You are on page 1of 7

10/11/2010

Case Presentation 3
October 9, 2009
• Patient: 10 year‐old female presented with 
mother to USC Dental Emergency
• Chief complaint from mother:  My daughter 
was on a swing at school three days ago and a
was on a swing at school three days ago and a 
boy ran in front of her.  She hit her front teeth 
on his head.  Please help my daughter.
• Mother provided consent for photographs of 
daughter.

Case Presentation 3
• Medical history: non‐contributory.  Patient was 
given Rx for amoxicillin and Tylenol with codeine 
from previous dentist.  Tetanus vaccine is current.
• Dental history: swing accident October 6, 2009.  
Dental history: swing accident October 6, 2009.
Mother reported seeking dental care from 4 
different dentists.  1 dentist stated she needed 
extractions.  2 dentists told her they could not 
help her.  1 dentist advised she see an oral 
surgeon.  No referrals were given.

#8 and #9 Horizontal Fractures
Case Presentation 3
#10 Extrusive Luxation 
• Periapical and panoramic radiographs taken in 
Emergency
• Referred to Graduate Endodontics

1
10/11/2010

#7 Class I mobility #8 Class III mobility
#9 Class III mobility #10 Class III mobility Case Presentation 3
• Periapical radiographs taken
• Referral to Oral Surgery for suspected alveolar 
fracture

Alveolar Fracture of Maxilla

Repositioning Maxilla Arch Bar

2
10/11/2010

Andreasen JO, Adreasen FM, Bakland LK and Flores  2004 Recommended Guidelines of the AAE for 
MT. Traumatic Dental Injuries Second Edition. 2003 the Treatment of Traumatic Dental Injuries:
Alveolar Fracture
• Alveolar fracture: splint with a rigid or non‐ • Reposition the fragment.  Stabilize the 
rigid splint for 3‐4 weeks.  Pulpal and PDL  fragment to the adjacent teeth with a splint 
healing should be monitored after 4, 8 and 26
healing should be monitored after 4, 8 and 26  for 3 4 weeks
for 3‐4 weeks.
weeks and after 1 year.
• Soft diet
• CHX 0.12% twice a day for 7 days
• Follow‐up at 3‐4 weeks, 6‐8 weeks, 6 months, 
1 year and yearly for 5 years.

Position Arch Bar and securing with 26  Arch bar Placed in OS 10/09/09
gauge wire Advised removal at 4 weeks

Class I with #8 and #9 Diastema Before and After

Splint Placement 10/09/09 Splint Adjustment 10/12/09

3
10/11/2010

Andreasen FM and Andreasen JO. 
Parent Compliance 1993: Treatment of Coronal Segment 
• Parent unable to bring patient back to USC for  of a Horizontally Fractured Tooth
follow‐ups.  Parent works weekdays and lives  • The coronal fragment of a horizontally 
in Anaheim. fractured tooth can be considered a luxation 
• Three broken appointments on 10/16, 10/21 
Three broken appointments on 10/16 10/21 injury with resultant trauma to the PDL and
injury, with resultant trauma to the PDL and 
and 10/22. neurovascular supply to the coronal pulp 
• OS is contacting mother. (causing necrosis).  In contrast, the apical 
fragment remains essentially uninjured.

Andreasen FM and Andreasen JO.  Plan
1993: Alveolar Fractures
• Clean and shape the incisal segments of #8 
• The bony fracture may disrupt the vascular  and #9 then place calcium hydroxide with Arch 
supply to the associated teeth, which can  Bar in place during general anesthesia
result in pulp necrosis
result in pulp necrosis. • During same treatment,  Arch Bar Removal by 
During same treatment Arch Bar Removal by
• Thus monitoring pulp vitality is critical. OS
• A non‐rigid splint may be placed after Arch Bar 
removal during the same treatment

Plan
• MTA obturation of incisal segments of #8 and 
#9 under general anesthesia with the 
ENDODONTIC CONSIDERATIONS IN 
possibility for treatment of #7 and/or #10.
• Follow‐up pulp vitalities of #7 and #10 at 3‐4 
Follow up pulp vitalities of #7 and #10 at 3 4
THE CARE OF TRAUMATIC TEETH
weeks, 6‐8 weeks, 6 months, 1 year and yearly 
for 5 years.

4
10/11/2010

Primary level of care Priority Categories
• Acute Priority‐avulsion, alveolar fracture, 
Replant avulsed tooth extrusion, lateral luxation, root fractures
• (treat within a few hours)
Stabilize luxated teeth
• Subacute priority‐intrusion, concussion, 
Reattach a broken tooth fragment subluxation, crown fractures with pulp 
exposure‐delay of several hours does not 
effect results

Priority categories Crown Fractures therapy depends on:
• Size of exposure
• Condition of the pulp
• Delayed –crown fractures with no pulp 
exposure • Maturity of the roots
• Time between accident and treatment
• Concomitant periodontal injury
• Restorative plan

Pulp ‐1.5 hrs after trauma
Increase in vascularization

Histopathological Evaluation of the 
human dental pulp in crown 
fractures

5
10/11/2010

4 days‐increased number of blood 
17 hours –Mononuclear infiltrate
vessels

7 days –large aggregates of collagen 
20 days‐degenerating nerve fibers
fibers

Crown Fracture‐exposed pulp Root Fractures
• MTA PULP CAP • Infrequent occurrence‐5% of all dental injuries
• Observe • No RCT initially
• Pulp test‐ 3 months • Reposition of coronal segment
• Radiograph‐follow root development • Stabilize 4‐6 weeks
• Splint should be functional and non‐rigid‐use 
ortho wire, or flexible resin with nylon 
filament
• RCT on coronal section possible

6
10/11/2010

Luxation Injuries Luxation injuries cont
• Concussion‐tooth is sensitive to percussionbut • Intrusive luxation‐tooth is forced into the 
not excessively mobile alveolus‐appears ankylosed
• Subluxation‐injury has left the tooth with  • WORST INJURY
increased mobility
increased mobility
• Extrusive luxation‐tooth is partially extruded  • With exception of concussion, luxation injuries 
in the socket and very mobile frequently cause pulp necosis
• Lateral luxation‐tooth displaced horizontally or 
locked in position 

Avulsions Avulsions cont.
• Best outcome‐replant immediately • If avulsed tooth is left dry for more than 1 hr‐
• 15 mins or sooner‐PDL will survive hard to get pdl restored
• Most likely RCT is necessary except if tooth  • Replant tooth
h i
has immature apex root formation
f i • Discuss resorption
i i
nd
• Rct  2 week after replantation
• Splint with a functional non rigid splint 2‐3 
weeks to re‐establish pdl