Sie sind auf Seite 1von 2

 

 
 
   

Douglas W. Bush, M.A. 

Conflict Resolution
Overview 

Douglas W. Bush, M.A.                                                                                       
dwbush@aol.com
8/28/2008 

Douglas W. Bush, M.A. © 2008 
Conflict Resolution 
 
 

What is conflict? 
 
Conflict exists when two or more people are task interdependent, one or both feel angry, blame each other, and 
use behaviors that cause a business problem1. 
 
 

Where does conflict begin? 
 
A situation (activating or anticipated event) triggers the perception (thought) which leads to a feeling (emotion) 
which contributes to a behavior (acting out).  This creates a trigger in the other person and begins a cycle of 
retaliation. 
 
 

When is conflict destructive? 
 
Conflict in the workplace needs to be addressed when it contributes to a business problem.  Conflict also 
contributes to: wasted time, lowered job motivation and productivity, absenteeism, loss of good employees, theft, 
sabotage, vandalism, damage, poor health, degraded decision quality.  
 
 

How do I resolve conflict? 
 
Conflict with another person can be resolved when both employee’s are willing to talk about the issues, without 
interruption, using the steps below.  A trained and experienced mediator can also help. 
 
1.  Find a time and place to talk. 
2.  Plan to talk about the agreed upon issues with no “walk‐aways” and no “power‐plays”. 
3.  Talk through the issues, expressing real feelings behind what needs to be said. 
4.  Make a deal as to what each will stop, start or continue doing to work better together. 
5.  Follow‐up periodically with each other to sustain the gains. 
 

Why is it important to resolve conflict 
 
Conflict when resolved in a positive, favorable and constructive manner helps others stay focused on what 
helps to support an effective relationship – the ability and skill to communicate and problem‐solve.  Working 
together involves a commitment between two individuals to resolve their differences when conflict arises. 

                                                      
1
 Dana, Daniel “Managing Differences – How to Build Better Relationships at Work and Home,” MTI Publications, 2006 
Douglas W. Bush, M.A. © 2008