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The Bajaj Sunny was launched in 1990; the Kawasaki Bajaj 4S Champion followed a year later.

About
this time, the Indian government was initiating a program of market liberalization, doing away with the
old 'license raj' system, which limited the amount of investment any one company could make in a
particular industry.
A possible joint venture with Piaggio was discussed in 1993 but aborted. Rahul Bajaj told the Financial
Times that his company was too large to be considered a potential collaborator by Japanese firms. It
was hoping to increase its exports, which then amounted to just five percent of sales. The company
began by shipping a few thousand vehicles a year to neighboring Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, but soon
was reaching markets in Europe, Latin America, Africa, and West Asia. Its domestic market share,
barely less than 50 percent, was slowly slipping.
By 1994, Bajaj also was contemplating high-volume, low-cost car manufacture. Several of Bajaj's rivals
were looking at this market as well, which was being rapidly liberalized by the Indian government.
Bajaj Auto produced one million vehicles in the 1994-95 fiscal year. The company was the world's
fourth largest manufacturer of two-wheelers, behind Japan's Honda, Suzuki, and Kawasaki. New models
included the Bajaj Classic and the Bajaj Super Excel. Bajaj also signed development agreements with
two Japanese engineering firms, Kubota and Tokyo R & D. Bajaj's most popular models cost about Rs
20,000. 'You just can't beat a Bajaj,' stated the company's marketing slogan.
The Kawasaki Bajaj Boxer and the RE diesel Autorickshaw were introduced in 1997. The next year saw
the debut of the Kawasaki Bajaj Caliber, the Spirit, and the Legend, India's first four-stroke scooter.
The Caliber sold 100,000 units in its first 12 months. Bajaj was planning to build its third plant at a cost
of Rs 4 billion ($111.6 million) to produce two new models, one to be developed in collaboration with
Cagiva of Italy.
New Tools in the 1990s
Still, intense competition was beginning to hurt sales at home and abroad during the calendar year
1997. Bajaj's low-tech, low-cost cycles were not faring as well as its rivals' higher-end offerings,
particularly in high-powered motorcycles, since poorer consumers were withstanding the worst of the
recession. The company invested in its new Pune plant in order to introduce new models more quickly.
The company spent Rs 7.5 billion ($185 million) on advanced, computer-controlled machine tools. It
would need new models to comply with the more stringent emissions standards slated for 2000. Bajaj
began installing Rs 800 catalytic converters to its two-stroke scooter models beginning in 1999.
Although its domestic market share continued to slip, falling to 40.5 percent, Bajaj Auto's profits
increased slightly at the end of the 1997-98 fiscal year. In fact, Rahul Bajaj was able to boast, 'My
competitors are doing well, but my net profit is still more than the next four biggest companies
combined.' Hero Honda was perhaps Bajaj's most serious local threat; in fact, in the fall of 1998, Honda
Motor of Japan announced that it was withdrawing from this joint venture.
Bajaj Auto had quadrupled its product design staff to 500. It also acquired technology from its foreign
partners, such as Kawasaki (motorcycles), Kubota (diesel engines), and Cagiva (scooters). 'Honda's
annual spend on R & D is more than my turnover,' noted Ruhal Bajaj. His son, Sangiv Bajaj, was working
to improve the company's supply chain management. A marketing executive was lured from TVS Suzuki
to help push the new cycles.
Several new designs and a dozen upgrades of existing scooters came out in 1998 and 1999. These, and a
surge in consumer confidence, propelled Bajaj to sales records, and it began to regain market share in
the fast-growing motorcycle segment. Sales of three-wheelers fell as some states, citing traffic and
pollution concerns, limited the number of permits issued for them.





Legend NXT 2
Technical Specification Photo Gallery

Brakes
Front
Rear

Dimension
Overall height 1150 mm
Overall length 1825 mm
Overall Width
Wheelbase 1275 mm
Ground Clearance 140 mm
Kerb weight 109 kgs
Fuel Tank Capacity 5 litres

Engine
Type
Stroke (2/4) 2 - Stroke, air cooled
No. of cylinders 1
Bore x stroke
Displacement 145.45 cc
Electrical 12V 2.5Ah

Performance
Maximum Power 8.18 bhp@5500 rpm
Max. Torque
Start Kick start

Suspension
Front
Rear

Transmission
No. of Gears 4-speed
Clutch

Tyres
Front
Rear



Company has stopped manufacturing this
model.
The Bajaj Chetak 150 MT is an old-time favourite from the
house of Bajaj. This 150cc scooter will be on its way out
by the year 2000. Newer variations are undergoing trials
in the R&D department, but for now, the Chetak is one of
the best-selling two-wheelers in the semi-urban and rural
markets.
A large fuel tank and an average fuel consumption figure
of 42 kpl leads to a reasonable interval between fuel tank
toppings. The problem is the two-stroke engine, which
generates the seven-plus bhp that powers the bike. It

consumes more petrol as compared to the rest. The plus
points are a tough body, low maintenance and initial cost
and good resale value. The minus points are poor
averages, unbalanced ride, stiff gear-shifting, lacklustre
braking and higher pollution levels. This model is not Y2K
proof.
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS OF BAJAJ CHETAK
Engine
Engine : Two stroke/petrol
Transmission : Four-speed
Displacement : 145. 45cc
Tachometer : No
Max Power : 7.48 hp@5500 rpm
Max torque: 1.1kgm@3500 rpm
Ground
Clearance : 145mm
Ignition : Electronic
Dry Weight: 103kg
Fuel tank
Capacity : 6.5 litres
Battery: 12V
F/R suspension : Spring-loaded
Absorber
R/R suspension : Hydraulic absorber
Max Speed : 85kph
Front Tyre size : 3.50x10.4 Pr
Rear Tyre size : 3.50x10.4 Pr
Wheelbase : 1230mm


Introduction/Description
A conventional induction ignition creates a spark by applying electric
potential (12 volts) to the primary side of the coil. The coil steps the
primary potential up to as much as 10,000 volts and delivers this
high voltage to the spark plugs. However, this "step up" process is
relatively slow, and as crank speed (rpm) increases, the secondary
voltage declines dramatically.
This limitation was partially solved by the development of
capacitive-discharge ignition (CDI) systems. Instead of applying 12
volts to the coil, a CD ignition increases the primary current by
storing it in a kind of miniature battery called a capacitor. When this
higher primary current is applied to the coil, the secondary voltage
is dramatically increased.
The principal advantage of a CDI system is the ability to present a
superior spark to the air/fuel mixture inside the combustion
chamber, thus maximizing burn efficiency. The easiest way to get a
bigger spark is to increase the spark plug gap size. However,
increasing the gap distance also increases the voltage necessary to
ionize the air/fuel mixture. And the resistance of the air/fuel mixture
increases as the mixture is pressurized in the cylinder, requiring
even higher voltage to spark across a plug. A CDI system provides
the higher voltage required by the increased spark plug gap size,
thus providing very intense spark.
A CDI ignition system can create spark potential as high as 37,000
volts. Most engines only need about 20,000 volts for reliable
ignition. The stock system begins to 'droop' as the rpm goes up. At
highway speeds, the spark voltage becomes more and more
marginal, averaging about 18,000 volts. With a CDI system, the
step up process is very fast compared to a conventional 12-volt
induction. This assures a more consistent spark delivery across the
plug gap, even at very high crank speeds (rpm)


Bajaj Sunny Bajaj Sunny Spice

More Details More Details
Fuel Tank Capacity 3.5 Liters 3.5 Liters
Muxlmum Speed 50 Km/Hour 55 Km/Hour
Engine Type Two stroke/petrol 2 - stroke forced air cooled
Power 2.8b hp@6000 rpm 3.6bhp/6500rpm
Torque - 4.3Nm
No of Cyllnders - Slngle Cyllnder
Gear Box Automatic Single speed
Clutch Type - Centrlfugul wet type
Front Suspension Leading link with Coil springs
Leading link with coil spring &
Antidive link (Hyd.Damper
Reur Suspenslon
Hydruullc dumper wlth couxlul
sprlngs
Swlng urm hydruullc dumper couxlul
sprlng
Front Brakes - Drum
Reur Brukes - Drum
front Tyre 2.75x10 Pr 3 X 10
Reur Tyre 2.75x10 Pr 3 X 10
Wheel Base 1165 mm 1165 mm
Ground Cleurunce 100 mm 120 mm
Kerb Weight 63 kg -
Seut Helght - 760
Max Payload - 120 Kg
Capacities

Fuel Tank Capacity 3.5 Liters 3.5 Liters
Performance

Maximum Speed 50 Km/Hour 55 Km/Hour
Engine

Engine Type Two stroke/petrol 2 - stroke forced air cooled
displacement 59.86 cc 59.86 cc
maxPower 2.8b hp@6000 rpm 3.6bhp/6500rpm
maxTorque - 4.3Nm
No of Cylinders - Single Cylinder
Electricals

Battery 12V 12V
Head Lamp - 35/35 W
System - 12V 5 Ah
Transmission

Gear Box Automatic Single speed
Clutch Type - Centrifugal wet type
Suspensions

Front Suspension Leading link with Coil springs
Leading link with coil spring &
Antidive link (Hyd.Damper
Rear Suspension
Hydraulic damper with coaxial
springs
Swing arm hydraulic damper coaxial
spring
Brakes

Front Brakes - Drum
Rear Brakes - Drum
Wheels and Tyres

Front Tyre 2.75x10 Pr 3 X 10
Rear Tyre 2.75x10 Pr 3 X 10
Styling and Design
Sunny is very much simple in its styling. In fact, most of its components are made of fibres to give a lighter feel and
better mileage. The front consists of a single small, headlamp more like a bigger torch light. The handlebar lock is
placed at the front above the front wheel mudguard. The leg room is best for average built people only. The
instruments on either side include a kill switch and headlamp on off button on right and a horn and dim/bright switch
on the left. The choke is present above the legroom on the plastic area below the rider¶s seat. There is a usable hook
like in scooters to hang grocery bags.
The leg room is wide comfortably accomodating big basket below the handlebar. The seat has average width and
accomodates to adults perfectly. The grab rail is simple and also has some storage shelf at the rear. The seat can be
lifted to fill petrol and it also has a luggage space in rectangle shape. The side skins are too much curved showing all
of the suspension spring and the chain set completely. The rear lamp is box type with a small rectangle reflector in
the middle. There are no turn indicators in this bike. The large rear view mirror is same as in other Bajaj Scooters.
Surprisingly only one spring does the suspension for the rear. The three spoke wheels are very small allowing only a
ground clearance of 100mm.

Engine
Bajaj Sunny is powered by a 59.88 cc two stroke engine, with maximum power of 2.8/6000 bhp/rpm. The scooterette
acheives a top speed of 50 kmph. A mileage around 45 kmpl is returned by Sunny.
Ride and Handling
Suiting more for teens, Sunny gives a sluggish pick up from stand still and achieved 30 kmph in a while. There is
nothing particular to mention about handling, as with that speed, one could easily manage halting Sunny with the
drum brakes. The front Leading link with coil springs and the rear hydraulic dampers with coaxial springs give very
much average suspension making you feel every pot hole and bad patch. But one could not blame it because,
considering its low price and chassis, nothing can be expected more than this. With a pillion it takes little more effort
to steer.
With lots of space for luggage, it will fit the teenagers bag, lunch bag too. Straight line stability is good up to 40 kmph
speed and to steer it across a corner, you need to be careful. The 10 inch wheels are puny. As with any two stroke
engine, the paper figures of 2.8 bhp torque is exactly delivered on road. Even after years of using it, the motor still
lives up to its character. The 63kg weight of the scooterette can provide you hardly any grip during rainy days. The
centre stand cannot be easily put, due to the poor design. There is no side stand either. At night, the small headlamp
is better than a cycle dynamo headlamp. The speedometer marked from 0-60 is hardly visible when lit.




Saffire vs active vs kinetic
First the Kinetic. The 98.8cc two-stroke engine of the Kinetic is coupled to a
CVT transmission (commonly known as a variator). Unlike an automatic, there is no gearchange
lag in a variator, simply because there aren't any gears! That's the theory at least. In practice
though, there is a distinct half-a-second lag after turning the throttle when pulling away from a
standstill. Strange! This takes a toll on its Performance, specially on its 0-60kph time where it is
the slowest of the pack at 19.79 seconds. Mid-range Performance is tolerable, with a 20-40kph
time of 4.87sec, while the 40-60kph jog takes 11.76sec. Yet, Performance was rarely the
criterion for a Kinetic buyer over the years. Being the first two-wheelerin the country to have an
electric start, the Kinetic was in favour right from its inception and much hasn't changed since.
This was further enhanced by not having to fiddle with awkwardly placed leaky fuel taps, no
manual choke to deploy on cold mornings, and no gearshifts to grapple with.

Armed with an electric start as standard, the Saffire was aiming right for the Kinetic when it was
launched. And a four-stroke 92.2cc engine promising better fuel-efficiency was the icing on the
cake. Firing up the Saffire is never an issue, since the bypass supply valve with
itstemperature sensor detects a cold engine and enriches the mixture automatically. The engine is
astonishingly smooth and barely audible at idle.

Throttle action is light, and just a hint of a twist is enough to get the wheels rolling. However,
once you twist the throttle and keep it there, the noise from the engine is enough to drown out a
hive of bees, never mind the engine vibration giving your feet a steady massage. For all its
racket, the Saffire is a mediocre performer - the 0-60kph dash is covered in just over 16sec
which, though faster than the Kinetic, is no match compared to the hot Honda. In the 40-60kph
run, it posts a respectable 9.13sec, thanks to its top gear kicking in.

The Activa's 102cc four-stroke engine - the largest of the three - is an absolute gem. It whirs into
life with just a gentle depression of the starterand quickly settles down to an unwrinkled purr of
an idle. The initial throttle response is quick, but once on the move, the experienced rider will
notice a slight drop in engine rpm as the variator changes the ratio, before it starts to build up
again and stays so to the very end. Noise and vibration are nearly non-existent, even at full
throttle. Performance, to say the least, is shattering for its class and the 0-60kph sprint takes a
mere 13.27sec, over 6sec faster than 'king' Kinetic. Overtaking is a joy, with 20-40kph
dispatched in just 3.56sec and 40-60kph in 7.87 seconds. Simply exhilarating!
The Kinetic doesn't inspire a lot of confidence in a straight line, let alone
corners. The feeling that comes through from the handlebars is one of
apprehension that the scooter might do a nasty twist if you swerve hard to
avoid a pothole. Hard cornering can be indulged in with a do-or-die approach
and you come out of the corner shaken but not spilled. The Kinetic's brakes
lack the progressive feel of the Activa and the front tends to lock up under
hard braking.

The Saffire takes all in its stride pretty well with its extremely rigid frame
and centrally mounted engine. Significantly, it feels better planted than the
Activa when turning at slow speeds and its straight-line stability will amaze
many. The brakes on the Saffire get the job done but lack the sheer
stopping power of the Honda. The souring of the ride on the Saffire is due to
the single-sided front suspension's inability to iron out the bumps or the
slightest of uneven road surfaces.

Going into a corner at slow speed, the Activa comes through as a bit over-
eager which may have you leaning at angles fractionally more than what you
intended to. Straightline handling or high-speed banking throws no nasty
surprises. One enjoys a comfortable ride at a cruising speed of 50kph. The
Activa has the largest ground clearance of the three at 145mm, which just
might let you jump that kerb without a nasty jolt to the underbody. The
Activa does bottom but it has to be dumped harshly into something
resembling a minor moon crater. Devoid of any obvious and disturbing
vibrations, the ride remains supple and invites larger throttle openings
because of the effortless way that it tackles road irregularities. Then there is
the longish wheelbase-derived stability that greatly adds to the comfort. And
finally the awesome brakes, providing pin-sharp stopping power with a good
progressive feel throughout. The front leading link suspension does not
completely inhibit weight transfer, which aids braking Performance during
panic stops. The rear end, though, tends to break out a wee bit when the
brakes are jammed at top-end speeds, but that would be fault-finding.




While the Kinetic returned 34.2kpl in the city and 39.1kpl on the highway,
the Saffire delivered 45.6kpl and 46.2kpl, with the Activa coming out tops
with 45.9kpl and 47.1kpl.



Rear Dimension Overall height Overall length Overall Width Wheelbase Ground Clearance Kerb weight Fuel Tank Capacity 1275 mm 140 mm 109 kgs 5 litres 1150 mm 1825 mm Engine Type Stroke (2/4) No.5Ah 2 . Torque Start Kick start 8. . Newer variations are undergoing trials in the R&D department. the Chetak is one of the best-selling two-wheelers in the semi-urban and rural markets. but for now.18 bhp@5500 rpm Suspension Front Rear Transmission No.45 cc 12V 2. air cooled 1 Performance Maximum Power Max. This 150cc scooter will be on its way out by the year 2000. of Gears Clutch 4-speed Tyres Front Rear Company has stopped manufacturing this model.Stroke. The Bajaj Chetak 150 MT is an old-time favourite from the house of Bajaj. of cylinders Bore x stroke Displacement Electrical 145.

The plus points are a tough body. The minus points are poor averages.1kgm@3500 rpm . low maintenance and initial cost and good resale value. 45cc No 7. lacklustre braking and higher pollution levels.5 litres 12V Spring-loaded 145mm Electronic 103kg Two stroke/petrol Four-speed 145. which generates the seven-plus bhp that powers the bike. The problem is the two-stroke engine. It consumes more petrol as compared to the rest.48 hp@5500 rpm 1.4 Pr 3. TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS OF BAJAJ CHETAK Engine Engine : Transmission : Displacement : Tachometer : Max Power : Max torque: Ground Clearance : Ignition : Dry Weight: Fuel tank Capacity : Battery: F/R suspension : Absorber R/R suspension : Max Speed : Front Tyre size : Rear Tyre size : Wheelbase : Hydraulic absorber 85kph 3. unbalanced ride.50x10. This model is not Y2K proof.A large fuel tank and an average fuel consumption figure of 42 kpl leads to a reasonable interval between fuel tank toppings. stiff gear-shifting.4 Pr 1230mm 6.50x10.

even at very high crank speeds (rpm) Bajaj Sunny Bajaj Sunny Spice . the step up process is very fast compared to a conventional 12-volt induction. And the resistance of the air/fuel mixture increases as the mixture is pressurized in the cylinder. the spark voltage becomes more and more marginal. thus providing very intense spark. requiring even higher voltage to spark across a plug. The coil steps the primary potential up to as much as 10. Instead of applying 12 volts to the coil. The easiest way to get a bigger spark is to increase the spark plug gap size. The principal advantage of a CDI system is the ability to present a superior spark to the air/fuel mixture inside the combustion chamber. The stock system begins to 'droop' as the rpm goes up.000 volts. increasing the gap distance also increases the voltage necessary to ionize the air/fuel mixture. When this higher primary current is applied to the coil. However. A CDI ignition system can create spark potential as high as 37. However. thus maximizing burn efficiency.000 volts and delivers this high voltage to the spark plugs. the secondary voltage is dramatically increased. Most engines only need about 20.Introduction/Description A conventional induction ignition creates a spark by applying electric potential (12 volts) to the primary side of the coil. the secondary voltage declines dramatically. averaging about 18. This limitation was partially solved by the development of capacitive-discharge ignition (CDI) systems.000 volts. A CDI system provides the higher voltage required by the increased spark plug gap size. At highway speeds. and as crank speed (rpm) increases. a CD ignition increases the primary current by storing it in a kind of miniature battery called a capacitor.000 volts for reliable ignition. this "step up" process is relatively slow. With a CDI system. This assures a more consistent spark delivery across the plug gap.

P+RXU Two stroke/petrol .3Nm 1RRI&\OLQGHUV Gear Box  Automatic 6LQJOH&\OLQGHU Single speed &OXWFK7\SH  &HQWULIXJDOZHWW\SH Leading link with coil spring & Antidive link (Hyd.P+RXU 2 .75x10 Pr 'UXP 3 X 10 5HDU7\UH Wheel Base [3U 1165 mm . 1165 mm *URXQG&OHDUDQFH Kerb Weight PP 63 kg PP - 6HDW+HLJKW Max Payload  -  120 Kg . Fuel Tank Capacity 3.stroke forced air cooled 3RZHU Torque EKS#USP - EKSUSP 4.5 Liters More Details  More Details  3.Damper Front Suspension Leading link with Coil springs 5HDU6XVSHQVLRQ +\GUDXOLFGDPSHUZLWKFRD[LDO VSULQJV - 6ZLQJDUPK\GUDXOLFGDPSHUFRD[LDO VSULQJ Drum Front Brakes 5HDU%UDNHV front Tyre  2.5 Liters 0D[LPXP6SHHG Engine Type .

6bhp/6500rpm 4.Capacities Fuel Tank Capacity Performance Maximum Speed Engine Engine Type displacement maxPower maxTorque No of Cylinders Electricals Battery Head Lamp System Transmission Gear Box Clutch Type Suspensions Leading link with coil spring & Antidive link (Hyd.86 cc 2.Damper Swing arm hydraulic damper coaxial spring Automatic Single speed Centrifugal wet type 12V 12V 35/35 W 12V 5 Ah Two stroke/petrol 59.3Nm Single Cylinder 50 Km/Hour 55 Km/Hour 3.stroke forced air cooled 59.86 cc 3.5 Liters Front Suspension Leading link with Coil springs Rear Suspension Hydraulic damper with coaxial springs Brakes .8b hp@6000 rpm 2 .5 Liters 3.

lunch bag too. most of its components are made of fibres to give a lighter feel and better mileage.75x10 Pr 3 X 10 3 X 10 Sunny is very much simple in its styling. considering its low price and chassis. The front consists of a single small. But one could not blame it because. Sunny gives a sluggish pick up from stand still and achieved 30 kmph in a while. The choke is present above the legroom on the plastic area below the rider¶s seat. The centre stand cannot be easily put. Engine Bajaj Sunny is powered by a 59.88 cc two stroke engine. as with that speed. due to the poor design. As with any two stroke engine. with maximum power of 2.Front Brakes Rear Brakes Wheels and Tyres Front Tyre Rear Tyre Styling and Design - Drum Drum 2. The leg room is wide comfortably accomodating big basket below the handlebar. A mileage around 45 kmpl is returned by Sunny. There is a usable hook like in scooters to hang grocery bags. With a pillion it takes little more effort to steer. Ride and Handling Suiting more for teens. The scooterette acheives a top speed of 50 kmph. The rear lamp is box type with a small rectangle reflector in the middle. The leg room is best for average built people only. the motor still lives up to its character. The seat has average width and accomodates to adults perfectly. The three spoke wheels are very small allowing only a ground clearance of 100mm. . the paper figures of 2.75x10 Pr 2. Straight line stability is good up to 40 kmph speed and to steer it across a corner. The seat can be lifted to fill petrol and it also has a luggage space in rectangle shape. There is nothing particular to mention about handling. The handlebar lock is placed at the front above the front wheel mudguard.8/6000 bhp/rpm. you need to be careful. The large rear view mirror is same as in other Bajaj Scooters. At night. The instruments on either side include a kill switch and headlamp on off button on right and a horn and dim/bright switch on the left. The grab rail is simple and also has some storage shelf at the rear. nothing can be expected more than this. There are no turn indicators in this bike. There is no side stand either. the small headlamp is better than a cycle dynamo headlamp. With lots of space for luggage. The speedometer marked from 0-60 is hardly visible when lit. The front Leading link with coil springs and the rear hydraulic dampers with coaxial springs give very much average suspension making you feel every pot hole and bad patch. The 10 inch wheels are puny. Even after years of using it. Surprisingly only one spring does the suspension for the rear. The 63kg weight of the scooterette can provide you hardly any grip during rainy days. In fact. one could easily manage halting Sunny with the drum brakes. it will fit the teenagers bag.8 bhp torque is exactly delivered on road. The side skins are too much curved showing all of the suspension spring and the chain set completely. headlamp more like a bigger torch light.

to say the least. However. Performance. with 20-40kph dispatched in just 3. with a 20-40kph time of 4. Yet.76sec. while the 40-60kph jog takes 11. and just a hint of a twist is enough to get the wheels rolling. The engine is astonishingly smooth and barely audible at idle. even at full throttle.87sec. over 6sec faster than 'king' Kinetic. This was further enhanced by not having to fiddle with awkwardly placed leaky fuel taps. before it starts to build up again and stays so to the very end. let alone corners. the Saffire was aiming right for the Kinetic when it was launched. there is a distinct half-a-second lag after turning the throttle when pulling away from a standstill. Armed with an electric start as standard. it posts a respectable 9. the Saffire is a mediocre performer . thanks to its top gear kicking in. the noise from the engine is enough to drown out a hive of bees. Significantly. specially on its 0-60kph time where it is the slowest of the pack at 19.27sec. Overtaking is a joy. no manual choke to deploy on cold mornings. the Kinetic was in favour right from its inception and much hasn't changed since. It whirs into life with just a gentle depression of the starterand quickly settles down to an unwrinkled purr of an idle. since the bypass supply valve with itstemperature sensor detects a cold engine and enriches the mixture automatically.79 seconds. Unlike an automatic. And a four-stroke 92. once you twist the throttle and keep it there. though faster than the Kinetic. is no match compared to the hot Honda. The Activa's 102cc four-stroke engine .56sec and 40-60kph in 7. Hard cornering can be indulged in with a do-or-die approach and you come out of the corner shaken but not spilled. The 98. Noise and vibration are nearly non-existent.87 seconds.is an absolute gem. Simply exhilarating! The Kinetic doesn't inspire a lot of confidence in a straight line.13sec.Saffire vs active vs kinetic First the Kinetic. simply because there aren't any gears! That's the theory at least. never mind the engine vibration giving your feet a steady massage. is shattering for its class and the 0-60kph sprint takes a mere 13. Performance was rarely the criterion for a Kinetic buyer over the years. Being the first two-wheelerin the country to have an electric start.2cc engine promising better fuel-efficiency was the icing on the cake. For all its racket. In practice though. the experienced rider will notice a slight drop in engine rpm as the variator changes the ratio. The Saffire takes all in its stride pretty well with its extremely rigid frame and centrally mounted engine. Throttle action is light. Firing up the Saffire is never an issue. The Kinetic's brakes lack the progressive feel of the Activa and the front tends to lock up under hard braking. and no gearshifts to grapple with. it feels better planted than the Activa when turning at slow speeds and its straight-line stability will amaze . but once on the move. The feeling that comes through from the handlebars is one of apprehension that the scooter might do a nasty twist if you swerve hard to avoid a pothole.the 0-60kph dash is covered in just over 16sec which. In the 40-60kph run. there is no gearchange lag in a variator. Strange! This takes a toll on its Performance.the largest of the three . The initial throttle response is quick. Mid-range Performance is tolerable.8cc two-stroke engine of the Kinetic is coupled to a CVT transmission (commonly known as a variator).

the ride remains supple and invites larger throttle openings because of the effortless way that it tackles road irregularities. which aids braking Performance during panic stops.2kpl in the city and 39. The Activa has the largest ground clearance of the three at 145mm.2kpl. The Activa does bottom but it has to be dumped harshly into something resembling a minor moon crater. which just might let you jump that kerb without a nasty jolt to the underbody. One enjoys a comfortable ride at a cruising speed of 50kph. providing pin-sharp stopping power with a good progressive feel throughout.1kpl.1kpl on the highway. While the Kinetic returned 34. The front leading link suspension does not completely inhibit weight transfer. with the Activa coming out tops with 45. Devoid of any obvious and disturbing vibrations. Going into a corner at slow speed.6kpl and 46. The rear end. Then there is the longish wheelbase-derived stability that greatly adds to the comfort. Straightline handling or high-speed banking throws no nasty surprises. . tends to break out a wee bit when the brakes are jammed at top-end speeds. the Activa comes through as a bit overeager which may have you leaning at angles fractionally more than what you intended to. And finally the awesome brakes. The brakes on the Saffire get the job done but lack the sheer stopping power of the Honda. The souring of the ride on the Saffire is due to the single-sided front suspension's inability to iron out the bumps or the slightest of uneven road surfaces. though.9kpl and 47. but that would be fault-finding.many. the Saffire delivered 45.