Issues In Contemporary Architecture 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

W ITH  REFERENCE  TO  THE  EXPERIENCES  OF  M ILTON  K EYNES ,   DO  M ELVIN  W EBBER ' S  THEORIES  OF  ‘ NON ‐ PLACE  URBAN  REALM ’   REPRESENT  A  VIABLE  APPROACH  FOR  HOUSING  AND  COMMUNITY  EXPANSION ? 
Milton Keynes is Britain’s most recent, and largest, post‐war new town.  Its architects claim that Melvin Webber’s theory of ‘non‐place urban realm’ was instrumental in the  town’s planning, calling Webber the true ‘father of Milton Keynes’1.  Against today’s backdrop of online‐social networking, low‐cost flights and a rising proportion of one‐ person households, this essay explores concepts of place and non‐place, and, through analysis of the successes and failures of Milton Keynes, seeks to determine how valid a  framework of ‘non‐place’ is in fostering true urbanity.  It examines whether Webber’s theories were misinterpreted at Milton Keynes, some of the wider, pragmatic issues of  establishing new towns, and any weaknesses within the theory itself, briefly contrasting with the experiences of the new town of Almere in the Netherlands, constructed  around a different urban theory.  Finally, it identifies some techniques which might be employed to address problems of atomisation resulting from today’s information‐rich  society. 

     
‘...it was in these crowded places where thousands of individual itineraries converged for a  moment, unaware of each other, that there survived [...] the feeling that all there is to do is  10 to “see what happens”’  – Marc Augé’s description of a journey through Paris Roissy airport  in Non‐places: Introduction To An Anthropology Of Supermodernity

F RAMING NON ‐ PLACE  
Urban theorist Melvin Webber coined the expression ‘non‐place urban realm’ in his essay The Urban Place and the Non‐place Urban Realm in 19672.   The term ‘non‐place'  carries, in itself, to many, pejorative connotations ‐ in the same way that the words: ‘entity’ and ‘non‐entity’ might.  Non‐place implies an absence, or even a denial, of  physical place, in the phenomenological senses described by Heidegger and a rejection of the methodology human‐kind has traditionally employed to establish ‘places’.    Marc Augé frames the opposition: '”place”... refers to an event (which has taken place), a myth (said to have taken place) or a history (high places)’3. ‘If a place can be  defined as relational, historical and concerned with identity, then a space which cannot be defined as relational, or historical, or concerned with identity will be a non‐ place’4. Consequently planners' understanding of towns and cities has been grounded on the principle of ‘urban’ being distinct from the ‘rural’ ‐ a ‘physically separate unit  that is visually identifiable from the air’5  Webber presented the idea of non‐place as settlement reliant on communication, transport and information flows. ‘The history of city growth, in essence, is the story of  man's eager search for ease of human interaction. Our large modern urban nodes are, in their very nature, massive communications systems’6.  He observed how density offered by cities and towns was historically attractive because it afforded its inhabitants ‘economies of urbanisation’7 ‐ business was facilitated via  face‐to‐face contact.  With the advent of mass‐media and technological advances in communication – both physical, in the form of the automobile, and virtual – telephone  and fax, Webber believed that urbanity should no longer be defined by the spatial arrangement of buildings, but by the level of information flow.  The acceleration of this  trend is amplified yet by the seemingly relentless advance of specialisation.    It  is  now  becoming  apparent  that  it  is  the  accessibility  rather  than  the  propinquity  aspect  of  “place”  that  is  the  necessary  condition.    As  accessibility  becomes  further freed from propinquity, cohabitation of a territorial place [...] is becoming less important to the maintenance of social communities.8 [...] Thus, urbanity is  no longer the exclusive trait of the city dweller; the suburbanite and the exurbanite are among the most urbane of men; increasingly the farmers themselves are  participating in the urban life of the world9.                                                                      Derek Walker, The Architecture And Planning Of Milton Keynes, (London: The Architectural Press, 1982), p.8.   Melvin Webber, The Urban Place and the Non‐place Urban Realm in Explorations into Urban Structure ‐ (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1967), pp. 79‐153.   Marc Augé, Non‐places: Introduction To An Anthropology Of Supermodernity (translated by John Howe), (London: Verso, 1995), p. 82.   Ibid, p.77‐78.   Webber, p.81.   Ibid, p.86.   Ibid,p.85.   Ibid, p.109.   Ibid, p.88.         
10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9

                                                                   Augé, p.3.  1 

Issues In Contemporary Architecture 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

  T HE  S IGNIFICANCE  O F  N ON ‐ PLACE  &   N EW  T OWNS  
Webber's work is of relevance today for two prime reasons.  Firstly, the pressure to increase the supply of new housing, driven by under‐supply since the 1980s and by  immigration  from  EU  expansion.    Secondly,  the  increase  in  the  volume  of  non‐face‐to‐face  communication.    Webber  was  uncannily  prescient  –  writing  back  in  the  late  1960s: ‘Today, the man who does not participate in such spatially extensive communities is the uncommon one’11 being an apt summary of the facebook‐myspace online  social‐networking generation.  Simultaneously, considering the wider aspects of non‐place, we observe that our exisitng ‘places’ are becoming increasingly ‘anonymised’  and therefore, closer to non‐places through the cookie‐cutter expansion of the standard template of nationwide, multi‐national chain retail stores.   Whilst there is still a focus on increasing densities within Britain's existing urban fabric, there remains a strong desire, particularly amongst those with families, to move out of  city centres. ‘Polls show that 80% of Britons want to live in country towns and villages’12, a statistic which appears to approximately tally with the data from a 2002 RICS  survey (table 1).  Consequently, the Government is seeking to increase annual house‐building from about ‘160,000 to 200,000 additional homes per year by 2016’13. Currently 84% of the  population of England lives in suburban areas14.  This suggests that more new towns will be needed, and this presents planners with issues of 'non‐place', given that the sites  of these new towns may not be imbued with historical or geographical significance, and certainly will only have attained limited cultural attributes. 

Table 1:  Where would you ideally like to live?19  A village An isolated rural location  A market town  A seaside town  A city centre  A new town  An inner suburb close to the city centre  An inter‐war suburb on the outskirts of a city  Other   Figure 1: placing Milton Keynes20 

% of respondents  27 9 16 13 4 2 13 13 2

M ILTON  K EYNES AND THE APPLICATION OF  W EBBER ' S THEORIES  
We  are  fortunate  to  have  a  built  entity  founded  on  Webber's  theories  of  a  non‐place  urban  realm  to  analyse:  Milton  Keynes,  a  ‘new  town’  75  kilometres  North  West  of  London (figures 2 and 3). In 1967, the Ministry of Housing and Local Governments called for a new town to accommodate 150,000 low to middle‐income Londoners over a  period of 20 years.  The site covers 9,000 hectares, and the creation of Milton Keynes combined the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford and eleven  villages. The combined population of the area prior to the instigation of the master plan was c.40,000 people.  Milton Keynes is a strictly‐zoned, low‐rise (the original guidance stated that no building should be higher than the tallest tree), car‐based new town. In a change from UK  tradition, the plan is a non‐hierarchical, devolved, irregular urban grid of 1 kilometre squares laid over an ostensibly agrarian landscape, rather than the radial pattern found  in older settlements.  It is greened courtesy of its location, the flood‐plains of the River Ouze, giving rise to 1,750 hectares of linear parks, equivalent to almost 20% of the  total master plan area.  Similar to the grid system of Los Angeles, but more sinuous (the Milton Keynes Development Corporation ‐ MKDC ‐ believed this to be more organic and naturalistic than LA's  strict rectilinear system) the road network was designed to ‘avoid congestion at focal points (as there are no focal points)’15 according to Steer Eiler Rasmussen. Milton Keynes  was designed before the oil crisis of 1973 as 'the city of the car'.  ‘The grid roads could be the most enjoyable part of the city – our Venice canals’16, suggested Derek Walker,  Milton Keynes’s chief architect, seemingly without a trace of irony.  Initially, a housing density of 24‐30 houses per hectare was targeted, falling to 15 per hectare at later phases of the planning17 (table 2).  The grid was sized at 1 kilometre  squares so that residents would never have to walk too far to minibuses, which the planners envisaged would provide mobility for non‐car users18.                                                                         Webber, p.109.   Ian Colquhoun and Peter G. Fauset, Housing Design – An International Perspective, (London: B T Batsford, 1991), p.11.   Ben Kochan, Achieving a Suburban Renaissance – The Policy Challenges, <www.tcpa.org.uk/downloads/20070710_Suburb‐ren.pdf> [accessed 21 November 2007], p.19.   Ibid, p.19.   Walker, p.5.   Ibid, p.30.   Jeff Bishop, Milton Keynes – The Best of Both Worlds?  Public And Professional Views Of A New City, (Bristol, University of Bristol SAUS, 1986), p.12.   Terence Bendixson and John Platt, Milton Keynes, Image And Reality, (Cambridge, Granta Editions, 1992), p.60.         
20 19

  Figure 2: Placing Milton Keynes ‐ ii21 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

                                                                      RICS Survey 2002, from Ritsuko, Ozaki and Matjaž Uršič, What Makes ‘Urban’  Urban And ‘Suburban’ Suburban? Urbanity And Patterns Of Consumption In  Everyday Life <www.sifo.no/files/Ozaki_Ursic.pdf>  [accessed 2 December  2007]   Bishop, p. 9.   Bendixson and Platt, p.2.  2 

18

21

Issues In Contemporary Architecture   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

The Central Business District (CBD) is formed around a more regular, straight grid, in order to facilitate the provision of the higher density building located there, including the  acclaimed, naturally‐lit ‘The Centre MK’ shopping mall, which took its inspiration from Milan's Galleria.  Central Milton Keynes was not intended to act as a town centre, but  as a business and shopping centre that supplemented local district centres within most grid squares.  Nonetheless, the intention was to create a real city, not a dormitory  town22.  The Milton Keynes Development Plan calls for residential areas to be  designed with a mix of houses built around primary school catchments.  Neighbourhoods  should offer a choice in size, density, tenure and price of home.  The social philosophy is one which believes that a heterogeneous mix of people locally promotes  social understanding [...] almost all layouts are deep, meandering, curvilinear arrangements of dwellings grouped around culs‐de‐sac23.    Each of the neighbourhoods was to accommodate around 5,000 people24.  The intention of the planners was for overlapping catchment areas and activity centres, as shown  diagrammatically  in  figure  5.  Milton  Keynes  had  some  of  the  best  practises  from  across  Europe  working  for  it,  including  Norman  Foster,  Henning  Larsen,  Ted  Cullinan,  Colquhoun and Miller, MacCormac and Jamieson25.  Richard Rogers had to pull out owing to the win of the Pompidou Centre commission.  Although the master plan for Milton Keynes was prepared by Llewellyn‐Davies in 1970, Melvin Webber was an 'urban society' consultant to their team.  Derek Walker said:  Many of us who worked on the architecture and planning of Milton Keynes were educated in the United States at a time when the impact of Webber's work was  greatest....Webber's ideas of a community based on voluntary association rather than propinquity are fundamental to the thinking behind the Plan – he could claim  more than anyone to be the father of Milton Keynes.26    Figure 5: Activity Centres and Overlapping Catchments27  Figure  6:  A  Local  Centre,  as  envisaged  by  Llewelyn  ‐ Davies28 

Table 2: MK target densities by category since 198229 Housing type  Rent / Shared Ownership for Families  Elderly / First Step / Starter  Low Priced  Medium Priced  Medium High Priced  High Priced  Plots Figure 3: The car is king in Milton Keynes30 

Dwellings / ha 30‐60 40‐55 30‐45 25‐35 15‐25 10‐20 5‐25

  Figure 4: Map of Central Milton Keynes31 

   
22

 

                                                                   Ellis Woodman, Growing Pains: BD's 2004 Review Of The Masterplan For Almere, hosted by BDOnline  <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=725&storycode=3082902> [accessed 15 December 2007]   Julienne Hanson, ‘Milton Keynes – Selling The Dream’ in Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 15 (15 April 1992), 36‐37 (p.36).   Philip Opher, Philip and Clinton Bird, British New Towns, Architecture & Urban Design – Milton Keynes, (Oxford Polytechnic: Urban Design, 1981), p.2.   Ruth Owens, ‘Milton Keynes ‐ The Great Experiment’ in Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 15 (15 April 1992), 30‐35 (p.32).   Walker, p.8.   Chesterton Consulting, The Milton Keynes Planning Manual, (1992), p.19.   Bendixson & Platt, p.62.         
30 29

23 24 25 26 27

                                                                   Chesterton Consulting on Behalf of Milton Keynes Development Manual, The  Milton Keynes Planning Manual, (1992), p. 91.   Little Los Angeles in Bucks p.26.  Bendixson & Platt, p.135.  3 

28

31

Issues In Contemporary Architecture  Figure 5: The Plan for Milton Keynes, 197032

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

32

                                                                   Bendixson & Platt, p.56.          4 

Issues In Contemporary Architecture 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

  M ILTON  K EYNES  &   T HE  M ISINTERPRETATION OF  N ON ‐P LACE  
Since its inception, Milton Keynes has been the subject of countless jokes, from snipes at its concrete cows and roundabouts to its inability to secure ‘city’ status.  ‘Why does  Milton Keynes not feel like a city, even though, on paper, it has everything, a large and successful shopping centre, restaurants, pubs, entertainments, parks, a street market –  and nearly 150,000 people?’ asks Bill Hillier in the Architect's Journal33. ‘The two things that Milton Keynes is most often said to lack are a local sense of place and the sense of  the urban whole’34.  In assessing some of the problems that have affected Milton Keynes in attempting to create a non‐place urban realm, we can identify a number of factors which are not  directly linked to Webber's theories.  Namely:  1. 2. 3. the misapplication or misinterpretation of Webber's thinking in the design of the overall plan for Milton Keynes;  build quality / technical issues, associated both with the speed of construction and the unfamiliarity with new building techniques and materials; and  a see‐sawing between stark modernism and neo‐vernacular romanticism in both typologies and materials, again linked to the speed of development. 

Figure 6: Concrete Cows by Liz Leyh, Milton Keynes’s first artist‐in‐residence38

  Figure 7: Milton Keynes’s take on Bath’s Royal Crescent, with appropriate signage?39

Addressing these points consecutively, the most noticeable rejection of Webber's theory is the overall plan of Milton Keynes – it appears as a sharply delineated town built in  a green belt, on a wavy grid system, heavily zoned between retail, office and residential, with token local shops serving each residential community.  This is in stark contrast to  Webber's call for blurred boundaries.  The network of roads, necessary for rapid automobile communication, carves up the communities (see figure 5).    While  paying  lip‐service  to  Webber  as  the  “father  of  Milton  Keynes”, Derek  Walker,  its  first  chief  architect  and  planner,  promptly  set  out  to  build  a  scaled‐down  version of the sort of city – urban, visual, monumental – that Webber had shown to be both obsolete and irrelevant35.    Indeed, when reading Walker's book on Milton Keynes, you cannot fail to notice the text is littered with images of celebrated European places – from the Royal Crescent in  Bath, to Haussmann's plan of Paris, to Rome, and London. The result is pastiche, such as the central boulevard lined with London plane trees designed to look as though, in  days gone by, a tram track once travelled down it (figure 8).  Communications were hampered by the sky‐rocketing cost of operating the dial‐a‐bus service owing to the fuel crisis, leaving those without access to, or the funds to run,  effectively stranded within their neighbourhood islands.  ‘For those with a car and the money to afford to run it, Milton Keynes is certainly an easy place to move about in [...]  However, for those without a car, life can be very restricted indeed.  The public transport system has not only failed to provide the degree of service hoped for, it is virtually  non‐existent’36.  It appears that despite Webber's teachings, Walker and the other architects working at Milton Keynes found it difficult to shake of the burden of precedent and aesthetics.    The visual paradigm is the prevailing condition in city planning from the idealised towns of the Renaissance to the Functionalist principles that reflect the “hygiene of  the optical” [...] the contemporary city is more and more “the city of the eye”, detached from the body by rapid motorised movement37.                                                                            33  Bill Hillier, ‘Milton Keynes – Look Back To London’ in Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 15 (15 April 1992), 42‐46, (p.42). 
34 35 36 37

  Figure 8: One of Milton Keynes’s phantom ‘tram track’ boulevards40

                                                                           Bendixson & Platt, p.189.   Mars, p.25.   Ibid, p.25.  5 

 Ibid, p.43.   Tim Mars, ‘Little Los Angeles in Bucks’ in Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 15 (15 April 1992), 22‐26, (p.24).   Opher and Bird, p.5.   Juhani Pallasmaa, The Eyes of the Skin – Architecture and the Senses, (London: Academy Editions, 1996), p.18.         
38 39 40

Issues In Contemporary Architecture   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

Figure 9: May 1981: Residents protest about Beanhill49

Turning to build quality, at the outset, the majority of the architects working for MKDC were fiercely Modern – stark rectilinear volumes, flat roofs, using new materials.  An  example is Bean Hill, one of Norman Foster's earliest projects, which was a flat roofed terraced construction.  At the time, contractors were still struggling with how to  deliver flat roofs that didn't leak.  Consequently, Bean Hill has gone on to be logged as one of Milton Keynes's 'heroic failures'. ‘[it] consists of single‐ storey terraced houses  clad  in  profiled  metal  sheets  which  have suffered  the  indignity  of  added  pitched  roofs  following  early  problems  of  water  penetration’41  (figure  10). Netherfield,  with  its  terraces up to a kilometre long (figure 11), is widely regarded by critics as Milton Keynes’s most significant failure, both socially and architecturally, including by Walker  himself42.  A contributing factor to the low initial build quality was the speed of construction that the planners were tasked with.  This necessitated central, top‐down planning, with  little scope for organic feedback into the model, and thus Walker and his team were obliged to rely upon a cut and paste technique using spatial models from other towns.   MKDC called for 3,000 new homes to be produced each year from a standing start43.  Walker himself admitted: ‘Smaller groups of houses, about 120 at a time, is a nicer way  to design, but there was no alternative at the start’44.  As a result of new forms, new materials and low quality delivery, in the mid 1970s there was a sea‐change from ultra‐ modernism to neo‐vernacular, a post‐modernism typology.  Pitched roofs and brick were back.  This reversion to romanticism and more familiar housing typology and materiality reflected:   the over‐riding trend [...] for architects and their patrons to seek refuge in nostalgia.  Faced with the public outcry from the last 20 years [1968‐88] [...] architects all over the world have now come to believe that a vernacular image is the only viable solution.  Gabled roofs, windows with shutters, wood and brick predominate, and the results are tremendously popular.  Their gentility and folksiness correspond to the ideal of a house.45   An example of such work was Neath Hill, striving for village imagery, complete with clock tower, built between 1975 and 1979 (figure 12).  These neo‐vernacular houses, within their kilometre square wavy grids, disconnected from other grid elements by the road network, helped entrench a very narrow form of communication.  A problem with such pastiche housing is that it serves to 'pre‐announce' its occupants, the house being, as noted by Thorstein Veblen in The Theory of the Leisure Class, one of the ultimate acts of conspicuous consumption.    Therefore, in analysing the mistakes that the architects and planners made in implementing Webber's vision of a non‐place urban realm in building Milton Keynes, it could be said that the speed and radicalism of the programme was too much for the general public to adopt.  The shock of the new was too great.  Perhaps acceptance might have been  more  widespread  had  new  forms  and  typologies  been  introduced  using  familiar  material?    ‘If  [Bean  Hill]  had  been  built  in  brick  [instead  of  profiled  metal],  as  first envisaged, people would not have reacted against it’46 said Walker.  Alternatively, new materials could have been employed in conjunction with familiar housing shapes, a technique employed by MVRDV in The Hague, for example (figure 14).  Analysis of private housing stock for sale today [in Milton Keynes] shows that they share similar configurations, and their layouts are deep, tree‐lined and zoned [...] Milton Keynes houses indicate status and purchasing power.  Etiquette demands, where money allows, that circulation be separated from rooms and that groups of rooms be insulated from each other47 [...] Private houses in Milton Keynes seem designed to insulate family members from one another48                                                                     Owens, p.31.   Derek Walker, Defending Suburbia ‐ interview with Zoë Blackler, hosted by BDOnline,  <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=725&storycode=3092887&c=2&encCode=0000000001405b0a> [accessed 26 October 2007]   Owens, p.31.   Derek Walker interview with Owens, p. 31.   Colquhoun and Fauset, p. 18. 
50

  Figure 10: Foster’s Beanhill, with the addition of pitched roofs50

  Figure 11: Netherfields Plan  
51

41 42

   
49

43 44

45 46

                                                                   Unattributed author on BDOnline, Problems Amount To A Hill of Beans,  <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=430&storycode=3092313&c=2& encCode=000000000136ba32> [accessed 14 December 2007] 

 Walker, p.32.   Hanson, p.36.   Ibid, p.37.         

47 48

 Blackler, Zoë, Norman Foster’s Beanhill,  <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3092588> [accessed 7 December  2007] 
51

 Opher and Bird, p.12.  6 

Issues In Contemporary Architecture   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

Figure 12: Neo‐vernacular Neath Hill60 

Above  all,  it  seems  that  the  planners  themselves  struggled  to  entirely  free  themselves  of  their  preconceptions  about  urbanity  and  place,  and  the  enshrining  of  physical  objects; in other words ‐ they were unable to fully embrace the notion of non‐place.   There was a    belief that the good things about cities and towns – pedestrian activity, informal use of public spaces, overlapping communities, the sense of local place, aesthetic  stimulation, and so on – can be recreated piecemeal [...] that we can have the good things in about cities without the bad52   ‘Milton Keynes stands for the idea that towns are assemblages of parts into a whole, rather than wholes in which good parts arise’53.  It appeared to oscillate from attempting  to  be  a  non‐place  urban  realm  to  being  place‐schizophrenic,  that  is,  suffering  from  a  form  of  ‘multiple  place  disorder’.    Julienne  Hanson  wrote  in  the  Architects’  Journal:  ‘Milton Keynes is a futuristic city which goes in for collective nostalgia’54.  

W EAKNESSES OF  W EBBER ' S  N OTIONS OF  N ON ‐P LACE  
At  times,  Webber  reads  like  van  Eyck  or  Hertzberger  in  his  advice  for  urban  planners  to  not  become  overly  prescriptive  through  aesthetics  or  spatial  organisation  in  attempting to influence how people should behave, but instead providing a framework for events, along with his emphasis on creation of opportunities for communication  above urban form‐making.  ‘Spatial distribution is not the crucial determinant [...] but interaction is’55.  Ignoring the issues posed by semantics of establishing a ‘non‐place’ within a physical geography where place already exists (in Milton Keynes's case, the River Ouse and the  Grand Union Canal being the two most evident physical legacies of 'place' – see figure 15) and notwithstanding the problems of the physical ‘delivery’ of Milton Keynes, I  believe there are fundamental flaws in Webber's attitudes towards place and community.   Webber  canonised  communication  and  high‐level  interaction  within  ‘non‐territorially  defined  interest  communities’  as  a  more  valuable  activity  than  place‐communities.  ‘Place‐community  represents  only  a  limited  and  special  case  of  the  larger  genus  of  communities,  deriving  its  basis  from  the  common  interests  that  attach  to  propinquity  alone’56.  Webber was focused on the maximising of output, and within this definition he included information.  Information is the raison d'etre , information uber alles, in the  non‐place urban realm.  As such, the day‐to‐day, the frivolous, the unexpected events typical of place‐communities are accredited little worth.  At the extreme end, one could  even draw parallels between Webber's perception of valid interaction and Atelier van Lieshout’s dystopian Slave City57.  The key problem is that place communities and non‐place communities are mutually exclusive.  To illustrate ‐ the time you spend, for example, talking with your friends in  Australia  via  the  internet  is  time  that  is  no  longer  available  to  be  spent  with  your  next‐door  neighbours.    Webber  himself  recognised  this:  ‘for  the  proportion  of  his  time  devoted to place community roles, he is a member of that place‐community.  For the proportion of his time in which he plays roles in other communities, he is not a member  of his place‐community’58.  In On Reading Heidegger, Kenneth Frampton stated that a loss of ‘nearness’   provoked alienation in contemporary life, distancing people undesirably from a sense of place and belonging [...] architects should be responsible for place creation,  in order to recover a sense of meaning amid the decentring urbanism of late capitalism59.   
52 53

  Figure 13: Discrete rooms, deep plans and culs‐de‐sac represent the dominant  typology in Milton Keynes61 

  Figure 14: MVRDV Waterwijk Ypenburg Housing in the Hague – an example of  keeping typology but changing materials62

                                                                   Hillier, p.42.   Ibid, p.43.   Hanson, p.37.   Webber, p.110.   Ibid, p.111.   Atelier van Lieshout, Slave City, <www.ateliervanlieshout.com/> [accessed 16 December 2007]   Webber, p.114.   Adam Sharr, Heidegger for Architects, (London: Routledge, 2007),  p.105.         
60 61

54 55 56 57 58 59

                                                                   Owens, p.31.   Hanson, p.36.   MVRDV <www.mvrdv.nl/_v2/projects/071_waterwijk/index.html> [accessed 14  December 2007]  7 

62

Issues In Contemporary Architecture 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

E XPERIENCES OF  O THER  N EW  T OWNS  
Concurrent with the development of Milton Keynes, Almere, a new town in the Netherlands, was also being constructed.  Comparisons between England and the Netherlands  are  frequently  drawn  by  UK  town  planners  and  architects  of  mass‐housing,  and  for  obvious  reasons.    Both  countries  enjoy  a  similar  climate,  and  have  surprising  close  population densities – around 400 inhabitants per square kilometre63  64. Socially and politically there are close parallels, with a dominant middle‐class.  The Netherlands has  demonstrated a more consistent approach to the provision of new housing – providing 80,000 dwellings a year for a population of 16 million65.   The speed of delivery in the Netherlands is assisted by the use of concrete tunnelling techniques, which implies a greater volume of terraced housing in the Netherlands than  in the UK where the semi‐detached and detached house is more prevalent in suburban locations. Clearly this is one factor that gives rise to a greater sense of direct, local  community in the Nethelands:  the  conspicuous  presence  of  spatial  and  architectural  coherence  with  the  emphasis  not  on  individuality  but  on  collectivity.  It  has  produced  a  suburbia  with  an  overwhelmingly  urban  form,  but  one  which,  owing  to  the  homeopathic  dilution  of  the  mass  (low‐rise  development  interspersed  with  wide  streets,  avenues  and  urban canals), never makes an urban impression66    Table 3: Some factors influencing community compared67  Modal Split  Car  Mass Transit  Bicycle  Walk  Average Travel Distance  % trips below 3km  Density (dwellings per ha)  Form  proportion who see a car as 'essential'  % households with children under 12 years who are always supervised outside home    % children under 12 who are never supervised outside home       
63 64 65 66

Figure 15: Milton Keynes’s ‘placeness’ is, in part, defined by its location on the  Grand Union Canal68 

Milton Keynes

Almere  

 

59% 17% 6% 18% 7.2km 45% 20 scattered, separated use 70% 52% 8%

35% 17% 28% 20% 6.9km 85% 35‐40 'organic', mixed use 50% 16% 48%

                           

                                                                   Office for National Statistics, <www.statistics.gov.uk/cci/nugget.asp?id=760> [accessed 16 December 2007]   Britannica Online Encyclopaedia, <www.britannica.com/eb/question‐409956/6/density‐sq‐km‐The‐Netherlands> [accessed 16 December 2007]   Hans Ibelings, Hypersuburbia, <parole.aporee.org/work/hier.php3?spec_id=19463&words_id=891 > [accessed 11 December 2007]   Ibid. 

         
68

 Kenworthy, Jeff, Techniques of Urban Sustainability ‐ Urban Villages, hosted by the Institute for Sustainability and Technology Policy, Murdoch University,  <www.sustainability.murdoch.edu.au/casestudies/Case_Studies_Asia/urbvill/urbvill.htm>  [accessed 26 October 2007]         

67

                                                                   Opher and Bird, p.4.  8 

Issues In Contemporary Architecture 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                       

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

I  would  suggest  that the contrast  in the methods  and speed  of  communication  between  Milton Keynes  and Almere  is  a  key factor.   The  open,  slower,  exposed  nature  of  bicycle travel as opposed to the hermetically sealed automotive life of Milton Keynes may help to ground Almere residents back in their community.  Furthermore, there are  fewer small and private gardens in Almere, meaning that people are brought together at the bigger parks and recreation facilities69.    Meanwhile, internal configurations have  been open‐plan for a far longer period in Almere than in Milton Keynes. ‘Many of the houses are aimed at couples, individuals, or groups of single people, who seek multi‐ functional, connected spaces rather than a minimal box subdivided into small, sealed compartments’70. 

C ONCLUSIONS  ‐   L EARNING  F ROM  M ILTON  K EYNES  
UK population growth through immigration, the internet, mobile phones, online social networking means that non‐place is a very real issue to be addressed, and the study of  Webber’s prescient theories on the subject and the real experiences of Milton Keynes yield many lessons.  Milton Keynes suffered from the application of theories of non‐ place being implemented using a design language of the ocular realm.  The first thirty years of Milton Keynes has demonstrated to observers that, given the opportunity,  people will opt to disengage from place/local communities and consecrate more time to their non‐place, interest‐based communities.  When combined with some of planning  techniques, this provided a template for a dearth of local interaction.  ‘Milton Keynes is the first whole‐city expression of twentieth century disurbanism disguised as romantic  urbanism’71. An initial reaction to the problems that Milton Keynes experienced could be that new towns are not, per se, the avenue to pursue in housing an increasing, and increasingly  mobile, population.  Peter Hall from the London School of Economics proposes infill urban villages ‐ 'in‐town suburbia'. ‘It is paradoxical: the easiest way to repopulate our  72 depopulated cities would be to develop extensive new suburbs in‐town [...] rather than seeking to impose an unfamiliar form of urbanness on them’ .   Alternatively, assuming the other extreme – if it is the rural idyll that people are looking for, in a world where it is hard to ever be out of the reception range of a mobile  phone or far from a broadband internet connection, why, if we are to subscribe to the concept of non‐place urban realm, do we need settlements resembling towns and  villages? I perceive the logical conclusion of Webber's theory to be a person with a lightweight tent and a laptop – which in itself may be a form of wearable technology as  opposed to a distinct object.   The attractions of this approach are that it suggests democracy of ‘placeness’, contrary to tradition, built examples, which may be subject to  criticisms of ‘place fascism’73. Place becomes wherever you pitch your tent, the views, the smells, combined with the memories on your hard drive in the form of photos and  music. ‘If the neighbours were not to be friends, why did one need to live so close to them?’74   However, it would appear from the survey data in table 1, that despite technological advances and despite Webber's theorising, people do still yearn for propinquity – they  want to live near to other people, in towns and villages, and be close to nature.  Therefore, it seems likely that new towns will remain a tool for accommodating an element of  the population.  It is interesting to note in Milton Keynes that, with wear and tear now necessitating repairs, residents are starting to forge place‐based communities through  their modifications, customisations and DIY.  Therein lies the biggest weakness in Webber's belief that all resultant, highbrow interaction derived from the non‐place urban realm is something to be celebrated at the  expense of the everyday.  Given how unlikely it is that society will imminently abandon its love affair with new technology and virtual communities, it would suggest that as  we increase the proportion of their daily lives inhabiting non‐places, architects and planners need to ensure that they provide the physical infrastructure that will ensure that  real, day to day contact, however tedious and unintellectual it may prima facie seem, is maintained.        
69

Figure 16: Customisations at Netherfield75 

     

                                                                   Martin Richardson, ‘Dutch Courage’ in Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 17 (29 April 1992), 24‐27, (p.26).   Ibid, p.25.   Hillier, p.46.  Peter Hall – ‘The Land fetish: Densities And London Planning’ in London: Bigger & Better? (London: London School of Economics, 2006); cited by Kochan in Achieving a  Suburban Renaissance – The Policy Challenges, <www.tcpa.org.uk/downloads/20070710_Suburb‐ren.pdf> [accessed 21 November 2007], p.20. 
75

70 71

72 

73 74

 Sharr, p.73.   Owens, p.30.         

                                                                   Blackler, Zoë, Short‐lived Paradise In Milton Keynes,  http://www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3091786 [accessed 7  December 2007]  9 

Issues In Contemporary Architecture   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

Methods of achieving this could include more human‐speed  modes of physical transport (walking, cycling, as promoted by Jan Gehl ), open‐plan internal configurations, and  blank canvases / unfinished buildings to promote customisation and individuality, even if this is as simple as residents choosing the colour or their front door.  The alternative  potentially being a neo‐vernacular 'noddy house' which seeks to announce the occupants status with no input required on their part, allowing them to indulge almost fully in  their non‐place, ‘interest‐activities’ and ignore their locality.  This, I would suggest is where Milton Keynes went wrong, and is now, as, 30 years plus on and as the fabric starts  to  decay,  that  residents  are  now  starting  to  get  out  and  adapt  and  influence  their  communities  future.    Looking  at  Netherfield,  a  sink‐hole  estate  in  Milton  Keynes,  and  generally regarded as its biggest failure, Zoë Blackler of BDOnline observes: ‘while the stone and brick cladding, painted facades and personalised front porches are a sign of  the  estate’s  decay,  they  are  equally  a  testament  to  the  power  of  individual  expression  in  the  face  of  so  much  uniformity’76  (figure  16).  It  is  interesting  that  Rogers  Stirk  Harbour  and  Partners’  Oxley  Woods  affordable  housing  scheme  for  Wimpey  in  Milton  Keynes,  completed  in  2007,  allows  for  some  limited  customisation  of  the  cladding  panels to suit the buyer's taste (figure 17).  Ultimately, I believe that the denial or suppression of physical, experiential place in favour of non‐place communities risks ignoring some of our most primitive needs and  confers a ‘drift towards a distancing, a kind of chilling de‐sensualisation and de‐eroticism of the human relation to reality’77.  To quote Adam Sharr on Heideigger: ‘In a post‐ war era when Westerners seemed to justify their actions with increasing reference to economic and technical statistics, [Heidegger] pleaded that the immediacies of human  experience shouldn't be forgotten.  According to him, people make sense first through their inhabitation of their surroundings, and their emotional responses to them.  Only  then do they attempt to quantify their attitudes and actions through science and technology’78.     

Figure 17: Rogers, Stirk, Harbour & Partners scheme at Oxley Woods for Wimpey79 

   

                            (4,154 words excluding tables, footnotes, bibliography and headings)   
76 77 78

                                                                   Blackler, Zoë, Short‐lived Paradise In Milton Keynes, http://www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3091786 [accessed 7 December 2007] 
79

 Pallasmaa, p.22.   Sharr, p.2.         

                                                                   Emily, Prefab Friday: Richard Rogers’ Oxley Park Houses,  http://www.inhabitat.com/2007/06/01/prefab‐friday‐richard‐rogers‐flexi‐ houses/  [accessed 7 December 2007]  10 

Issues In Contemporary Architecture 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

B IBLIOGRAPHY  
Alexander, Christopher, Ishikawa, Sara and Silverstein, Murray, A Pattern Language:  Towns, Buildings, Construction, (New York: Oxford University Press, 1977)  Atelier van Lieshout, Slave City, <www.ateliervanlieshout.com/> [accessed 16 December 2007]  Augé, Marc, Non‐places: Introduction To An Anthropology Of Supermodernity (translated by John Howe), (London: Verso, 1995)  Bendixson, Terence & Platt, John, Milton Keynes: Image And Reality, (Cambridge: Granta Editions, 1992)  Bishop, Jeff, Milton Keynes – The Best Of Both Worlds?  Public And Professional Views Of A New City, (Bristol: University of Bristol School For Advanced Urban Studies, 1986)  Blackler, Zoë, Milton Keynes: The Making Of A Suburban Dream, hosted by BDOnline, <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3092485> [accessed 10 December 2007]  Blackler, Zoë, The Vision For Milton Keynes, hosted by BDOnline, <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3092395> [accessed 11 December 2007]  Blackler, Zoë, Netherfield by Jeremy Dixon, Edward Jones, Michael Gold And Chris Cross, hosted by BDOnline,  <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3092587>   [accessed 10 December 2007]  Blackler, Zoë, Coffee Hall, Springfield And Neath Hill, hosted by BDOnline, <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3092863> [accessed 7 December 2007]  Blackler, Zoë, Norman Foster’s Beanhill, hosted by BDOnline, <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3092588> [accessed 7 December 2007]  Blackler, Zoë, Central Milton Keynes, hosted by BDOnline, <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=725&storycode=3092589&featurecode=11977&c=1>  [accessed 9  December 2007]  Blackler, Zoë, Short‐lived Paradise In Milton Keynes, hosted by BDOnline, < www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3091786> [accessed 7 December 2007]  Blackler, Zoë, Ralph Erskine’s Eaglestone, hosted by BDOnline, <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3092678> [accessed 10 December 2007]  Britannica Online Encyclopaedia, www.britannica.com/eb/question‐409956/6/density‐sq‐km‐The‐Netherlands> [accessed 16 December 2007]  Chesteron Consulting, The Milton Keynes Planning Manual, (Milton Keynes: Milton Keynes Development Corporation, 1992)  Christiaanse, Kees, The Dutch Approach to Housing, hosted by designforhomes.org, <www.designforhomes.org/media/pdfs/KChristCPD.pdf>  [accessed 25 October 2007]  Colquhoun, Ian and Fauset, Peter G., Housing Design – An International Perspective, (London: B T Batsford, 1991)   Coote. Martyn, How We Built Britain: The Architectural Secrets of Milton Keynes, hosted by BBC Three Counties Radio,  <www.bbc.co.uk/threecounties/content/articles/2007/05/30/hwbb_milton_keynes_feature.shtml > [accessed 2 December 2007]  Dytham, Mark, A New City At The Bottom Of My Garden, <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3092897>  [accessed 10 December 2007]  Emily, Prefab Friday: Richard Rogers’ Oxley Park Houses, hosted by inhabit.com, <www.inhabitat.com/2007/06/01/prefab‐friday‐richard‐rogers‐flexi‐houses/ > [accessed 7  December 2007]  Gilbert, John, House Construction In The Netherlands, <www.johngilbert.co.uk/resources/dutch.html> [accessed 2 December 2007]  Hanson, Julienne, ‘Milton Keynes – Selling The Dream’, Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 15, pp.36‐37  Hiller, Bill, ‘Milton Keynes – Look Back To London’, Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 15, pp.42‐46  Holden, Robert, ‘Milton Keynes – How The Land Lies’, Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 15, pp.38‐39  Ibelings, Hans, Hypersuburbia, <parole.aporee.org/work/hier.php3?spec_id=19463&words_id=891 > [accessed 11 December 2007]  Jacobs, Jane, The Death And Life Of Great American Cities, (New York: Random House, 1993) 

   

 

 

11 

Issues In Contemporary Architecture 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

    Ralph Kent wsa iii 

Jones, Edward, Never Say Nether Again, hosted by BDOnline, < www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=725&storycode=3092493&c=1&encCode=000000000136bd4e>  [accessed 8 December 2007]  Kenworthy, Jeff, Techniques Of Urban Sustainability ‐ Urban Villages, hosted by the Institute for Sustainability and Technology Policy, Murdoch University,  <www.sustainability.murdoch.edu.au/casestudies/Case_Studies_Asia/urbvill/urbvill.htm>  [accessed 26 October 2007]  Kochan, Ben, Achieving A Suburban Renaissance – The Policy Challenges, <www.tcpa.org.uk/downloads/20070710_Suburb‐ren.pdf> [accessed 21 November 2007]  Leach, Neil, The Anaesthetics of Architecture, (Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 1999)  Lynch, Kevin, A Theory of Good City Form, (Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 1981)   MacCormac, Richard, Housing And The Dilemma Of Style,  <www.mjparchitects.co.uk/essay/Housing_and_dilemma_style.pdf?sessionid=16b5db2299517ac3b83ad85afb1184a4>  [accessed 26 October 2007]  Mars, Tim, ‘Little Los Angeles in Bucks’, Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 15, pp.22‐26  MVRDV, Waterwijk Ypenburg, <www.mvrdv.nl/_v2/projects/071_waterwijk/index.html> [accessed 14 December 2007]   Office for National Statistics, <www.statistics.gov.uk/cci/nugget.asp?id=760> [accessed 16 December 2007]  Opher, Philip and Bird, Clinton, British New Towns, Architecture & Urban Design – Milton Keynes, (Oxford Polytechnic: Urban Design, 1981)   Owens, Ruth, ‘Milton Keynes ‐ The Great Experiment’, Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 15, pp.30‐35  Ozaki, Ritsuko, and Uršič, Matjaž, What Makes ‘Urban’ Urban And ‘Suburban’ Suburban? Urbanity And Patterns Of Consumption In Everyday Life  <www.sifo.no/files/Ozaki_Ursic.pdf> [accessed 2 December 2007]  Pallasmaa, Juhani, The Eyes of the Skin – Architecture and the Senses, (London: Academy Editions, 1996)  Richardson, Martin, ‘Dutch Courage’, Architects’ Journal, vol. 195, no. 17, pp.24‐27  Rose, Steve, Urban Outfitters, hosted by Guardian Unlimited, <arts.guardian.co.uk/features/story/0,11710,1261937,00.html> [accessed 15 December 2007]   Sharr, Adam, Heidegger for Architects, (London: Routledge, 2007)   Shearcroft, Geoff, Learning From Milton Keynes, hosted by BDOnline, <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3092706> [accessed 26 October 2007]  Walker, Derek, The Architecture And Planning Of Milton Keynes, (London: The Architectural Press, 1982)  Walker, Derek, Defending Suburbia ‐ interview with Zoë Blackler, hosted by BDOnline,  <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=725&storycode=3092887&c=2&encCode=0000000001405b0a> [accessed 26 October 2007]  Waugh, Andrew, Child Of The Grid, hosted by BDOnline, <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?storycode=3092505> [accessed 11 December 2007]  Webber, Melvin, M., ‘The Urban Place And The Non‐Place Urban Realm’ in Explorations into Urban Structure, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, Second Edition,  1967)  Woodman, Ellis, Growing Pains: BD's 2004 Review Of The Masterplan For Almere, hosted by BDOnline,  <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=725&storycode=3082902> [accessed 15 December 2007]  Unattributed author on BDOnline, Problems Amount To A Hill of Beans, hosted by BDOnline,  <www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=430&storycode=3092313&c=2&encCode=000000000136ba32> [accessed 14 December 2007]  Veblen, Thorstein, The Theory Of The Leisure Class, (New York: Dover Publications, 1994) 

   

 

 

12 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful