P U B L I S H E R S WE E K L Y

®
Special Report 2011
Providing obsolescence-proof,
device-neutral, and media-rich content
for the global publishing industry
Content Services in
INDIA
© 2011 Cenveo. All rights reserved.
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C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
May 2008 to 352,032 in February 2011,
nearly 15% of which were games. And
the U.S. market for self-paced e-learning
products and services, according to the
Ambient Insight Store, will reach $24.2
billion by 2015.
These astonishing numbers are the
stuff of dreams. But let’s be realistic.
Dealing with the accompanying chal-
lenges (which may shatter those dreams)
calls for more than projections and expec-
tations.
The variety of e-deliverables, for
instance, is proving to be a headache. For
content services vendors, tweaking con-
tent to fit every device—whether an
e-reader or smartphone—is time-con-
suming. For publishers, it is costly. And
no one dares to favor one format or device
over the other.
Some publishers are holding back
because they can’t be sure what to do,
given the proliferation of e-gadgets in
the marketplace. But can they hold out
for long? The answer is a definite no; the
reason, survival.
E-books might seem like a disruptive
format that cannibalizes existing revenue
streams, says CEO Dev Ganesan of
Aptara, “but as with all disruptive tech-
nologies, once it starts to gain acceptance
among users, there are only two options
left: adapt and extract maximum value
out of the technology, or accept that
someone else will use it to alter the eco-
nomics of the business and eventually
render you redundant.”
After all, the benefits of e-books are
obvious: eliminating the cost of printing
and distribution, shortening time to
market, allowing new business models
such as per-article or per-chapter pricing,
and creating enhanced content.
The challenge for publishers, notes
Ganesan, is that the market is controlled
by just a few big players. “Even with the
recent shift to an agency model, pricing
power belongs to these e-tailers, which
constricts all but the largest of publish-
ers. But looking beyond the constraints
and challenges, publishers will find that
the opportunity and market access will
increase significantly. Furthermore, dis-
intermediation in the e-book channel
Three hot areas requiring future-proof
content, interoperability, and rich media
Of E-book, Mobile
App, and E-learning
By Teri Tan
The numbers are huge; the forecast, compelling. The message
is clear: e-books, mobile apps, and e-learning are hot, growing
furiously, and not to be ignored. Not surprising, of course,
given the ubiquity of handheld devices and laptops around us.
Production floor at Chennai-based Lapiz
lishers predict that more than 10% of
their total book revenue will come from
e-books by 2012. And ABI Research pro-
jected that revenues from global mobile
commerce will hit a staggering $119 bil-
lion by 2015. Yet that figure represents
only 8% of the total e-commerce market.
The number of apps offered through
the Apple App Store grew from two in
A
ccording to the Association
of American Publishers,
e-book sales at 16 publish-
ing houses jumped 115.8%,
to $69.9 million, during
the first three months of
2011. In Great Britain, a survey carried
out by Publishing Technology PLC
found that one-third of U.K. trade pub- C
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from the ground up for various e-readers,
particularly iPad. Redesigning text-
books and adding multimedia compo-
nents is the way to attract the generation
of students that has grown up with
smartphones and tablets. And halfway
across the globe, in city-state Singapore
(where this correspondent is based), four
schools have handed out iPads to stu-
dents and teachers in a pilot project to
change the learning and teaching envi-
ronment.
The use of media-rich elements and
games in e-learning, Sen adds, is
becoming more prevalent. But pub-
lishers must always remember that the
focus should be on the learning. “Too
much jazzing up with rich media, ani-
mation, music, and interactivity—for
the sake of making it different and
entertaining—may turn a learning
module into an animated film. The
focus is then lost. On the other hand,
the usage of games is good. But when
learning is forcefully introduced into a
game, it becomes an interruption to
the gaming process. This would demo-
tivate the student instead. A good bal-
ance between entertainment and learn-
ing is often difficult to achieve.”
This brings us back to the fundamen-
tals that must be in place before you
think about e-books, mobile apps, or
e-learning modules. In order to pivot
content to fit the devices or platforms, it
must first be made flexible, neutral, reus-
able, portable, scalable, and obsoles-
cence-proof. The way to achieve all these
is with a digital workflow that uses
XML, the lingua franca that enables
delivery of content any time, any place,
any way. “Create once, publish many” is
the goal when there are devices galore in
the marketplace.
The shift from a print-centric tradi-
tion to an XML-first workflow is not
easy, but it must happen.
Need more convincing? Let’s go
back to the start of this article where
various figures foretell the future
trends in publishing. In order to be a
part of this future, you have to embrace,
and love, XML. There is simply no two
ways about it. n
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
P U B L I S H E R S WE E K LY n A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 1 2
means that small and medium publishers
will get a level of market access never
before available.”
Across the board, publishers are
mostly concerned about four interrelated
issues: market, pricing, future business
models, and the impact of technology,
says Jim Lewis, senior v-p for sales and
marketing at Innodata Isogen. “In the
e-book area, the new agency model is just
working its way through the system, but
there is the looming question of whether
an increase in unit sales will follow from
lower prices. In any case, most publishers
with titles that have commercial poten-
tial are already working on digitization
and e-book conversion.”
But the channels are changing and so
is the market approach. “It is not just a
shift from print to devices, but also the
integration of social media, new content
development initiatives driven by tech-
nology change, open Web access, and so
on. The list is long and the challenges
significant.” In the past year, there has
been a seismic shift in the bookselling
environment, Lewis adds, and “publish-
ers are looking everywhere for revenue.
Increasingly, the sources are digital in
nature.”
That brings us to the device part and
the race to go from monochrome to full-
color, e-paper to e-ink, and no camera to
two.
Today, the race is being won by the
multipurpose devices, iPad and iPhone.
The plethora of Android-powered
options with open-source operating sys-
tems has failed to erode Apple’s domi-
nance in the smartphone and tablet mar-
kets. The fact that Apple does not sup-
port Flash—which is primarily used to
create e-learning modules and multime-
dia e-books—and yet manages to come
out on top causes both consternation and
amazement among publishers and ven-
dors alike.
Naturally, all content services vendors
wish that there were one format for all
devices, saving them the hassle of tweak-
ing content to suit Apple, Amazon,
Barnes & Noble, Sony, and so on. (You
can be sure, however, that the vendors do
love tabulating and adding up the differ-
ent costs for different formats in the final
bill for their publishing clients.)
And what about the oh-so-addictive
mobile apps? (Angry Birds, anyone?)
Well, for a start, their market’s fast and
furious growth prompted PW to launch
a weekly online column, “This Week in
Apps,” last December. (The buzz needs
constant feeding, after all.)
“There is no denying that mobile
devices are going to be a huge part of
our daily lives—whether it is for read-
ing books, listening to music, watch-
ing movies, buying products, navigat-
ing an area, or doing office tasks,” says
Gurvinder Batra, cofounder and CTO
of KiwiTech, which is responsible for
redesigning the PW app. “But publish-
ers are cautious as they have yet to see
big revenue dollars associated with
apps.” As for which market segment
shows the biggest growth in apps, he
says, “We are seeing equal growth in
all segments. Demand comes in from
children’s, higher-ed, and medical
book publishers, besides the obvious
players—entertainment companies in
movies and music. Reference products
seem to be at the top of the list.”
The herd mentality, Batra notes, is
alive and well in the present app-creating
frenzy. He likens the situation to when
the Web was first launched. “Everyone
wanted to have an online presence, but
had not a clue why they were doing it,
how someone would find the Web site,
or why people would want to visit it in
the first place. They were doing it only
because everyone else was. Now this is
happening to the mobile space.”
Investments from publishers in digital
products will continue to grow in the
foreseeable future, says CEO Samudra
Sen of e-learning company Learning-
Mate. “Even Pearson Education, with a
balance sheet that already shows one-
third of its recent revenues coming from
digital products, is predicting that the
trend is going to continue at the com-
pany.”
Just three weeks ago, Pearson and
McGraw-Hill announced their invest-
ment in Inkling, a San Francisco com-
pany that creates interactive textbooks
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Global Content
Distribution
Providing Global e-Distribution
20 vendors when 10 would do the work
and make managing all that much easier.
The same is happening on the supply
side. Larger vendors that prospered
through the dour economy are now look-
ing to grow through acquisitions. The
smaller ones that managed to survive are
looking for like-sized counterparts to
merge and combine resources in order to
carve out their own niche.
Now that all multinational publishing
houses—in SSTM, higher-ed, or k–12—
are deep in the offshoring process, ven-
dors are shifting their attention to tier
two and three publishers, those with siz-
able lists but still doing everything in-
house (or onshore). Persuading these
smaller publishers to take the plunge
may not be easy, but with limited
resources to shift from one vendor to the
next, they are perceived to be more loyal.
Vendors are also venturing further
afield to seek out cheaper but equally
green pastures. Creeping costs and
shrinking margins spare no one, not even
in India. In fact, in the next couple of
years, your production facility visit may
be a city-hopping itinerary that includes
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
Kolkata, Madurai, Pune, Trivandrum,
and Chandigarh. Or even Thimphu in
Bhutan.
But whatever the size of the vendors,
and wherever they are located, XML is at
the front, back, and center of their oper-
ations. To speed up the XML-ing pro-
cess, vendors have developed special
scripts, automation tools, and even pro-
prietary software that can be incorpo-
rated into any existing publishing work-
flow. Their experts can pivot XML-based
content to fit any required device, for-
mat, or platform.
For publishers, being a part of the
digital world means being pro-XML and
choosing an XML-first workflow. But
you don’t have to be an expert in XML
tags or XML schema, or worry about
XSL-FO, XSLT, or XQuery. Leave that to
the following 15 companies (in reverse
alphabetical order)—and many that are
not listed here but thriving in India—to
help transform your content. It is up to
you to evaluate, choose, and determine
which of the vendor(s) can best be your
partner(s) on a successful trip down the
XML road.
Thomson Digital India
The school segment, says executive
director Vinay Singh, has begun to travel
offshore for development services and
support, following the same path taken
by the higher-ed and STM segments:
“We see major opportunities in the seg-
ment, hence our investment in Orlando
[Fla.]-based Element LLC last July. Our
focus since the inception of Thomson
Digital in 1988 had been on the STM
b o o k a n d
journal seg-
ments, and we
have built our
expertise and
r e p u t a t i o n
there. Then,
in the past five
years, we were
f o c us e d o n
higher-ed and
professional
publ i s hi ng
verticals, and
The plethora of new and upcoming
gadgets needs obsolescence-proof
publishing methods
Transforming Content
For Tomorrow
By Teri Tan
In an increasingly app-centric and e-book world, gadgets are
getting smaller, more portable, and capable of catering for
more than one purpose. Add common Web-based program-
ming standards, where switching platforms is as easy as A-B-
C, and you know content has to be dynamic, agile, and com-
pletely neutral (read: loyal to no device or format).
W
hile the tech industry
is looking out for the
next iPad/iPhone/
Google/Facebook/
Twitter killer, the
publishing industry
is busy finding partners to enhance
e-books using multimedia authoring
tools, to provide periodic updates of
mobile apps, or to redesign a course book
for the digital classroom. Or for help
with editorial development, page design,
photo research, creative illustration, per-
missions management, technical writ-
ing, abstraction, and localization. On an
even more basic level, to take over tedious
keyboarding, typesetting, and scanning/
conversion processes. All eyes are on con-
tent—how to create, deconstruct, con-
vert, improve, aggregate, archive, de-
chunk, or repurpose it.
Meanwhile, consolidation is in. Pub-
lishers with vast outsourcing experience
in India are shortening their vendor list,
since more companies are offering full-
service project management through a
combined onshore/offshore outsourcing
model. It makes perfect sense not to have
P U B L I S H E R S WE E K LY ■ A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 1 4
Vinay Singh, executive
director at Thomson Digi-
tal
Together we provide the ultimate in print
and technology product development.
• Project Management
• Content & Editorial
• Design
• Composition
• Illustration
• Image Research
• Conversion & Digitization
• XML & E-Books
• New Media Technology
Thomson Digital and Element have
merged to bring the best resources
from around the world to meet your
publishing needs!
Bigger & Better
Element, LLC
|
7829 Greenbriar Parkway
|
Orlando, Florida, USA 32819
|
www.elementllc.com
Thomson Digital
|
Plot 129, NSEZ
|
Noida 201 305, India
|
www.thomsondigital.com
A Division of Thomson Digital
element
PW_AD_BLEED.indd 1 4/8/11 11:02 AM
showcased our content capabilities and
hosted two discussions: one on monetiz-
ing content and the other about adding
efficiencies to a publisher’s value chain.”
Established in 1984 and listed on the
Mumbai Exchange in 2006, more than
50% of Repro’s business comes from
overseas markets. “Our goal is to manage
our clients’ content to provide a zero
inventory solution by printing and deliv-
ering books just in time—whether it is
one copy or a million copies,” adds
Rajnish Shirsat, v-p of print solutions.
“We see the synergies in working with
clients to integrate three different divi-
sions into a one-stop shop. Few in India
can offer such a service in a seamless
workflow. And instead of waiting for cli-
ents to discover us and our integrated
services, we have decided to be more
aggressive in marketing ourselves and
making our services known to all.”
PreMediaGlobal
At PMG, school and college projects
grew around 20%–25% last year, even
though, as co-CEO Kapil Viswanathan
concedes, “the school market in general
has had a difficult time recently. But we
have substantial experience in k–12 con-
tent development and this has helped us
to grow. In terms of trends, we are seeing
more demand for interactive white-
boards, Web portals, and so on that inte-
grate the development of print with
digital products.” There is also more
demand for translations and new content
in non-English languages, especially
Spanish, French, and German.
There has been a significant rise in
nonconventional services such as creative
design, permission clearance, and image
research. For the latter, PMG has just
the right product to offer: Right-
Photo, its proprietary engine for ser-
vices covering image research, per-
missions, rights management, and
image archiving. The challenge in
offering this service, Viswanathan
says, “lies in creating a highly effi-
cient process that is scalable to large
volumes, something that we have
been able to do with our seamless
onshore/offshore workflow.”
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
P U B L I S H E R S WE E K LY ■ A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 1 6
succeeded in securing a substantial mar-
ket share. Our current goal is to expand
and diversify into other segments glob-
ally, and that’s where Element LLC comes
in.” The Element team will focus on
front-end content development and edi-
torial services, creative design, art and
photo management, and full-service
project management for the k–12,
higher-ed, and adult learning segments.
“Both our India and U.S. teams are fully
integrated so that we can offer respon-
sive, timely, and cost-effective solutions
to all the clients and markets that we
serve around the world.”
Singh is aggressively pursuing growth
in technology and new media solutions
in order to sustain Thomson Digital’s
status as a market leader. Exploring
investment opportunities to supplement
organic growth is on his to-do list.
“Interactive products, whiteboards, and
e-learning modules, online assessments,
multiplatform e-books and apps, you
name it.” Singh says. “We are keeping
our eyes on each growing segment, and
tailoring our expertise and services to
offer the best possible solutions to cli-
ents.”
Meanwhile, ever-increasing price pres-
sure and rising costs in India have
prompted Singh to consider setting up
new operations in unconventional loca-
tions. The northeastern and Himalayan
parts of India come to mind. “I would
even consider neighboring countries like
Bhutan, where one would find almost
100% English-medium schools with aca-
demic evaluations affiliated to the Indian
Central Examination Board. Cost is stable
and so is its workforce, and since no other
content services vendor has set up shop
there, we do not have to worry about
attrition and poaching.” That does not
mean that Thomson Digital is moving
away from Noida or Chennai. “On the
contrary, we will equip the existing facil-
ities—including our Mauritius opera-
tions—with better infrastructure and
technology. One top priority is to further
strengthen our European-language capa-
bilities.” Thomson Digital offers French,
Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese, and has
recently added Polish to its portfolio.
Repro India
Not many vendors can boast of having two
publishing experts—Robert Baensch and
Chris Curtis—on their advisory board or
having the foresight to organize a series of
seminars on future trends in publishing.
The latter, Knowledge Forum, gets the
Indian publishing community together to
discuss shifting trends that have forced
some changes in the fundamental process
of bringing out a book. The first forum was
held in September 2010 in Delhi, attract-
ing around 120 publishers; the second was
in Hyderabad in January 2011, attended
by 45 publishers.
“Publishers must rethink how to man-
age content right from the start, and they
need to connect the dots between different
processes: content management, printing,
and fulfillment,” says Amit Chavan, who
is in charge of publishing services, a seg-
ment currently representing 5% of the
company’s total turnover. “At Repro
India, we want to be a custodian of our
clients’ content from start to finish. We
can help in designing books, developing
content, converting print titles into vari-
ous deliverables, or setting up digital asset
management or digital rights manage-
ment systems.” Recently, his team helped
a client to redesign and print 10 children’s
books, consisting of around 1,200 pages
with 2,500 illustrations to be altered or
created—all within four months.
Increasingly, adds Chavan, “clients rec-
ognize that Repro India is more than a
printing company—even though that was
our primary business in the past—and
that we offer end-to-end solutions.” To
raise the company’s profile, Chavan and
his team participated in the 2010 Frank-
furt Book Fair Hot Spots, where “we
Rajnish Shirsat (l.) and Amit Chavan of Repro
India
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
taxonomy, METS/ALTO output and
even cataloguing services. We will be
launching consulting services in devel-
oping digital libraries soon,” says Vishal
Salgotra, v-p of business development,
adding that the demand for high quality
content in different formats has increased
two- to threefold in recent years. “Tradi-
tional book publishers are now more
open to technology and are making stra-
tegic moves into the digital space in
order to maintain their market leader-
ship. At the same time, there are niche
digital publishers that are seeing double-
digit growth within just a few years of
operation.” Naturally, Planman is invest-
ing heavily in crucial new technologies
and software knowledge.
Among the new technologies thrown
into focus are HTML5 and Flex. “There is
huge interest from the U.K. and U.S.
markets in these. We have done several
interactive whiteboards [IWBs] and
e-book projects using Flash/Flex in which
our team handled everything from story-
boarding, content writing, animating,
illustrating, to programming. Develop-
ing mobile and tablet apps is another area
that we are working on aggressively,” says
v-p of sales Amit Vohra. One recent proj-
ect, Learn & Draw, aimed at eight- to
10-year-olds, effectively illustrates Plan-
man’s capabilities. The team developed
digital components such as IWBs with
interactive videos, background music, and
animation to give kids a fun-filled experi-
ence as basic facts about various subjects
from the print product were included.
Last July, Planman opened a new office
in Cincinnati, Ohio, with a strong and
experienced editorial and project man-
O n t h e
higher-ed side,
f ul l - s e r v i c e
project man-
a g e m e n t
r e ma i ns i t s
f o c u s . “ An
increasing pro-
portion of our
higher-ed proj-
ects i nvol ve
t h e w h o l e
works, from content development,
design, and image research up to deliver-
ables,” says executive v-p (higher-ed divi-
sion) Rick Vayo. And e-books are a grow-
ing part of those deliverables. “E-book
volumes are certainly growing, and this
growth will outpace that of print. How-
ever, print will still play a role in certain
types of material. E-reader devices will
continue to get more usable and feature-
rich, and while there has been no single
killer device yet, we might see a clear
leader emerging soon.”
Senior v-p (pre-k–12 division) Jane
Petlinski adds, “When we develop
e-books and other digital products simul-
taneously with the print product, we can
customize them by weaving in new
media, interactivity, and additional con-
tent for a more exclusive, value-added,
and tailor-made feel. Storyboarding right
from the start would help both print and
digital formats.”
Confident of the growing opportuni-
ties in the publishing marketplace, PMG
increased its office space last February and
will be expanding its current 1,000-mem-
ber team.
Planman
Technologies
No other vendor has so much
going on in the library space.
With a clientele consisting of
national libraries from around
the globe, Planman offers end-
to-end services ranging from
microfilm scanning to data
crunching. “We provide digital
library support and portal
development, metadata cre-
ation, and schema conversion,
Kapil Viswanathan,
co-CEO of PreMediaGlobal
(l.-r.) Vishal Salgotra, Sourav Chatterjee, Amit Vohra,
and P.S. Narang of Planman Technologies
www.reproindialtd.com
Creation-Conversion-Conservation
Content Management
Archival, IPR, DRM,
Content Distribution Channels
Publishing Services
Development, Composition
Alternate Format Conversions
ePub, eBook, XML, XHTML, SGML
Graphics & Digital Imaging
Scanning, Images & Illustrations
transforming
content
in any format
offering
multiple delivery
options
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
P U B L I S H E R S WE E K LY ■ A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 1 8
Newgen Imaging
While other vendors are working to
build developmental editing or creative
services capabilities, these are nothing
new at Newgen. “Our Texas and New
York offices support acquisitions editors
by working with authors to ensure man-
agement team to provide full-service sup-
port to American publishing clients. One
recent project in literature for grades
six–12 fully illustrates the team’s exper-
tise. “For this project, our Cincinnati edi-
torial team worked with the Delhi pro-
duction team using a K4 InCopy work-
flow,” says Orville Dykes, director of
publishing services. “We will expand our
Cincinnati office, enhance editorial devel-
opment expertise in core subject areas,
and continue building technology devel-
opment capabilities, in our ongoing effort
to be a valued partner to our clients.”
At STM publisher CRC Press, a subsidiary of Taylor &
Francis, outsourcing to India was a gradual process that
started with typesetting, then on to graphic work (such
as relabeling and redrawing illustrations) and finally
the whole workflow covering copyediting and project
management to deliverables. V-p of production Rick
Beardsley talks to PW about his outsourcing experience
and offers some dos and don’ts.
When did you start outsourcing to
India, and how many vendors do you
use?
That was 10 years ago, and we currently
use eight full-service vendors: one based in
Singapore, one in the U.S. (that partners
with Indian vendors), and the rest, India.
What is the basic format for your
frontlist?
A majority of our books are in InDesign,
with the basic page layout scripted to
follow a particular template.
How about backlist conversion?
Mass backlist conversion to XML is something that we
have avoided. As we develop more interactive products, we
want the products to determine the conversion format, not
vice versa. We have, however, converted most of the titles
for our online subscription database, CRCnetBASE, in
which each title is broken up into chapters of metadata-
rich interactive PDFs.
How do you deal with the rising demand for e-books
and content flexibility?
We have adjusted accordingly. More of our frontlist is now
available as e-books, and we have expanded our conver-
sion capabilities as well as the number of formats provided.
On the archival side, we have instituted stricter quality
control and tighter organization on our files. As more oppor-
tunities to use and reuse our content emerge, we need the
files to be accurate, complete, and in a usable format.
What is your concern about e-books?
Equation- and table-heavy content may be broken up and
become meaningless on a small screen. As an STM pub-
lisher, we have to be careful with that. Also, preventing
piracy is a major concern with e-books.
What are your words of wisdom on vendor selection?
Firstly, consider carefully the type of work you are look-
ing to outsource. Copyediting and proofreading could be
tricky. We have an easier time with STM publishing
because we can usually live with a light basic grammar
and spelling edit, and not worry so much about the
author’s voice. But if your author is a non-native English
speaker, then it is probably not wise to have another
non-native English speaker as the editor. Many of our
Indian vendors use copyediting and
project management resources not
only from their own country but
also from the U.S. and U.K.
Secondly, test new vendors thor-
oughly and rigorously. Low prices
can be tempting, but, as we have
discovered, there is a wide range of
ability and quality control out there.
Thirdly, one or two successful proj-
ects do not mean that the vendor is
ready for a regular flow of work. We
consider a vendor to be in test mode in the first year, and
we have rejected far more vendors than what we ended
up using.
Any specific areas to look out for?
In general, explicit instruction is crucial, and it is good to
put every detail in writing. Building a full-service instruc-
tion manual is one way we have dealt with it. And don’t
be overly tempted by volume discounts because growing
volume too quickly can be disastrous.
Your thoughts on the current Indian content services
industry?
Overall, we have seen it becoming more stable and better
prepared to handle our work. The price advantage over
domestic sources is not as dramatic as in the past, but
India is still a good deal. We have come to a point where
we outsource large and complex handbooks to India with
confidence, but the process has taken a number of years to
develop. In the past, some of our biggest problems came
from a lack of proper project management, but that is no
longer an issue. Moving slowly while developing our sup-
pliers and forming a long-term relationship with them
has certainly paid off.
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Congratulate
We
Winner of the Independent Publisher
of the Year at the 2011
IPG Awards
and
The Ingram Academic & Professional
Publisher of the Year Award
Winner of AAP’s Prose Award
for Literature, Language &
Linguistics
for
The City of Translation by
Jose Maria Rodriguez Garcia
Copyediting
.
Project Management
.
Composition
.
ePub
.
Design
.
Data Archival
sales@newgenimaging.com
Chennai, India - +91 99406 38938 | Austin, USA - +1 512 478 541| Oxford, UK - +44 186 586 1988
Congratulate
We
Winner of the
2011 awards for IPG Independent
Publisher of the Year
and
Ingram Academic & Professional
Publisher of the Year
Winner of the
2010 PROSE Award for Literature,
Language & Linguistics
for
The City of Translation
by Jose Maria Rodriguez Garcia
Copyediting
.
Project Management
.
Composition
.
ePub
.
Design
.
Data
.
Archival
sales@newgenimaging.com
Chennai, India +91 99406 38938 | Austin, USA +1 512 478 5341| Oxford, UK +44 186 586 1988
diversified, enterprise-scale content and
technology business. “Large publishers
are increasing investments in the Asia
Pacific region and creating market-spe-
cific digital products. In fact, some of
these projects are a complete overhaul of
the original product lines with different
language and cultural contexts. Our
team works with our clients in Japan,
Singapore, Taiwan, and Australia, and we
are learning to collaborate with local
experts in these countries as well.”
In the past six months, LearningMate’s
revenues from consulting services have
shot up. “We have been called to design
enterprise-wide content architectures
that provide for the way content will be
used in years to come. A great example is
a content model we developed for a major
higher-ed publisher on which their new
product and distribution strategy is
built. They can now configure and sell
their content in new ways and through
new channels—unthinkable just five
years ago. We have also created innova-
tive tools and automated workflows for
XML transformation and content deliv-
ery to emerging mobile device plat-
forms.”
Meanwhile, plans to set up another
office in India are in the works. “We con-
sidered Chennai, Bangalore, Hyderabad,
and Pune before settling on Kolkata. The
city impressed us with its academic infra-
structure, local talent pool, and reason-
able cost structure. It’s a great fit for a
midsize company like ours. The city is
also emerging as the destination for many
software companies from tier one cities in
India.” Across the oceans, in New Jersey,
Sen is busy building a content develop-
ment team. “Our customers want to out-
source the entire value chain from content
authoring and media development to
packaging and delivery. Naturally, we are
gearing up to meet their needs.”
Lapiz
Acquiring more editorial capabilities in
the k–12 segment and making process
improvements in projects involving con-
tent management systems and digital
devices are on CEO Indira Rajan’s to-do
list for 2011. She is also in the process of
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
P U B L I S H E R S WE E K LY ■ A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 1 10
uscripts arrive in proper
shape, on time, and with the
agreed subject coverage. We
prepare author guidelines,
create Word authoring tem-
plates, manage schedules
and the review process, and
ensure content compli-
ance—the whole works. We
even create model chapters
to guide authors on the
structure and f eatures.
Developing print and digi-
tal ancillaries is also part of developmen-
tal editing—and all these tasks call for
considerable subject matter expertise.”
Digitization of legacy content has
always been a major segment at Newgen,
especially with its SCOOP (SCan, OCR,
Online PDFs) services. Nowadays, out-
puts are no longer PDFs only. “In 2010,
we converted more than one million
pages to ePub format, and the figure is
expected to more than double this year.
Our proprietary conversion engine can
deliver ePub files from any input format
at a fast clip with consistent quality,”
says president Maran Elancheran, adding
that the software converts backlist and
frontlist titles to all major e-book for-
mats on the fly.
Currently, Newgen is the only India-
based vendor (with no printing facility)
to offer a manufacturing coordination
service to publishers. “Coordinating
with the publishers’ printers and compo-
nent suppliers, managing warehouse
delivery schedules, estimating, creating
book covers, and ensuring correct brand-
ing—these are just some of the services
that we provide,” adds Elancheran,
whose printing engineers also manage
the delivery of final files in specific for-
mats to different aggregators on behalf of
their clients.
Elancheran and his team are seeing
increasing demand for multiple print
products from the same XML content.
For one legal publisher, for instance,
Newgen produces a serial title with one
annual and two bimonthly print and
online editions. He says, “Even though
all three products are derived from the
same content, the style, format, and cov-
erage are different for each.
When the project came to
us, the three editions were
managed as three separate
databases. We created a
master XML database that
allows them to be generated
from a single source, so con-
tent updates need be made
just once to be reflected in
all three editions. The data-
base workf l ow ensures
100% da t a i nt e gr i t y
between products while reducing work
duplication.” And that is the very aim of
the industry: creating robust and effi-
cient single-source content that can be
moved into different channels without
losing data integrity.
LearningMate
With tier two and three publishers
aggressively investing in digital strate-
gies, CEO Samudra Sen sees “an oppor-
tunity for publishers to leverage Learn-
ingMate’s digital services to achieve their
goals. For instance, we helped a midsize
legal publisher create its e-book plat-
form, and now we are in the process of
building its enterprise portal to serve
litigation lawyers across the U.S.” More
recently, LearningMate executed one of
the largest digital transformation proj-
ects ever: creating, building, and deploy-
ing several hundred courses over four
months for a major educational pub-
lisher. “Our process automation tools and
integrated project management systems
helped us accomplish this seamlessly.”
Sen is transforming his company from
an e-learning pure-play to a global,
Samudra Sen (r.) and Abhijeet Sethi of
LearningMate
Maran Elancheran, presi-
dent of Newgen Imaging
www.learningmate.com
Publish Everywhere.
That’s Where Students Learn.
With an e-publishing partner who understands your business,
your products and your customers, you can deliver digital content
on multiple channels quickly and affordably. LearningMate
empowers you with innovative technologies, professional
services and streamlined processes to give your customers
more—more content, more engagement, more learning.
Let’s transform learning together.
Write to us: publishing@learningmate.com
New York Vancouver London Mumbai
Instructional Design
XML Workfows
Editorial Services
Assessment Solutions
Immersive eBooks
Mobile Apps
Authoring Tools
Custom Applications
smaller ones have more at stake with each
app project.”
Scalability, he says, is a very important
factor for the publishing industry. And
with scalability comes cost. “You can
choose to create a unique solution for a
book, but doing so for each and every book
is simply not practical. The more practical
approach is to avoid recreating the wheel.
Take book design, for instance. Publishers
can create a series of book and page
designs, and fit a book into one of these
designs. It helps to keep costs low as well
as standardizing the process. We can take
a similar approach to apps development—
keeping the individuality of the book
intact while reducing the development
costs.” In general, an app may cost
between $8,000 and $15,000 to develop.
Partnering with large players to help
them with their digital strategy and fig-
uring out how to scale and provide a
digital solution across their product lines
are the goals of KiwiTech. “We are work-
ing on some exciting projects that will
be the first of their kind in the mobile
industry. But this is too early for us to
divulge any details. Suffice it to say that
the next 12 to 16 months looks extremely
exciting for us.”
Integra
Unveiling a new logo and the vision of
“powering content transformation” a few
weeks before entering 2011 marks a new
chapter at Pondicherry-based Integra.
“We have used the old logo for more than
16 years, and it’s high time for a change.
The feedback from our clients has been
encouraging. They really like the new,
more colorful logo, our focused vision
and mission statement, and the way they
are in sync with our business goals and
industry trends. One large educational
publisher, in particular, likes the use of
the word ‘joyful’ in our mission state-
ment because he finds that Integra really
lives its vision,” says Sriram Subramanya,
cofounder, managing director, and CEO.
Clients, especially nonnative speakers
of English, are also “joyful” to find copy-
editing and proofreading services readily
accessible at Language-Polishing.com.
“We position this service as a product, and
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
P U B L I S H E R S WE E K LY ■ A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 1 12
recruiting a
senior execu-
tive responsi-
ble for “for-
mulating and
implementing
departmental
and organiza-
tional policies
a nd pr o c e -
dures to maxi-
mize output,
freeing v-p V.
Bharathram to focus on creating more
strategic partnerships.”
How to maximize productivity for dif-
ferent digital devices such as iPad and
Kindle is constantly on Rajan’s mind.
Her team is busy with R&D on the crop
of e-readers in the market, looking for
the best way to tweak content to suit
each format. She adds, “Digital content
is the way forward, and more schools will
be opting for digital textbooks. But there
is a big difference between producing
digital content for trade, college, and
k–12. Admittedly, we have a very strong
hold in the trade book division, and visu-
alization, interactivity, and instructional
design are much more complex in k–12
projects. We need to acquire these capa-
bilities given the rate of e-textbook
adoption.” Her team is currently produc-
ing print and digital products simultane-
ously for a major publisher’s program
that involves 4,000 pages, 80% requir-
ing Flash animation.
For now, Rajan sees her team as having
a competitive edge because “we are one of
the few companies that have worked with
different publishers’ content manage-
ment systems. We have worked on K4
and, recently, Documentum.” Asked
about major challenges in working with
such systems, she says, “Nothing major
thus far. At times, connectivity was an
issue, but we resolved it by buying addi-
tional bandwidth.” And she does not
think that there is any loss of control,
even though everything is done through
the client’s FTP server. “In fact, there is
more transparency,” she says. “The work-
flow is powerful and highly customized,
and all activities are logged and therefore
traceable. There is much better version
control, and any human errors can be
tracked and rectified quickly. The best
part is that our team members can work
on different parts of the same project
simultaneously, and our client can track
up-to-the-minute progress. The only
thing that we need to be sure of is to have
a very well-defined internal workflow
prior to working on such projects.”
KiwiTech
The mobile apps frenzy is evident in
KiwiTech’s growth spurt: 26 months
since its inception, it already has 80-some
people on its payroll. “We add around
five to six people every month—mostly
for our development team—and have
launched a new Web site to better show-
case our expertise,” says cofounder and
CTO Gurvinder Batra. The company has
also established a sales and marketing
team in New York, headed by cofounder
and president Anita Gupta.
Mobile commerce is going to be huge,
Batra adds, saying, “We want to stay very
focused on this particular space. Our goal
is to stay aggressive and move ahead of
the market. Most of all, we want to con-
tinue having fun creating innovative app
solutions that will help our clients achieve
their goals.” For those thinking of turn-
ing print into apps, he has a few tips to
offer: “Figure out your digital strategy
based on specific product lines. Remem-
ber that an app is only one of the solutions
from the mobile delivery perspective.
Some other options may be more cost-
effective. And having one successful app
does not mean that the same approach or
style will work for all other products.
Experimen-
tation is cru-
c i a l . Yo u
need to test
the platform
using your
top product
lines. While
bigger play-
e r s h a v e
m o r e
resources to
experiment,
Gurvinder Batra, cofounder
and CTO of KiwiTech
Indira Rajan, CEO of
Lapiz
it’s only available through our Web
site. We launched this site last Octo-
ber, so the traffic is just picking up.
Clients are mostly from European and
Asian countries. It is really encourag-
ing to see a large STM publisher list
Integra as an approved source for lan-
guage polishing services. We have
seen it gaining traction and many
projects have already been com-
pleted,” adds Subramanya, who
recently set up an office in Ely, Cam-
bridgeshire, U.K., with three senior
staff to handle full-service project
management.
Publishers, he says, are currently “in the transformation
stage, and it will take two to three years until e-gadgets sta-
bilize before they have more clarity in their direction. In the
meantime, everyone is merging traditional and new media.
This convergence has taken the educational publishing indus-
try by storm, and it has spread through publishing BPOs like
Integra. Higher-ed and school publishers are looking to part-
ner with vendors who can provide both media services and
high-value end-to-end services. At Integra, having editorial
development and full-service offices in the U.S. and U.K.
means that we can have certain services either executed
onshore or brought back to Pondicherry.”
But it is not all work for Subramanya and his wife, cofounder
and joint managing director, Anu Sriram. Aside from greening
the local environment with tree-planting campaigns, the Sri-
ram Charitable Trust has also started a program to bring diag-
nostic tests and free medicine to people in neighboring rural
areas. “We have carried out 24 Eye Camp programs to provide
specialist eye care services, including cataract and cornea oper-
ations. This is just one of the ways Integra gives back to society,”
adds Subramanya.
Innodata Isogen
“The iPad has compelled publishers to look at how its sophis-
ticated technology can support content enrichment,” says Jim
Lewis, senior v-p for sales and mar-
keting, whose team has been pro-
viding e-publishing services for
Apple’s iBookstore since last
November. “I think we are just at
the beginning of a trend in book
publishing: enhanced design, cov-
ering graphical design, animation,
increased interactivity, and better
use of text. There are also ties with
social networking and the vast
linkable resources of the Web.”
Overall, Lewis continues to see
“increased demand for traditional
Jim Lewis, senior v-p for
sales and marketing at
Innodata Isogen
Sriram Subramanya,
cofounder, managing
director and CEO of
Integra
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
P U B L I S H E R S WE E K LY ■ A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 1 14
is the application of ‘e’ to just about every
aspect of the publishing process: e-pro-
duction, e-discovery, e-marketing, e-sell-
ing and so on. Print is still the archival
medium of choice and access where band-
width is slow or nonexistent. But increas-
ingly, the print version is not the publica-
tion of record.”
As for e-books, Lewis sees the next
wave coming from emerging markets and
services related to content transforma-
tion and mobility, as well as greater
demand for authoring, content creation,
and other high value-added services. As
the movement toward open access text-
books and educational materials contin-
ues to grow, we have been producing
more topic maps and first drafts of
important texts.” Innodata Isogen also
creates a lot of abstracted and summa-
rized content as well as short descriptions
or articles for numerous Web-based pub-
lishers. “There is significant demand for
technology-enabled educational materi-
als, along with short topic summaries for
people who want quick access to perti-
nent information.”
E-publishing, he adds, is gaining
momentum: “Product development
around new technologies is increasing, as
In January, it was announced that the BookMasters
Group Inc. had formed a strategic partnership with
Bangalore-based Macmillan Publishing Services to offer
clients a complete array of services covering digital
publishing, fulfillment, and print and electronic distri-
bution. CEO David Wurster of BMI talks to PW about
the benefits this partnership brings to both sides, and
how clients can leverage both partners’ expertise.
When did you start working with MPS?
It began a few years ago. We met with MPS
executives in the U.S. and U.K., and worked
out an arrangement where BMI provides
warehousing and fulfillment in the U.S. while
MPS takes care of call center and order taking
in India. Then Rajiv Seth, CEO of MPS, and
I met last summer and we began talking about
leveraging our companies’ expertise and mar-
ket share.
What factors determine your choice of
partner?
We seek vendors based on resource needs, and we have
many active relationships with offshore vendors based on
their strengths and our needs. Since we have already tried
and tested these resources, it enables us to better customize
our publishing clients’ production processes. And when-
ever we have new publishing challenges, we turn to our
diverse resources for solutions and information.
Did you look at vendors outside of India at all?
The market dictates that offshore vendors be used since
there is a pseudo-commodities market that has sprung up
around composition and conversion price points. This
transition has happened in the industry over the past decade
and we have accepted it. Our talented U.S. team itself has
transitioned to managers of offshore composition and con-
version services. Given our established rapport with Indian
vendors since the late 1990s, we don’t have the need or
impetus to move work to another region.
Teething problems in partnerships are normal. How
do you deal with them?
Communication is the main issue when dealing with any
supplier, onshore or offshore. Managing expectations and
developing proactive solutions are crucial. We have imple-
mented a very transparent production reporting system
that works not only internally but allows our publisher-
clients direct access as well. By casting MPS as part of our
U.S. team pulling for the same publishing client, we get
buy-in to the project’s goals, thus achieving higher stan-
dards in execution and delivery. Basically, everyone likes
seeing a job well done, regardless of culture or time zone,
and MPS has put great focus in this area for BMI.
How does your e-book conversion and
distribution program, Converso, fit into
this partnership?
Converso allows publishers to defer their
e-book conversion costs until sales volumes of
the e-books are able to cover the initial invest-
ment. This means that publishers can convert
backlist titles—which often do not have the
production budget of frontlists—and pay for
the conversions out of reported sales accrued
through our online retail partners.
So the publisher only needs to contract with BMI
instead of tens of online retailers?
That’s right. We handle the contracts and terms as well as
report sales back into one central place for the publisher’s
online account management. Converso also remedies
metadata issues by creating one set of standard metadata
from which we then disseminate to the various online
retail partners in their preferred format. We also ensure
that the e-book files adhere to specifications required by
different e-reading devices.
A couple of months down the partnership road with
MPS, what is your assessment?
We are seeing great interest from both American and over-
seas publishers looking to leverage the low-cost composi-
tion/conversion services while receiving a well-managed
electronic distribution and production workflow in the
U.S. The digital printing component—on a print-to-order
basis—has received lots of attention as well. No major
deals yet, but it’s still early days. I’m very optimistic
about this partnership.
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(US): 917-464-3518 : 646-383-8014

(India): +91 22 4066-3681
email id: sales@ditechps.com • www.ditechps.com
of the medical publisher Thieme, the
publisher named DiTech as one of its
most preferred vendors. For Ahmed, that
acknowledgment is an encouragement to
do even better. In fact, after completing
one major project for the U.S. division,
DiTech was referred to one of Thieme’s
German imprints and subsequently
awarded 500 titles for production based
on CoreSource/VitalSource specifications.
To date, Braille/NIMAS/DAISY con-
version continues to be one of DiTech’s
strongest services, but so too are its cus-
tomized solutions for educational institu-
tions. Recently, one Australian university
approached Ahmed for urgent help to con-
vert 55,000 pages to RTF format. “Chal-
lenges abounded. The source files were
poor quality scans, so extraction of text and
images was near impossible. On top of
that, we were staring at a 45-day deadline
because the material was needed for the
coming semester. We formed a dedicated
team for the project, did complete key-
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
different language groups.
“Until very recently, the
e-book market was U.S.- and
English-based with a small
amount of Spanish thrown
in. This is changing rapidly
as more languages outside
the major ones, including
the ideographic languages,
are being supported by more
reading devices.” Annually,
Innodata Isogen produces
hundreds of thousands of
e-books for almost two dozen e-book dis-
tribution platforms. The volume has con-
tinued to grow as new and varied types of
publications enter the mix. “We see an
increase in frontlist work, but backlist
projects continue to grow as well. If I
could make a general statement based on
what we are seeing today, it would be that
we will see more frontlists from major
publishers and more backlists from small
and midsize publishers.”
DiTech Process
Solutions
Since taking over DiTech
(formerly IBH Process Solu-
tions) in May 2010, CEO
Nizam Ahmed has been
focused on expanding his
publishing services, espe-
cially in the digital/e-book
area: “Our revenue has dou-
bled in the past six months,
and our e-book conversion
business has shown double-digit growth.
Our strategy is to have a CAGR [com-
pound annual growth rate] of 150% year-
on-year through organic and inorganic
expansion.” Acquiring a mid-tier com-
pany in the publishing/conversion vertical
to strengthen DiTech’s offshore presence
is in the cards, and the deal should be
sealed before the year is out.
Last month, during a Business Review
interview to mark the 125th anniversary
Nizam Ahmed, CEO
of DiTech Process
Solutions
Content
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(India): +91 22 4066-3681
email id: sales@ditechps.com • www.ditechps.com
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
validates, and dispatches them to their
client. “We assign around 80 people to
this project, and they finish between 180
and 200 titles a day.”
For v-p Mahesh Balakrishnan, “EPub,
boarding and proofreading, and developed
internal quality control tools to check the
final files against client specifications.”
Soon after the project was successfully
delivered ahead of schedule, the university
began awarding DiTech more work for
DAISY, Braille, and PDF conversion.
The next 12 to 16 months will also see
Ahmed opening full-time sales and proj-
ect management offices in three different
regions across the globe. “Historically,
our energies have been focused on culti-
vating North American businesses, but
we are now going to make a move into
Europe and Asia Pacific.” And augment-
ing his sales force while looking into
growing the publishing business is none
other than Jan Zucker, former v-p of
Hudson News, who joined the team in
January this year. “Then we hope to
attain certification in information secu-
rity management system [ISMS] and
work on providing a truly green office
environment for our 350-odd staff.”
diacriTech
Working with an American
aggregator to convert 12,000
titles into ePub format by
April is one project that is
keeping v-p A.R.M. Gopi-
nath and his team on their
toes. The source files are
batched to diacriTech in dif-
ferent formats, including
PDF, InDesign, and QuarkX-
Press, and some are math-
heavy. “Extraction scripts are
written to automatically con-
vert the content into XML
based on a DTD that was
devel oped earl i er, whi l e
images and math equations
are turned into GIF. Valida-
tion and quality control comes next, and
all corrections are made directly to the
XML files,” adds Gopinath, whose team
then converts those files into ePub using
a combination of PerlScript and XSLT,
Oshore | Onshore | Hybrid
+91-44-4288-9000 | sales@diacritech.com | www.diacritech.com
deas with no boundaries
+1-603-606-5800, +1-617-236-7500 | www.laureltech.com
Project Management
Composition
XML First Workflow
XML/NIMAS Conversion
Content Development
(Writing, Editing and Accuracy Checking)
Design and Illustration
Multimedia
eBooks / ePub
iPad, Android Apps
Interactive Whiteboard Apps
Mahesh Balakrishnan (standing) and A.R.M. Gopinath of
diacriTech
WWW. P U B L I S H E R S WE E K LY. C O M 17
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
mobile app, and e-book projects are the
next wave. And we anticipate that cli-
ents—publishers and content aggrega-
tors—will be constantly looking for a
single vendor who can take care of the
full product cycle.” He recently had a
client looking to develop an app for an
image repository of skin infections.
“Since the client wanted to display the
list of skin ailments by region, our team
incorporated a GPS [global positioning
system] function into the app as well. So
far, we have been called to develop apps
that perform very specific tasks, such as
improving general knowledge using
crossword puzzles, teaching simple
math using card games, or enhancing
business communication using language
translators.”
There have been a lot of Adobe Flash-
based projects in recent months as well.
Adds Gopinath, “Most of our Flash proj-
ects are based on technical simulations
that require subject matter experts to
collaborate closely with the Flash team
and the client. Being a full-service pro-
vider, we are also asked to create interac-
tive Flash content that goes into com-
panion Web sites or CDs. In such cases,
we have to create storyboards based on
the focus of the curriculum. So a good
understanding of the book publishing
process is crucial to the Flash develop-
ment process.”
Meanwhile, business from the U.S.
has picked up in recent months. “The
indicators are positive: more new proj-
ects are being developed, publishers are
starting to visit India again, and there is
lots of interest in apps, e-books, and
Flash coming from different
market segments. I think
the publishing industry has
gotten over the tough time
and is now looking at how to
capitalize on the craze for
tablets and smartphones,”
adds Balakrishnan.
Datamatics
The formation of Datamat-
ics Global Services from the
merging of the company’s
software and BPO divisions
in the past two years has brought “a shift
in the strategic direction of our com-
pany, from providing software develop-
ment, back-office processing, and body
shopping to solution-based services,”
says Krishna Tewari, global head for
online, publishing, and media solutions.
“To enable this shift, several modular
tools and applications have been devel-
oped to make back-office processing
faster, cheaper, and better. Then, by
applying intelligent rules to these appli-
cations, we error-proof the processes,
leading to easier training and scaling
processes while reducing our depen-
dency on skill-based resources. You can
say that we are no longer a traditional
pre-press house.”
One major back-office project at
3,000-strong Datamatics involves main-
taining the Web catalogues of one of the
world’s largest retailers. Says Tewari, “It
involves writing any missing product
descriptions, ensuring correct product
and category listing, calculating ship-
ping cost and other pricing information,
verifying details such as UPC [Universal
Product Code], images, brand, features,
etc. Sometimes, multilingual work is
required. The biggest challenge is related
to the project’s seasonality, which makes
capacity and production planning com-
plex, but working closely with the cli-
ent’s product managers has helped to
smooth the process.” The goal, he says, is
“to make sure our client’s customers are
able to find the products they are search-
ing for accurately and quickly.”
As of now, around 85% of Datamat-
ics’s clients come from the U.S., and
many publishers, espe-
cially from the reference
and textbook segments,
are doing e-books for
their front lists. Says
Tewari, “We have sepa-
rate teams for this ser-
vi c e l i ne a nd ha ve
enhanced our capabili-
ties to grow the e-book
business. Our technol-
ogy team has developed
module-based conver-
s i on/ t r ans f or mat i on
Krishna Tewari, global head for
online, publishing, and media
solutions at Datamatics
Oshore | Onshore | Hybrid
+91-44-4288-9000 | sales@diacritech.com | www.diacritech.com
deas with no boundaries
+1-603-606-5800, +1-617-236-7500 | www.laureltech.com
Project Management
Composition
XML First Workflow
XML/NIMAS Conversion
Content Development
(Writing, Editing and Accuracy Checking)
Design and Illustration
Multimedia
eBooks / ePub
iPad, Android Apps
Interactive Whiteboard Apps
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
Noida (Delhi), and Bangalore, besides
three facilities in the U.S., serving many
of the largest k–12, higher-ed, and STM
publishers. “The synergies of the com-
bined organization have allowed us to
build and launch a new suite of tools that
includes ePublish, an e-book converter
capable of high quality conversion of
complex content,” says v-p of operations
Waseem Andrabi. “We now have the
ability to convert complex content that
has graphics, math, tables, and interac-
tive and enriched formatting for any
mobile device platform.”
In view of the multitude of e-reader
devices, standardization of deliverables
becomes necessary. Andrabi adds, “Our
simple solution is Mobile dPub, a prod-
uct that we launched last month. It is a
device-neutral, browser-based e-reader
that is highly customizable so that pub-
lishers do not have to worry about pre-
paring different formats for different
devices. E-books can be delivered to any
mobile or desktop device, providing
educational publishers the flexibility to
offer content to students
on any device.”
Cenveo has increased the
speed at which new proj-
ects and services hit the
market, and embarked on
an intense marketing pro-
gram to raise awareness of
some new workflow tools.
Says Andrabi, “As we
develop more new tools,
we see growth in our full-
service business because
more publishers are mov-
ing toward a single-source solution. We
undertake onshore/offshore project man-
agement, composition and creative
design, copyediting, and a wide array of
related publishing services such as work-
flow management and consulting.”
Aptara
Aptara’s focus for the next 12 to 16
months, says CEO Dev Ganesan, centers
on helping publishers capitalize on the
exploding e-book and tablet markets by
doing digital right the first time. “The
more the mobile device market grows,
applications that make conversion from
various XML or SGML formats to
e-books simple, fast, and easy.”
In order to continue offering cutting-
edge solutions, the company is growing
its capabilities organically and inorgani-
cally. Recently, Datamatics opened a
new delivery center in Bosnia to offer
multilingual services. “We acquired
Devoteam Danet in October 2009 and
have streamlined its operations to offer
billing solutions to content merchandis-
ers and other content information pro-
viders. As for our joint venture with
Cignex, we will use its open source plat-
form to build next-generation digital
asset management solutions,” says
Tewari, adding that clients “can expect
much larger capacity from onshore and
offshore Datamatics facilities, and be
sure that the tools and platforms that we
enhance and develop will cater to the
ever-changing industry needs.”
Cenveo Publisher
Services
This global full-service
publishing company was
built from the combined
technology and experience
of Cadmus Communica-
tions, KGL, and Glyph.
While Cadmus and KGL
operations have been part
of Cenveo since 2007,
Gl yph wa s a c qui r e d
almost a year ago, in May
2010. Atul Goel, senior
v-p of global operations
and technology, says, “By
combining the service, technology, and
knowledge of these three entities, we
have created a comprehensive service
and technology platform ideally suited
to serve the needs of today’s global pub-
lishers. By adding Glyph to our existing
portfolio, we have been able to share our
tools, training programs, and workflows
across the larger organization, and better
position our company to offer a higher
level of service and more innovative
products to our customers.”
The company now has operations in
India, including in Mumbai, Chennai,
Atul Goel, senior v-p of global
operations and technology at
Cenveo
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Aptara-PWad2 4/1/2011 3:35 PM Page 1
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C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
as much or as little of the end-to-end
publishing platform as they need within
their existing workflows. There is no
need to disrupt long-standing produc-
tion processes to implement a new tech-
nology.”
He adds, “There are too many options
in the e-book market right now. But
once the format and medium conun-
drum is sorted out, barriers to growth
will be lowered and the cost of market
access reduced. Moreover, content that is
unencumbered by formatting gives pub-
lishers the flexibility and freedom to
always be prepared for whatever device
that comes next, regardless of its make
or model. And this is one challenge that
Aptara is uniquely poised to help pub-
lishers solve. PXE is giving publishers
their own multichannel digital work-
flows and the right foundation for prof-
iting from print, online, and e-book
revenues.” n
duce an XML-first work-
f l ow, and i ncorporate
online proofing capabili-
ties. With PXE, Wiley-
Blackwell’s turnaround
time was reduced by more
than 75% for six of their
medical, pharmaceutical
and physics journals, from
over nine weeks to 15
days, helping them to get
critical peer-reviewed sci-
entific and medical find-
i ngs o nl i ne we l l i n
advance of the print editions,” adds
Ganesan, whose company continues to
partner with other key players in the
value chain, including LibreDigital,
Inkling, ScrollMotion, and MarkLogic,
to further expedite the content manage-
ment and distribution process for
Aptara customers.
PXE, he says, allows publishers “to use
the more consumers are
setting the rules for how,
when, and where they
want content.”
To compete, publishers
must be able to quickly
and efficiently convert
their content from a single
source to digital formats
for multichannel distribu-
tion without requiring
reformatting. Enter Apta-
ra’s PXE end-to-end Web-
bas ed t echnol ogy f or
authoring and producing multichannel
content. Last year, PXE was imple-
mented across three Wiley-Blackwell
locations in two countries, for the use of
more than 1,000 staff, and customized
to Wiley’s existing workflows. “They
were looking for a fast publishing solu-
tion that would reduce their time to
market from 75 days to 15 days, intro-
Dev Ganesan, CEO of Aptara
Forget everything you knew about moving to digital. Forget everything you knew about moving to digital.
Discover a direct path to digital that
supports your existing workflows
with Aptara’s next generation
content publishing solutions.
aptaracorp.com
Your Fastest Path to
Digital Multi-Channel Content
Aptara-PWad2 4/1/2011 3:35 PM Page 1
real time. Some contributors were ini-
tially reluctant to try the paperless
approach, but they were later convinced
by the efficient end-to-end and faster
XML workflow.
DiTech
With only 25 days to convert 240 full-
color design-intensive titles (approxi-
mately 40,000 pages) to XML and ePub
formats, the team had to first produce a
sample for approval for each of four cat-
egories of titles. All images had to be
processed in a variety of sizes following
the client’s specifications. The team
developed proprietary XML and e-book
tools to enhance productivity, and cre-
ated a CSS style sheet to check the qual-
ity of finished files.
Integra
The premier cosmetology textbook from
Milady landed in Integra’s New York
office, requiring full-service project
management that included copyediting,
design, photo research, image purchase,
and production of the core text as well as
nearly 2,000 pages of supplementary
material. The team also provided devel-
opment services for portions of Hough-
ton Mifflin Harcourt’s bestselling Sci-
ence Fusion program, including student
editions, flip charts, and teacher editions.
Lapiz
A 70,000-page legacy conversion project
for a client’s asset management system
was the highlight last year. Additionally,
C o n t e n t S e r v i c e s i n I n d i a 2 0 1 1
there were 45,000 pages for MathML
conversion. Tight deadline and frequent
DTD updates were among the top chal-
lenges. Highly customized and auto-
mated solutions were developed to meet
the short turnaround time, quality
requirements, and productivity level.
Planman
Technologies
A collaboration with Danish company
xml-tekst resulted in the IDA Reader, a
user-friendly software application for the
dyslexic and visually impaired users. A
multiformat reader, it reads aloud text
from a variety of file formats including
DAISY (2.0 and 3.0), HTML, RTF, and
XML. Launched last month at the CSUN
Conference on Technology and Persons
with Disabilities in San Diego, Calif., it
also has additional features such as book-
marking, highlighting, text search, and
a library for dyslexics. Best of all, the
software does file encryption at multiple
levels to prevent piracy.
Repro India
For a publisher that has more than half
of its catalogue out of print (around 700
titles), the team suggested digitizing the
titles to put them back on sale. A pilot
project consisting of 10 titles was carried
out. Titles were converted on an XML
workflow, and deliverables included
print-ready PDFs and ePub files. From
there, the titles were archived and then
distributed through Repro’s Digital
Storefront, allowing customers to buy
and print on demand.
Thomson Digital
The team was given three days to turn
around 7,700 pages of a Spanish reprint
program. Input files arrived in batches
of 600 to 700 pages, and the task
involved incorporating corrections
marked on tear sheets and relinking
images from the client’s FTP folder.
Version control was managed effec-
tively through the use of Thomson
Digital’s proprietary FMS (File Man-
agement System), and only the team
leader had access to the FTP to avoid
work duplication and confusion. n
Proving themselves across segments
and domains
Projects Showcase
No project, it seems, is too complex or daunting for Indian
vendors. PW randomly selects some notable projects to show-
case these vendors’ capabilities and domain expertise.
Cenveo
For one publisher, the team developed
programs to convert files in various for-
mats (QuarkXPress, InDesign, and PDF)
to end-XML. Converting 2,000 to 3,000
articles daily, the entire journal backlist
was completed in 10 weeks. It took
another two weeks to tweak the content
to fit new requirements, and the files
were then uploaded onto the publisher’s
content management system for online
publication. The team is now working on
the client’s backlist of books.
Datamatics
Providing end-to-end back-office publish-
ing services for a leading legal publisher
requires the team to turn around input files
within 14 hours or risk being penalized by
the printing company for the publisher.
Daily volume may go from 400 pages to
1,500 pages (submitted by two to seven
reporters), and deliverables include print-
ready PDFs, Web-ready documents, and
media-ready files. An XML-based work-
flow is provided, and all reports (with
enhanced search capabilities) are stored in
the publisher’s repository for reuse.
diacriTech
A medical series with more than 4,500
pages and 12,500 images required the
team to use an online workflow to enable
simultaneous collaboration with and
among various contributors. The titles
were hosted on diacriTech’s server to
allow authors to make changes, and coau-
thors to collaborate and share notes, in
P U B L I S H E R S WE E K LY n A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 1 20
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