing Mistyped Characters

Controlling Capitalization

Designating a Keystroke as a Command Entry Disabling and Reenabling Editing Features

FC-26

FC-27

FC-27

FC-28

FC-28

FC-28

FC-29

FC-29

FC-29

Searching and Filtering CLI Output

FC-30

Understanding Regular Expressions

FC-30

Using the Cisco IOS CLI Examples

FC-35

Determining Command Syntax and Using Command History Example

Searching and Filtering CLI Output Examples

FC-37

FC-36

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Using AutoInstall and Setup

Using AutoInstall

FC-41

FC-41

Understanding AutoInstall

AutoInstall Configuration Task List

FC-42

FC-52

Monitoring and Completing the AutoInstall Process

AutoInstall Configuration Examples

FC-60

Using Setup

FC-62

Using Setup After First-Time Startup

Using Streamlined Setup Using Configuration Applications

FC-69

FC-70

Cisco ConfigMaker Cisco Fast Step

FC-70

FC-71

FC-62

Configuring Operating Characteristics for Terminals

FC-59

FC-73

Terminal Operating Characteristics Configuration Task List

FC-73

Displaying Information About the Current Terminal Session

FC-74

Setting Local Terminal Parameters

Saving Local Settings Between Sessions

Ending a Session

Changing Terminal Session Parameters

FC-74

FC-75

FC-76

FC-76

Defining the Escape Character and Other Key Sequences

Specifying Telnet Operation Characteristics

Configuring Data Transparency for File Transfers Specifying an International Character Display

Setting Character Padding

Specifying the Terminal and Keyboard Type

Changing the Terminal Screen Length and Width

Enabling Pending Output Notifications

Creating Character and Packet Dispatch Sequences

Changing Flow Control for the Current Session

Enabling Session Locking

Configuring Automatic Baud Rate Detection

Setting a Line as Insecure

Configuring Communication Parameters for Terminal Ports

FC-78

FC-81

FC-83

FC-80

FC-82

FC-84

FC-84

FC-85

FC-86

FC-87

FC-86

FC-87

FC-76

FC-87

Displaying Debug Messages on the Console and Terminals

Recording the Serial Device Location

FC-88

FC-88

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Changing the Retry Interval for a Terminal Port Queue

FC-88

Configuring LPD Protocol Support on a Printer

FC-89

Managing Connections, Menus, and System Banners

FC-91

Managing Connections, Menus, and System Banners Task List

Managing Connections

FC-92

FC-91

Displaying Current Terminal Characteristics

Escaping Terminal Sessions and Switching to Other Connections

Assigning a Logical Name to a Connection

Changing a Login Name

Locking Access to a Terminal

Sending Messages to Other Terminals

Clearing TCP Connections

Exiting a Session Started from a Router

Logging Out of a Router Disconnecting a Line

FC-92

FC-93

FC-94

FC-95

FC-96

FC-96

FC-96

FC-97

FC-97

Configuring Terminal Messages

FC-97

FC-93

Configuring an Idle Terminal Message

FC-98

Configuring a “Line in Use” Message

FC-98

Configuring a “Host Failed” Message

FC-98

Configuring Terminal Banners Using Banner Tokens

FC-99

FC-99

Configuring a Message-of-the-Day Banner

Configuring a Login Banner Configuring an EXEC Banner

Configuring an Incoming Banner

Configuring a SLIP-PPP Banner Message

Enabling or Disabling the Display of Banners

FC-100

FC-100

FC-100

FC-100

FC-101

FC-101

Creating Menus

FC-103

Creating a Menu Task List

FC-104

Specifying the Menu Title

FC-104

Specifying the Menu Prompt Specifying the Menu Item Text

Specifying the Underlying Command for the Menu Item

Specifying the Default Command for the Menu

Creating a Submenu

FC-105

FC-106

FC-108

FC-108

FC-106

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Creating Hidden Menu Entries

Specifying Menu Display Configuration Options

Specifying per-Item Menu Options

Invoking the Menu

Deleting the Menu from the Configuration

FC-109

FC-110

FC-111

FC-111

FC-112

Connection Management, System Banner, and User Menu Configuration Examples

Changing a Login Name Example

Sending Messages to Other Terminals Example

Clearing a TCP/IP Connection Example

Configuring Banners Example

Setting a SLIP-PPP Banner with Banner Tokens Example

Configuring a Menu Example

FC-113

FC-113

FC-114

FC-115

FC-116

FC-115

Using the Cisco Web Browser User Interface (UI)

FC-117

Cisco Web Browser UI Task List Enabling the Cisco Web Browser UI

Configuring Access to the Cisco Web Browser UI

FC-117

FC-118

FC-118

Specifying the Method for User Authentication

FC-118

Applying an Access List to the HTTP Server Changing the HTTP Server Port Number

Accessing and Using the Cisco Web Browser UI

FC-118

FC-119

FC-119

Accessing the Router Home Page

Issuing Commands Using the Cisco Web Browser UI

FC-119

Customizing the Cisco Web Browser UI

Understanding SSIs

Customizing HTML Pages Using SSIs

FC-123

FC-123

FC-125

Copying HTML Pages to Flash Memory Displaying HTML Files Containing SSIs Cisco Web Browser UI Customization Examples

FC-125

FC-125

FC-126

FC-121

Using the SSI EXEC Command Example

FC-126

Using the SSI ECHO Command Example

FC-127

FC-112

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File Management

Using the Cisco IOS File System (IFS) IFS Use and Management Task List

Using the Cisco IOS File System (IFS) IFS Use and Management Task List

FC-131

FC-131

Understanding IFS

FC-132

Displaying and Classifying Files Platform-Independent Commands Minimal Prompting for Commands

Displaying and Classifying Files Platform-Independent Commands Minimal Prompting for Commands
Displaying and Classifying Files Platform-Independent Commands Minimal Prompting for Commands

FC-132

FC-132

FC-132

Creating and Navigating Directories

Copying Files Using URLs

FC-133

Specifying Files on a Network Server

Specifying Local Files Using URL Prefixes Using URLs in Commands

FC-133

FC-134

FC-136

FC-132

FC-133

Determining File Systems Supporting a Command

FC-136

Using the Default File System

FC-136

Using Tab Completion

FC-137

Listing Files in a File System

FC-137

Managing File Systems

FC-137

Listing Available File Systems

FC-137

Setting the Default File System

FC-138

Displaying the Current Default File System

Displaying Information About Files on a File System

Displaying a File

FC-138

FC-140

Flash Memory File System Types

FC-140

FC-138

Class A Flash File Systems

FC-141

Class B Flash File Systems

FC-143

Class C Flash File Systems

FC-145

Remote File System Management

FC-146

NVRAM File System Management

FC-146

System File System Management

FC-147

Managing Configuration Files

FC-149

Understanding Configuration Files Types of Configuration Files Location of Configuration Files

FC-149

FC-149

FC-150

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Configuration File Management Task List

FC-150

Displaying Configuration File Information

FC-151

Entering Configuration Mode and Selecting a Configuration Source

FC-151

Modifying the Configuration File at the CLI

FC-151

Copying Configuration Files from the Router to a Network Server

FC-153

Copying a Configuration File from the Router to a TFTP Server

FC-153

Copying a Configuration File from the Router to an rcp Server

FC-153

Copying a Configuration File from the Router to an FTP Server

FC-155

Copying Configuration Files from a Network Server to the Router

FC-157

Copying a Configuration File from a TFTP Server to the Router

FC-158

Copying a Configuration File from an rcp Server to the Router

FC-158

Copying a Configuration File from an FTP Server to the Router

FC-160

Maintaining Configuration Files Larger than NVRAM

FC-162

Compressing the Configuration File

Storing the Configuration in Flash Memory on Class A Flash File Systems

Loading the Configuration Commands from the Network

FC-162

FC-164

FC-163

Controlling the Parser Cache Clearing the Parser Cache Disabling the Parser Cache

FC-165

FC-166

FC-166

Reenabling the Parser Cache

Monitoring the Parser

FC-166

FC-166

Copying Configuration Files Between Different Locations

FC-167

Copying Configuration Files from Flash Memory to the Startup or Running Configuration

Copying Configuration Files Between Flash Memory File Systems Copying a Configuration File from a Server to Flash Memory Devices

FC-168

FC-169

Reexecuting the Configuration Commands in the Startup Configuration File

Clearing Configuration Information

Clearing the Startup Configuration Deleting a Specified Configuration File Specifying the Startup Configuration File

FC-171

FC-171

FC-171

FC-172

FC-170

Specifying the CONFIG_FILE Environment Variable on Class A Flash File Systems

Configuring the Router to Download Configuration Files

FC-173

FC-172

Loading and Maintaining System Images

Understanding Images Types of Images

FC-177

FC-177

FC-177

FC-167

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Image Naming Conventions

General Output Conventions for Copy Operations

FC-178

System Images Task List

Displaying System Image Information

FC-179

FC-179

FC-178

Copying Images from Flash Memory to a Network Server

FC-180

Copying an Image from Flash Memory to a TFTP Server

FC-180

Copying an Image from Flash Memory to an rcp Server

FC-181

Copying an Image from Flash Memory to an FTP Server

FC-183

Copying Images from a Network Server to Flash Memory

FC-185

Restrictions on Naming Files

FC-186

Understanding Flash Memory Space Considerations

FC-186

Output for Image Downloading Process

Copying to Flash Memory for Run-from-Flash Systems

FC-187

FC-188

Copying an Image from a TFTP Server to a Flash Memory File System

FC-188

Copying an Image from an rcp Server to a Flash Memory File System

FC-190

Copying an Image from an FTP Server to a Flash Memory File System

FC-193

Verifying the Image in Flash Memory

FC-195

Copying Images Between Local Flash Memory Devices

FC-195

Copying a File Between Local Flash Memory Devices Example

FC-196

Specifying the Startup System Image in the Configuration File

FC-197

Loading the System Image from Flash Memory

FC-198

Loading the System Image from a Network Server

FC-199

Loading the System Image from ROM

FC-201

Using a Fault-Tolerant Booting Strategy

FC-202

Recovering a System Image Using Xmodem or Ymodem

FC-203

Xmodem Transfer Using the Cisco IOS Software Example

FC-204

Xmodem Transfer Example Using the ROM Monitor

Loading and Displaying Microcode Images Understanding Microcode Images

FC-207

FC-208

Specifying the Location of the Microcode Images

Reloading the Microcode Image

Displaying Microcode Image Information Using Microcode on Specific Platforms

FC-209

FC-209

FC-210

FC-206

FC-208

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Maintaining System Memory

FC-211

Understanding Memory Types and Functions

DRAM

FC-211

EPROM

FC-212

NVRAM

FC-212

FC-211

Flash Memory

FC-212

Maintaining System Memory Task List

Displaying System Memory Information

Partitioning Flash Memory

FC-214

FC-213

FC-214

Systems that Support Partitioning

Benefits of Partitioning Flash Memory Flash Load Helper Versus Dual Flash Bank

Partitioning Flash Memory

FC-214

FC-214

FC-215

FC-215

Using Flash Load Helper to Upgrade Software on Run-from-Flash Systems

Flash Load Helper Features

Downloading Files Using the Flash Load Helper

FC-216

Formatting Flash Memory

FC-218

Flash Memory Formatting Process Recovering from Locked Blocks

FC-219

FC-219

Reallocating DRAM Memory for the Cisco 3600 Series

FC-217

FC-220

Reallocate Processor Memory and I/O Memory Example

Using Memory Scan on the Cisco 7500 Series Configuring and Verifying Memory Scan

FC-222

FC-223

FC-222

Rebooting

FC-225

Understanding Rebooting Procedures

FC-225

Which Configuration File Does the Router Use upon Startup?

Which Image Does the Router Use upon Startup?

FC-226

Rebooting Task List

Displaying Boot Information

Modifying the Configuration Register Boot Field

FC-229

FC-229

FC-229

FC-225

How the Router Uses the Boot Field

Hardware Versus Software Configuration Register Boot Fields

Modifying the Software Configuration Register Boot Field

FC-230

FC-230

FC-230

Setting Environment Variables BOOT Environment Variable

FC-232

FC-232

FC-215

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BOOTLDR Environment Variable CONFIG_FILE Environment Variable Controlling Environment Variables

BOOTLDR Environment Variable CONFIG_FILE Environment Variable Controlling Environment Variables
BOOTLDR Environment Variable CONFIG_FILE Environment Variable Controlling Environment Variables

FC-233

FC-233

FC-233

Scheduling a Reload of the System Image

FC-235

Configuring a Scheduled Reload

Display Information about a Scheduled Reload

FC-235

Cancel a Scheduled Reload Entering ROM Monitor Mode

FC-236

FC-236

Aliasing ROM Monitoring Commands

FC-237

FC-236

Manually Loading a System Image from ROM Monitor

FC-238

Manually Booting from Flash Memory in ROMMON

FC-238

Manually Booting from a Network File in ROMMON

FC-240

Manually Booting from ROM in ROMMON

FC-240

Manually Booting Using MOP in ROMMON

FC-240

Exiting from ROMMON

FC-241

Configuring Basic File Transfer Services

FC-243

Basic File Transfer Services Configuration Task List Configuring a Router as a TFTP or RARP Server

FC-243

FC-243

Configuring a Router as a TFTP Server

FC-244

Configuring a Router as a RARP Server

FC-248

Configuring System BOOTP Parameters

FC-251

FC-253

FC-250

Configuring a Router to Use rsh and rcp

FC-250

Configuring a Router to Use rsh

Configuring a Router to Use rcp

Configuring a Router to Use FTP Connections

FC-255

System Management

Performing Basic System Management Basic System Management Task List

FC-259

FC-259

Configuring the System Name Customizing the CLI Prompt

Creating and Displaying Command Aliases

Controlling Minor Services

FC-260

FC-260

FC-261

FC-260

Controlling the BOOTP Server Controlling the Finger Protocol

FC-262

FC-262

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Hiding Telnet Addresses

FC-263

Setting Time and Calendar Services Understanding Time Sources

Setting Time and Calendar Services Understanding Time Sources

FC-263

FC-264

Configuring NTP

FC-266

Configuring SNTP

FC-273

Configuring VINES Time Service

Configuring Time and Date Manually

Using the Hardware Clock

Monitoring Time and Calendar Services

Configuring Time Ranges

FC-273

FC-273

FC-275

FC-277

FC-276

Delaying EXEC Startup

FC-278

Handling an Idle Telnet Connection Setting the Interval for Load Data

Handling an Idle Telnet Connection Setting the Interval for Load Data

FC-278

FC-279

Limiting the Number of TCP Transactions

Configuring Switching and Scheduling Priorities

Modifying the System Buffer Size

Basic System Management Examples System Configuration File Example

FC-279

FC-280

FC-281

FC-282

FC-280

Clock, Calendar, and NTP Configuration Examples

Buffer Modification Examples

FC-283

FC-282

Troubleshooting and Fault Management

FC-285

Troubleshooting and Fault Management Task List

Displaying System Information Using show Commands

Testing Network Connectivity

FC-285

FC-286

FC-287

Configuring the TCP Keepalive Packet Service

FC-287

Testing Connections with the ping Command

FC-288

Tracing Packet Routes Testing Memory and Interfaces

FC-288

FC-288

Testing Flash Memory Status

FC-289

Testing System Memory Testing Interfaces Status Logging System Error Messages Enabling Message Logging

Testing System Memory Testing Interfaces Status Logging System Error Messages Enabling Message Logging
Testing System Memory Testing Interfaces Status Logging System Error Messages Enabling Message Logging
Testing System Memory Testing Interfaces Status Logging System Error Messages Enabling Message Logging

FC-289

FC-289

FC-289

FC-290

Enabling Message Logging for a Slave Card Setting the Error Message Display Device

FC-290

FC-290

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Configuring Synchronization of Logging Messages

Enabling Time-Stamps on Log Messages

Limiting the Error Message Severity Level and Facilities

Defining the UNIX System Logging Facility

Displaying Logging Information

Logging Errors to a UNIX Syslog Daemon

FC-291

FC-291

FC-293

FC-294

FC-291

FC-294

Setting the Syslog Source Address Using Field Diagnostics on Line Cards

Setting the Syslog Source Address Using Field Diagnostics on Line Cards

Troubleshooting Specific Line Cards Storing Line Card Crash Information

Troubleshooting Specific Line Cards Storing Line Card Crash Information

FC-294

FC-295

FC-296

FC-296

Creating Core Dumps

FC-296

Specifying the Protocol for the Core Dump

Specifying the Name of the Core Dump File Creating an Exception Memory Core Dump Setting a Spurious Interrupt Core Dump

Specifying the Name of the Core Dump File Creating an Exception Memory Core Dump Setting a
Specifying the Name of the Core Dump File Creating an Exception Memory Core Dump Setting a

FC-297

FC-299

FC-299

FC-300

Enabling Debug Operations

Enabling Conditionally Triggered Debugging

FC-300

FC-301

Enabling Protocol-Specific debug Commands Enabling Conditional Debugging Commands Specifying Multiple Debugging Conditions

Conditionally Triggered Debugging Configuration Examples

FC-302

FC-302

FC-304

Using the Environmental Monitor

FC-306

FC-304

Configuring SNMP Support Understanding SNMP SNMP Notifications

FC-307

FC-307

FC-308

MIBs and RFCs

FC-310

SNMP Versions

FC-311

SNMP Configuration Task List

FC-312

Creating or Modifying an SNMP View Record

Creating or Modifying Access Control for an SNMP Community

Specifying an SNMP-Server Engine Name (ID)

Specifying SNMP-Server Group Names

FC-313

FC-314

FC-314

Configuring SNMP-Server Hosts

FC-314

Configuring SNMP-Server Users

FC-315

Enabling the SNMP Agent Shutdown Mechanism

FC-315

FC-313

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Setting the Contact, Location, and Serial Number of the SNMP Agent

Defining the Maximum SNMP Agent Packet Size

Limiting the Number of TFTP Servers Used via SNMP

Monitoring and Troubleshooting SNMP Status

Disabling the SNMP Agent

Configuring SNMP Notifications

Configuring the Router as an SNMP Manager

FC-315

FC-316

FC-316

FC-316

FC-316

FC-319

SNMP Configuration Examples

New MIB Features in Cisco IOS Release 12.2

FC-320

FC-321

FC-315

Circuit Interface Identification MIB

Ethernet-like Interfaces MIB

Event MIB

Expression MIB Support for Delta, Wildcarding, and Aggregation

Interfaces Group MIB Enhancements

MIB Enhancements for Universal Gateways and Access Servers

MSDP MIB

NTP MIB FC-325 Response Time Monitor MIB

FC-321

FC-321

FC-322

FC-322

FC-325

FC-325

FC-322

FC-323

Configuring Cisco Discovery Protocol

FC-327

Configuring the Cisco Discovery Protocol

CDP Configuration Task List

FC-328

FC-327

Setting the CDP Transmission Timer and Hold Time

Reenabling CDP on a Local Router

Reenabling CDP Version-2 Advertisements

Reenabling CDP on an Interface Monitoring and Maintaining CDP

FC-330

FC-329

FC-329

FC-329

FC-329

CDP Configuration Examples

FC-330

Setting the CDP Transmission Timer and Hold Time Example

Monitoring and Maintaining CDP Example

FC-331

Configuring RMON Support Configuring RMON Support

FC-333

FC-333

Configuring RMON Alarm and Event Notifications

Configuring RMON Groups

Monitoring and Verifying RMON Configuration

RMON Configuration Examples

FC-335

FC-337

FC-335

FC-336

FC-331

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Network Monitoring Using Cisco Service Assurance Agent

FC-339

Understanding the Cisco SA Agent

FC-339

New Features in Cisco IOS Release 12.2

FC-340

Cisco SA Agent Configuration Task List

FC-340

Configuring SA Agent Operations

FC-341

Configuring the Operation Type

FC-342

Configuring SA Agent Operation Characteristics

FC-344

Scheduling the Operation

FC-349

Enabling the SA Agent Responder on Operational Targets

FC-349

Configuring SA Agent Control Message Authentication

FC-350

Resetting the SA Agent

Restarting a Stopped Operation

Displaying SA Agent Status and SA Agent Operational Results

Changing the Memory Threshold for the SA Agent

Configuring Specific Operations

Configuring SA Agent Operations Using SNMP

FC-350

FC-351

FC-352

FC-353

FC-356

FC-351

Accessing SA Agent Data Using SNMP

FC-357

Enabling SA Agent SNMP Notifications

FC-357

SA Agent Configuration Using the CLI Examples

FC-358

SNA Echo Example

IP/ICMP Path Echo Example

TcpConnect Example

SA Agent Control Protocol Authentication Example

Jitter Operation Example HTTP GET Operation Example

HTTP RAW Operation Using RAW Submode Example

HTTP RAW Operation Through a Proxy Server Example

FTP Operation Example DNS Operation Example

FC-358

FC-361

FC-360

FC-362

FC-363

FC-365

FC-366

FC-366

FC-366

FC-367

DLSw Operation Example

FC-367

DHCP Operation Example

FC-368

Connection Loss Trigger Example

FC-368

SA Agent Configuration Using SNMP Examples

FC-369

Creating an Echo Operation Example Creating a Path Echo Operation Example

FC-369

FC-370

xvi Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

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xvi Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

Contents

Creating a UDP Operation Example

FC-370

Creating a TCP Operation Example

FC-370

Creating a Jitter Operation Example

FC-370

Creating an HTTP Get Operation Example

FC-371

Creating an HTTP RAW Operation Example

FC-371

Creating a DNS Operation Example

FC-371

Creating a DLSw Operation Example

FC-371

Creating a DHCP Operation Example

FC-371

Creating an FTP Operation Example

FC-372

Configuring Web Cache Services Using WCCP

Understanding WCCP

FC-373

FC-373

Understanding WCCPv1 Configuration

FC-374

Understanding WCCPv2 Configuration

FC-375

WCCPv2 Features

FC-376

Support for Services Other than HTTP

FC-376

Support for Multiple Routers

MD5 Security

Web Cache Packet Return

Load Distribution

FC-377

FC-377

FC-376

FC-377

Restrictions for WCCPv2

Configuring WCCP

FC-377

FC-378

Specifying a Version of WCCP

Configuring a Service Group Using WCCPv2

Excluding Traffic on a Specific Interface from Redirection

Registering a Router to a Multicast Address Using Access Lists for a WCCP Service Group

FC-378

FC-379

FC-380

FC-381

FC-380

Setting a Password for a Router and Cache Engines Verifying and Monitoring WCCP Configuration Settings

WCCP Configuration Examples

FC-382

Changing the Version of WCCP on a Router Example

Performing a General WCCPv2 Configuration Example

Running a Web Cache Service Example Running a Reverse Proxy Service Example

Registering a Router to a Multicast Address Example

Using Access Lists Example

FC-383

FC-384

FC-384

FC-381

FC-382

FC-383

FC-383

FC-384

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xvii

Contents

Setting a Password for a Router and Cache Engines Example

Verifying WCCP Settings Example

FC-385

FC-384

Appendixes

Cisco IOS Command Modes Base Command Modes

User EXEC Mode

Privileged EXEC Mode

FC-389

FC-389

FC-389

FC-390

Global Configuration Mode

ROM Monitor Mode

Setup Mode

Configuration Modes and Submodes

FC-390

FC-390

FC-390

FC-391

AAA Preauthentication Configuration Mode

FC-391

Access List Configuration Mode Access-point Configuration Mode

Access List Configuration Mode Access-point Configuration Mode

FC-391

FC-392

Access-point List Configuration Mode Address Family Configuration Mode

FC-392

FC-392

ALPS Circuit Configuration Mode ALPS ASCU Configuration Mode

ALPS Circuit Configuration Mode ALPS ASCU Configuration Mode

FC-392

FC-393

APPN Configuration Modes ATM VC Configuration Mode

ATM VC Bundle Configuration Mode

ATM VC Bundle-Member Configuration Mode

ATM VC CES Configuration Mode

ATM VC Class Configuration Mode ATM-FR VC Group Configuration Mode ATM PVC Range Configuration Mode

ATM PVC-in-range Configuration Mode

FC-393

FC-393

FC-393

FC-394

FC-394

FC-394

FC-395

FC-395

CA Identity Configuration Mode

CA Trusted-Root Configuration Mode Call Discriminator Configuration Mode

FC-395

FC-395

FC-395

FC-394

Called-Group Configuration Mode

FC-396

CASA Configuration Mode

FC-396

CAS Custom Configuration Mode

FC-396

CES Configuration Mode

FC-396

xviii Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

xviii

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xviii Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

Contents

Certificate Chain Configuration Mode

FC-396

Class Map Configuration Mode Controller Configuration Mode Crypto Map Configuration Mode

Class Map Configuration Mode Controller Configuration Mode Crypto Map Configuration Mode
Class Map Configuration Mode Controller Configuration Mode Crypto Map Configuration Mode

FC-397

FC-397

FC-397

Crypto Transform Configuration Mode

FC-397

Customer Profile Configuration Mode

FC-397

DHCP Pool Configuration Mode

FC-398

Dial Peer Voice Configuration Mode

FC-398

Dial Peer COR List Configuration Mode

FC-398

Dialer DNIS Group Configuration Mode

FC-398

DLUR Configuration Mode

DNIS Group Configuration Mode

Extended Named Access List (NACL) Configuration Mode

Frame Relay DLCI Configuration Mode

Frame Relay Congestion Management Configuration Mode

FRF.5 / FRF.8 Configuration Mode Gatekeeper Configuration Mode Gateway Configuration Mode

Hex Input Mode

HTTP Raw Request Configuration Mode

Hub Configuration Mode

IBM Channel Configuration Mode

IBM Channel Internal Adapter Configuration Mode

IBM Channel Internal LAN Interface Configuration Mode

Interface Configuration Mode

IP Host Backup Configuration Mode IPX Router Configuration Mode

ISAKMP Policy Configuration Mode Key-Chain Configuration Mode Key-Chain Key Configuration Mode

LANE Database Configuration Mode

Line Configuration Mode

Listen-Point Configuration Mode Map Class Configuration Mode Map-List Configuration Mode

FC-398

FC-399

FC-399

FC-399

FC-400

FC-400

FC-400

FC-400

FC-400

FC-400

FC-401

FC-401

FC-402

FC-402

FC-402

FC-402

FC-403

FC-403

FC-403

FC-403

FC-403

FC-403

FC-399

FC-399

FC-401

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

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xix

Contents

Modem Pool Configuration Mode

FC-404

MPOA Client (MPC) Configuration Mode

FC-404

MPOA Server (MPS) Configuration Mode

FC-404

MRM Manager Configuration Mode

FC-404

Policy-Map Configuration Mode Poll-Group Configuration Mode

Policy-Map Configuration Mode Poll-Group Configuration Mode

FC-404

FC-405

Public-Key Chain Configuration Mode Public-Key Key Configuration Mode

Public-Key Chain Configuration Mode Public-Key Key Configuration Mode

FC-405

FC-405

Public-Key Hex Input Configuration Mode

FC-405

QoS Class-Map Configuration Mode

FC-405

QoS Policy-Map Configuration Mode

FC-406

QoS Policy-Map Class Configuration Mode

FC-406

RADIUS Server Group Configuration Mode

FC-406

RED Group Configuration Mode

RLM Group Configuration Mode RLM Device Configuration Mode Resource Group Configuration Mode

(Resource-Pool) Call Discriminator Profile Configuration Mode

FC-407

FC-407

FC-407

FC-407

FC-407

(Resource-Pool) Customer Profile Configuration Mode (Resource-Pool) Resource Group Configuration Mode (Resource-Pool) Service Profile Configuration Mode (Resource-Pool) VPDN Profile Configuration Mode

Configuration Mode (Resource-Pool) Service Profile Configuration Mode (Resource-Pool) VPDN Profile Configuration Mode
Configuration Mode (Resource-Pool) Service Profile Configuration Mode (Resource-Pool) VPDN Profile Configuration Mode
Configuration Mode (Resource-Pool) Service Profile Configuration Mode (Resource-Pool) VPDN Profile Configuration Mode

FC-408

FC-408

FC-408

FC-408

Route-Map Configuration Mode Router Configuration Mode RTR Entry Configuration Mode

RTR HTTP Raw Request Configuration Mode Server Group RADIUS Configuration Mode

Server Group TACACS+ Configuration Mode

Service Profile Configuration Mode

SLB DFP Configuration Mode

SLB Real Server Configuration Mode SLB Server-Farm Configuration Mode SLB Virtual Server Configuration Mode

Standard Named Access List (NACL) Configuration Mode

Static Maps Class Configuration Mode

FC-409

FC-409

FC-409

FC-409

FC-409

FC-410

FC-410

FC-410

FC-410

FC-411

FC-411

FC-410

FC-411

xx Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

xx

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

xx Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

Contents

Static Maps List Configuration Mode Subinterface Configuration Mode

System Controller Poll-Group Configuration Mode

Time Range Configuration Mode

TN3270 Server Configuration Mode TN3270 DLUR Configuration Mode TN3270 DLUR PU Configuration Mode

TN3270 DLUR Linked SAP Configuration Mode

TN3270 Listen-Point Configuration Mode

FC-412

FC-412

FC-412

FC-413

FC-413

FC-413

FC-412

FC-414

FC-414

TN3270 Listen-Point PU Configuration Mode

FC-414

TN3270 PU Configuration Mode

FC-414

TN3270 Response-Time Configuration Mode

FC-415

TN3270 Security Configuration Mode

FC-415

TN3270 Security Profile Configuration Mode

FC-415

Translation-Rule Configuration Mode

Voice Class Configuration Mode Voice Port Configuration Mode Voice Service Configuration Mode

Voice Service Session Configuration Mode

VoIP Dial Peer Configuration Mode

VRF Configuration Mode

FC-415

FC-416

FC-416

FC-416

FC-416

FC-416

FC-417

VPDN Group Mode and Submodes VPDN Profile Configuration Mode X.25 Profile Configuration Mode Configuration Modes Summary Table

FC-417

FC-417

FC-417

FC-418

Configuring Line Cards on the Cisco 7500 Series

FC-431

Performing a Single Line Card Reload

Configuring Dual RSPs on Cisco 7500 Series Routers

FC-431

FC-431

Understanding Master and Slave Operation

Understanding Dual RSP Implementation Methods

Dual RSP Configuration Task List

Setting Environment Variables on the Master and Slave RSP

Manually Setting Environment Variables on the Slave RSP

FC-432

FC-433

FC-433

Monitoring and Maintaining Dual RSP Operation

FC-444

Overriding the Slave Image Bundled with the Master Image

FC-442

FC-443

FC-444

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

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xxi

Contents

Manually Synchronizing Configuration Files

Troubleshooting and Reloading a Failed RSP Card

Disabling Access to the Slave Console

Displaying Information About Master and Slave RSP Cards

FC-444

FC-444

FC-445

FC-445

Index

xxii Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

xxii

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

xxii Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide
About Cisco IOS Software Documentation This chapter discusses the objectives, audience, organization, and conventions of

About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

This chapter discusses the objectives, audience, organization, and conventions of Cisco IOS software documentation. It also provides sources for obtaining documentation from Cisco Systems.

Documentation Objectives

Cisco IOS software documentation describes the tasks and commands necessary to configure and maintain Cisco networking devices.

Audience

The Cisco IOS software documentation set is intended primarily for users who configure and maintain Cisco networking devices (such as routers and switches) but who may not be familiar with the tasks, the relationship between tasks, or the Cisco IOS software commands necessary to perform particular tasks. The Cisco IOS software documentation set is also intended for those users experienced with Cisco IOS software who need to know about new features, new configuration options, and new software characteristics in the current Cisco IOS software release.

Documentation Organization

The Cisco IOS software documentation set consists of documentation modules and master indexes. In addition to the main documentation set, there are supporting documents and resources.

Documentation Modules

The Cisco IOS documentation modules consist of configuration guides and corresponding command reference publications. Chapters in a configuration guide describe protocols, configuration tasks, and Cisco IOS software functionality and contain comprehensive configuration examples. Chapters in a command reference publication provide complete Cisco IOS command syntax information. Use each configuration guide in conjunction with its corresponding command reference publication.

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide xxiii
Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide xxiii

xxiii

Documentation Organization

About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

47953

Figure 1 shows the Cisco IOS software documentation modules.

Figure 1 shows the Cisco IOS software documentation modules. Note The abbreviations (for example, FC and

Note

The abbreviations (for example, FC and FR) next to the book icons are page designators, which are defined in a key in the index of each document to help you with navigation. The bullets under each module list the major technology areas discussed in the corresponding books.

Figure 1

Cisco IOS Software Documentation Modules

Cisco IOS IPC IP1R Cisco IOS IP Cisco IOS Apollo Configuration Cisco IOS AppleTalk and
Cisco IOS
IPC
IP1R
Cisco IOS
IP
Cisco IOS
Apollo
Configuration
Cisco IOS
AppleTalk and
Cisco IOS
FC
P2C
Banyan
P3C
Guide
IP Command
Novell
IPX
Configuration
DECnet, Domain, VINES,
ISO
Reference,
Configuration
Fundamentals
CLNS,
and XNS
Volume
1 of 3:
Guide
Configuration
Configuration
Addressing
Guide
Guide
and Services
IP3R
Cisco IOS
Cisco IOS
Cisco IOS
Cisco IOS
Apollo
IP2R
AppleTalk and
Cisco IOS
IP Command
IP Command
Banyan
Novell IPX
Configuration
Reference,
Reference,
DECnet, Domain, VINES,
ISO
Command
Fundamentals
Volume
2 of 3:
Volume
3 of 3:
CLNS, and XNS
Reference
Command
FR
Routing
Multicast
P2R
P3R
Command
Reference
Protocols
Reference
Module FC/FR:
Module IPC/IP1R/IP2R/IP3R:
Module P2C/P2R:
Module P3C/P3R:
Cisco IOS User
Interfaces
• IP Addressing and Services
• AppleTalk
• Apollo Domain
• IP Routing Protocols
• Novell IPX
• Banyan VINES
File Management
• IP Multicast
• DECnet
System Management
• ISO CLNS
• XNS
Cisco IOS
Cisco IOS
Cisco IOS
Security
Cisco IOS
Mobile
WC
IC
MWC
SC
Interface
Configuration
Wide-Area
Wireless
Configuration
Guide
Networking
Configuration
Guide
Configuration
Guide
Guide
Cisco IOS
Cisco IOS
Cisco IOS
Security
Cisco IOS
Mobile
Interface
Command
Wide-Area
Wireless
Command
Reference
Networking
Command
Reference
WR
Command
IR
MWR
Reference
SR
Reference

Module WC/WR:

Module IC/IR:

Module MWC/MWR:

Module SC/SR:

• ATM

• LAN Interfaces

• General Packet

• AAA Security Services

• Broadband Access

• Serial Interfaces

Radio Service

• Security Server Protocols

• Frame Relay

• Logical Interfaces

• Traffic Filtering and Firewalls

• SMDS

• X.25 and LAPB

• IP Security and Encryption

• Passwords and Privileges

• Neighbor Router Authentication

• IP Security Options

• Supported AV Pairs

xxiv Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

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Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

xxiv Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

Documentation Organization

DC

Cisco IOS Dial Technologies Configuration Guide Cisco IOS Dial DR Technologies Command Reference Module DC/DR:
Cisco IOS
Dial
Technologies
Configuration
Guide
Cisco IOS
Dial
DR
Technologies
Command
Reference
Module DC/DR:

Preparing for Dial Access

Modem and Dial Shelf Configuration and Management

ISDN Configuration

Signalling Configuration

Dial-on-Demand Routing Configuration

Dial-Backup Configuration

Dial-Related Addressing Services

Virtual Templates, Profiles, and Networks

PPP Configuration

Callback and Bandwidth Allocation Configuration

Dial Access Specialized Features

• Dial Access Scenarios Cisco IOS VC Voice, Video, and Fax Configuration Guide Cisco IOS
• Dial Access Scenarios
Cisco IOS
VC
Voice, Video,
and Fax
Configuration
Guide
Cisco IOS
Voice, Video,
and Fax
Command
VR
Reference

Module VC/VR:

Voice over IP

Call Control Signalling

Voice over Frame Relay

Voice over ATM

Telephony Applications

Trunk Management

Fax, Video, and Modem Support

TC

Cisco IOS Terminal Services Configuration Guide Cisco IOS Terminal TR Services Command Reference Module TC/TR:
Cisco IOS
Terminal
Services
Configuration
Guide
Cisco IOS
Terminal
TR
Services
Command
Reference
Module TC/TR:

ARA

LAT

NASI

Telnet

TN3270

XRemote

X.28 PAD

Protocol Translation

QC

Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions QR
Cisco IOS
Quality of
Service
Solutions
Configuration
Guide
Cisco IOS
Quality of
Service
Solutions
QR
Command
Reference
Module QC/QR:

Packet Classification

Congestion Management

Congestion Avoidance

Policing and Shaping

Link Efficiency

Signalling

Mechanisms

Cisco IOS Bridging and BC IBM Networking Configuration Guide B2R B1R Cisco IOS Cisco IOS
Cisco IOS
Bridging and
BC
IBM
Networking
Configuration
Guide
B2R
B1R
Cisco IOS
Cisco IOS
Bridging
Bridging
and IBM
and IBM
Networking
Networking
Command
Command
Reference,
Reference,
Volume 1
of 2
Volume
2 of 2
Module BC/B1R:
Module BC/B2R:
• Transparent
Bridging
• DSPU and SNA
Service Point
• SRB
• SNA Switching
• Token Ring
Services
Inter-Switch Link
• Cisco Transaction
• Token Ring Route
Connection
Switch Module
• Cisco Mainframe
• RSRB
Channel Connection
• DLSw+
• CLAW and TCP/IP
• Serial Tunnel and
Offload

Block Serial Tunnel CSNA, CMPC,

LLC2 and SDLC

and CMPC+

IBM Network Media Translation

TN3270 Server

SNA Frame Relay Access

NCIA Client/Server

• Airline Product Set Cisco IOS Switching XC Services Configuration Guide Cisco IOS Switching Services
• Airline Product Set
Cisco IOS
Switching
XC
Services
Configuration
Guide
Cisco IOS
Switching
Services
Command
Reference
XR
Module XC/XR:
47954

Cisco IOS

Switching Paths

NetFlow Switching

Multiprotocol Label Switching

Multilayer Switching

Multicast Distributed Switching

Virtual LANs

LAN Emulation

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

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xxv

Documentation Organization

About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

Master Indexes

Two master indexes provide indexing information for the Cisco IOS software documentation set:

an index for the configuration guides and an index for the command references. Individual books also contain a book-specific index.

The master indexes provide a quick way for you to find a command when you know the command name but not which module contains the command. When you use the online master indexes, you can click the page number for an index entry and go to that page in the online document.

Supporting Documents and Resources

The following documents and resources support the Cisco IOS software documentation set:

Cisco IOS Command Summary (two volumes)—This publication explains the function and syntax of the Cisco IOS software commands. For more information about defaults and usage guidelines, refer to the Cisco IOS command reference publications.

Cisco IOS System Error Messages—This publication lists and describes Cisco IOS system error messages. Not all system error messages indicate problems with your system. Some are purely informational, and others may help diagnose problems with communications lines, internal hardware, or the system software.

Cisco IOS Debug Command Reference—This publication contains an alphabetical listing of the debug commands and their descriptions. Documentation for each command includes a brief description of its use, command syntax, usage guidelines, and sample output.

Dictionary of Internetworking Terms and Acronyms—This Cisco publication compiles and defines the terms and acronyms used in the internetworking industry.

New feature documentation—The Cisco IOS software documentation set documents the mainline release of Cisco IOS software (for example, Cisco IOS Release 12.2). New software features are introduced in early deployment releases (for example, the Cisco IOS “T” release train for 12.2, 12.2(x)T). Documentation for these new features can be found in standalone documents called “feature modules.” Feature module documentation describes new Cisco IOS software and hardware networking functionality and is available on Cisco.com and the Documentation CD-ROM.

Release notes—This documentation describes system requirements, provides information about new and changed features, and includes other useful information about specific software releases. See the “Using Software Release Notes” section for more information.

Caveats documentation—This documentation provides information about Cisco IOS software defects in specific software releases.

RFCs—RFCs are standards documents maintained by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Cisco IOS software documentation references supported RFCs when applicable. The full text of referenced RFCs may be obtained on the World Wide Web at http://www.rfc-editor.org/.

MIBs—MIBs are used for network monitoring. For lists of supported MIBs by platform and release, and to download MIB files, see the Cisco MIB website on Cisco.com at http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml.

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xxvi Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

New and Changed Information

New and Changed Information

The following organizational changes have been made since the 12.1 release of the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide:

The material found in the “Monitoring the Router and Network” chapter of the previous release can now be found in the following chapters:

“Configuring SNMP Support”

“Configuring RMON Support”

“Configuring Cisco Discovery Protocol”

“Network Monitoring Using Cisco Service Assurance Agent”

The chapters titled “System Management Using System Controllers” and “Managing Dial Shelves” have been removed; information on system controllers and dial shelves is now found in the Cisco IOS Dial Technologies Configuration Guide.

New Features in Cisco IOS Release 12.2

Cisco IOS Release 12.2 software incorporates the enhancements available in Cisco IOS Release 12.1(1) through 12.1(5) and combines them with the new features introduced in Cisco IOS Release 12.1(1)T through 12.1(5)T.

For a complete list of new features in Cisco IOS Release 12.2, see the “New Features in Cisco IOS Release 12.2” index or the “New Features in Release 12.1 T” online index, available on Cisco.com and the Documentation CD-ROM. The Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide for Release 12.2 includes information about the following new features in the Cisco IOS software:

In the “Configuring SNMP Support” chapter:

Call Tracker plus ISDN and AAA Enhancements for the Cisco AS5300 and Cisco AS5800

Circuit Interface Identification MIB

Cisco AAA Server MIB and Additional Enhancements for the Cisco AS5300 and Cisco AS5800

Cisco AAA Session MIB

Ethernet-like Interfaces MIB

Event MIB

Individual SNMP Trap Support

Interface Index Persistence

Interfaces Group MIB Enhancement

Monitoring Resource Availability on Cisco AS5300 Universal Access Servers

MSDP MIB

NTP MIB

In the “Managing Configuration Files” chapter:

Parser Cache

In the “Network Monitoring Using Cisco Service Assurance Agent” chapter:

Service Assurance Agent Enhancements

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

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xxvii

Identifying Platform Support for Cisco IOS Software Features

About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

In the “Performing Basic System Management” chapter:

Trimble Palisade NTP Synchronization Driver for the Cisco 7200 Series

In the “Configuring Web Cache Services Using WCCP” chapter:

WCCP Redirection on Inbound Interfaces

In the “Configuring Line Cards on the Cisco 7500 Series” Appendix:

Single Line Card Reload for the Cisco 7500 Series

Identifying Platform Support for Cisco IOS Software Features

Cisco IOS software is packaged in feature sets consisting of software images that support specific platforms. The feature sets available for a specific platform depend on which Cisco IOS software images are included in a release. To identify the set of software images available in a specific release or to find out if a feature is available in a given Cisco IOS software image, see the following sections:

Using Feature Navigator

Using Software Release Notes

Using Feature Navigator

Feature Navigator is a web-based tool that enables you to quickly determine which Cisco IOS software images support a particular set of features and which features are supported in a particular Cisco IOS image.

Feature Navigator is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To access Feature Navigator, you must have an account on Cisco.com. If you have forgotten or lost your account information, e-mail the Contact Database Administration group at cdbadmin@cisco.com. If you do not have an account on Cisco.com, go to http://www.cisco.com/register and follow the directions to establish an account.

To use Feature Navigator, you must have a JavaScript-enabled web browser such as Netscape 3.0 or later, or Internet Explorer 4.0 or later. Internet Explorer 4.0 always has JavaScript enabled. To enable JavaScript for Netscape 3.x or Netscape 4.x, follow the instructions provided with the web browser. For JavaScript support and enabling instructions for other browsers, check with the browser vendor.

Feature Navigator is updated when major Cisco IOS software releases and technology releases occur. You can access Feature Navigator at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/fn

Using Software Release Notes

Cisco IOS software releases include release notes that provide the following information:

Platform support information

Memory recommendations

Microcode support information

Feature set tables

Feature descriptions

Open and resolved severity 1 and 2 caveats for all platforms

xxviii Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

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Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

xxviii Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

Document Conventions

Release notes are intended to be release-specific for the most current release, and the information provided in these documents may not be cumulative in providing information about features that first appeared in previous releases.

Document Conventions

Within Cisco IOS software documentation, the term router is generally used to refer to a variety of Cisco products (for example, routers, access servers, and switches). Routers, access servers, and other networking devices that support Cisco IOS software are shown interchangeably within examples. These products are used only for illustrative purposes; that is, an example that shows one product does not necessarily indicate that other products are not supported.

The Cisco IOS documentation set uses the following conventions:

Convention

Description

^ or Ctrl

The ^ and Ctrl symbols represent the Control key. For example, the key combination ^D or Ctrl-D means hold down the Control key while you press the D key. Keys are indicated in capital letters but are not case sensitive.

string

A string is a nonquoted set of characters shown in italics. For example, when setting an SNMP community string to public, do not use quotation marks around the string or the string will include the quotation marks.

 

Command syntax descriptions use the following conventions:

Convention

Description

boldface

Boldface text indicates commands and keywords that you enter literally as shown.

italics

Italic text indicates arguments for which you supply values.

[x]

Square brackets enclose an optional element (keyword or argument).

|

A vertical line indicates a choice within an optional or required set of keywords or arguments.

[x

| y]

Square brackets enclosing keywords or arguments separated by a vertical line indicate an optional choice.

{x | y}

Braces enclosing keywords or arguments separated by a vertical line indicate a required choice.

 

Nested sets of square brackets or braces indicate optional or required choices within optional or required elements. For example:

Convention

Description

[x

{y | z}]

Braces and a vertical line within square brackets indicate a required choice within an optional element.

Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide

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xxix

Obtaining Documentation

About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

Examples use the following conventions:

Convention

Description

screen

Examples of information displayed on the screen are set in Courier font.

boldface screen

Examples of text that you must enter are set in Courier bold font.

<

>

Angle brackets enclose text that is not printed to the screen, such as passwords.

!

An exclamation point at the beginning of a line indicates a comment line. (Exclamation points are also displayed by the Cisco IOS software for certain processes.)

[

]

Square brackets enclose default responses to system prompts.

The following conventions are used to attract the attention of the reader:

conventions are used to attract the attention of the reader: Caution Means reader be careful .

Caution

Means reader be careful. In this situation, you might do something that could result in equipment damage or loss of data.

that could result in equipment damage or loss of data. Note Means reader take note .

Note

Means reader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to materials not contained in this manual.

or references to materials not contained in this manual. Timesaver Means the described action saves time

Timesaver

Means the described action saves time. You can save time by performing the action described in the paragraph.

Obtaining Documentation

The following sections provide sources for obtaining documentation from Cisco Systems.

World Wide Web

The most current Cisco documentation is available on the World Wide Web at the following website:

http://www.cisco.com

Translated documentation is available at the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.html

Documentation CD-ROM

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a CD-ROM package, which ships with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM is updated monthly and may be more current than printed documentation. The CD-ROM package is available as a single unit or through an annual subscription.

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About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Ordering Documentation

Cisco documentation can be ordered in the following ways:

Registered Cisco Direct Customers can order Cisco product documentation from the Networking Products MarketPlace:

http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/order/order_root.pl

Registered Cisco.com users can order the Documentation CD-ROM through the online Subscription Store:

http://www.cisco.com/go/subscription

Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by calling Cisco corporate headquarters (California, USA) at 408 526-7208 or, in North America, by calling 800 553-NETS(6387).

Documentation Feedback

If you are reading Cisco product documentation on the World Wide Web, you can submit technical comments electronically. Click Feedback in the toolbar and select Documentation. After you complete the form, click Submit to send it to Cisco.

You can e-mail your comments to bug-doc@cisco.com.

To submit your comments by mail, use the response card behind the front cover of your document, or write to the following address:

Cisco Systems, Inc. Document Resource Connection 170 West Tasman Drive San Jose, CA 95134-9883

We appreciate your comments.

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco provides Cisco.com as a starting point for all technical assistance. Customers and partners can obtain documentation, troubleshooting tips, and sample configurations from online tools. For Cisco.com registered users, additional troubleshooting tools are available from the TAC website.

Cisco.com

Cisco.com is the foundation of a suite of interactive, networked services that provides immediate, open access to Cisco information and resources at anytime, from anywhere in the world. This highly integrated Internet application is a powerful, easy-to-use tool for doing business with Cisco.

Cisco.com provides a broad range of features and services to help customers and partners streamline business processes and improve productivity. Through Cisco.com, you can find information about Cisco and our networking solutions, services, and programs. In addition, you can resolve technical issues with online technical support, download and test software packages, and order Cisco learning materials and merchandise. Valuable online skill assessment, training, and certification programs are also available.

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About Cisco IOS Software Documentation

Customers and partners can self-register on Cisco.com to obtain additional personalized information and services. Registered users can order products, check on the status of an order, access technical support, and view benefits specific to their relationships with Cisco.

To access Cisco.com, go to the following website:

http://www.cisco.com

Technical Assistance Center

The Cisco TAC website is available to all customers who need technical assistance with a Cisco product or technology that is under warranty or covered by a maintenance contract.

Contacting TAC by Using the Cisco TAC Website

If you have a priority level 3 (P3) or priority level 4 (P4) problem, contact TAC by going to the TAC website:

http://www.cisco.com/tac

P3 and P4 level problems are defined as follows:

P3—Your network performance is degraded. Network functionality is noticeably impaired, but most business operations continue.

P4—You need information or assistance on Cisco product capabilities, product installation, or basic product configuration.

In each of the above cases, use the Cisco TAC website to quickly find answers to your questions.

To register for Cisco.com, go to the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/register/

If you cannot resolve your technical issue by using the TAC online resources, Cisco.com registered users can open a case online by using the TAC Case Open tool at the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/tac/caseopen

Contacting TAC by Telephone

If you have a priority level 1 (P1) or priority level 2 (P2) problem, contact TAC by telephone and immediately open a case. To obtain a directory of toll-free numbers for your country, go to the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/687/Directory/DirTAC.shtml

P1 and P2 level problems are defined as follows:

P1—Your production network is down, causing a critical impact to business operations if service is not restored quickly. No workaround is available.

P2—Your production network is severely degraded, affecting significant aspects of your business operations. No workaround is available.

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Configuration Fundamentals Overview This chapter provides an overview of the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals

Configuration Fundamentals Overview

This chapter provides an overview of the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide for Cisco IOS Release 12.2. It includes descriptions of the parts and chapters of this document, and suggestions on which parts of the documentation to read to perform common tasks.

Organization of This Guide

The Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide is divided into three main parts:

Cisco IOS User Interfaces

File Management

System Management

This section provides a description of the chapters within each part.

Cisco IOS User Interfaces

The user interface chapters describe the different methods of entering commands into a router and altering the user environment:

“Using the Command-Line Interface”

The command-line interface (CLI) is the primary means of configuring Cisco IOS software-based devices. This chapter provides an overview of the CLI, and discusses its editing features, context-sensitvie help, and other features.

“Using AutoInstall and Setup”

The Cisco IOS software includes two features that simplify or automate the configuration of Cisco devices: AutoInstall and Setup. AutoInstall allows a network manager to load configuration files onto new Cisco devices automatically. Setup guides a user throught the initial configuration of a Cisco device. This chapter describes how to set up your network for AutoInstall, and how to use Setup.

“Configuring Operating Characteristics for Terminals”

A basic method of accessing the CLI is to connect a terminal to the router through the console port or one of the tty lines. This terminal connection uses default settings, which should work for most terminal sessions. However, you may want to alter the terminal settings. This chapter provides details on how to perform these alterations.

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Organization of This Guide

Configuration Fundamentals Overview

“Managing Connections, Menus, and System Banners”

This chapter provides details on managing connections you make to other hosts, displaying messages to users connecting to your router, and setting up user menus.

“Using the Cisco Web Browser User Interface”

This chapter provides detailed information on using the Cisco IOS web browser user interface (UI) to configure and monitor your router, as an alternative to using the CLI. It also explains how to configure the Web Browser interface for other users.

File Management

The file management chapters describe the tasks associated with copying, saving, moving, and loading different types of files, such as configuration files, images, and microcode:

“Using the Cisco IOS File System” This chapter descibes how to manage files using the Cisco IOS File System (IFS), which provides a common syntax for managing all file systems on Cisco devices, including Flash memory file systems and network file systems, as well as for any other endpoints used for reading or writing data.

“Managing Configuration Files” This chapter describes how to modify configuration files, as well as how to upload, store, and download configuration files. This chapter also explains how to specify which configuration file the system should use at startup.

“Loading and Maintaining System Images” This chapter describes how to download images from servers, store images on servers, and specify which image is loaded at system startup. If you are not upgrading your system image and you do not want to change image booting procedures, you do not need to read this chapter.

“Maintaining System Memory” This chapter describes the different types of memory your router may have and how to use this memory to manage files.

“Rebooting” This chapter focuses on tasks related to the rebooting procedure. Read this chapter if you want to change which image or configuration file is loaded at system startup. This chapter also discusses ROM Monitor mode, which allows you to boot the router manually.

“Configuring Basic File Transfer Services” This chapter describes how to configure your router to function as a server, or use the remote shell (rsh) and remote copy (rcp) functions. As a TFTP server, your router can provide other routers with images and configuration files over the network. The rsh and rcp functions allow users to remotely execute commands or copy files to or from another host. This chapter also addresses optional configuration of Maintenance Operation Protocol (MOP) and Boot Operation Protocol (BOOTP) services.

System Management

The system management chapters discuss tasks that allow you to maintain your router after it is configured with the network, routing, and WAN protocols. These chapters discuss ways you can fine-tune the router and maintain it over time. These chapters also discuss router and network monitoring tools used for gathering information about connected devices and network performance.

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Task-Oriented Documentation Approaches

“Performing Basic System Management” Discusses basic optional tasks. For example, you can change the name of the router, create command aliases, enable minor services, and set time and calendar services.

“Troubleshooting and Fault Management” Provides an introduction to troubleshooting techniques (including use of show commands), error message logging, and debugging commands. If you are troubleshooting a particular protocol, read this chapter to learn how to log system error messages and use debugging commands. Then, refer to the chapter in the documentation set that documents your protocol. For detailed troubleshooting information, see the Internetwork Troubleshooting Guide.

“Configuring SNMP Support” Describes the steps for configuring Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) on your router.

“Configuring Cisco Discovery Protocol” Describes the Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP), and how to use CDP to discover other local devices.

“Configuring RMON Support” Describes the Remote Monitoring (RMON) features available on Cisco routers to supplement SNMP use.

“Network Monitoring Using Cisco Service Assurance Agent” Describes the Cisco Service Assurance Agent (SA Agent), and how to use SA Agent operations to monitor network performance and ensure levels of service.

“Configuring Web Cache Services Using WCCP” Describes the Web Cache Control Protocol, a Cisco-developed content-routing technology that allows you to utilize cache engines (such as the Cisco Cache Engine 550) and web-caches in your network.

Task-Oriented Documentation Approaches

The above parts and chapters of the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide suggest a framework for learning configuration and maintenance tasks. This section provides some suggestions on alternate paths you can take through the documentation to learn about particular topics or tasks, focusing on common configuration topics that span multiple chapters of this book.

For complete descriptions of the configuration commands introduced in this guide, see the Release 12.2 Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference, which is the second book of this documentation module.

Overview of Router Configuration Tasks

To configure your router or access server, you must perform several tasks. Initially, you must determine the following:

Which network protocols you are supporting (for example, AppleTalk, IP, Novell IPX, and so on)

The addressing plan for each network protocol

Which routing protocol you will use for each network protocol

Which WAN protocols you will run on each interface (for example, Frame Relay, HDLC, SMDS, X.25, and so on)

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Task-Oriented Documentation Approaches

Configuration Fundamentals Overview

Then, refer to the Cisco Product Catalog and the platform-specific release notes for a list of Cisco-supported protocols, interfaces, and platforms. Set up the hardware as described in the documentation shipped with your product. Configure any user interface, file management, or interface management tasks as described in this book. Configure protocol-specific features on your router or access server as described in the appropriate chapters of the other Cisco IOS software configuration guides.

Understanding the Cisco IOS Command-Line Interface

If you are not familiar with the Cisco IOS command-line interface, read the following sections to gain a basic understanding of the user interface and basic configuration tasks:

In the “Using the Command-Line Interface” chapter:

Understanding Cisco IOS Command Modes

Using the No and Default Forms of Commands

Getting Context-Sensitive Help Within a Command Mode

Checking Command Syntax

Using CLI Command History

Using Command-Line Editing Features and Shortcuts

In the “Modifying, Downloading, and Maintaining Configuration Files” chapter:

Displaying Configuration File Information

Understanding Configuration Files

Entering Configuration Mode and Selecting a Configuration Source

Configuring Cisco IOS from the Terminal

Reexecuting the Configuration Commands in Startup Configuration

Clearing the Configuration Information

In the “Performing Basic System Management” chapter:

Setting the Router Name

You may also wish to review the Appendix of this book, “Cisco IOS Command Modes,” for a summary description of modes available in the command-line interface.

Storing or Obtaining Configuration Files or Images from a Server

You might want to save a configuration or image on a server or upgrade your image to a different software release. If you will be storing or obtaining configuration files or images from a server, read the following sections:

In the “Managing Configuration Files”chapter:

Copying Configuration Files from the Router to a Network Server

Copying Configuration Files from a Network Server to the Router

Maintaining Configuration Files Larger than NVRAM

Copying Configuration Files Between Different Locations

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Task-Oriented Documentation Approaches

In the “Maintaining System Memory” chapter:

Partitioning Flash Memory

Using Flash Load Helper to Upgrade Software on Run-from-Flash Systems

Changing the Image or Configuration File Loaded by the Router

If you want to change the image or configuration file used when the system reloads, read the following sections:

In the “Managing Configuration Files” chapter:

Specifying the Startup Configuration File

In the“Loading and Maintaining System Images” chapter:

Specifying the Startup System Image in the Configuration File