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DB2ADMNS admin group

DB2USERS user group


C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Desktop\BkpApril26th 2010
C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\My Documents\DB2 bank
1.About your self ?

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1.Cloud computing
1.1 Breif of cloud computing
1.2 what u did in cloud computing
2.DB2
2.1 how DB2 will be different in Cloud
2.2 biref of what you did in DB2
2.3 Breif of the Security
2.4 Breif of Physical desgin
2.5 Breif of GSK plugin
2.6 Breif of WLM
2.7 Breif of LBAC
2.8 Breif of Autoninc involved
2.9 HADR
2.10 difference between Db2 z/Os and LUW
3.SOA
3.1 breif of SOA
3.2 breif of what modules we have
3.3 steps involved in the modules
3.4 what and how???
4.Rexx command etc
5.Virtualisation
6.Fuzzy logic
7.System Z
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cloud defination :
Common, Location-independent,Online Utility on Demand where Common implies mult
i-tenancy, not single or isolated tenancy; Utility implies pay-for-use pricing ;
on Demand implies ~infinite, ~immediate, ~invisible scalability
Alternatively, a Zero-One-Infinity definition
0 On-premise infrastructure, acquisition cost, adoption cost,support cost
1 Coherent and resilient environment not a brittle software stack
? Scalability in response to changing need,Integratability/ Interoperability wit
h legacy assets and other services
Customizability/Programmability from data, through logic, up into the us
er interface without compromising robust
multi-tenancy
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Multitenancy refers to a principle in software architecture where a single insta
nce of the software runs on a server, serving multiple client organizations (ten
ants).
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Cloud Software as a Service (SaaS)
Use provider s applications over a network
Cloud Platform as a Service (PaaS)
Deploy customer-created applications to a cloud
Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)
Rent processing, storage, network capacity, and other fundamental computing reso
urces
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Certificate Management System:-CMS
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LBAC:
A security label is composed of one or more security label components. There are
three types of security label components that you can use to build your security
labels:
Sets. A set is a collection of elements where the order in which those
elements appear is not important. All elements are deemed equal.
Arrays. An array is an ordered set that can be used to represent a simple
hierarchy. In an array, the order in which the elements appear is
important. For example, the first element ranks higher than the second
element and the second higher than the third.
Trees. A tree represents a more complex hierarchy that can have multiple
nodes and branches. For example, trees can be used to represent
organizational charts. You use a security policy to define the security label
components that make up a particular security label.

# Why this matters


Our clients work on amazing things, and IBM has many talents and resoures. If IB
M and I can support clients in making the kind of difference they want to make,
we can all make the world better.
# Ideal
I help clients envision the possible, troubleshoot problems, navigate IBM's capa
bilities, and work with IBM on making things happen.
# Strengths I can build on
I'm great at connecting people, tools, and resources across the organization. Th
is is something many clients and many IBMers have a hard time with. If I build o
n this strength, I can help more people learn how to do this well.
I'm also good at understanding the big picture and communicating it to other peo
ple. I can empathize with clients' objectives and communicate that big picture w
ith people in IBM.
# How I can grow
* Find role models and mentors who exemplify this for clients or industries
* Move from development or consulting into a client account supporting role
* Map out my network and strategies for connecting