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2010–2011

Catalog

School of Undergraduate Studies

www.umuc.edu
(

UMUC in Maryland and Around the World


At University of Maryland University College (UMUC), a high-quality education is always within reach. UMUC
is dedicated to offering on-site and online courses and resources to adult students in Maryland and around the
world. Under contract to the U.S. Department of Defense, UMUC is one of the largest providers of education to the U.S.
military worldwide and serves 36,000 active-duty military servicemembers. With more than 150 worldwide locations in
27 countries and more than 100 undergraduate and graduate degree and certificate programs offered entirely online,
UMUC makes it possible to earn a widely respected degree from just about anywhere.

UMUC’s commitment to students around the globe extends far beyond providing access to excellent degree
programs. An online academic and administrative services portal, MyUMUC, makes it simple for students to
register for courses, pay tuition, and order textbooks and other supplies when it’s convenient for them. Students
can also access academic and career advising, financial aid counseling, library services, and much more online
via the university’s Web site or by phone or e-mail. All over the world, UMUC gives its students what they need
to succeed, putting goals within their reach.

This catalog provides the degree requirements and recommended curriculum for students who begin continuous study on or after August 1, 2010. (Details are listed on p. 7.)
Students should keep their catalog available for easy reference throughout their degree program.
From the Dean
Whether this is your first time at UMUC
or you are returning to advance toward
your degree, you will find the School of
Undergraduate Studies is committed to
supporting you as a lifelong learner. In
today’s fast-paced world, the demands
on you are greater than ever. To help
you gain the education you aspire to,
we offer high-quality academic pro-
grams in innovative delivery formats and
educational programs that are relevant to your needs in the work-
place and in life.

I urge you to use this catalog as your reference throughout your


progress toward your degree, as it contains information and require-
ments essential to your success. But don’t forget that we continue
to develop new programs and support services, and I hope you will
keep up with new opportunities through your academic department
and your online portal (MyUMUC).

I wish you the very best in your educational and career goals.
Please stay in touch and let me know how we are doing in our
educational partnership with you. I welcome your e-mail comments
at deanundergrad@umuc.edu.

Sincerely,
POLICY STATEMENT

This publication and its provisions do not consti-


tute, and should not be regarded as, a contract
between UMUC and any party or parties. At the
Marie A. Cini, PhD time of publication, reasonable effort was made
Vice Provost and Dean, to ensure the factual accuracy of the information.
School of Undergraduate Studies However, this publication is not a complete state-
ment of all policies, procedures, rules, regulations,
academic requirements, and tuition and fees
applicable to UMUC, its students, or its programs.
In addition, changes or additions may be made to
the policies, procedures, rules, regulations, and
academic requirements set out in this publication.
UMUC reserves the right to make these changes
and additions to the information in this publication
without prior notice. When a curriculum or grad-
uation requirement is changed, it is not made
retroactive unless the change is to the student’s
advantage and can be accommodated within
the span of years normally required for graduation.
See additional policies on inside back cover.

1
Table of Contents

WELCOME TO UMUC
4
4
A Unique Institution
Carrying Out the Mission
4 Bachelor’s Degree Curricula Continued . . .

31
31
Computing
Criminal Justice
4 Facilities and Programs 33 Customer Service Management
4 For Assistance 33 Cybersecurity
35 Economics
35 Emergency Management
SCHOOL OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
5 Preparing Citizens
for the 21st Century
5 37
39
English
Environmental Management
41 Finance
5 Serving Adult Students 43 Fire Science
6 Educational Partnerships 45 Forensics
6 For More Information 45 General Studies
46 Gerontology

7
BACHELOR’S DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 47 Global Business and Public Policy
49 Graphic Communication
7 Expectations
51 History
7 Requirements
53 Homeland Security
10 Program Choices
55 Humanities
56 Human Resource Management
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
12
13
Majors and Minors
Descriptions
12 59
60
61
Information Systems Management
International Business Management
Investigative Forensics
of Majors and Minors 62 Journalism
13 Accounting 63 Laboratory Management
15 African American Studies 64 Legal Studies
15 Art 66 Management Studies
15 Art History 67 Marketing
16 Asian Studies 69 Mathematical Sciences
17 Biology 70 Microbiology
18 Biotechnology 70 Natural Science
19 Business Administration 70 Philosophy
21 Business Law and Public Policy 71 Political Science
22 Business Supply Chain Management 72 Psychology
22 Communication Studies 74 Social Science
24 Computer and Information Science 76 Sociology
26 Computer Information Technology 76 Speech Communication
27 Computer Science 77 Strategic and Entrepreneurial
29 Computer Studies Management
77 Women’s Studies

MAJORS are indicated in bold.

2
IMPORTANT DATES
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
78
78
Requirements
Curricula
78 SERVICES AND RESOURCES
238
239
Availability of Services
General Information
238
239 Admission Assistance
239 Automated Services
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
88
88
Curricula
Requirements
88 239
240
Academic Advising
Disabled Student Services
240 Financial Aid
89 Certificate Descriptions 242 Veterans Benefits
244 Graduation Services
INFORMATION ON COURSES
104
104
The Unit of Credit
Prerequisites
104 244
244
244
Transcript Services
Student Advisory Council
Other Resources
104 Key to Course Descriptions
105
106
Index to Course Descriptions
Undergraduate Courses
ADMINISTRATION
247 University System
of Maryland
247
ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE
REQUIREMENTS 220 247 UMUC

220

224
Scholastic and
Administrative Standards
Rights and Responsibilities
CONTACT INFORMATION
250
250
UMUC Stateside
UMUC Europe
250
of the Student 251 UMUC Asia

ADMISSION AND ENROLLMENT


227 General Information
and Orientation
227 APPENDICES
254 Statements on Policies 254
and Procedures
227 Admission 271 UMUC Sites
230 Registration
230 Financial Information
INDEX
273
WAYS OF EARNING CREDIT
232 Earning Credit at UMUC 232
234 Transferring Credit from
Outside Sources
DEGREE PLANNING WORKSHEET
283

3
3
Welcome to UMUC

A UNIQUE INSTITUTION Convenience and flexibility are not the and MyUMUC, the university’s online
only concern, however. UMUC seeks gateway to services and information.
University of Maryland University Col-
to create a learning environment that UMUC’s faculty also strive to find new
lege (UMUC) is unique among institu-
students will find respectful of their ways to best use these technologies to
tions of higher education. From its
diverse backgrounds, inclusive, respon- assist their students’ learning.
founding in 1947, UMUC was designed
sive, and relevant.
to meet the educational needs of adult
students—students who must balance Recognizing that financial concerns FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS
study with the demands of work and are often the biggest obstacle to
UMUC offers degree programs from
family life. higher education, UMUC also strives
the associate’s level to the doctorate.
to keep tuition costs low and provides
Today UMUC has grown to be the larg- Most undergraduate and graduate
numerous financial aid opportunities,
est public university in the nation, serv- programs are available online. These
including scholarships for military or
ing students throughout the state, the academic programs are administered
community college students.
country, and the world. Yet its focus on by the School of Undergraduate Studies
providing open access to high-quality Excellence and the Graduate School of Manage-
educational programs and services— An accredited university, UMUC is dedi- ment and Technology, which includes
eliminating the barriers that can keep cated to providing the highest quality the Institute for Global Management.
students from achieving their educa- programs and services to its students UMUC also provides noncredit leader-
tional goals—remains unchanged. and ensuring excellence in its online ship development programs through its
and on-site courses. National Leadership Institute (NLI).

CARRYING OUT THE MISSION In providing these programs, UMUC The university’s headquarters are
relies on a renowned faculty of scholar- located in Adelphi, Maryland, and also
Students First
practitioners—teachers who bring serve as home to a prestigious art
At UMUC, student success is of para-
real-world experience to courses— collection and a conference facility,
mount importance. The university seeks
and the use of the latest technologies. the Inn and Conference Center, oper-
not only to help students fulfill their cur-
UMUC also is able to provide a wealth ated by Marriott. Most classes and
rent education goals but also to create
of resources to its students because of services, however, are provided at
an educational partnership that will last
its place within the University System of more than 150 sites worldwide, as well
throughout their lives.
Maryland. as through cutting-edge technology—
To that end, the university looks first online via the university’s proprietary
The success of UMUC’s efforts is evi- course delivery system, WebTycho.
for ways to ensure that students can
dent. Year after year, UMUC continues
easily access programs and services.
to garner awards from such notable
Admission policies are designed to
organizations as the University Continu- FOR ASSISTANCE
simplify the process (standardized tests
ing Education Association, the Sloan
are not required), making it possible for Assistance is available by e-mail
Consortium, and the Maryland Distance
students to apply and register at the at info@umuc.edu or by phone at
Learning Association.
same time. 800-888-UMUC (8682).
Innovation
As a global university, UMUC makes it
UMUC has always looked for new and
possible for students to take classes
better ways to serve students. Long
any time, any place, by offering the
before the online revolution, UMUC was
largest selection of online programs
delivering courses to students at distant
available—in addition to classes at
locations, using any and all available
sites throughout Maryland and the
technologies—from interactive tele-
metropolitan Washington area and at
vision to voice mail. Today, students
military sites all over the world. Student
access both courses and services
services can also be accessed online
online, using WebTycho, UMUC’s
and by phone, as well as on-site.
proprietary course-delivery system,

4
School of Undergraduate Studies

The mission of the School of Undergrad- ful learning. UMUC expects students students who wish to refresh their skills
uate Studies at University of Maryland to demonstrate knowledge and skills and knowledge, advance to a higher
University College is to provide open not only in the major areas of study, but level or different specialty in the work-
access to quality undergraduate educa- also in critical analysis, reasoning, and place, or earn a credential for career
tional opportunities to women and men problem solving; diverse cultures and advancement while progressing toward
around the world, including residents historical periods; the use of technol- the bachelor’s degree. (Full descriptions
of the state of Maryland, members of ogy; key concepts and principles of of certificates begin on p. 88.) Courses
the U.S. Armed Services, and national the natural, social, and behavioral toward these certificates may also be
and international students pursuing a sciences; information literacy; effective applied toward the bachelor’s degree.
university education on-site and online. writing and communication; mathemati-
It seeks to produce graduates who are cal and quantitative reasoning; and the
well prepared to be responsible citizens application of frameworks for ethical SERVING ADULT STUDENTS
in a global society, as well as effective decision making. These hallmarks of a UMUC welcomes all students and helps
participants in the complex, fast- UMUC undergraduate education are them achieve their educational goals
changing world of work. instilled through a broad foundation in but has a special focus on the needs of
general education in combination with adult students in the workforce. In 2009,
The School of Undergraduate Studies
a strong and focused major area of 75 percent of UMUC undergraduates
is committed to meeting undergraduate
study. Students’ mastery of these abili- worked full-time, and nearly half were
students’ needs for lifelong learning by
ties is planned and assessed through- working parents. Currently, the median
providing innovative delivery of high-
out their program of study. age for stateside undergraduate stu-
quality educational programs, ensuring
dents is 34 years old.
substantive and relevant curricula, For their core studies, students may
and recognizing the value of experi- choose one of 33 majors from a wide In recognition of the diverse edu-
ential learning. At the undergraduate variety of academic fields, including cational goals and aspirations of its
level, UMUC offers the Associate of business, cybersecurity, humanities, students, the university uses a variety
Arts (available only to active-duty communications, biotechnology, social of strategies to ensure access and
military personnel and other special sciences, legal studies, environmental facilitate degree completion. Knowing
populations), the Bachelor of Arts, the management, gerontology, and fire that adult students bring experience as
Bachelor of Science, and the Bachelor science. (A chart of available programs well as a willingness to learn, UMUC
of Technical and Professional Studies is on pp. 10–11.) Academic minors are acknowledges the value of that experi-
degrees, as well as a wide range of available in 38 different areas. The ence by incorporating the assessment
undergraduate certificates. majors and minors provide focused of nontraditional learning in the evalu-
courses of study that are developed ation of students. Since adult students
and kept current through consulta- may have gained college-level learning
PREPARING CITIZENS FOR tion with faculty, employers, profes- from multiple sources, UMUC offers
THE 21ST CENTURY sional and educational organizations, a number of innovative credit options
UMUC prepares graduates to be and other experts in the field. These that recognize the learning achieved
effective professionals and citizens academic programs prepare students through work and life experience and
in their organizations, communities, for the modern workplace and also accelerate progress toward the degree.
and families. The university values the help working students put their current These options (described on pp. 232–34)
contributions of both a broad-based knowledge into a broader context. include Cooperative Education, which
education and specific disciplines to offers credit for new learning in the
Recognizing the importance of lifelong
the undergraduate experience and thus workplace, and Prior Learning, which
learning, UMUC also offers 31 under-
incorporates cross-curricular context offers credit for college-level learning
graduate certificates covering specific
and analytical approaches in all pro- acquired through previous work or life
content areas in business and manage-
grams to complement practice. experience. UMUC also accepts credit
ment, communications, computing and
from community college coursework
Instruction and curricula at UMUC technology, gerontology, paralegal
and a variety of other sources, includ-
are based on the belief that certain studies, and science and security.
ing military service credit and credit by
abilities are the hallmarks of success- Certificates are especially valuable for
examination (described on pp. 235–37).

5
5
School of Undergraduate Studies Continued . . .

UMUC understands the demands of further with the creation of several community colleges across the United
balancing work, family, and study and specialized programs. The Bachelor States—and internationally, includ-
responds by offering undergraduate of Technical and Professional Studies ing Far East National University and
classes at convenient locations and programs in biotechnology (described Irkutsk State University in Russia, and
times, including evenings and week- on p. 18) and laboratory management the Higher School of Insurance and
ends. Courses are also provided in (described on p. 63) are joint initiatives Finance in Bulgaria.
innovative formats, including acceler- with several community colleges in
ated sessions, online delivery, and Maryland. Special UMUC scholarships
hybrid courses that combine on-site are also available for graduates from FOR MORE INFORMATION
and online delivery. The rapid growth Maryland community colleges. For more information about UMUC and
in undergraduate enrollments at UMUC the School of Undergraduate Studies,
UMUC is a charter member of
testifies to the convenience, flexibility, students should contact the university
MarylandOnline, a consortium of
and substantive content of its academic by phone at 800-888-UMUC or by e-mail
Maryland community colleges and
offerings in all formats. at umucinfo@umuc.edu.
universities formed to encourage col-
laboration among institutions across
EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS Maryland and to extend resources for ALLIANCE PARTNERS INCLUDE
the development and delivery of online
UMUC is dedicated to collaboration N Allegany College of Maryland
courses.
and cooperation with other Maryland
N Anne Arundel Community College
educational institutions, both public UMUC also works to develop strong
and private, and actively seeks partner- strategic partnerships with local and N Baltimore City Community College
ships with those institutions to benefit national leaders in business and indus- N Carroll Community College
Maryland citizens. For 60 years, UMUC try, government, and nonprofit organiza- N Cecil Community College
has proudly served the U.S. military tions and is an important partner in the
through its educational partnerships N Chesapeake College
region’s economic development.
in Europe and Asia. The university also N College of Southern Maryland
reaches out through educational col- UMUC values employers’ viewpoints.
N Community College of
laborations around the world. In 2010, the School of Undergraduate
Baltimore County
Studies convened advisory councils
In support of the university’s mission to made up of corporate, governmental, N Frederick Community College
extend access to educational oppor- and nonprofit leaders to review every N Garrett College
tunities to Maryland’s adult students, one of its degree programs and iden-
N Hagerstown Community College
UMUC has formed alliances with all tify the most current and workplace-
16 Maryland community colleges (listed relevant learning outcomes. Consis- N Harford Community College
at right), enabling students to earn an tent with its mission of bringing N Howard Community College
associate’s degree at an allied com- convenient and relevant learning op-
N Montgomery College
munity college and finish a bachelor’s portunities to the workforce, UMUC
degree by completing required course- has developed strong relationships N Prince George’s Community College
work at UMUC. These alliances offer with many prominent employers in the N Wor-Wic Community College
students a seamless transition area and around the country, including
between curricula through linked the American Bankers Association,
degree programs. Numerous loca- the Federal Bureau of Investigation,
tions in Maryland and the Washington, Northrop Grumman IT, and Geico.
D.C., area and online courses enable UMUC has developed other custom-
students to complete associate’s and ized programs for employers and
bachelor’s degrees conveniently close organizations across the country.
to home. The university has developed articu-
lated programs with other educational
UMUC’s partnerships with Maryland
institutions nationwide—including
community colleges have expanded

6
BACHELOR’S DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
At the undergraduate level, UMUC offers the Bachelor of Arts t Knowledge of diverse cultures and historical periods
(BA), Bachelor of Science (BS), and Bachelor of Technical and t Understanding of frameworks for ethical decision making and
Professional Studies (BTPS) degrees, as well as 31 certificates. The the ability to apply them
Associate of Arts degree, the Bachelor of Science in general stud- UMUC conducts learning outcomes assessments to measure
ies, and several other certificates are available only to active-duty and improve student learning in these areas as well as in specific
military personnel and others who conform to special stipula- disciplinary knowledge and skills.
tions. The Bachelor of Technical and Professional Studies degree
programs are available only to students who have earned the In pursuit of an academic major (and minor), the UMUC stu-
Associate of Applied Science degree from a community college dent acquires mastery of a considerable body of knowledge in
with which UMUC has an appropriate articulation agreement. a specific academic subject area or group of related subjects.
Each major provides clearly articulated learning outcomes for
Except for those restricted programs, current UMUC degree the knowledge, skills, and abilities a student is expected to
programs are open to UMUC students anywhere in the world. acquire in completing the major.
However, offerings sufficient to complete every program may not
be available at every location or in every format. Students should
consult advisors, current schedules, and site-specific materials to REQUIREMENTS
determine which programs they may normally expect to com-
plete from their geographic location.
In general, the UMUC degree requirements that apply to a
Requirements for degrees vary according to the major and minor. student are those that were in effect when the student began
The requirements that all candidates for the bachelor’s degree continuous enrollment in any public institution of higher
must meet are summarized in the following sections. education in Maryland (including UMUC). If the student has
not been continuously enrolled, the requirements that apply are
those in effect at UMUC when the student resumes continuous
EXPECTATIONS enrollment. To be considered continuously enrolled, degree-
seeking students must be or have been enrolled at UMUC or
UMUC aims to produce graduates who are well prepared to be another Maryland public institution of higher education and
responsible citizens of a global society as well as effective partici- have had no more than two sequential years of nonenrollment.
pants in the complex, fast-changing world of work. A bachelor’s When a continuously enrolled student chooses to change his
degree from UMUC offers a multidimensional experience, or her degree program, the student may be subject to all degree
combining a solid educational foundation with cross-curricular requirements in effect at the time of the change.
breadth and focused study in an academic discipline. Through The following requirements for the BA, BS, and BTPS are
that experience, UMUC graduates develop and demonstrate the applicable to students who enroll on or after August 1, 2010.
hallmarks of the educated person: intellectual ability, curiosity,
and flexibility; fundamental skills in reasoning, analysis, investi-
gation, and expression; understanding of the principles of scien-
tific and intellectual inquiry; awareness of global and historical
context; and civic and ethical responsibility.
The UMUC degree begins with basic intellectual tools, ensuring
through the general education and other degree requirements
that students are able to demonstrate
t Effective writing and oral communication skills
t Competence in the use of information technology
t Competence in information literacy skills
t Competence in mathematical and quantitative reasoning skills
t Competence in critical analysis, critical reasoning, and prob-
lem solving
t Understanding of key concepts and principles of the natural,
social, and behavioral sciences

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 7
BACHELOR’S DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS CREDITS E. Mathematics 3
Note: Courses applied to general education requirements may not be MATH 106, MATH 107, or a course at or above the level of college algebra.
applied toward major, minor, or elective requirements and may not be
Must be completed within the first 18 credits. Placement test required.
taken pass/fail.
Note: MATH 115 (or MATH 107–108) is required for the majors in com-
puter science and environmental management.
A. Communications 12
WRTG 101/101X (3 credits) F. Interdisciplinary or Emerging Issues 7
Must be completed within the first 18 credits. Placement test required.
May not be earned through credit by examination. One course (LIBS 150) in information literacy and research methods
(1 credit), which must be completed within the first 18 credits.
Another writing course (3 credits) A total of 6 credits in computing courses as follows:
All 3-credit WRTG courses (except WRTG 288, 388, 486A, or 486B);
t*'4.PS$.45 DSFEJUT

ENGL 102, 294, 303, and 485; and JOUR 201 apply.
t"OBEEJUJPOBMDPNQVUJOHDPVSTFBQQSPQSJBUFUPUIFBDBEFNJDNBKPS
A third course in writing or a course in speech communication (3 credits)
(3 credits) Students should refer to the specific major for requirements or recommenda-
All 3-credit COMM, SPCH, and WRTG courses (except 486A and 486B); tions. Unless otherwise specified, upper- or lower-level courses in CMIS,
ENGL 102, 294, 303, and 485; and JOUR 201 apply. $.*5 $.4$ $.45 $4*" BOE*'4."$$5BOE-(45BOE
363A apply. Note:&JUIFS*'4.PS"$$5JTSFRVJSFEGPSNBKPSTJO
An upper-level advanced writing course (3 credits)
emergency management, homeland security, and all business-related fields.
WRTG 391/391X, 393/393X, and 394/394X apply.
May not be earned through credit by examination.
Total General Education Requirements 41
No more than 3 credits in writing may be earned by examination.

B. Arts and Humanities 6 MAJOR, MINOR, AND ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS CREDITS


One course that offers a historical perspective (any 3-credit ARTH or
HIST course except ARTH 100).
A. Academic Major 30–38
One 3-credit course chosen from the following disciplines: ARTH, ARTT,
The number of credits required to complete an academic major varies
ASTD (depending on course content), HIST, HUMN, MUSC, PHIL,
according to academic program. At least half the credits earned within
THET, dance, literature, or foreign language.
the major must be upper level (i.e., earned in courses numbered 300 and
The two courses must be in different disciplines. higher) and must be earned through UMUC. No grade may be lower than
C. Specific coursework is prescribed for each major and is described in the
C. Behavioral and Social Sciences 6 following chapter.

One 3-credit course each in two of the following disciplines: AASP (AASP Students may receive a dual major upon completion of all requirements
201 only), ANTH, ASTD (depending on course content), BEHS, CCJS for both majors, including the required minimum number of credits for
(CCJS 100, 105, 350, 360, 432, 453, 454, and 461 only), ECON, GEOG, each major and all related requirements for both majors; however, the same
GERO (except GERO 341, 342, 351, and 353), GVPT, PSYC, SOCY, or course may not be used to fulfill requirements for more than one major.
WMST (WMST 200 only). Certain restrictions (including use of credit and acceptable combinations of
majors) apply for double majors. Students may not major in two programs
with excessive overlap of required coursework. Students should consult an
D. Biological and Physical Sciences 7 advisor before selecting a double major.
A science lecture course (3 credits) with related laboratory course (1 credit)
or a science course combining lecture and laboratory (4 credits). B. Academic Minor 15–17
Any other science course (3 credits). Choosing a minor is strongly encouraged even though it is optional for all
Courses from the following disciplines satisfy both requirements: ASTR, but accounting majors. Students may not take a major and minor in the
BIOL, CHEM, GEOL, NSCI, PHYS, biotechnology, botany, entomology, same area and may not receive a dual minor. The number of credits required
general science, and zoology. to complete an academic minor varies according to academic program. At
least half the credits earned within the minor must be upper level (unless
otherwise specified) and must be earned through UMUC. No grade may
be lower than C. Specific coursework is prescribed for each minor and is
described in the following chapter.

8 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
C. Electives 24–34 Second Bachelor’s Degree
Electives may be taken in any academic discipline. No more than 21 credits
At UMUC, students who have already received a bachelor’s
may consist of vocational or technical credit (described on p. 236). Pass/fail
degree from UMUC or from another regionally accredited insti-
credit, up to a maximum of 18 credits, may be applied toward electives only.
tution can broaden their education by earning a second bach-
Total Major, Minor, and Elective Requirements 79
elor’s degree with a different major. However, students may not
earn a second bachelor’s degree with a double major. Students
may not earn a second degree in general studies and, except for
Overall Bachelor’s Degree Requirements the accounting degree which has a mandatory minor, may not
obtain an academic minor or a second associate’s degree within
In addition to the general education requirements and the major, the second bachelor’s degree.
minor, and elective requirements listed on p. 8, the overall
requirements listed below pertain to all bachelor’s degrees. A student must have received the first bachelor’s degree to be
FMJHJCMFUPCFHJOBTFDPOE'PSBTFDPOECBDIFMPSTEFHSFF UIFTUV-
1. Students must complete a minimum of 120 credits. dent needs to complete at least 30 credits through UMUC after
2. Students must maintain a minimum grade point average completing the first degree. The combined credit in both degrees
of 2.0 (C) overall and a minimum grade of C (2.0) for any must add up to at least 150 credits.
course applied to the academic major or minor. To qualify for academic honors in a second bachelor’s degree, the
3. Within the 120 credits required, the following coursework student must complete at least 45 new credits through UMUC
must be taken through UMUC: with the requisite grade point average.
 tDSFEJUT OPSNBMMZUIFëOBM
 Students must complete all requirements for the major. All
 t)BMGPGUIFSFRVJSFEOVNCFSPGDSFEJUTXJUIJOCPUIUIF course prerequisites apply. If any of these requirements were
major and the minor satisfied in the previous degree, the remainder necessary to com-
plete the minimum 30 credits of new courses should be satisfied
 tDSFEJUTBUUIFVQQFSMFWFM JF FBSOFEJODPVSTFTOVN- XJUIDPVSTFTSFMBUFEUPUIFNBKPS'PSQVSQPTFTPGEFUFSNJOJOH
bered 300 to 499), preferably within the major or minor what major requirements apply to a given student, the applicable
4. At least 45 credits must be upper level and include date is the date the student started coursework at UMUC after
being admitted into the second undergraduate degree program.
 t"UMFBTUPOFIBMGPGUIFDSFEJUTSFRVJSFEGPSUIFNBKPS
As with other degrees, continuous enrollment at UMUC is
 tDSFEJUTJOBEWBODFEXSJUJOH required. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in all courses
The remaining upper-level credits may be earned in any part taken through UMUC is required for graduation.
of the curriculum. All students need to be aware of what is entailed in a second
5. At least half the required number of credits for any aca- bachelor’s degree. Before beginning work or considering non-
demic major or minor must be earned through graded traditional options toward a second degree, each student should
coursework. Credit earned by examination, portfolio consult an academic advisor. Advisors will be glad to explain
assessment, internships/Cooperative Education, or non- the requirements for a second bachelor’s degree and clarify its
collegiate training does not count as graded coursework. limitations.

Total Degree Requirements 120 Credits

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 9
BACHELOR’S DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
PROGRAM CHOICES

DISCIPLINE MAJOR MINOR CERTIFICATE(S)

Accounting p. 13 p. 14 Introductory accounting, p. 89


Advanced accounting, p. 89
Fraud investigation, p. 95
African American studies p. 15
Art p. 15 Computer graphics and design, p. 91
Art history p. 15
Asian studies p. 16 p. 17
Biology p. 17
Biotechnology p. 18
Business administration p. 19 p. 21 Business project management, p. 90
Management foundations, p. 99
Business law and public policy p. 21
Business supply chain management p. 22
Communication studies p. 22 p. 24 Web design, p. 102
Workplace communications, p. 103
Computer and information science p. 24 Database design and implementation, p. 92
Object-oriented design and programming, p. 99
UNIX system administration, p. 101
Computer information technology p. 26 Computer networking, p. 92
Computer science p. 27 Game development, p. 95
Computer studies p. 29 Desktop publishing, p. 93
Internet technologies, p. 98
Visual Basic programming, p. 102
Computing p. 31
Criminal justice p. 31 p. 32 Criminal justice intelligence, p. 92
Customer service management p. 33
Cybersecurity p. 33 Information assurance, p. 97
Economics p. 35
Emergency management p. 35 p. 37
English p. 37 p. 39
Environmental management p. 39 p. 40
Finance p. 41 p. 42 Financial management, p. 94
Fire science p. 43 p. 44
Forensics p. 45
General studies p. 45

10 U N D ER G R A D UAT E C ATA LO G | 2 0 0 9 – 2 010


PROGRAM CHOICES (continued)

DISCIPLINE MAJOR MINOR CERTIFICATE(S)

Gerontology p. 46 p. 47 Health issues for the aging adult, p. 96


Global business and public policy p. 47
Graphic communication p. 49 Web design, p. 102
History p. 51 p. 52
Homeland security p. 53 p. 54
Humanities p. 55 p. 56
Human resource management p. 56 p. 58 Human resource management, p. 97
Information systems management p. 59 Database management, p. 93
Information management, p. 98
Project management for IT professionals, p. 100
Visual Basic programming, p. 102
International business management p. 60
Investigative forensics p. 61
Journalism p. 62
Laboratory management p. 63
Legal studies p. 64 Paralegal studies, p. 100
Management studies p. 66 Management foundations, p. 99
Marketing p. 67 p. 69
Mathematical sciences p. 69
Microbiology p. 70
Natural science p. 70
Philosophy p. 70
Political science p. 71 p. 72 Terrorism and institutions: Prevention
and response, p. 101
Psychology p. 72 p. 74 Clinical mental health care, p. 91
Human development, p. 96
Social science p. 74 Applied behavioral and social sciences, p. 90
Diversity awareness, p. 94
Sociology p. 76
Spanish Workplace Spanish, p. 103
Speech communication p. 76
Strategic and entrepreneurial management p. 77
Women’s studies p. 77

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 11
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
MAJORS AND MINORS Global business and public policy
Homeland security
The academic major requires 30 to 38 credits, while the minor Human resource management
(optional) requires 15 to 17 credits. Students must maintain a Information systems management
minimum grade point average of 2.0 (C) and earn a minimum Investigative forensics
grade of C (2.0) for any course applied to the major or minor. Legal studies
Management studies
Half of the credit applied toward any major must be upper level, Marketing
and at least half of the credit for any major or minor must be Political science
taken through UMUC. At least half of the credit applied toward Psychology
a major or minor must be earned through graded coursework. A Social science
maximum of six 1-credit courses may be applied to a major or
minor. Students must also fulfill all overall requirements for the Available for the BTPS**
bachelor’s degree (listed on p. 9).
Biotechnology
Majors and minors are described in the following section. Laboratory management

Majors Minors
Each major is available only for the Bachelor of Arts (BA), Academic minors are strongly recommended but optional.
the Bachelor of Science (BS), or the Bachelor of Technical and They are available in the following areas:
Professional Studies (BTPS) degree. Dual majors are available
Accounting
only for the Bachelor of Science degree.
African American studies
Art
Available for the BA Art history
Asian studies Asian studies
Communication studies Biology
English Business administration
Graphic communication Business law and public policy
History Business supply chain management
Humanities Communication studies
Computing
Available for the BS Criminal justice
Customer service management
Accounting Economics
Business administration Emergency management
Computer and information science English
Computer information technology Environmental management
Computer science 'JOBODF
Computer studies 'JSFTDJFODF
Criminal justice 'PSFOTJDT
Cybersecurity Gerontology
Emergency management History
Environmental management Homeland security
'JOBODF Humanities
'JSFTDJFODF Human resource management
General studies* International business management
Gerontology Journalism

* Available only to active-duty military personnel in UMUC Europe and UMUC Asia and certain others who conform to special stipulations. General studies is not
available for a double major.
** Available only to students who have completed an Associate of Applied Science degree in an appropriate field from a community college with which UMUC has an
articulation agreement. Students should consult an advisor before selecting these majors.

12 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Marketing t Employ analysis, critical thinking, and problem solving to
Mathematical sciences identify, test, and validate processes, systems, and financial
Microbiology data to advise stakeholders.
Natural science t Define, develop, and demonstrate ethical business practices
Philosophy and accountability by identifying and addressing current and
Political science
emerging ethical and regulatory issues.
Psychology
Sociology t Develop professionally by collaborating, training, mentor-
Speech communication ing, negotiating, solving problems creatively, and participating
Strategic and entrepreneurial management in networking activities to demonstrate and develop leader-
Women’s studies ship skills.

Degree Requirements
DESCRIPTIONS OF MAJORS AND MINORS
A degree with a major in accounting requires the successful
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 54 credits
for the major and mandatory minor in business administration,

Accounting 41 credits in general education requirements, and 25 credits in


electives and other requirements. At least 18 credits in the major
and 9 credits in the minor must be earned in upper-level courses
Students may seek either an academic major or minor in (numbered 300 or above).
accounting.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ACCOUNTING MAJOR
Major in Accounting Coursework for a major in accounting, with a mandatory minor in business
administration, includes the following:
The accounting major combines theory and practice to prepare
students for analysis of and reporting on the economic activities t Required core courses (21 credits): ACCT 220, 221, 310, 311, 321, 323,
of organizations and communication of that information to deci- and 422
sion makers. Students develop skills in managerial accounting, t Supplemental major courses (12 credits): Any upper-level ACCT courses
budgeting, accounting systems, internal controls, financial analy- t Required capstone course (3 credits): ACCT 495
sis, financial reporting, internal and external auditing, taxation, t Required minor courses (18 credits): STAT 230 (or 200); BMGT 364,
and international accounting. The major prepares students for a  BOE'*/$BOE.3,5
range of accounting careers in profit, not-for-profit, and govern- t Required related courses (9 credits), which may be applied anywhere in
ment organizations. UIFEFHSFF"$$5 PS*'4.
BOE&$0/BOE

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
Intended Program Outcomes
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
The student who graduates with a major in accounting will accounting. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some recom-
be able to mended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses for
those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet degree
t Work effectively with interdisciplinary professionals and
requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage
diverse stakeholders.
of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill
t Communicate with financial and nonfinancial audiences in general education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities,
a clear and concise manner, by making appropriate decisions behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics,
about relevancy, reliability, and medium. and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
t Research, prepare, analyze, and review financial and business
data by applying accounting and business management prin-
ciples and standards to produce financial and business reports.
t Proficiently use current technology and analytical tools to
perform business functions, work collaboratively, and facilitate
decision making.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 13
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Accounting Degree Courses Credits 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. or speech requirement
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems 3
(strongly recommended as first course) or*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 (fulfills the interdisciplinary issues/computing
requirement; students should note prerequisites)
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT  Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
or a higher-level math course foundation courses)
BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3 U BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3
(strongly recommended elective for students U ACCT 311 Intermediate Accounting II 3
with no prior business experience)
U"$$5 'FEFSBM*ODPNF5BY* 
U ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting I 3
U BMGT 496 Business Ethics 3
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits) U ACCT 422 Auditing Theory and Practice 3
U ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II 3 WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 or other course to fulfill the communications/
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills upper-level advanced writing requirement
the first behavioral and social sciences requirement) U ACCT 424 Advanced Accounting 3
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 or other upper-level ACCT course
and NSCI 101 Physical Science Laboratory 1 (supplemental major course)
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical U ACCT 425 International Accounting 3
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement or other supplemental major course
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 U'*/$ #VTJOFTT'JOBODF 
or other course to fulfill the communications/ U ACCT 436 Internal Auditing 3
writing requirement or other supplemental major course
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT  U BMGT 380 Business Law I 3
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software U ACCT 427 Advanced Auditing 3
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits) or other supplemental major course
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 U MRKT 310 Marketing Principles 3
or a foreign language course Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 15 credits)
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, U ACCT 495 Contemporary Issues in Accounting Practice 3
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement Additional Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
U STAT 230 Business Statistics 3 along with required major courses) 16
or STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics Recommended Elective
ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ACCT 426 Advanced Cost Accounting
(related requirement for the major) (may meet requirements for certain graduate degree
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 programs at UMUC)
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral Total credits for BS in accounting 120
and social sciences requirement (discipline
must differ from first)
BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 Minor in Accounting
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical The accounting minor complements the skills the student gains
sciences lecture requirement in his or her major discipline by providing a study of how the
U ACCT 310 Intermediate Accounting I 3 accounting environment measures and communicates the eco-
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 nomic activities of organizations to enable stakeholders to make
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 informed decisions regarding the allocation of limited resources.
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
U ACCT 321 Cost Accounting 3

14 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Requirements for the Minor
A minor in accounting requires the completion of 15 credits of
Art
coursework in accounting. Any ACCT courses apply. Students may seek an academic minor in art.
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
major or general education) may not be applied toward the Minor in Art
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses. The art minor complements the skills the student gains in his or
her major discipline by offering an aesthetic and personal explo-
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF  ration of imagery, media, and composition through a balance of
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. art theory and practice.

Requirements for the Minor


African American Studies A minor in art requires the completion of 15 credits of art
coursework. All ARTT courses apply. It is recommended that
Students may seek an academic minor in African American studies. students take ARTT 110 and 210 (or ARTT 320) as the first
courses in the minor (if they have not already applied the courses
Minor in African American Studies toward other degree requirements).
The African American studies minor complements the skills the Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
student gains in his or her major discipline by offering an inter- major or general education) may not be applied toward the
disciplinary approach to study of the contemporary life, history, minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
and culture of African Americans. (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
Requirements for the Minor students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
A minor in African American studies requires the completion of
15 credits of coursework focusing on African American issues,
chosen from the following courses:
AASP Any course
Art History
CCJS 370 Race, Crime, and Criminal Justice Students may seek an academic minor in art history.
ENGL 363 African American Authors to 1900
ENGL 364 African American Authors Since 1900
GVPT 434 Race Relations and Public Law Minor in Art History
HIST 255 African American History
The art history minor complements the skills the student gains in
HIST 372 Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement
his or her major discipline by developing skills in historical and
HIST 460 African American Life: 1500 to 1865
HIST 461 African American Life Since 1865
cultural interpretation and critical analysis of works of architec-
MUSC 436 Jazz: Then and Now ture, sculpture, painting, and the allied arts.
SOCY 423 Ethnic Minorities
SOCY 424 Sociology of Race Relations Requirements for the Minor
It is recommended that students take AASP 201 as the first A minor in art history requires the completion of 15 credits in
course in the minor (if they have not already applied the course art history. All ARTH courses apply.
toward other degree requirements). Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g., major or general education) may not be applied toward the
major or general education) may not be applied toward the minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses. 'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF  students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 15
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA

Asian Studies REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASIAN STUDIES MAJOR


Coursework for a major in Asian studies includes the following:

Students may seek either an academic major or minor in t Required foundation courses (9 credits): ASTD 150 and 160 and
Asian studies. PHIL 307
t Required Asian language sequence (9 credits): Either JAPN 111, 112,
and 114; KORN 111, 112, and 114; or CHIN 111, 112, and 114
Major in Asian Studies t Supplemental major courses (9 credits): Chosen from any upper-level
The Asian Studies major provides an interdisciplinary overview ASTD, JAPN, KORN, Asian HIST, and Asian GVPT courses; ANTH
417; ECON 380; and PHIL 348
of the history, economics, politics, culture, and languages of the
Asian continent, including India, Southeast Asia, China, Korea, t Required capstone course (3 credits): ASTD 485
and Japan. It examines the region’s rich past and continuing
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
contributions to the global community. The curriculum empha-
sizes an understanding of Asia based on both expanded cultural The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BA in
Asian studies. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some rec-
awareness and scholarly analysis in multiple disciplines. Students
ommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses
are provided with background knowledge that both enriches
for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet
their appreciation of the area and prepares them for a range of degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking
careers that require a broad knowledge of the region and accurate advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allow-
understanding of the culture. able) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts and
humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences,
Intended Program Outcomes mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.

The student who graduates with a major in Asian studies will


be able to Asian Studies Degree Courses Credits
t Interpret, communicate, educate, and advise others based on First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
understanding, research, and analysis of the social, historical, Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
and cultural contexts of Asia.
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
t Use knowledge of Asia to identify, create, facilitate, and pro- (strongly recommended as first course)
mote opportunities for interaction and cooperation between LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
Asia and the global community, as well as to mediate and WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
negotiate between Asians and others. ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
t Apply knowledge of Asian diversity, values, and expectations or a higher-level math course
to perform in a culturally appropriate way in personal and Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
professional settings. PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
t Communicate in both written and spoken form in an or &/(- *OUSPEVDUJPOUP'JDUJPO 1PFUSZ BOE%SBNB
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
Asian language, integrating interpersonal skills and cul- PHIL, THET, dance, literature, or foreign language
tural knowledge. course to fulfill the arts and humanities requirement
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
Degree Requirements and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
A degree with a major in Asian studies requires the successful or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 30 credits sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements. or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level requirement
courses (numbered 300 or above). GVPT 170 American Government 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software

16 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
U ASTD 150 Introduction to Asian Studies I 3 Minor in Asian Studies
U JAPN 111 Elementary Japanese I 3
or CHIN 111 Elementary Chinese I
The Asian studies minor complements the skills the student gains
or other first Asian language course for the major in his or her major discipline by providing an interdisciplinary
study of the cultural, historical, political, and contemporary busi-
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
ness reality of the Asian/Pacific world.
U ASTD 160 Introduction to Asian Studies II 3
ANTH 102 Introduction to Anthropology:
Cultural Anthropology 3 Requirements for the Minor
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and A minor in Asian studies requires the completion of 15 credits
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first)
of coursework in Asian studies, which must include ASTD 150
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
and 160. Courses allowable for the major in Asian studies apply.
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical major or general education) may not be applied toward the
sciences lecture requirement minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
HIST 141 Western Civilization I 3 (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
or HIST 142 Western Civilization II
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts 'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
and humanities requirement in historical perspective students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/

41$)
computing requirement
'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
Biology
or COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts Students may seek an academic minor in biology.
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement
U JAPN 112 Elementary Japanese II 3 Minor in Biology
or CHIN 112 Elementary Chinese II The biology minor complements the skills the student gains in
or other second Asian language course for the major
his or her major discipline by providing an underlying scientific
U PHIL 307 Asian Philosophy 3
base upon which to build a career in the life sciences, allied
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory health fields, bioinformatics, environmental management,
and foundation courses) science journalism, or science education.
WRTG 391/391X Advanced Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement Requirements for the Minor
U ASTD 309 Business in Asia 3 A minor in biology requires the completion of 15 credits
or HIST 483 History of Japan Since 1800 of coursework in biology. Any BIOL courses apply.
or other supplemental major course
U JAPN 114 Elementary Japanese III 3 Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
or CHIN 114 Elementary Chinese III major or general education) may not be applied toward the
or other third Asian language course for the major minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
U PHIL 348 Religions of the East 3 (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
or other supplemental major course
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
U HIST 481 History of Modern China 3
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
or other supplemental major course
Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 15 credits)
U ASTD 485 Great Issues in Asian Studies 3
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
along with required major courses) 46

Total credits for BA in Asian studies 120

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 17
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA

Biotechnology t Develop an action plan that includes the continuous pursuit


of education, training, and research to keep current on bio-
technology practices and trends for personal and professional
Students who have completed an Associate of Applied Science development.
degree in biotechnology or a related field from a community
t Apply scientific knowledge and principles, quantitative meth-
college with which UMUC has an articulation agreement for
ods, and technology tools to think critically and solve complex
this major may seek an academic major in biotechnology. Stu-
problems in biotechnology.
dents should consult an advisor before selecting this major.
The major in biotechnology is based on a collaborative arrange- Degree Requirements
ment between UMUC and specific Maryland community
colleges. Students with a similar degree from another institution A degree with a major in biotechnology requires the success-
may be considered for this program based on an institutional ful completion of 120 credits of coursework from UMUC and
articulation agreement with UMUC. the collaborating community college, including 36 credits for
the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and
43 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
Major in Biotechnology At least 18 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level
The biotechnology major prepares students for the biotechnol- courses (numbered 300 or above).
ogy industry by building on the technical and scientific knowl-
edge gained through the associate’s degree program and direct REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BIOTECHNOLOGY MAJOR
experience in the field. It combines laboratory skills and applied Coursework for a major in biotechnology includes the following lower-level
coursework with a biotechnology internship experience and coursework taken as part of an appropriate Associate of Applied Science
upper-level study. The biotechnology curriculum covers general degree program at a collaborating community college:
biological and chemical sciences, biotechniques, bioinstrumenta- t 'PVOEBUJPODPVSTFT DSFEJUT
(FOFSBMNJDSPCJPMPHZ XJUIMBCPSBUPSZ

tion, bioinformatics, microbiology, molecular biology, and cell general genetics (with laboratory), and biotechnology techniques
biology. Students are prepared to enter pharmaceutical, agricul- t Required related courses (17 credits), which may be applied anywhere
tural, and biomedical research industries and organizations as in the bachelor’s degree: Chosen from biotechnology, biochemistry, cell
laboratory technicians, quality control technicians, assay analysts, biology, chemistry, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular biol-
chemical technicians, or bioinformaticists. ogy, physics, and virology courses

Coursework for a major in biotechnology also includes the following:


Intended Program Outcomes
t Required core courses (12 credits): BIOL 350 and 400 and 6 credits in
The student who graduates with a major in biotechnology will Co-op internship courses (numbered 486A or 486B) in any discipline
be able to related to biotechnology
t Practice ethical standards of integrity, honesty, and fairness in t Supplemental major courses (9 credits): Chosen from BIOL 320,
330–339, 350–359, 362, 422, and 430–439; NSCI 301; and an addi-
scientific practices and professional conduct.
tional Co-op internship
t Communicate orally and in writing in a clear, well-organized
manner that effectively informs and clarifies scientific prin- RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
ciples and lab techniques to staff and stakeholders. The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BTPS
t Offer technical support, customer assistance, and cost-benefit in biotechnology (if the student selects appropriate courses as part of the
analyses in the application of biotechnical approaches to the articulated degree program from the community college). Coursework for
development of products and services. the major is indicated by U. Since some recommended courses fulfill more
t Use scientific procedures and current and emerging technolo- than one requirement, substituting courses for those listed may make it
gies to conduct safe and hygienic laboratory experiments and to necessary to take additional courses to meet degree requirements. Students
collect data that are appropriately validated and documented. should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other options.
Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general educa-
t Comply with and adhere to national, state, and local stan- tion requirements (in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and
dards, policies, protocols, and regulations for laboratory and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisci-
manufacturing activity. plinary issues) may be found on p. 8.

18 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Biotechnology Degree Courses Credits ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
or SPCH 482 Intercultural Communication
Required Courses from Community College (recommended elective)
U Lower-level coursework in the following areas: 15
Required Upper-Level Courses for Major (to be taken after introductory
General microbiology with lab
and general education courses)
General genetics with lab
WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing 3
Biotechnology techniques
or other course to fulfill the communications/
Additional coursework related to biotechnology 17 upper-level advanced writing requirement
Selected from biotechnology, biochemistry, cell biology, chemistry, genetics, U BIOL 350 Molecular and Cellular Biology 3
immunology, microbiology, molecular biology, physics, or virology, as speci-
U BIOL 400 Life Science Seminar 3
fied by the articulated associate’s degree program (should also fulfill general
U BIOL 362 Neurobiology 3
education requirements in biological and physical sciences)
or other supplemental major course
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits at UMUC U#*0- 'PSFOTJD#JPMPHZ 
or other supplemental major course
if not brought in transfer)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. U BIOL 422 Epidemiology of Emerging Infections 3
or other supplemental major course
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
Internship for Major (to be taken in the last 30 credits)
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
U Internship through Cooperative Education 6
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or a higher-level math course Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
Introductory and General Education Courses (to be taken within the along with required major courses) 30
first 30 credits) Total credits for BTPS in biotechnology 120
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement Business Administration
GVPT 170 American Government 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, Students may seek either an academic major or minor in business
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or administration.
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 Major in Business Administration
or a foreign language course The business administration curriculum provides the skills
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill and knowledge necessary for a successful career in business
the arts and humanities requirement and management. It includes studies in accounting, business
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 law and public policy, business supply chain management,
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology customer service and operations management, ethics and social
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and responsibility, finance, human resource management and labor
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ relations, international business, strategic and entrepreneurial
from first) management, organizational behavior, marketing and sales, and
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 statistical analysis. A major in business administration prepares
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 graduates for careers in for-profit and not-for-profit organiza-
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective tions and the public sector.
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
or other course to fulfill the communications/
writing or speech requirement
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary
issues/computing requirement

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 19
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Intended Program Outcomes Business Administration Degree Courses Credits

The student who graduates with a major in business administra- First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
tion will be able to Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.

t Plan and communicate a shared vision for the organization EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
that will drive strategy, assist with decision making, and posi- (strongly recommended as first course)
tion the organization in the business environment. LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
t Employ critical thinking to evaluate qualitative and quanti-
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
tative data and effectively communicate across all layers of
or a higher-level math course
the organization.
U BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3
t Develop, communicate, implement, and follow policies and (students with business experience should substitute
procedures that inform and guide operations to reduce cost a supplemental major course in the last 60 credits
and organizational risk and promote ethical practices. of study)
t Manage people, time, and resources by utilizing effective Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
employment practices, encouraging team building, and men- ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
toring junior members of the staff. (related requirement for the major; also fulfills the
first behavioral and social sciences requirement)
t Design and execute personal and employee development sys-
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
tems to enhance job performance and leadership skills.
and NSCI 101 Physical Science Laboratory 1
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
Degree Requirements sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
A degree with a major in business administration requires the WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
successful completion of 120 credits of coursework, including requirement
36 credits for the major; 41 credits in general education require- *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
ments; and 43 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
requirements. At least 18 credits in the major must be earned in U ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting I 3
upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above). PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
or a foreign language course
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAJOR or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
Coursework for a major in business administration includes the following: PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement
t Required foundation courses (12 credits): BMGT 110 (or prior business
experience and an additional supplemental course), ACCT 220 and 221,
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
and STAT 230 (or 200) U STAT 230 Business Statistics 3
t 3FRVJSFEDPSFDPVSTFT DSFEJUT
#.(5  BOE'*/$ or STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
330; HRMN 300; and MRKT 310 PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
t Supplemental major course or courses (3 credits): Any ACCT, BMGT, or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
&/.5 '*/$ )3./ .3,5 PS.(45DPVSTF
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
t Required capstone course (3 credits): BMGT 495 from first)
t Required related courses (9 credits), which may be applied anywhere in U ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II 3
UIFEFHSFF"$$5 PS*'4.
BOE&$0/BOE BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in sciences lecture requirement
business administration. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics 3
some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting (related requirement for the major)
courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities requirement in historical perspective
and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sci- (discipline must differ from other humanities course)
ences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.

20 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT  first course in the minor (if they have not already applied the
or ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems course to other requirements).
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills the
interdisciplinary issues/computing requirement) Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  major or general education) may not be applied toward the
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
or speech requirement
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
and foundation courses)
U BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3
WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing
or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement
3
Business Law
U MRKT 310
U BMGT 380
Marketing Principles
Business Law I
3
3
and Public Policy
U HRMN 300 Human Resource Management 3 Students may seek an academic minor in business law and
U'*/$ #VTJOFTT'JOBODF  public policy.
U BMGT 392 Global Business Management 3
or other supplemental major course
U BMGT 496 Business Ethics 3 Minor in Business Law and Public Policy
Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 15 credits) The business law and public policy minor complements the skills
U BMGT 495 Strategic Management 3 the student gains in his or her major discipline by exploring and
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
analyzing legal, social, environmental, technological, and ethical
along with required major courses) 37
issues affecting business, industry, and government.
Recommended Minors
Human resource management, marketing, finance, or other
Requirements for the Minor
business-related minor A minor in business law and public policy requires the comple-
Recommended Electives tion of 15 credits of coursework in business law and public
MATH 140 Calculus I policy, chosen from the following courses:
(for students who plan to go on to graduate school;
students should note prerequisites) BMGT 378 Legal Environment of Business
BMGT 510 The Manager in Organizations and Society BMGT 380 Business Law I
(for qualified students who plan to enter the MBA pro- BMGT 381 Business Law II
gram at UMUC; students should note prerequisites and BMGT 405 Environmental Management and Business
consult an advisor) BMGT 428 Legal Aspects of Technology Management
BMGT 437 International Business Law
Total credits for BS in business administration 120
BMGT 454 Global Business and Public-Policy Regimes
BMGT 482 Business and Government
Minor in Business Administration BMGT 496 Business Ethics
HRMN 408 Employment Law for Business
The business administration minor complements the skills the HRMN 462 Labor Relations Law
student gains in his or her major discipline by providing a study
Students are recommended to take BMGT 380 and 496 as the
of principles and techniques used in organizing, planning, man-
first courses in the minor (if they have not already applied the
aging, and leading within various organizations.
course toward other degree requirements).
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
Requirements for the Minor major or general education) may not be applied toward the
A minor in business administration requires the completion of minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
15 credits of coursework in business administration. Any ACCT, (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
#.(5 &/.5 '*/$ )3./ .(45 BOE.3,5DPVSTFT 'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
apply. It is recommended that students take BMGT 364 as the students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 21
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA

Business Supply Chain Communication Studies


Management Students may seek either an academic major or minor in com-
munication studies.
Students may seek an academic minor in business supply chain
management.
Major in Communication Studies
The major in communication studies provides students with an
Minor in Business Supply Chain appropriate balance of theoretical knowledge and sophisticated,
Management practical communication skills. Students learn how people create
The business supply chain management minor complements the and use messages to generate meaning within and across various
skills the student gains in his or her major discipline by increas- contexts, cultures, channels, and media. The multidisciplinary
ing the student’s capabilities as a manager to analyze operational curriculum covers speech communication, mass communication
performance within supply chains, to design and manage pro- and new media, journalism, public relations, business writing,
cesses for competitive advantage, and to manage systems acquisi- and technical writing. It encourages students to develop written,
tion and development in technical enterprises. oral, and visual communication skills; to apply communica-
tion theories to both personal and professional situations; and
to increase their understanding of human interaction. Students
Requirements for the Minor with a major in communication studies are prepared for a wide
The minor in business supply chain management requires the variety of careers in areas such as journalism, public relations,
completion of 15 credits of coursework in business supply chain marketing, communication, and professional writing.
management, chosen from the following courses:
BMGT 304 Managing E-Commerce in Organizations Intended Program Outcomes
BMGT 305 Knowledge Management The student who graduates with a major in communication stud-
BMGT 317 Problem Solving for Managers ies will be able to
BMGT 372 Supply Chain Management
t Apply analytical skills in interpreting, using, and delivering
BMGT 375 Purchasing Management
information, particularly as it applies to mass media.
BMGT 487 Project Management I
BMGT 488 Project Management II
t Create professional written, oral, and visual communication
#.(5 &YQMPSJOHUIF'VUVSF
for specific purposes and diverse audiences, applying structural
MRKT 457 E-Marketing
and stylistic conventions.
t Design, create, and/or select multimedia components and
Students are recommended to take BMGT 304, 317, and 372 integrate them into print, broadcast, and online media-
as the first courses in the minor (if they have not already applied rich resources.
the courses toward other degree requirements). t Manage successful communication activities within the
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g., ethical, legal, and financial parameters of the project and
major or general education) may not be applied toward the of the profession.
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses t Work with individuals and groups in ways that reflect
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses. both an understanding of communication theory and
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF  professional expectations.
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. t Use an understanding of diverse and intercultural perspectives
as they affect communication practices.
t Design and/or employ specific research methodologies and
tools to gather information for specific purposes.

Degree Requirements
A degree with a major in communication studies requires the
successful completion of 120 credits of coursework, including
30 credits for the major; 41 credits in general education require-
ments; and 49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree

22 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
requirements. At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above). or GVPT 170 American Government 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE COMMUNICATION STUDIES MAJOR
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
Coursework for a major in communication studies includes the following: social sciences requirement
t Required foundation courses (6 credits): COMM 300 and 302 *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
t Writing and language arts course (3 credits): Chosen from COMM or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
380 and WRTG 288/288X, 289, 388, 390, 391/391X, 393/393X, Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
394/394X, and 489 PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
t Mass communication course (3 credits): Chosen from COMM 400 and or BEHS 210 Introduction to Social and Behavioral Science
any JOUR courses or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
t Speech communication course (3 credits): Any SPCH course social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
t Supplemental major courses (12 credits): Chosen from PSYC 334 and from first)
424; HRMN 302 and 367; MRKT 310; and any COMM, JOUR, NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
SPCH, or WRTG courses or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
t Capstone course (3 credits): Chosen from COMM 495, SPCH 397, and or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement
WRTG 493
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
or a foreign language course
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BA in PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
communication studies. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since the arts and humanities requirement (discipline
some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting must differ from other humanities course)
courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever or JOUR 201 Writing for the Mass Media
taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts or speech requirement
and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sci- *'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
ences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8. or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/
computing requirement
U COMM 300 Communication Theory 3
Communication Studies Degree Courses Credits U COMM 302 Critical Perspectives in Mass Communication 3
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. foundation courses)
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing 3
(strongly recommended as first course) or WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
U COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts 3
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or other writing or language arts course for the major
or a higher-level math course
U COMM 400 Communication and the Law 3
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits) or JOUR 330 Public Relations Theory
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 or other mass communication course for the major
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 U SPCH 470 Listening 3
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts and or other speech communication course for the major
humanities requirement in historical perspective U COMM 493 Strategies for Visual Communications 3
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 or other supplemental major course
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1 U SPCH 482 Intercultural Communication 3
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology or other supplemental major course
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical U SPCH 324 Communication and Gender 3
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement or other supplemental major course
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 U SPCH 426 Negotiation and Conflict Management 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing or HRMN 302 Organizational Communication
requirement or other supplemental major course

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 23
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 15 credits) are prepared for careers in various computing areas, including
U COMM 495 Seminar in Workplace Communication 3 applications in programming, databases, software engineering,
or SPCH 397 Organizational Presentations and networking.
or WRTG 493 Seminar in Advanced Technical Writing
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits along Intended Program Outcomes
with required major courses) 46
The student who graduates with a major in computer and infor-
Total credits for BA in communication studies 120 mation science will be able to
t Design, implement, secure, and maintain databases that meet
user requirements for both transaction processing and data
Minor in Communication Studies warehouses.
The communication studies minor complements the skills the t Design, develop, implement, secure, and maintain software
student gains in his or her major discipline by providing special- applications that meet user requirements, using current best
ized skills in workplace communication, including the develop- practices and tools for all application interfaces and domains.
ment of written and oral communication skills and a greater t Design, implement, and maintain a reliable and secure net-
understanding of human interaction. work and services infrastructure.
t Plan, manage, and provide appropriate documentation and
Requirements for the Minor communication through all phases of the software develop-
ment life cycle to ensure successful implementation of an
A minor in communication studies requires the completion of
information technology (IT) project that is on time and
15 credits of coursework in communication studies. All COMM,
within budget.
JOUR, SPCH, and WRTG courses apply. It is recommended
t Identify, learn, and adapt to local and global IT trends,
that students take COMM 300 early in the minor (if they have
technologies, legalities, and policies, as well as appropriately
not already applied the course toward other degree requirements).
communicate their impact to key stakeholders.
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g., t Work independently or as an effective member of an applica-
major or general education) may not be applied toward the tion development team to determine and implement systems
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses that meet customer requirements.
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF  Degree Requirements
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
A degree with a major in computer and information science
requires the successful completion of 120 credits of coursework,
including 30 credits for the major; 41 credits in general educa-
Computer and tion requirements; and 49 credits in the minor, electives, and
other degree requirements. At least 15 credits in the major must
Information Science be earned in upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above).

Students may seek an academic major in computer and informa- REQUIREMENTS FOR THE COMPUTER AND INFORMATION
tion science. SCIENCE MAJOR
Coursework for a major in computer and information science includes the
following:
Major in Computer and Information Science
t Required core courses (12 credits): CMIS 141, 170, 242, and 310
The computer and information science major provides an t Supplemental major courses (18 credits, 6 of which must be 400-level):
in-depth study of computer and information science through Chosen from CMIS 102 (for students with no prior programming expe-
a hands-on approach that enables students to explore computer- rience) and any upper-level CMIS courses except CMIS 486A and 486B
based solutions to challenging problems. The curriculum focuses (Note: Students should take CMIS 102 before core courses and may
on problem-solving skills and techniques that can be applied apply it toward the interdisciplinary issues/computing requirement rather
to many disciplines and covers software and Web engineer- than toward the major.)
ing, relational databases, programming languages, operating
systems, computer networks, and distributed systems. Students

24 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in U CMIS 242 Intermediate Programming 3
computer and information science. Coursework for the major is indicated PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
by U. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
courses to meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advi- social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
sor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate from first)
courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in com- NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
munications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
found on p. 8. sciences lecture requirement
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
Computer and Information Science Degree Courses Credits or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) (discipline must differ from other humanities course)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 or a foreign language course
(strongly recommended as first course) (recommended elective)
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or speech requirement
or a higher-level math course
U CMIS 310 Computer Systems and Architecture 3
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
CMIS 102 Introduction to Problem Solving
foundation courses)
and Algorithm Design 3
(fulfills the interdisciplinary issues/computing WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing 3
requirement and prerequisite for later courses) or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
U CMIS 325 UNIX with Shell Programming 3
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
or other supplemental major course
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
U CMIS 330 Software Engineering Principles and Techniques 3
or&/(- *OUSPEVDUJPOUP'JDUJPO 1PFUSZ and Drama or other supplemental major course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
U CMIS 320 Relational Databases 3
PHIL, THET, dance, literature, or foreign language
course to fulfill the arts and humanities requirement or CMIS 370 Data Communications
or other supplemental major course
U CMIS 141 Introductory Programming 3
U CMIS 485 Web Database Development 3
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
or other supplemental major course
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
U CMIS 415 Advanced UNIX and C 3
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or CMIS 460 Software Design and Development
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
or other 400-level supplemental major course
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
U CMIS 420 Advanced Relational Databases 3
U CMIS 170 Introduction to XML 3
or CMIS 435 Computer Networking
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other 400-level supplemental major course
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
GVPT 170 American Government 3 along with required major courses) 43
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, Recommended Minor
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
Computing
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
Total credits for BS in computer and information science 120

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 25
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA

Computer Information REQUIREMENTS FOR THE COMPUTER INFORMATION


TECHNOLOGY MAJOR

Technology Coursework for a major in computer information technology includes the


following:
t Required foundation courses (6 credits): CMIS 310 and CMIT 265
Students may seek an academic major in computer information
technology. t Core courses (15 credits): Any upper-level CMIT courses
t Supplemental major courses (12 credits): Any CMIS, CMIT, CMSC,
$.45 $4*" BOE*'4.DPVSTFT Note: Students without prior pro-
Major in Computer Information Technology gramming experience should take CMIS 102 before core courses and
may apply it toward the interdisciplinary issues/computing requirement
The computer information technology major prepares students
rather than toward the major.)
to enter or advance in information technology fields where certi-
fication of knowledge level is commonly considered in hiring and RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
promotion decisions. It is designed to combine the benefits of a
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
traditional college education with the benefits of hands-on train-
computer information technology. Coursework for the major is indicated
ing in state-of-the-art computer technology. Students become by U. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement,
technically competent but also learn to write well-organized and substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional
clear documents. The computer information technology curricu- courses to meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advi-
lum integrates technical skill with communication skills, superior sor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate
general education knowledge, and breadth of knowledge in the courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in com-
computer information technology field, particularly networking. munications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological
and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be
found on p. 8.
Intended Program Outcomes
The student who graduates with a major in computer informa-
Computer Information Technology Degree Courses Credits
tion technology will be able to
t Design, implement, and administer local-area and wide-area First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
networks to satisfy organizational goals. Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
t Resolve information technology (IT) system problems and EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
meet the needs of end-users by applying troubleshooting (strongly recommended as first course)
methodologies. LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
t Apply relevant policies and procedures to effectively secure WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
and monitor IT systems. ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or a higher-level math course
t Meet organizational goals in completing individual and team
assignments using effective workforce skills, best practices, and Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
ethical principles. CMIS 102 Introduction to Problem Solving
t Effectively communicate IT knowledge to diverse audiences and Algorithm Design 3
(fulfills the interdisciplinary issues/computing
using a wide range of presentation modalities. requirement and prerequisite for later courses)
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
Degree Requirements or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
A degree with a major in computer information technology PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
requires the successful completion of 120 credits of coursework, or&/(- *OUSPEVDUJPOUP'JDUJPO 1PFUSZ and Drama
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
including 33 credits for the major, 41 credits in general educa- PHIL, THET, dance, literature, or foreign language
tion requirements, and 46 credits in the minor, electives, and course to fulfill the arts and humanities requirement
other degree requirements. At least 17 credits in the major must Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
be earned in upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above), and and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
18 credits in courses designated CMIT. or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement

26 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 U CMIT 486A Internship in Computer Information Technology
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing Through Co-op 3
requirement or other supplemental major course
GVPT 170 American Government 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits along
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or with required major courses) 37
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and Recommended Minors
social sciences requirement Computing, English, or mathematics
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits) Recommended Elective
U CMIT 265 Networking Essentials 3 MATH 140 Calculus I
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 or other calculus course (for students planning
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology to go on to graduate school: students should note
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and prerequisites)
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first) Total credits for BS in computer information technology 120
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy

Computer Science
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 Students may seek an academic major in computer science.
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) Major in Computer Science
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
(recommended elective)
The computer science major prepares students to plan, design,
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
and optimize scalable computer software and hardware systems
or a foreign language course
for use in commercial and government environments. It is
(recommended elective) designed for students who have a good background in math-
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  ematics and an interest in the theory, practice, art, and science
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers of computer programming. The major provides graduates with
or other course to fulfill the communications/ an educational foundation appropriate for careers as software
writing or speech requirement architects and engineers, application software designers, system
U CMIS 310 Computer Systems and Architecture 3 analysts and programmers, and system engineers.
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
foundation courses) Intended Program Outcomes
WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
The student who graduates with a major in computer science will
upper-level advanced writing requirement be able to
U CMIT 368 Windows Server 3 t Apply logic and mathematical principles to the design, devel-
or other core course for the major opment, and verification of secure, high-performance, and
U CMIT 376 Windows Network Infrastructure 3 reliable computing systems.
or other core course for the major
t Analyze, design, develop, and document secure technical solu-
U CMIT 377 Windows Directory Services Infrastructure 3
or other core course for the major tions for computing systems and networking infrastructure.
U CMIT 320 Network Security 3 t Plan, design, and optimize computing architecture, software
or other core course for the major applications, data, and systems that securely support enter-
U CMIT 425 Advanced Network Security 3 prise needs.
or other supplemental major course t Contribute and adhere to local, national, and international
U CMIT 374 Exchange Server 3 technical standards, ethics, and intellectual property regula-
or other core course for the major
tions when developing computer applications and systems.
U CMIT 350 Interconnecting Cisco Devices 3
or other supplemental major course
U CMIT 450 Designing Cisco Networks 3
or other supplemental major course

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 27
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
t Analyze, compare, and contrast algorithms, programming lan- MATH 115 Pre-Calculus 3
guages, compilers, and operating systems to select or develop or both MATH 107 College Algebra
the most appropriate solution to the problem. and MATH 108 Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry
(prerequisite for later courses)
t Identify and respond to emerging technology, models, meth-
odologies, systems, and trends in human/computer interac- Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
tion, including social networking, gaming, and modeling and U MATH 140 Calculus I 4
simulation. *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
Degree Requirements CMSC 101 Introductory Computer Science 3
(fulfills the interdisciplinary issues/computing
A degree with a major in computer science requires the success- requirement and prerequisite for later courses)
ful completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 38 credits GVPT 170 American Government 3
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
41 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
At least 18 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level social sciences requirement
courses (numbered 300 or above). Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
Coursework for a major in computer science includes the following: or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
t Required mathematics courses (8 credits): MATH 140 and 141
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
t Required foundation courses (9 credits): CMSC 130, 150, and 230 or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
t Required core courses (9 credits): CMSC 330 and 335 and any 300-level requirement
CMSC course U CMSC 150 Introduction to Discrete Structures 3
t Supplemental major courses (9 credits): Chosen from CMSC 101 (for PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
students without prior programming experience) and any 400-level or&/(- *OUSPEVDUJPOUP'JDUJPO 1PFUSZ and Drama
CMSC courses except CMSC 486A and 486B (Note: Students should or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
take CMSC 101 before core courses and may apply it toward the inter- PHIL, THET, dance, literature, or foreign language
disciplinary issues/computing requirement rather than toward the major.) course to fulfill the arts and humanities requirement
t Required capstone course (3 credits): CMSC 495 Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
U CMSC 130 Computer Science I 3
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
U MATH 141 Calculus II 4
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
in computer science. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever from first)
taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sci- or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
ences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8. sciences lecture requirement
U CMSC 230 Computer Science II 3
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
Computer Science Degree Courses Credits
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 *'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
(strongly recommended as first course) (recommended elective)
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement

28 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics
or a foreign language course
(recommended elective)
3
Computer Studies
Students may seek an academic major in computer studies.
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory
and foundation courses)
WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing 3 Major in Computer Studies
or other course to fulfill the communications/ The computer studies major provides in-depth knowledge in
upper-level advanced writing requirement
practical applications of computing. The coherent and flexible
U CMSC 311 Computer Organization 3
program of study includes areas such as digital media, gaming,
or any 300-level CMSC course
and Web-based technologies. The interdisciplinary approach
U CMSC 330 Advanced Programming Languages 3
allows students to integrate courses from several specialized areas
U CMSC 335 Object-Oriented and Concurrent Programming 3
in computing. Graduates are prepared for a variety of entry- and
U CMSC 415 UML and Design Patterns 3
or other supplemental major course midlevel technical and management positions within the digital
U CMSC 480 Advanced Programming in Java 3 media, Web technology, gaming, and computing industries.
or other supplemental major course
U CMSC 425 Building Applications for Mobile Devices 3 Intended Program Outcomes
or other supplemental major course
The student who graduates with a major in computer studies
Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 9 credits) will be able to
U CMSC 495 Current Trends and Projects in t Design, develop, and manage Web applications using current
Computer Science 3 and emerging technologies that adhere to industry standards.
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits t Analyze needs and effectively manage projects and resources,
along with required major courses) 32 applying sound business principles and technology.
Recommended Minors t Configure, optimize, and administer computer systems to
Computing or mathematics support Web technologies.
Recommended Elective t Design and develop digital, interactive, and Web-based media
&%51 1SPGFTTJPOBM'VOEBNFOUBMTPG5FBDIJOHBOE-FBSOJOH to meet customer requirements and usability standards.
(for qualified students who plan to enter the MAT pro-
t Develop, test, and implement Web and multimedia applica-
gram at UMUC; students should note prerequisites and
consult an advisor) tions using sound techniques for scripting and programming.
t Effectively apply relevant theories, practices, and principles
Total credits for BS in computer science 120 when designing and developing works of digital media.

Degree Requirements
A degree with a major in computer studies requires the success-
ful completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 30 credits
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and
49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level
courses (numbered 300 or above).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE COMPUTER STUDIES MAJOR


Coursework for a major in computer studies includes the following:
t Introductory course (3 credits): Chosen from CMIS 141 and 170,
CMSC 130, and CMST 306
t 'PVOEBUJPODPVSTFT DSFEJUT
$IPTFOGSPN$.*4 PS$.4$

*'4.BOE BOE$.45
t Supplemental major courses (21 credits, at least 15 of which must be
upper level): Chosen from any CMST, CMIS, CMIT, CMSC, CSIA,
BOE*'4.DPVSTFT Note: Students without prior programming experi-
ence should take CMIS 102 before core courses and may apply it toward
the interdisciplinary issues/computing requirement rather than toward
the major.)

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 29
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE U CMST 340 Computer Applications in Management 3
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS or other foundation course for the major
in computer studies. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever sciences lecture requirement
taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sci- or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
ences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8. and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
U*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT 
Computer Studies Degree Courses Credits or other foundation course for the major
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) or a foreign language course
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. (recommended elective)
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
(strongly recommended as first course) or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 or speech requirement
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT  *'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
or a higher-level math course (recommended elective)

Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits) Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 foundation courses)
or&/(- *OUSPEVDUJPOUP'JDUJPO 1PFUSZ and Drama WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing 3
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, or other course to fulfill the communications/
PHIL, THET, dance, literature, or foreign language upper-level advanced writing requirement
course to fulfill the arts and humanities requirement U CMST 310 Electronic Publishing 3
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT  or other supplemental major course
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software U CMST 416 Advanced Visual Basic Programming 3
or other supplemental major course
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
U CMST 385 Internet and Web Design 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1 or other supplemental major course
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology U CMST 386 Advanced Internet and Web Design 3
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical or other supplemental major course
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
U CMST 430 Web Site Management 3
CMIS 102 Introduction to Problem Solving and or other supplemental major course
Algorithm Design 3 U CMST 450 Web Design with XML 3
(fulfills the interdisciplinary issues/computing or other supplemental major course
requirement and prerequisite for later courses)
U$.45 8FC"QQMJDBUJPO%FWFMPQNFOU6TJOH$PME'VTJPO 
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 or other supplemental major course
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
GVPT 170 American Government 3 along with required major courses) 40
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, Recommended Minor
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
Business administration
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
Total credits for BS in computer studies 120
U CMST 306 Introduction to Visual Basic Programming 3
or other introductory course for the major
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first)

30 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Computing t Apply critical thinking skills and logic to analyze and
solve a variety of complex problems in the criminal
justice environment.
Students may seek an academic minor in computing.
t Manage and evaluate organizational efforts to ensure effective
cooperation with stakeholders to prevent, control, and man-
Minor in Computing age crime to ensure public safety.
The computing minor complements the skills the student t Utilize an ethical framework and an understanding of legal
gains in his or her major discipline by providing a study of the constraints to make decisions as a criminal justice professional.
principles and techniques used in developing computer-related t Develop specialized technical knowledge and skills relevant
solutions to practical problems. to subspecialties in the field of criminal justice to ensure
public safety.
Requirements for the Minor t Use interpersonal and leadership skills to work both inde-
pendently and cooperatively as a member of a criminal
A minor in computing requires the completion of 15 credits justice team.
of coursework chosen from any courses in computer and infor-
mation science, computer information technology, computer Degree Requirements
science, computer studies, cybersecurity, and information sys-
tems management. A degree with a major in criminal justice requires the successful
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 30 credits
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and
major or general education) may not be applied toward the
49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
courses (numbered 300 or above).
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJOR
Coursework for a major in criminal justice includes the following:
t Required foundation course (3 credits): CCJS 100 or 105
Criminal Justice t Required statistics course (3 credits): STAT 200
t Core courses (15 credits): CCJS 230 (or 234), 340 (or 320), 350 (or
Students may seek either an academic major or minor in crimi- 461), 345 (or 430), and 497 (or 432)
nal justice. t Supplemental major courses (9 credits, 3 of which must be upper level):
Any CCJS courses or HMLS 495

Major in Criminal Justice RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


The criminal justice program provides students with an under- The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
standing of the nature of crime and the personnel, institutions, criminal justice. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some
and processes that prevent or respond to crime. Students learn recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting
both the theory and practice of the criminal justice system. The courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to
curriculum covers crime and criminal behavior, law enforcement, meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever
taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where
courts, corrections, security, and investigation. It provides a solid
allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts
foundation for further study or entry into a variety of criminal
and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sci-
justice professions. ences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.

Intended Program Outcomes


Criminal Justice Degree Courses Credits
The student who graduates with a major in criminal justice will
be able to First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
t Accurately communicate orally and in writing to complete
organizational missions to ensure public safety. EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
(strongly recommended as first course)
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 31
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT  foundation courses)
or a higher-level math course U CCJS 340 Law-Enforcement Administration 3
U CCJS 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 or CCJS 320 Introduction to Criminalistics
or CCJS 105 Introduction to Criminology U CCJS 350 Juvenile Delinquency 3
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits) or CCJS 461 Psychology of Criminal Behavior
GVPT 170 American Government 3 U CCJS 497 Correctional Administration 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, or CCJS 432 Law of Corrections
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or WRTG 391/391X Advanced Expository and Research Writing 3
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and or other course to fulfill the communications/
social sciences requirement upper-level advanced writing requirement
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 U CCJS 345 Introduction to Security Management 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1 or CCJS 430 Legal and Ethical Issues in Security Management
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology U CCJS 341 Criminal Investigation 3
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical or other supplemental major course
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
U CCJS 486A Internship in Criminal Justice Through Co-op 3
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 or other supplemental major course
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
U HMLS 495 Public Safety Policies and Leadership 3
requirement
or other supplemental major course
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits along
U CCJS 230 Criminal Law in Action 3 with required major courses) 43
or CCJS 234 Criminal Procedure and Evidence Recommended Electives
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 CAPL 398A Career Planning Management
or a foreign language course (for students not taking EDCP 100)
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, CCJS 360 Victimology
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill the CCJS 352 Drugs and Crime
arts and humanities requirement
Total credits for BS in criminal justice 120
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
U STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics 3
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
Minor in Criminal Justice
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and The criminal justice minor complements the skills the student
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ gains in his or her major discipline by providing a study of
from first) crime, law enforcement, courts, corrections, security, and
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 investigative forensics.
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement Requirements for the Minor
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 A minor in criminal justice requires the completion of 15 credits
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 of coursework in criminal justice. Any CCJS courses apply. It
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
is recommended that students take CCJS 100, CCJS 105, or
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) CCJS 230 as the first course in the minor (if they have not
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3 already applied the course toward other degree requirements).
(recommended elective) Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  major or general education) may not be applied toward the
or COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF  'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/ students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
computing requirement

32 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Customer Service Cybersecurity
Management Students may seek an academic major in cybersecurity.

Students may seek an academic minor in customer service


management.
Major in Cybersecurity
The major in cybersecurity prepares graduates to be leaders in
the protection of data assets. The curriculum focuses on the
Minor in Customer Service Management techniques, policies, operational procedures, and technologies
The customer service management minor complements the skills that secure and defend the availability, integrity, authentication,
the student gains in his or her major discipline by providing a confidentiality, and nonrepudiation of information and informa-
study of how customer service managers make informed deci- tion systems, in local as well as more broadly based domains.
sions regarding organization, planning, operating procedures, The major prepares students for careers as information systems
management, and allocation of limited resources. security professionals, senior system managers, and system
administrators responsible for information systems and security
Requirements for the Minor of those systems.

A minor in customer service management requires the comple-


Intended Program Outcomes
tion of 15 credits in customer service management coursework,
chosen from the following courses: The student who graduates with a major in cybersecurity will
ACCT 301 Accounting for Nonaccounting Managers be able to
BMGT 317 Problem Solving for Managers t Protect an organization’s critical information and assets by
BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory ethically integrating cybersecurity best practices and risk man-
BMGT 375 Purchasing Management agement throughout an enterprise.
BMGT 378 Legal Environment of Business t Implement continuous network monitoring and provide real-
BMGT 487 Project Management I time security solutions.
HRMN 302 Organizational Communication t Analyze advanced persistent threats and deploy counter
HRMN 406 Employee Training and Development measures.
MRKT 395 Managing Customer Relationships t Conduct risk and vulnerability assessments of planned and
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g., installed information systems.
major or general education) may not be applied toward the t Investigate cyber crimes and assist in recovery of operations.
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses t 'PSNVMBUF VQEBUF BOEDPNNVOJDBUFTIPSUBOEMPOHUFSN
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses. organizational cybersecurity strategies and policies.
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. Degree Requirements
A degree with a major in cybersecurity requires the successful
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 33 credits
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and
46 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
At least 17 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level
courses (numbered 300 or above).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CYBERSECURITY MAJOR


Coursework for a major in cybersecurity includes the following:
t Required foundation courses (9 credits): CSIA 301 and 302 (or
$.*5
BOE*'4.
t Required core courses (12 credits): CSIA 303, 412, and 413 and
CMIT 320

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 33
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
t Supplemental major courses (9 credits): Chosen from CCJS 421; CMIT Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
BOE$4*"  BOEBOE*'4.BOE CCJS 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
t Required capstone course (3 credits): CSIA 485 or CCJS 105 Introduction to Criminology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first)
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
U CSIA 301 Information Systems Architecture 3
cybersecurity. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some rec-
ommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses U*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allow- or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
able) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts and sciences lecture requirement
humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8. or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
Cybersecurity Degree Courses Credits (discipline must differ from other humanities course)
*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT 
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) (prerequisite to later courses)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 or a foreign language course
(strongly recommended as first course) (recommended elective)
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 U CSIA 302 Telecommunications in Information Systems 3
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 or CMIT 265 Networking Essentials
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT  41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
or a higher-level math course or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
or speech requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
(prerequisite to later courses)
foundation courses)
CMIS 102 Introduction to Problem Solving and
WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing 3
Algorithm Design 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
(fulfills the interdisciplinary issues/computing
upper-level advanced writing requirement
requirement; prerequisite to later courses)
U$4*" 'PVOEBUJPOTPG*OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFN4FDVSJUZ 
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
U CSIA 412 Senior System Managers and Security 3
or&/(- *OUSPEVDUJPOUP'JDUJPO 1PFUSZ and Drama
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, U CSIA 413 System Administrators and Information Security 3
PHIL, THET, dance, literature, or foreign language U CMIT 320 Network Security 3
course to fulfill the arts and humanities requirement U$$+4 $PNQVUFS'PSFOTJDT 
Both NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 or other supplemental major course
and NSCI 101 Physical Science Laboratory 1 U CSIA 457 Cyber Crime and Cyber Terrorism 3
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical or other supplemental major course
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement U*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4FDVSJUZ/FFET"TTFTTNFOU
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 and Planning 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing or other supplemental major course
requirement Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 15 credits)
GVPT 170 American Government 3 U CSIA 485 Trends and Projects in Cybersecurity and
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
Information Assurance 3
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits along
social sciences requirement with required major courses) 37
Recommended Electives (students should note prerequisites)
Courses related to security and cyber crime:
BMGT 366 Global Public Management
CCJS 462 Protection of Business Assets

34 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
CCJS 496
GVPT 409
Cyber Crime and Security
Terrorism, Antiterrorism, and Homeland Security Emergency Management
HMLS 408 Infrastructure Security Issues
HMLS 414 International Security Issues Students may seek either an academic major or minor in emer-
Courses related to psychological and sociological concerns: gency management.
CCJS 461 Psychology of Criminal Behavior
14:$ 'PVOEBUJPOTPG'PSFOTJDT1TZDIPMPHZ Major in Emergency Management
SOCY 313 The Individual and Society
SOCY 427 Deviant Behavior
The emergency management major develops the knowledge,
Courses related to computing:
skills and abilities needed for leadership in emergency man-
CMIS 141 Introductory Programming
agement, with a focus on disaster prevention, planning, pre-
CMIS 330 Software Engineering Principles and Techniques
paredness, response, mitigation, and recovery. The curriculum
Course for qualified students planning graduate study in cybersecurity at UMUC:
covers needs and issues, operations management, planning and
CSIA 510 Cyberspace and Cybersecurity
response, and terrorism and is designed to provide students with
Course for qualified students planning graduate study in teaching at UMUC:
a global outlook, interpersonal skills, and emergency manage-
&%51 1SPGFTTJPOBM'VOEBNFOUBMTPG5FBDIJOHBOE-FBSOJOH
ment knowledge and skills. Students are prepared for manage-
ment positions in emergency management in government and
Total credits for BS in cybersecurity 120 industry or for graduate study in emergency management,
homeland security, or management and leadership. Course-
XPSLNBZBMTPëMMSFRVJSFNFOUTSFMBUFEUPUIF/BUJPOBM'JSF
Protection Association Standard on Disaster/Emergency Man-
Economics agement and Business Continuity Programs (1600), qualifica-
tion as a Certified Emergency Manager, and other professional
Students may seek an academic minor in economics. association certifications.

Minor in Economics Intended Program Outcomes


The economics minor complements the skills the student gains The student who graduates with a major in emergency manage-
in his or her major discipline by providing a study of the forces ment will be able to
that determine production and distribution, price levels, and t 'BDJMJUBUFBOETVQQPSUMFBEFSTIJQBOEWJTJPOJOFNFSHFODZ
income distribution, as well as other economic factors that influ- management to administer successful programs, including
ence the quality of life. intergovernmental, interagency, and interdisciplinary outreach.
t Utilize informed decision making, calmness under stress, goal
Requirements for the Minor orientation, teamwork, ethical behavior, professional develop-
ment, the integration of assets and resources, enhanced tech-
A minor in economics requires the completion of 15 credits
nology, and communication to ensure effective administration
in economics. All ECON courses apply. Students should take
of emergency management related programs.
ECON 201 and 203 as the first courses in the minor (if they have
not already applied the courses toward other degree requirements). t Use clear and effective oral and written communication strate-
gies in concert with strong interpersonal, technology, and
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g., social media skills to facilitate building collaborative partner-
major or general education) may not be applied toward the ships in emergency management.
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses t Identify risks and design responses, plans, training, and exer-
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses. cises that coordinate public and private resources to effectively
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF  encourage disaster prevention, improve emergency response,
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. enhance recovery, and effectively mitigate disasters.

Degree Requirements
A degree with a major in emergency management requires the
successful completion of 120 credits of coursework, including
30 credits for the major; 41 credits in general education require-

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 35
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
ments; and 49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
requirements. At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above).
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT MAJOR
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
Coursework for a major in emergency management includes the following:
or a foreign language course
t Required core courses (15 credits): EMGT 302, 304, 306, 312, or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
and 486A PHIL, THET, dance, or literature, course to fulfill
t Supplemental major course in needs and issues (3 credits): the arts and humanities requirement
$IPTFOGSPN&.(5 $4*"BOE BOE*'4.PS Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
t Supplemental major course in operations management (3 credits): PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
Chosen from EMGT 310; BMGT 366 and 405; and ENMT 310 or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
t Supplemental major course in planning and response (3 credits): or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
HMLS 302 or EMGT 404 social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first)
t Supplemental major course in terrorism (3 credits): GVPT 406 or 407
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
t Required capstone course (3 credits): HMLS 495
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
t Required related course (3 credits), which may be applied anywhere in
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
UIFEFHSFF"$$5PS*'4. sciences lecture requirement
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
emergency management. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since and humanities requirement in historical perspective
some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting (discipline must differ from other humanities course)
courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to U EMGT 302 Concepts of Emergency Management 3
meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where or SPCH 482 Intercultural Communication
allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, (recommended elective)
arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical WRTG 390 Writing for Managers 3
sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8. or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement
*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT 
Emergency Management Degree Courses Credits
or ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) (fulfills the interdisciplinary issues/computing
requirement; students should note prerequisites)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
U EMGT 304 Emergency Response Preparedness and Planning 3
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 *'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
(strongly recommended as first course) (recommended elective)
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
and foundation courses)
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or a higher-level math course WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits) upper-level advanced writing requirement
GVPT 170 American Government 3 U EMGT 306 Political and Policy Issues in
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, Emergency Management 3
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
U EMGT 312 Social Dimensions of Disaster 3
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement U EMGT 486A Internship in Emergency Management Through
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 Co-op 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1 U*'4. %JTBTUFS3FDPWFSZ1MBOOJOH 
or other supplemental major course in
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
needs and issues
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement

36 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
U BMGT 366 Global Public Management
or other supplemental major course in
operations management
3
English
U HMLS 302 Introduction to Homeland Security 3 Students may seek either an academic major or minor in English.
or other supplemental major course in
planning and response
U GVPT 406 Global Terrorism 3 Major in English
or other supplemental major course in terrorism The English major provides students with broad cultural literacy,
Capstone Course for Major (to be taken after all other courses as well as the analytical, writing, and critical thinking skills for
for the major) successful professional work and graduate study. Graduates with
U HMLS 495 Public Safety Policies and Leadership 3 an English degree may pursue careers in business, education, law,
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits along the military, creative and professional writing, journalism, market-
with required major courses) 40 ing, public relations, administration, and management, as well as
advanced degrees in secondary teaching, literature, or related fields.
Recommended Electives
STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
(students should note prerequisite)
Intended Program Outcomes
EMGT 310 Continuity of Operations Planning and The student who graduates with a major in English will be able to
Implementation t Interpret literature and apply language in a thoughtful and artic-
(may meet requirements for certain graduate degree
programs at UMUC)
ulate way to reflect on the human condition in today’s world.
HMLS 302 Introduction to Homeland Security t Apply models from literature that reflect diversity and cultural
(may meet requirements for certain graduate degree competence to promote fair and inclusive interactions in the
programs at UMUC) workplace and the larger society.
t Apply models from literature to ethical leadership and strategic
Total credits for BS in emergency management 120
management in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations.
t Access, research, and analyze information using current technol-
Minor in Emergency Management ogies and library resources to accomplish professional objectives.
t Create professional written and oral communications for specific
The emergency management curriculum complements the skills
purposes and provide feedback on grammatical and stylistic
the student gains in his or her major discipline by providing
conventions.
knowledge of emergency management, including disaster plan-
ning and operations and allocation of limited resources. Degree Requirements
Requirements for the Minor A degree with a major in English requires the successful completion
of 120 credits of coursework, including 33 credits for the major;
A minor in emergency management requires the completion of
41 credits in general education requirements; and 46 credits in the
15 credits of coursework in emergency management. All EMGT
minor, electives, and other degree requirements. At least 17 credits
courses apply. It is recommended that students take EMGT 302
in the major must be earned in upper-level courses (numbered 300
or 304 as the first course in the minor (if they have not already
or above).
applied the course toward other degree requirements).
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g., REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ENGLISH MAJOR
major or general education) may not be applied toward the Coursework for a major in English includes the following:
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses t Required foundation course (3 credits): ENGL 303
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
t Fiction genre course (3 credits): ENGL 240, 246, 441, or 457
For a listing of all the requirements for the bachelor’s degree, t Poetry genre course (3 credits): ENGL 240, 345, or 446
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. t Drama genre course (3 credits): ENGL 240, 434, or 454
t Pre-1800 historical period course (3 credits): ENGL 201, 211, 221, 310,
or 311
t Historical period course (3 credits): ENGL 201, 211, 221, 222, 310,
311, 312, 425, 433, or 437
t American author course (3 credits): ENGL 354, 363, 364, or 439
t British author course (3 credits): ENGL 205, 304, 358, 406, 418, or 419

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 37
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
t British author course (3 credits): ENGL 205, 304, 358, 406, 418, or 419 NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
t Supplemental major courses (9 credits): Chosen from any ENGL courses or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
and WRTG 288, 289, 387, 388, 393, or 394 or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
Note: No course may be applied to more than one of the above categories. sciences lecture requirement
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BA in and humanities requirement in historical perspective
English. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some recom- (discipline must differ from other humanities course)
mended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses for *'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet degree or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/
requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage computing requirement
of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
general education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities, or COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts
behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics, or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8. or speech requirement
U&/(- *OUSPEVDUJPOUP'JDUJPO 1PFUSZ and Drama 3
or other supplemental major course
English Degree Courses Credits U ENGL 303 Critical Approaches to Literature 3
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. and foundation courses)
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 WRTG 391/391X Advanced Expository and Research Writing 3
(strongly recommended as first course) or other course to fulfill the communications/
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 upper-level advanced writing requirement
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 U ENGL 345 Modern Poetry 3
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT  or other poetry genre course for the major
or a higher-level math course U ENGL 441 The Novel in America Since 1914 3
or other fiction genre course for the major
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
U ENGL 311 17th- and 18th-Century British Literature 3
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 or other pre-1800 period course for the major
or a foreign language course U ENGL 433 American Literature: 1914 to the Present 3
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
or ENGL 425 Modern British Literature
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
or other historical period course for the major
the arts and humanities requirement
U ENGL 364 African American Authors Since 1900 3
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
or ENGL 354 American Women Writers Since 1900
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or other American author course for the major
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
U ENGL 406 Shakespeare: Power and Justice 3
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
or other British author course for the major
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
U ENGL 454 Modern World Drama 3
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other drama genre course for the major
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement U WRTG 388 Advanced Grammar 3
GVPT 170 American Government 3 or WRTG 387 Issues and Methods in Tutoring Writing
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, or other supplemental major course
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or U ENGL 481 The Art of Narration 3
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and or ENGL 485 Creative Writing: Poetry
social sciences requirement or other supplemental major course
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
along with required major courses) 43
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits) Recommended Elective
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 &%51 1SPGFTTJPOBM'VOEBNFOUBMTPG5FBDIJOHBOE-FBSOJOH
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology (for qualified students who plan to enter the MAT pro-
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and gram at UMUC; students should note prerequisites and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ consult an advisor)
from first)
Total credits for BA in English 120

38 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Minor in English and the environment in every activity and aspect of an envi-
ronmental management plan, procedure, and operation.
The English minor complements the skills the student gains
in his or her major discipline by providing exposure to literary t Apply scientific knowledge and principles, quantitative meth-
analysis, critical thinking and reading, and the study of the rela- ods, and technology tools to think critically and solve complex
tionship of literature to contemporary intellectual issues. environmental management problems in a variety of settings.
t Communicate orally and in writing on environmental issues,
Requirements for the Minor principles, and practices in a clear, well-organized manner
that effectively persuades, informs, and clarifies ideas, infor-
A minor in English requires the completion of 15 credits of mation, plans, and procedures to stakeholders and other
English coursework. All ENGL courses apply. It is recommended interested parties.
that students take ENGL 240 and 303 as the first courses in the
t Develop and implement management plans that incorporate
minor (if they have not already applied the courses toward other
degree requirements). scientific principles and comply with environmental laws and
ethical principles.
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
t Evaluate and use information obtained through field inspections,
major or general education) may not be applied toward the
monitoring, and sampling to assess the safety of environments.
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
Degree Requirements
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. A degree with a major in environmental management requires
the successful completion of 120 credits of coursework, includ-
ing 30 credits for the major; 41 credits in general education
Environmental Management requirements; and 49 credits in the minor, electives, and other
degree requirements. At least 15 credits in the major must be
Students may seek either an academic major or minor in envi- earned in upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above).
ronmental management.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL
MANAGEMENT MAJOR
Major in Environmental Management Coursework for a major in environmental management includes the
The major in environmental management prepares students to following:
plan, implement and control all facets of environmental manage- t Required core courses (15 credits): ENMT 301, 303, 321, 322 (or 405),
NFOU'PDVTJTPOUIFLOPXMFEHFBOETLJMMTTUVEFOUTOFFEUPCF and 340
effective environmental managers. The curriculum provides an t Supplemental major courses (12 credits): Chosen from any ENMT
interdisciplinary approach to environmental management that courses and BEHS 365
includes management of air, land, and water; pollution con- t Required capstone course (3 credits): ENMT 495
trol; policies; regulations; and environmental health and safety. t Required related courses (12 credits), which may be applied anywhere in
Students are prepared for careers in the fields of public safety, the degree: BIOL 101, MATH 115 (or MATH 107–108), NSCI 100,
occupational health, pollution remediation, hazard control, risk and STAT 230
management, risk assessment, and environmental health policy
and regulation. RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
Intended Program Outcomes environmental management. Coursework for the major is indicated by U.
Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, sub-
The student who graduates with a major in environmental man- stituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional
agement will be able to courses to meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor
whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate
t Identify and evaluate current and future air, water, land, and
courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in com-
energy resource needs to make appropriate recommendations
munications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological
and advocate regarding environmentally sustainable solutions and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be
and practices. found on p. 8.
t Ensure compliance with safety, health, and environmental
laws, regulations, and policies for the protection of humans

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 39
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Environmental Management Degree Courses Credits *'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT 
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) computing requirement
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 (recommended elective)
(strongly recommended as first course) *'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 (recommended elective)
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 U ENMT 301 Environment and Ecosystems Management 3
MATH 115 Pre-Calculus 3 Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory
or both MATH 107 College Algebra and foundation courses)
and MATH 108 Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3
(related requirement for the major) or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
U ENMT 303 Environmental Regulations and Policy 3
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
U ENMT 321 Environmental Health 3
and NSCI 101 Physical Science Laboratory 1
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills U ENMT 322 Occupational Health and Safety 3
the biological and physical sciences lecture and or ENMT 405 Pollution Prevention Strategies
laboratory requirement) U ENMT 340 Environmental Technology 3
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT  U ENMT 405 Pollution Prevention Strategies 3
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software or ENMT 322 Occupational Health and Safety
GVPT 170 American Government 3 or other supplemental major course
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, U ENMT 305 Hazardous Materials Toxicology 3
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or or other supplemental major course
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and U ENMT 380 Air Quality Management 3
social sciences requirement or other supplemental major course
BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 UENMT 315 Environmental Audits and Permits 3
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills the or other supplemental major course
biological and physical sciences lecture requirement)
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 15 credits)
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing U ENMT 495 Global Environmental Management Issues 3
requirement Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
STAT 230 Business Statistics 3 along with required major courses) 37
or STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
(related requirement for the major) Total credits for BS in environmental management 120
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
or a foreign language course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, Minor in Environmental Management
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement The environmental management minor complements the skills
the student gains in his or her major discipline by providing
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
a study of interdisciplinary and multimedia (air, water, land)
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
environmental management and related issues on a fundamental,
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and practical, and global level.
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first) Requirements for the Minor
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 A minor in environmental management requires the comple-
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts tion of 15 credits of coursework in environmental management.
and humanities requirement in historical perspective All courses allowable for the major apply. It is recommended
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) that students take ENMT 301 as the first course in the minor
WRTG 390 Writing for Managers 3 (if they have not already applied the course toward other degree
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirements).
or speech requirement
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
major or general education) may not be applied toward the

40 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses Degree Requirements
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
A degree with a major in finance requires the successful com-
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF  pletion of 120 credits of coursework, including 36 credits for
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and
43 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
At least 18 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level
Finance courses (numbered 300 or above).

Students may seek either an academic major or minor in finance. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE FINANCE MAJOR
Coursework for a major in finance includes the following:
Major in Finance t Required foundation courses (15 credits): ACCT 220 and 221, STAT
The finance major provides the knowledge of financial con- 230 (or 200), BMGT 364, and MRKT 310
cepts and analytical skills needed to balance finance theory and t 3FRVJSFEDPSFDPVSTFT DSFEJUT
'*/$   BOE
practical application. It combines a foundation in the principles t 4VQQMFNFOUBMNBKPSDPVSTFT DSFEJUT
$IPTFOGSPNBOZ'*/$DPVSTFT
of business, economics, and accounting with an in-depth focus and ECON 305, 306, and 430
on issues and knowledge in finance and financial management. t 3FRVJSFEDBQTUPOFDPVSTF DSFEJUT
'*/$
The curriculum covers business finance, financial management, t Required related courses (9 credits), which may be applied anywhere in
investments, and security analysis and valuation. Students are UIFEFHSFF"$$5 PS*'4.
BOE&$0/BOE
prepared to pursue a variety of careers in corporate and govern-
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
ment financial management, investments, portfolio analysis and
management, financial analysis, financial planning, banking, risk The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
finance. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some recom-
management, and insurance.
mended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses for
those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet degree
Intended Program Outcomes requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage
of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill
The student who graduates with a major in finance will be
general education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities,
able to
behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics,
t Prepare, analyze, and interpret financial information and and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
apply financial and economic theories to make sound
business decisions.
Finance Degree Courses Credits
t Apply basic principles of security markets to effectively create,
evaluate, and manage security portfolios. First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
t Describe and analyze the impact of legal, regulatory, and Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
environmental factors on planning, forecasting, and making EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
financial decisions. (strongly recommended as first course)
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
t Describe and analyze the impact of monetary systems and
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
legal, regulatory, and environmental factors on planning,
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
forecasting, and making financial decisions. or a higher-level math course
t Communicate, collaborate, lead, and influence across the BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3
organization to achieve organizational goals effectively (strongly recommended elective for students with
and ethically. no prior business experience)

t Identify required information and research, collect, synthesize, Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
and interpret data by applying appropriate technology tools to U ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting I 3
solve business problems. ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills the
t Use market principles and entrepreneurial skills to identify, first behavioral and social sciences requirement)
develop, and implement business opportunities and relation-
ships for financial products and services.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 41
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 U ECON 430 Money and Banking 3
and NSCI 101 Physical Science Laboratory 1 or other supplemental major course
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical U'*/$ 'JOBODJBM.BOBHFNFOU 
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement U'*/$ 4FDVSJUZ"OBMZTJTand Valuation 3
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 U'*/$ *OUFSOBUJPOBM'JOBODF 
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing or other supplemental major course
requirement
BMGT 392 Global Business Management 3
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT  (recommended elective)
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software BMGT 496 Business Ethics 3
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 (recommended elective)
or a foreign language course
Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 15 credits)
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill U'*/$ $POUFNQPSBSZ*TTVFTJO'JOBODF1SBDUJDF 
the arts and humanities requirement Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits) along with required major courses) 28
U STAT 230 Business Statistics 3 Recommended Minors
or STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics Human resource management, marketing, or other business-related minor
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
Total credits for BS in finance 120
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first) Minor in Finance
U ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II 3
The finance minor complements the skills the student gains in
BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
his or her major discipline by providing a study of the institu-
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
tions, theory, and practice associated with the allocation of
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement financial resources within the private sector.
ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics 3
(related requirement for the major) Requirements for the Minor
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
A minor in finance requires the completion of 15 credits of
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts DPVSTFXPSLJOëOBODF"MM'*/$DPVSTFTBQQMZ*UJTSFDPN-
and humanities requirement in historical perspective NFOEFEUIBUTUVEFOUTUBLF'*/$BOEBTUIFëSTUDPVSTFT
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) in the minor (if they have not already applied the courses toward
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  other degree requirements).
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
or speech requirement major or general education) may not be applied toward the
*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT  minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
or ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills the 'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
interdisciplinary issues/computing requirement)
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
U BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory
and foundation courses)
U'*/$ #VTJOFTT'JOBODF 
U MRKT 310 Marketing Principles 3
U'*/$ *OWFTUNFOUT 
WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement

42 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Fire Science Degree Requirements
A degree with a major in fire science requires the successful
Students may seek either an academic major or minor in completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 30 credits
fire science. for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and
49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level
Major in Fire Science courses (numbered 300 or above).
The major in fire science develops the knowledge, skills, and
abilities needed for leadership in fire protection. It covers disaster REQUIREMENTS FOR THE FIRE SCIENCE MAJOR
planning and the administration of fire-protection services, Coursework for a major in fire science includes the following:
encompassing all areas of incendiary-fire management. It pro-
t 3FRVJSFEDPSFDPVSTFT DSFEJUT
'4$/    BOE
vides an understanding of the interagency coordination necessary
t 4VQQMFNFOUBMNBKPSDPVSTFT DSFEJUT
"OZVQQFSMFWFM'4$/DPVSTFT
for fire prevention, emergency management, safe and successful
t Required capstone course (3 credits): HMLS 495
fire-incident command, and arson investigation. The curriculum
t Required related course (3 credits), which may be applied anywhere in
includes analytical approaches to fire protection and investiga-
UIFEFHSFF"$$5PS*'4.
tion, personnel management, disaster and fire-defense planning,
hazardous materials management, fire-protection structure and RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
system design, the role of the fire service within the community
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
and political structure, and the phenomena of fire propagation. fire science. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some recom-
%FWFMPQFEJODPOKVODUJPOXJUIUIF/BUJPOBM'JSF"DBEFNZPG mended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses for
UIF'FEFSBM&NFSHFODZ.BOBHFNFOU"HFODZ UIFNBKPSTFSWFT those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet degree
fire-service professionals seeking state-of-the-art knowledge to requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage
support advancement to chief executive management and senior of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill
leadership positions. It also serves professionals in related fields general education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities,
such as public safety, law enforcement, government, health behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics,
services, insurance, and private-industry emergency response, as and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
well as those in military fire departments in the United States
and abroad. Fire Science Degree Courses Credits

Intended Program Outcomes First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
The student who graduates with a major in fire science will be
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
able to (strongly recommended as first course)
t Apply principles of transformational leadership to negotiate, LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
mentor, motivate, and lead others toward a shared and ethical WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
organizational vision or goal. ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
t Apply knowledge of leadership, change, business models, or a higher-level math course
organizational issues, and regulations when working with staff Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
and federal officials to ensure organizational effectiveness, GVPT 170 American Government 3
resulting in the improvement of emergency services. or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
t Utilize the methods and resources of research, science, and
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
technology to effectively manage emergency services. social sciences requirement
t Use appropriate communication strategies and methods Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
t Utilize appropriate assessment and planning skills to or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
improve organization and community risk management or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
for emergency services. sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 43
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT  U'4$/ 'JSF1SPUFDUJPOBOE4USVDUVSF 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software or '4$/ $PNNVOJUZ3JTL3FEVDUJPOGPSUIF'JSFBOE
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 Emergency Services
or a foreign language course or other supplemental major course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, U'4$/ 'JSF%ZOBNJDT 
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill or '4$/ "QQMJDBUJPOPG'JSF3FTFBSDI
the arts and humanities requirement or other supplemental major course
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits) Capstone Course for Major (to be taken after all other courses
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 for the major)
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology U HMLS 495 Public Safety Policies and Leadership 3
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
from first) along with required major courses) 40
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 Recommended Elective
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement Total credits for BS in fire science 120
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts Minor in Fire Science
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) The fire science minor complements the skills the student gains
U'4$/ 'JSFand Emergency Services Administration 3 in his or her major discipline by providing knowledge of disaster
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3 planning and the administration of fire-protection services,
or SPCH 482 Intercultural Communication including organization, planning, operating procedures, manage-
(recommended elective) ment, and allocation of limited resources.
WRTG 390 Writing for Managers 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement
Requirements for the Minor
*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT  A minor in fire science requires the completion of 15 credits of
or ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems DPVSTFXPSLJOëSFTDJFODF"MM'4$/DPVSTFTBQQMZ*UJTSFDPN-
(fulfills the interdisciplinary issues/computing NFOEFEUIBUTUVEFOUTUBLF'4$/PSBTUIFëSTUDPVSTF
requirement; students should note prerequisites)
for the minor (if they have not already applied the course toward
U'4$/ 1FSTPOOFM.BOBHFNFOUGPS'JSFand Emergency
other degree requirements).
Services 3
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF  Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
(recommended elective) major or general education) may not be applied toward the
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
foundation courses)
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3 'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
or other course to fulfill the communications/ students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
upper-level advanced writing requirement
U'4$/ 'JSF1SFWFOUJPO0SHBOJ[BUJPOand Management 3
U'4$/ 1PMJUJDBMand-FHBM'PVOEBUJPOTPG'JSF1SPUFDUJPO 
U'4$/ &NFSHFODZ4FSWJDFT5SBJOJOHand Education 3
U'4$/ 'JSF*OWFTUJHBUJPOBOE"OBMZTJT 
or '4$/ "OBMZUJD"QQSPBDIFTUP1VCMJD'JSF1SPUFDUJPO
or other supplemental major course
U'4$/ 'JSF3FMBUFE)VNBO#FIBWJPS 
or '4$/ %JTBTUFS1MBOOJOHBOE$POUSPM
or other supplemental major course

44 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Forensics General Studies
Students may seek an academic minor in forensics. A related The general studies major is available only to active-duty military
academic major is available in investigative forensics (p. 61). personnel and certain others who conform to specific stipula-
tions. Students outside UMUC Europe and UMUC Asia should
not select this major.
Minor in Forensics
The minor in forensics complements the skills the student gains
in his or her major discipline by providing interdisciplinary
Major in General Studies
study in selected areas of criminal justice, natural science, social The general studies major allows students to draw from various
science, investigation and security, information and computer disciplines that provide a body of knowledge appropriate to an
systems, psychology, and sociology. It combines laboratory and identified area of interest (for example, an aspect of culture, a
field skills in the collection and analysis of physical evidence with historical period, or a geographical location). The interdisciplin-
further study in the various subfields of forensics. ary approach emphasizes analysis and synthesis of diverse theory
and practice.
Requirements for the Minor
Intended Program Outcomes
A minor in forensics requires the completion of 15 credits of
coursework in forensics, chosen from those listed in the require- The student who graduates with a major in general studies will
ments for the major in investigative forensics. It is recommended be able to
that students take CCJS 100, 234, or 320 as the first course for t Understand and apply key concepts from chosen disciplines.
the minor (if they have not already applied the course toward t Develop effective written and oral communication skills con-
other degree requirements). sistent with the chosen areas of study.
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g., t Apply skills and concepts to problems of modern life.
major or general education) may not be applied toward the t Define an approach grounded in the chosen disciplines and
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses appropriate to the study of a specific topic, area, or theme.
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses. t Develop effective skills in cross-disciplinary comparison,
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF  historical and critical analysis, research, and evaluation.
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. t Use computers for communication and research.
t Demonstrate information literacy through research and
resource evaluation appropriate to the chosen area of study.

Degree Requirements
A degree with a major in general studies requires the successful
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 30 credits
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and
49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level
courses (numbered 300 or above).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GENERAL STUDIES MAJOR


Coursework for the major in general studies includes either 15 credits in
each of two different disciplines or specific coursework for a particular
curriculum as defined by UMUC. The general studies major requires prior
approval. Unless the curriculum has already been defined by UMUC,
students must submit a formal proposal explaining the focus and intended
learning outcomes of the proposed course of study and identifying specific
courses to fulfill those learning outcomes. Students should consult an advi-
sor about eligibility for the major and about the requirements and procedure
for submitting a proposal.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 45
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA

Gerontology RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE


The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
gerontology. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some rec-
Students may seek an academic major or minor in gerontology. ommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses
for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet
Major in Gerontology degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking
advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allow-
The major in gerontology prepares students to implement and able) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts and
manage health and human service programs in gerontology. It humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences,
combines a foundation in the psychosocial and physiological mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
aspects of aging with an understanding of programs, services, and
policies related to aging and older adults. Graduates are prepared
Gerontology Degree Courses Credits
for careers such as gerontological services or program manager,
program and policy analyst, services developer, and housing or First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
facilities manager. Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
Intended Program Outcomes (strongly recommended as first course)
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
The student who graduates with a major in gerontology will
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
be able to
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
t Access, interpret, and apply gerontological research findings or a higher-level math course
related to biopsychosocial processes in the context of aging. Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
t Analyze the impact of sociological and cultural factors, such as U GERO 100 Introduction to Gerontology 3
race, ethnicity, gender, and social class, on the aging process. GVPT 170 American Government 3
t Analyze the development of policies related to aging and their or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
impact on services and organizations for older adults, both PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
locally and nationally.
social sciences requirement
t Apply interdisciplinary gerontological knowledge to work Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
with older adults in a chosen area of practice. and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
t Practice within the legal and ethical standards of the aging or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
services field. or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
Degree Requirements WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
A degree with a major in gerontology requires the successful requirement
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 30 credits *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements. PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level or a foreign language course
courses (numbered 300 or above). or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GERONTOLOGY MAJOR
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
Coursework for a major in gerontology includes the following:
U GERO 220 Psychological Aspects of Aging 3
t Required foundation courses (9 credits): GERO 100, 220 (or PSYC or PSYC 357 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging
357), and 302 (or BIOL 307)
U STAT 225 Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology 3
t Required management courses (9 credits): STAT 225 (or 200 or 230) or STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
and GERO 301 (or BMGT 361) and 306
or STAT 230 Business Statistics
t Health-related course (3 credits): GERO 338, 355, 380, or 460
t Supplemental major courses (6 credits): Any GERO courses
t Required internship (3 credits): GERO 486A

46 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 Minor in Gerontology
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and The gerontology minor complements the skills the student gains
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ in his or her major discipline by examining aging from a multi-
from first) disciplinary perspective that integrates biological, sociological,
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 psychological, and historical perspectives. It provides the student
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy with the opportunity to study complex processes and aspects of
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
aging and the field of gerontology.
sciences lecture requirement
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
Requirements for the Minor
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts A minor in gerontology requires the completion of 15 credits of
and humanities requirement in historical perspective coursework in gerontology. Courses appropriate for the major in
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
gerontology apply. It is recommended that students take GERO
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
100 and 220 (or PSYC 357) as the first courses in the minor (if
or COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing they have not already applied the courses toward other degree
or speech requirement requirements).
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF  Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/ major or general education) may not be applied toward the
computing requirement
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
U GERO 302 Health and Aging 3
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
or BIOL 307 The Biology of Aging
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
foundation courses)
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
or SPCH 482 Intercultural Communications

U GERO 301
(recommended elective)
Service/Program Management 3
Global Business
or BMGT 361
U GERO 306
Health Management
Programs, Services, and Policies 3
and Public Policy
WRTG 391/391X Advanced Expository and Research Writing 3
Students may seek an academic major in global business and
or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement public policy.
U GERO 338 Health Promotion in Older Adults 3
or other health-related course for the major
Major in Global Business and Public Policy
U GERO 311 Women and Aging 3
or GERO 410 Cross-Cultural Perspectives of Aging The major in global business and public policy prepares students
or other supplemental major course with the requisite knowledge and skills for professional success
U GERO 327 Ethnicity and Aging 3 in the global business environment. It provides a foundation in
or other supplemental major course the principles of business, marketing, and accounting with an
in-depth focus on global business and public policy. The curricu-
Internship for Major (to be taken within the last 30 credits) lum covers international and multinational management; public
U GERO 486A Internship in Gerontology Through Co-op 3 policy and management; and issues related to international law,
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken within the last 60 credits marketing, finance, and development. Students are prepared for
along with required major courses) 43 career opportunities in both private and public economic sectors,
including domestic and global corporations; federal, state and
Total credits for BS in gerontology 120 local governments; and not-for profit, nongovernmental, and
intergovernmental domestic and international organizations and
institutions.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 47
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Intended Program Outcomes RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
The student who graduates with a major in global business and
global business and public policy. Coursework for the major is indicated by
public policy will be able to
U. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement,
t Participate in, manage, and lead global teams to achieve insti- substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional
tutional goals and objectives. courses to meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advi-
t Apply the fundamentals of international finance, marketing, sor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate
sales, supply chain management, asset management, produc- courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in com-
tion, and human capital management to provide added value munications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological
and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be
and reduce risk.
found on p. 8.
t Employ knowledge of different environments, cultural
settings, ethics, and values to negotiate contracts and imple-
ment programs. Global Business and Public Policy Degree Courses Credits
t Research, analyze, and assess systems, markets, and policies First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
to guide decision making to structure and advance global Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
opportunities.
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
t Apply an understanding of the global challenge, opportuni- (strongly recommended as first course)
ties, and best practices used by global institutions to maximize LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
stakeholder value. WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
t Influence or execute institutional programs and practices that ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
comply with local, national, and international laws, policies, or a higher-level math course
and regulations and implement global strategies that will BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3
ensure a positive regulatory environment. (strongly recommended elective for students with
no prior business experience)
t Use critical and creative thinking and communication and
team-building skills in business and policy decisions to solve Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
global business issues. U ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting I 3
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills first
Degree Requirements behavioral and social sciences requirement)
A degree with a major in global business and public policy NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
requires the successful completion of 120 credits of coursework, and NSCI 101 Physical Science Laboratory 1
including 36 credits for the major; 41 credits in general educa- or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
tion requirements; and 43 credits in the minor, electives, and
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
other degree requirements. At least 18 credits in the major must or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
be earned in upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above). requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GLOBAL BUSINESS AND or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
PUBLIC POLICY MAJOR PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
Coursework for a major in global business and public policy includes the or a foreign language course
following: or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
t Required foundation courses (15 credits): ACCT 220 and 221, BMGT
the arts and humanities requirement
 '*/$ BOE.3,5
t Required core courses (12 credits): BMGT 392, 454, 456, and 482 Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
t Supplemental major courses (9 credits): Chosen from ACCT 425; STAT 230 Business Statistics 3
(related requirement for the major)
#.(5  BOE'*/$BOE.3,5
U ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II 3
t Required related courses (15 credits), which may be applied anywhere
JOUIFEFHSFF*'4. PS"$$5
#.(5 &$0/BOE ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics 3
(related requirement for the major)
203, and STAT 230

48 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
HIST 142
or HIST 157
Western Civilization II
History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
3
Graphic Communication
and humanities requirement in historical perspective Students may seek an academic major in graphic communication.
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology Major in Graphic Communication
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and The major in graphic communication provides students with a
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first)
multidisciplinary study of the skills and technology needed to
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
compete in today’s rapidly changing visual arts and communica-
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
tion environments. The curriculum combines training in graphic
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing art and design and computer graphics with studies in commu-
or speech requirement nication, including business-oriented writing and publication.
BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 Graduates are prepared for careers as graphic designers and
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy related positions that require creative skills as well as an under-
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical standing of business communication.
sciences lecture requirement
U BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3
Intended Program Outcomes
U MRKT 310 Marketing Principles 3
*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT  The student who graduates with a major in graphic communica-
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills the tion will be able to
interdisciplinary issues/computing requirement)
t Respond to stakeholder needs with appropriate design solu-
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory tions that effectively convey a coherent, consistent message for
and foundation courses) targeted purposes and audiences.
WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3 t Use appropriate technologies and sound design principles to
or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement create effective solutions for communication needs.
BMGT 380 Business Law I 3 t Synthesize effective visual communication from various oral,
(related requirement for the major) written, and visual elements.
U'*/$ #VTJOFTT'JOBODF  t Work within the ethical and legal parameters of the commu-
U BMGT 392 Global Business Management 3 nications professions.
U MRKT 454 Global Marketing 3 t Manage projects by identifying the steps, roles, responsibili-
or other supplemental major course ties, and resources to complete a project on time and on
U'*/$ *OUFSOBUJPOBM'JOBODF  budget through effective teamwork.
or other supplemental major course
BMGT 496 Business Ethics 3
(recommended elective) Degree Requirements
U BMGT 366 Global Public Management 3 A degree with a major in graphic communication requires the
or other supplemental major course
successful completion of 120 credits of coursework, including
U BMGT 456 Multinational Management 3
33 credits for the major; 41 credits in general education require-
U BMGT 482 Business and Government 3
ments; and 46 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree
U BMGT 454 Global Business and Public Policy Regimes 3
requirements. At least 16 credits in the major must be earned in
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above).
along with required major courses) 25
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION MAJOR
Total credits for BS in global business and public policy 120
Coursework for a major in graphic communication includes the following:
t Required design courses (6 credits): ARTT 110 and 250,
t Required graphic design courses (12 credits); ARTT 354, 458, and
479 and CMIST 310
t Required marketing and communication courses (12 credits):
COMM 300 and 493 and MRKT 310 and 354
t Required capstone course (3 credits): ARTT 495

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 49
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE U MRKT 310 Marketing Principles 3
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BA in NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
graphic communication. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to sciences lecture requirement
meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever U MRKT 354 Integrated Marketing Communications 3
taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sci- or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
ences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8. and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
CMST 385 Internet and Web Design 3
Graphic Communication Degree Courses Credits Fulfills the interdisciplinary issues/computing require-
ment; prerequisite for later courses
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) U CMST 310 Electronic Publishing 3
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 or WRTG 288/288X Standard English Grammar, Usage, and Diction
(strongly recommended as first course) or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 or speech requirement
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 U ARTT 354 Elements of Computer Graphics 3
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT  Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
or a higher-level math course foundation courses)
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits) U ARTT 479 Advanced Computer Graphics 3
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 or other writing or language arts course for the major
or a foreign language course WRTG 391/391X Advanced Expository and Research Writing 3
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, or other course to fulfill the communications/
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill upper-level advanced writing requirement
the arts and humanities requirement U ARTT 458 Graphic Design and Communication 3
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 U COMM 493 Strategies for Visual Communications 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1 or other supplemental major course
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology Capstone Course for Major (to be taken after all other courses
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
for the major)
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
U ARTT 495 Graphic Communication Portfolio 3
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits along
requirement with required major courses) 43
GVPT 170 American Government 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, Total credits for BA in graphic communication 120
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
U ARTT 110 Elements of Drawing I 3
U COMM 300 Communication Theory 3
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
U ARTT 250 Elements of Commercial Design 3
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
or BEHS 210 Introduction to Social and Behavioral Science
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first)

50 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
History t World history sequence (6 credits): HIST 115–116, 141–142, or
284–285
t U.S. distribution course (3 credits): HIST 255, 266, 360, 361, 362,
Students may seek either an academic major or minor in history. 364, 365, 372, 376, 377, 381, 453, 460, 461, 462, 463, or 467
t European distribution course (3 credits): HIST 324, 325, 326, 327,
332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 358, 375, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434,
Major in History 437, 438, 439, 440, 441, 443, or 448
The history major prepares students to read and analyze his- t World regions distribution course (3 credits): HIST 284, 285, 341,
torical works with critical insight and appreciate the range and 342, 353, 354, 382, 383, 389, 391, 392, 464, 465, 466, 480, 481,
variety of resources, as well as demonstrate knowledge of the 482, or 483
development and cultural diversity of their respective areas t Supplemental major courses (9 credits): Any HIST courses
of study. Students develop their research skills using libraries,
archives, and online sources to acquire a sense of intellectual RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
property and the responsibility of presenting and interpreting The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BA in
historical issues. They also develop writing skills to clearly history. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some recom-
express their findings using the language of the discipline. The mended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses for
history major prepares students for graduate study in history those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet degree
and for careers in education, writing and publishing, journalism, requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage
of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill
law, public relations, business, government, and management.
general education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities,
behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics,
Intended Program Outcomes and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
The student who graduates with a major in history will be able to
t Organize and use primary and secondary sources for research, History Degree Courses Credits
interpretation, and presentation of historical knowledge.
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
t Convey historical information by writing and speaking clearly Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
and appropriately for different audiences and with an appre-
ciation of diverse viewpoints. EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
(strongly recommended as first course)
t Engage in history as a moral and ethical practice, recognizing LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
a diversity of backgrounds and perspectives. WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
t Cultivate historical habits of mind, apply historical precedents ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
to contemporary developments, remain open to historical or a higher-level math course
interpretation as an incomplete process, and develop self-
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
reflection to mitigate bias.
U HIST 115 World History I 3
t Demonstrate a chronological understanding of the dif- or HIST 141 Western Civilization I
ferent peoples, events, and cultures that have shaped or other first course in required world history sequence
human civilization. for the major
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
Degree Requirements or a foreign language course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
A degree with a major in history requires the successful com- PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
pletion of 120 credits of coursework, including 33 credits for the arts and humanities requirement
the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
46 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements. and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
At least 17 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
courses (numbered 300 or above). or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
Requirements for the History Major or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
Coursework for a major in history includes the following: requirement

t Required U.S. history sequence (6 credits): HIST 156 and 157


t Required methodology course (3 credits): HIST 309

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 51
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
GVPT 170 American Government 3 U HIST 337 Europe’s Bloodiest Century 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, or other supplemental major course
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or U HIST 465 World War II 3
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and or other supplemental major course
social sciences requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT  Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software along with required major courses) 40
U HIST 116 World History II 3 Recommended Elective
or HIST 142 Western Civilization II &%51 1SPGFTTJPOBM'VOEBNFOUBMTPG5FBDIJOHBOE-FBSOJOH
or other second course in required world history (for qualified students who plan to enter the MAT pro-
sequence for the major gram at UMUC; students should note prerequisites and
consult an advisor)
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
U HIST 156 History of the United States to 1865 3 Total credits for BA in history 120
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and Minor in History
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first) The history minor complements the skills the student gains in
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 his or her major discipline by offering a historical perspective
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy and by developing critical thinking and an appreciation of the
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical major contributions of various events and individuals to human
sciences lecture requirement civilization.
U HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 3
ARTH 370 History of World Art I 3 Requirements for the Minor
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective A minor in history requires the completion of 15 credits of
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) coursework in history. All HIST courses apply. Students are rec-
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  ommended to take HIST 309 after all other courses in the minor.
or COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
or speech requirement major or general education) may not be applied toward the
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF  minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/ (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
computing requirement
HUMN 351 Myth and Culture 3
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
(recommended elective) students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
foundation courses)
WRTG 391/391X Advanced Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement
U HIST 309 Introduction to Historical Writing 3
U HIST 364 Emergence of Modern America: 1900 to 1945 3
or other U.S. distribution course for the major
U HIST 336 Europe in the 19th Century: 1815 to 1919 3
or other European distribution course for the major
U HIST 481 History of Modern China 3
or HIST 483 History of Japan Since 1800
or other world regions distribution course
for the major
U HIST 365 Recent America: 1945 to the Present 3
or other supplemental major course

52 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Homeland Security REQUIREMENTS FOR THE HOMELAND SECURITY MAJOR
Coursework for a major in homeland security includes the following:

Students may seek either an academic major or minor in home- t Required core courses (15 credits): HMLS 302, 304, 406, 408, and 414
land security. t Supplemental major course in technology (3 credits): Chosen from BIOL
 $$+4 $4*"BOE &/.5 BOE'4$/
t Supplemental major course in operations (3 credits): Chosen from
Major in Homeland Security #.(5&.(5   BOEBOE*'4.
The major in homeland security develops the knowledge, skills, t Supplemental major course in intelligence (3 credits): Chosen from
and abilities needed for leadership in homeland security, with CCJS 491 and 496, CSIA 459, and GVPT 408 and 409
a focus on the domestic and international security issues of t Supplemental major course in applied concepts (3 credits): Chosen from
homeland security, including international and domestic terror- ECON 440; EMGT 312; GVPT 200, 306, and 405; HMLS 486A;
or SOCY 473
ism, infrastructure protection, strategic planning for security,
international relations, intelligence operations and evaluation, t Required capstone course (3 credits): HMLS 495
and program management. The curriculum is designed to t Required related course (3 credits), which may be applied anywhere in
UIFEFHSFF*'4. PS"$$5

provide students with a global outlook, interpersonal skills, and


awareness of current issues in homeland security. Graduates of
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
the program will have the knowledge and skills to serve as leaders
in government and industry security. The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS
in homeland security. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since
some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting
Intended Program Outcomes courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to
The student who graduates with a major in homeland security meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever
taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where
will be able to
allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts
t Lead, manage, motivate, and develop others to establish and and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sci-
achieve strategic and operational homeland security goals and ences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
interface with internal and external audiences.
t Manage technology and information for the protection,
Homeland Security Degree Courses Credits
response, and recovery of critical infrastructure/information in
a hostile or emergency environment. First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
t Navigate public or private organizations’ financial, person- Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
nel, legal, and political information to identify, evaluate, and EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
address the organizational needs, requirements, and resources. (strongly recommended as first course)
t Thoroughly research, critically analyze, and synthesize com- LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
plex intelligence information using various methods to formu- WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
late risk assessments and responses to emerging threats. ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or a higher-level math course
t Communicate, negotiate, and educate strategically and tacti-
cally across cultural boundaries with diverse audiences within Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
homeland security. GVPT 170 American Government 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
t Write concise and succinct policy, planning, and procedure
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
documents for a variety of audiences to support homeland WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
security operations. social sciences requirement
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
Degree Requirements and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
A degree with a major in homeland security requires the success- or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
ful completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 30 credits sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements. or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level requirement
courses (numbered 300 or above).

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 53
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT  Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits along
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software with required major courses) 40
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 Recommended Electives
or a foreign language course STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, EMGT 310 Continuity of Operations Planning and
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement Implementation
(may meet requirements for certain graduate degree
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits) programs at UMUC)
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
Total credits for BS in homeland security 120
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first) Minor in Homeland Security
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
The homeland security minor complements the skills the student
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
gains in his or her major discipline by providing knowledge of
sciences lecture requirement the concepts of domestic and international security.
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 Requirements for the Minor
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective A minor in homeland security requires the completion of
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) 15 credits of coursework in homeland security. All HMLS
U HMLS 302 Introduction to Homeland Security 3 courses apply. It is recommended that students take HMLS 302
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3 or 304 as the first course in the minor (if they have not already
or SPCH 482 Intercultural Communication applied the course toward other degree requirements).
(recommended elective)
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
WRTG 390 Writing for Managers 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
major or general education) may not be applied toward the
or speech requirement minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT  (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills the 'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
interdisciplinary issues/computing requirement and
is prerequisite to recommended major course)
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
U HMLS 304 Strategic Planning in Homeland Security 3
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
(recommended elective)
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
foundation courses)
WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement
U HMLS 406 Legal and Political Issues of Homeland Security 3
U HMLS 408 Infrastructure Security Issues 3
U HMLS 414 International Security Issues 3
U$4*" 'PVOEBUJPOTPG*OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFN4FDVSJUZ 
or other supplemental major course in technology
U BMGT 366 Global Public Management 3
or other supplemental major course in operations
U GVPT 409 Terrorism, Antiterrorism, and Homeland Security 3
or other supplemental major course in intelligence
U HMLS 486A Internship in Homeland Security Through Co-op 3
or other supplemental major course in applied concepts
Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 15 credits)
U HMLS 495 Public Safety Policies and Leadership 3

54 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Humanities t Arts breadth course (3 credits): ARTH 370 or ARTH 371
t Literature breadth courses (6 credits): Chosen from COMM 380 and
any upper-level English or foreign-language literature courses
Students may seek either an academic major or minor in t Philosophy and religion breadth courses (6 credits): Chosen from any
humanities. 3-credit PHIL courses
t Supplemental major course (3 credits): Any upper-level ARTT, ARTH,
Major in Humanities ENGL, HIST, HUMN, or PHIL course
t Required capstone course (3 credits): HUMN 495
The interdisciplinary major in the humanities enables students
to broaden their understanding of themselves and their interac- RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
tion with the world, providing an understanding of their cultural The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BA in
and intellectual heritage while giving them the tools to use that humanities. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some recom-
knowledge as lifelong learners. Students explore how individu- mended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses for
als and groups understand their existence, their place within those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet degree
their cultures, and their responsibility to others and the physical requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage
world. They learn how to express this understanding—by studies of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill
in literature, language, history and through creative and expres- general education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities,
sive art—and define their own meaning of humanness within behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics,
and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
an increasingly technological and diverse world. The interdis-
ciplinary curriculum draws on art, art history, cultural history,
literature, language, music, philosophy and religious studies, Humanities Degree Courses Credits
and theater.
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
Intended Program Outcomes
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
The student who graduates with a major in the humanities will (strongly recommended as first course)
be able to LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
t Use the knowledge, experiences, and skills gained from the WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
study of the humanities to develop one’s identity as a lifelong ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
learner and contributing member of one’s community and or a higher-level math course
society. Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
t Plan, communicate, and implement coherent and justifiable PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
practices that improve human conditions. or a foreign language course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
t Critically analyze ideas and defend recommendations for
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
improving the conditions of all members of society. the arts and humanities requirement
t Act in a personally and socially responsible manner, recogniz- Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
ing the complexity and diversity of the human experience. and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
Degree Requirements or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
A degree with a major in humanities requires the successful WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 33 credits or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and requirement
46 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements. GVPT 170 American Government 3
At least 17 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
courses (numbered 300 or above). WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE HUMANITIES MAJOR *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
Coursework for a major in humanities includes the following: or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
t Required foundation courses (12 credits): HUMN 100, PHIL 100, HIST U HUMN 100 Introduction to the Humanities 3
115 (or HIST 116), and ARTT 205 (or MUSC 210 or THET 110)

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 55
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits) Minor in Humanities
U PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy 3
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 The humanities minor complements the skills the student gains
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology in his or her major discipline by providing an integrated curricu-
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and lum for enrichment and exploration of culture and ideas, as well
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ as a broad perspective on human behavior, thought, and values
from first) across traditional disciplines.
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy Requirements for the Minor
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement A minor in humanities requires the completion of 15 credits of
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 coursework in humanities. Courses allowable for the major apply.
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
and humanities requirement in historical perspective major or general education) may not be applied toward the
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level HUMN
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF  courses (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/ courses.
computing requirement
U HIST 115 World History I 3 'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
or HIST 116 World History II students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
or WRTG 288/288X Standard English Grammar, Usage, and Diction
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement Human Resource
U ARTT 205
or MUSC 210
Art Appreciation
The Impact of Music on Life
3
Management
or THET 110 Introduction to the Theatre
Students may seek either an academic major or minor in human
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and resource management.
foundation courses)
WRTG 391/391X Advanced Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/ Major in Human Resource Management
upper-level advanced writing requirement
The human resource major provides 21st-century skills, knowl-
U ARTH 370 History of World Art I 3
edge, and understanding of human resource functions in private-
or ARTH 371 History of World Art II
(arts breadth course for the major) and public-sector organizational settings. These functions include
U PHIL 110 Practical Reasoning 3 human resource planning; recruitment, selection, placement, and
or other philosophy and religion breadth course orientation of employees; training and career development; labor
for the major relations; management of performance appraisal, compensation,
U COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts 3 and benefit programs; and development of personnel policies
or other literature breadth course for the major and procedures. The curriculum also covers management and
U ENGL 433 American Literature: 1914 to the Present 3 organization theory, organizational behavior and development
or other literature breadth course for the major approaches, labor relations theory and practice, interpersonal
U PHIL 336 Ideas Shaping the 21st Century 3 skill development, and special perspectives such as women
or other philosophy and religion breadth course in management. Students are prepared for work in business
for the major
administration and human resources in the for-profit, non-
U PHIL 348 Religions of the East 3
profit, or public sector. Through the proper selection of courses,
or other supplemental major course
the student can prepare for the certification examinations for
Capstone Course (to be taken in the last 15 credits) Professional in Human Resources, Senior Professional in Human
U HUMN 495 Humanities Seminar 3 Resources, and Global Professional in Human Resources, which
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits along are offered by the Society for Human Resource Management.
with required major courses) 43

Total credits for BA in humanities 120

56 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Intended Program Outcomes t Required capstone course (3 credits): HRMN 495
t Required related courses (9 credits), which may be applied anywhere in
The student who graduates with a major in human resource UIFEFHSFF"$$5 PS*'4.
BOE&$0/BOE
management will be able to
t Apply business knowledge, change management, and ethical RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
leadership skills to effectively guide the organization, serve The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS
internal and external customers, and leverage and develop in human resource management. Coursework for the major is indicated by
strategic competencies. U. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement,
t Apply knowledge of human behavior, labor relations, and substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional
current laws and regulations to produce a working environ- courses to meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advi-
ment that is safe, fair, and compliant with all applicable regu- sor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate
lations and where all employees are motivated and valued. courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in com-
t Identify learning needs and develop, implement, and assess munications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological
and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be
programs and/or alternative strategies for employee and orga-
found on p. 8.
nizational learning and development.
t Create rewards that provide the needed knowledge, skills, and
attitudes through selection, engagement, and retention of Human Resource Management Degree Courses Credits
employees for organizational success by using knowledge of
monetary, nonmonetary, and environmental elements. First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
t Recognize the different cultures and world views that inform
human thinking and action and respond constructively to EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
human and global differences in workplaces, communities, (strongly recommended as first course)
and organizations. LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
t Identify and use technology to research, collect, analyze, inter- WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
pret, and communicate information to sustain the organiza- ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
tion and position it competitively. or a higher-level math course
U BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3
t Listen, speak, and write in an effective, professional manner
(students with business experience should substitute
that educates, inspires, and influences others. a supplemental major course in the last 60 credits
t Use reflective practice to drive learning and improvement of of study)
self and work practice. Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
Degree Requirements (related requirement for the major; also fulfills first
behavioral and social sciences requirement)
A degree with a major in human resource management requires
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
the successful completion of 120 credits of coursework, includ-
and NSCI 101 Physical Science Laboratory 1
ing 36 credits for the major; 41 credits in general education or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
requirements; and 43 credits in the minor, electives, and other sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
degree requirements. At least 18 credits in the major must be WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
earned in upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above). or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE HUMAN RESOURCE *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
MANAGEMENT MAJOR or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
Coursework for a major in human resource management includes the PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
following: or a foreign language course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
t Required foundation courses (9 credits): BMGT 110 (or prior busi- PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
ness experience and an additional supplemental course), ACCT 221 (or the arts and humanities requirement
ACCT 301), and STAT 230 U STAT 230 Business Statistics 3
t Required core courses (15 credits): BMGT 364 and HRMN 300, 362 or STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
(or 395 or 406), 400, and 408
t Supplemental major courses (9 credits): Chosen from BMGT 380, 381,
   BOE'*/$.3,5BOEBOZ)3./
courses

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 57
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits) Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 15 credits)
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 U HRMN 495 Contemporary Issues in Human Resource
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology Management Practice 3
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
from first) along with required major courses) 31
U ACCT 301 Accounting for Nonaccounting Majors 3 Recommended Elective
or ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II MATH 140 Calculus I
(students should note prerequisite) (students should note prerequisites)
BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 Recommended Minors
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy Business administration, finance, or other business-related minor
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement Total credits for BS in human resource management 120
ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics 3
(related requirement for the major)
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 Minor in Human Resource Management
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
The human resource management minor complements the skills
and humanities requirement in historical perspective the student gains in his or her major discipline by examining the
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) human resource functions in a private- or public-sector organiza-
*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT  tional setting. These functions include human resource plan-
or ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems ning; recruitment, selection, and placement; employee appraisal
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills the and compensation; employee training and career development;
interdisciplinary issues/computing requirement; management of labor relations; and development of a human
students should note prerequisite)
resource department implementation plan.
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing Requirements for the Minor
or speech requirement
A minor in human resource management requires the comple-
U BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3
tion of 15 credits of coursework in human resource manage-
U HRMN 300 Human Resource Management 3
ment. Any HRMN course applies. It is recommended that
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and students take HRMN 300 and 400 for the minor (if the courses
foundation courses) have not already applied elsewhere in the degree).
WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/ Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
upper-level advanced writing requirement major or general education) may not be applied toward the
BMGT 392 Global Business Management 3 minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
(recommended elective) (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
U HRMN 400 Human Resource Management: Analysis
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
and Problems 3
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
U HRMN 408 Employment Law for Business 3
U HRMN 362 Labor Relations 3
or HRMN 395 The Total Rewards Approach to Compensation
Management
or HRMN 406 Employee Training and Development
U'*/$ #VTJOFTT'JOBODF 
or other supplemental major course
U MRKT 310 Marketing Principles 3
or other supplemental major course
BMGT 496 Business Ethics 3
(recommended elective)
U BMGT 380 Business Law I 3
or other supplemental major course

58 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Information Systems REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INFORMATION SYSTEMS
MANAGEMENT MAJOR

Management Coursework for a major in information systems management includes the


following:
t Required foundation courses (15 credits): CMIS 141 (or other program-
Students may seek an academic major in information systems
NJOHMBOHVBHFDPVSTF
BOE*'4.   BOE
management.
t $PSFDPVSTFT DSFEJUT
"OZVQQFSMFWFM*'4.DPVSTFT DSFEJUTNVTU
be in 400-level coursework)
Major in Information Systems Management t 4VQQMFNFOUBMNBKPSDPVSTFT DSFEJUT
"OZ*'4. $.*4 $.*5 
CMSC, CMST, or CSIA courses
The information systems management major develops students’
t Required related course (3 credits), which may be applied anywhere in
abilities to conceptualize and manage the design and imple-
the degree: STAT 200
mentation of high-quality information systems. The curriculum
focuses on the concepts, methods, and practical applications of RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
information systems in the workplace. Students are provided
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
the skills needed to make substantive contributions to the use of
information systems management. Coursework for the major is indicated
information systems in corporate decision making. by U. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement,
substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to take addi-
Intended Program Outcomes tional courses to meet degree requirements. Students should consult an
advisor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on alter-
The student who graduates with a major in information systems nate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements
management will be able to (in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences,
t Evaluate, select, and apply appropriate analytical and mea- biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues)
surement methods/tools and system development life cycle may be found on p. 8.
(SDLC) methodologies to meet organizational needs.
t Research, assess, recommend/select, and implement informa- Information Systems Management Degree Courses Credits
tion technology that aligns with business needs and meets
business objectives. First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
t Effectively communicate with stakeholders orally, visually, and Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
in writing to determine stakeholders’ business requirements, EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
explain how their requirements will be met, and provide (strongly recommended as first course)
ongoing audience-appropriate information. LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
t Responsibly protect organizations’ critical information and WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
assets by integrating cybersecurity best practices and risk man- ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or a higher-level math course
agement throughout global enterprises.
t Plan, execute, and evaluate technology solutions to achieve stra- Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
tegic goals by managing high-performing teams and projects. *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
(prerequisite to later courses)
CMIS 102 Introduction to Problem Solving and
Degree Requirements Algorithm Design 3
A degree with a major in information systems management (fulfills the interdisciplinary issues/computing
requirement; prerequisite to later courses)
requires the successful completion of 120 credits of coursework,
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
including 30 credits for the major; 41 credits in general educa-
or&/(- *OUSPEVDUJPOUP'JDUJPO 1PFUSZ and Drama
tion requirements; and 49 credits in the minor, electives, and or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
other degree requirements. At least 15 credits in the major must PHIL, THET, dance, literature, or foreign language
be earned in upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above). course to fulfill the arts and humanities requirement
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 59
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 U CSIA 302 Telecommunications in Information Systems 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing or other supplemental major course
requirement
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
GVPT 170 American Government 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, along with required major courses) 37
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or Recommended Minors
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and Computing, business administration, psychology, or marketing
social sciences requirement
Recommended Elective
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits) MATH 140 Calculus I
STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics 3 (for students who plan to go on to graduate school;
(related requirement for the major) students should note prerequisites)
U CMIS 141 Introductory Programming 3 &%51 1SPGFTTJPOBM'VOEBNFOUBMTPG5FBDIJOHBOE-FBSOJOH
or other programming course (for students who plan to enter the MAT program at
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 UMUC; students should note prerequisites and consult
an advisor)
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
Total credits for BS in information systems management 120
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first)
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement
International Business
HIST 142
or HIST 157
Western Civilization II
History of the United States Since 1865
3 Management
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts Students may seek an academic minor in international business
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
management.
U*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT 
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3 Minor in International Business
or a foreign language course
(recommended elective)
Management
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  The international business management minor complements the
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers skills the student gains in his or her major discipline by present-
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing ing the basic concepts, theories, policies, and practices that sup-
or speech requirement port the institutional, environmental, functional, and strategic
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF  framework for conducting global business transactions.
(recommended elective)
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and Requirements for the Minor
foundation courses)
WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing 3 A minor in international business management requires the
or other course to fulfill the communications/ completion of 15 credits of coursework in international business
upper-level advanced writing requirement management.
U*'4. 4PGUXBSFand Hardware Concepts 3
Students must take one of the following courses:
U*'4. %BUBCBTF$PODFQUT 
BMGT 392 Global Business Management
U*'4. 4ZTUFNT"OBMZTJTand Design 3
BMGT 454 Global Business and Public-Policy Regimes
U*'4. )VNBO'BDUPSTJO*OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNT 
or other core course for the major BMGT 456 Multinational Management
U$4*" 'PVOEBUJPOTPG*OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFN4FDVSJUZ  Students may choose remaining courses from those listed above
or other supplemental major course and the following:
U*'4. 1SPKFDU.BOBHFNFOU  BMGT 407 Managing Global Trade
or other core course for the major
BMGT 437 International Business Law
U*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4FDVSJUZ/FFET"TTFTTNFOU
'*/$ *OUFSOBUJPOBM'JOBODF
and Planning 3
or other core course for the major Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
major or general education) may not be applied toward the

60 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses Degree Requirements
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
A degree with a major in investigative forensics requires the
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF  successful completion of 120 credits of coursework, including
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. 30 credits for the major; 41 credits in general education require-
ments; and 49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree
requirements. At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in
Investigative Forensics upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above).

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INVESTIGATIVE FORENSICS MAJOR


Students may seek an academic major in investigative forensics.
A related minor is available in forensics (p. 45). Coursework for a major in investigative forensics includes the following:
t Required foundation courses (9 credits): CCJS 100, 234, and 320
t Required criminal/forensic psychology course (3 credits): CCJS 461 or
Major in Investigative Forensics PSYC 370
The investigative forensics major prepares students with the t 3FRVJSFEDPSFDPVSTFT DSFEJUT
$$+4BOEBOE'4$/
knowledge, skills, and ethical principles necessary to process t 'PSFOTJDMBCPSBUPSZTDJFODFDPVSTFT DSFEJUT
$IPTFOGSPN#*0-
and report on physical evidence at a crime scene or in connec- CCJS 425, 486A, and 486B; and any courses designated as forensic
tion with a civil investigation. Students will understand both lab science
the theory and practice of the forensic disciplines and of police t Supplemental major course (3 credits): Chosen from ANTH 351, BIOL
work. The curriculum, based on national guidelines, provides    BOE$$+4'4$/BOEBOZDIFNJTUSZ 
students with a basic foundation in investigative, scientific, and forensic science, or physics courses
laboratory-based forensics, and introduces them to the various t Required related courses (6 credits), which may be applied anywhere in
the degree: STAT 200 and WRTG 393
disciplines that make up the forensic collaborative workgroup.
It prepares students for further education or employment in
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
the field.
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
investigative forensics. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since
Intended Program Outcomes some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting
The student who graduates with a major in investigative forensics courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to
meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever
will be able to
taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where
t Apply the scientific method to draw conclusions regarding allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts
forensic information. and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sci-
t Utilize ethical principles and an understanding of legal prec- ences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
edents to make decisions related to investigation, analyses, and
testimony as a crime scene or forensic professional. Investigative Forensics Degree Courses Credits
t Access, interpret, and apply investigative, forensic, and crimi-
nal justice research to maintain competency within the field. First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
t Use effective written and oral communication to clearly report
and articulate information, analyses, or findings to relevant EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
end users in a timely manner. (strongly recommended as first course)
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
t Recognize and evaluate evidence to determine all appropriate
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
analyses to gather all available forensic information.
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
t Synthesize forensic, evidential, and investigatory information or a higher-level math course
from multiple sources to generate theories about a crime. U CCJS 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
t Use an understanding of the capabilities, processes, and
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
limitations of the crime laboratory to be an informed con-
GVPT 170 American Government 3
sumer or practitioner. or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 61
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 U$$+4 'PSFOTJDT-BC 
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1 or other forensic laboratory science course
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology U#*0- 'PSFOTJD#JPMPHZ 
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical or '4$/ 'JSF%ZOBNJDT
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement or other supplemental major course
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement along with required major courses) 40
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT  Total credits for BS in investigative forensics 120
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
U CCJS 234 Criminal Procedures and Evidence 3
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
or a foreign language course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, Journalism
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement Students may seek an academic minor in journalism.
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics 3 Minor in Journalism
(related requirement for the major)
The journalism minor complements the skills the student gains
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
in his or her major discipline by introducing the fundamental
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and concepts and techniques in public relations and mass media
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ writing. Students learn how to create highly effective messages in
from first) both traditional and new media for different audiences and con-
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 texts. They also develop an understanding of the legal and ethical
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical implications of communication.
sciences lecture requirement
U CCJS 320 Introduction to Criminalistics 3
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 Requirements for the Minor
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 A minor in journalism requires the completion of 15 credits of
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
coursework in journalism and communication studies. All JOUR
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) and COMM courses apply. At least 9 credits must be earned in
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  JOUR courses. It is recommended that students take JOUR 201
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing and 202 first, followed by COMM 300 and 400 (if they have not
or speech requirement already applied the courses toward other degree requirements).
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
computing requirement major or general education) may not be applied toward the
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3 minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
(recommended elective) (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and 'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
foundation courses) students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing 3
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills
the communications/upper-level advanced writing
requirement)
U CCJS 461 Psychology of Criminal Behavior 3
or14:$ 'PVOEBUJPOTPG'PSFOTJD1TZDIPMPHZ
U CCJS 420 Medical and Legal Investigations of Death 3
U$$+4 $PNQVUFS'PSFOTJDT 
U'4$/ 'JSF*OWFTUJHBUJPOand Analysis 3
U CCJS 486A Internship in Criminal Justice Through Co-op 3
or other forensic laboratory science course

62 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Laboratory Management Degree Requirements
A degree with a major in laboratory management requires the
Students who have completed an Associate of Applied Science successful completion of 120 credits of coursework from UMUC
degree in a biology- or chemistry-related field from a community and the collaborating community college, including 36 credits
college with which UMUC has an articulation agreement for this for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and
major may seek an academic major in laboratory management. 43 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
Students should consult an advisor before electing this major. At least 18 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level
courses (numbered 300 or above).
The major in laboratory management is based on collaborative
arrangement between UMUC and specific Maryland community
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
colleges. Students with a similar degree from another institution
may be considered for this program based on an institutional Coursework for a major in laboratory management includes the following
lower-level coursework taken as part of an appropriate Associate of Applied
articulation agreement with UMUC.
Science degree program at a collaborating community college:
t 'PVOEBUJPODPVSTFT DSFEJUT BUMFBTUPGXIJDITIPVMECFJOMBCPSB-
Major in Laboratory Management tory science coursework): Chosen from biology, biochemistry, biotech-
The laboratory management major prepares students to man- nology, chemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology courses
age and coordinate the nontechnical activities that contribute t Additional required related science coursework (14–22 credits), which
to a safe and well-run laboratory. It builds on the technical and may be applied anywhere in the bachelor’s degree
scientific knowledge gained through the associate’s degree pro- Coursework for a major in laboratory management also includes the
following:
gram and direct experience in the field. The curriculum provides
both in-depth study of scientific concepts and procedures and t Required upper-level core courses (12 credits): BIOL 400, BMGT 364,
management skills related to inventory, budget, personnel, and COMM 300, and NSCI 301 (or ENMT 322)
operations. It is designed to prepare students to meet employer t Supplemental major course (3 credits): Chosen from BMGT 317 and
needs for scientific technicians trained in both the sciences and *'4.BOE41$)    BOE
the management of laboratory activities. t Required Co-op internship (6 credits): Courses numbered 486A or 486B
in any related discipline
t Required related courses (6 credits), which may be applied anywhere in
Intended Program Outcomes
the degree: STAT 200 and WRTG 393
The student who graduates with a major in laboratory manage-
ment will be able to RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
t Create a healthy, safe, and productive workplace by effectively The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BTPS
and appropriately hiring, training, supporting, and evaluating in laboratory management (if the student selects appropriate courses as part
of the articulated degree program from the community college). Course-
laboratory personnel.
work for the major is indicated by U. Since some recommended courses
t Manage (plan, organize, and direct) the daily work activities fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses for those listed may
of a laboratory setting by working independently and as a make it necessary to take additional courses to meet degree requirements.
member of a team, meeting job expectations, and adhering to Students should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other
organizational policies and goals. options. Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general
education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities, behav-
t Communicate thoughts orally and in writing in a clear, well-
ioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and
organized manner that effectively persuades, informs, and
interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
clarifies ideas, information, and lab techniques/procedures to
staff, the scientific community, and the public.
t Practice ethical standards of integrity, honesty, and fairness as Laboratory Management Degree Courses Credits
a laboratory manager and professional. Required Courses from Community College
t Monitor and maintain laboratory-related documentation, U Lower-level coursework in biology, biochemistry, biotechnology,
equipment, and supplies necessary for conducting efficient, chemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology 15
safe, cost-effective, and hygienic laboratory operations. Additional required science coursework 14–22
t Manage scientific and laboratory practices and procedures (should also fulfill requirements in biological and physical sciences)
by complying with and adhering to national, state, and local
standards, policies, protocols, and regulations.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 63
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits at UMUC U COMM 300 Communication Theory 3
if not brought in transfer) U NSCI 301 Laboratory Organization and Management 3
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. or ENMT 322 Occupational Health and Safety
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 U BMGT 317 Problem Solving for Managers 3
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 or other supplemental major course
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT  Internship for Major (to be taken in the last 30 credits)
or a higher-level math course U Internship through Cooperative Education 6
Introductory and General Education Courses (to be taken within Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
the first 30 credits) along with required major courses) 22–30
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software Total credits for BTPS in laboratory management 120
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
GVPT 170 American Government
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
3 Legal Studies
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or Students may seek an academic major in legal studies.
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 Major in Legal Studies
or a foreign language course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, The legal studies program prepares students with the knowledge,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill skills, and ethical principles necessary to research and produce
the arts and humanities requirement legal information and documents in law-related environments.
STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics 3 'PDVTJTPOGVOEBNFOUBMMFHBMLOPXMFEHF TLJMMT BOEFUIJDBMQSJO-
(related requirement for the major) ciples. The curriculum addresses the organization, function, and
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 processes of the lawmaking institutions in the American legal sys-
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology tem, as well as the role of the paralegal in the legal system and the
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
governing rules of legal ethics. It emphasizes legal analysis, legal
from first) writing and drafting, legal research, and computer competence in
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 the legal environment. The major in legal studies provides a solid
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 foundation for challenging paralegal work in various legal settings
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts as well as for further education in a variety of fields.
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
Intended Program Outcomes
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers The student who graduates with a major in legal studies will
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing be able to
or speech requirement
t Conduct research using appropriate resources to identify
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/
relevant, current legal authority.
computing requirement t Draft writings that reflect critical thinking and legal reasoning
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3 to inform, advocate, or persuade on legal matters.
or SPCH 482 Intercultural Communication t Use interpersonal and leadership skills to work both indepen-
(recommended elective) dently and cooperatively as a member of a legal team.
Required Upper-Level Courses for Major (to be taken after t Apply knowledge of legal systems, concepts, and methodolo-
introductory and foundation courses) gies to efficiently and ethically support the resolution of
WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing 3 legal disputes.
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills t Gather relevant information and properly complete a wide
the communications/upper-level advanced writing
requirement) variety of forms and documents used in private practice and
U BIOL 400 Life Science Seminar 3 government service.
U BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3

64 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
t Implement appropriate office systems consistent with legal WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
and ethical requirements and best practices using a variety ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
of technologies. or a higher-level math course
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
Degree Requirements PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
or a foreign language course
A degree with a major in legal studies requires the successful or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 33 credits PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and the arts and humanities requirement
46 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements. GVPT 170 American Government 3
At least 17 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
courses (numbered 300 or above). PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE LEGAL STUDIES MAJOR
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
Coursework for a major in legal studies includes the following: and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
t Required foundation courses (12 credits): LGST 101, 200, 201, and 204 or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
t General practice procedure and skills course (3 credits): LGST 320, 322, or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
325, 400, or 401
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
t General practice substantive law course (3 credits): LGST 312, 315, 316,
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
340, or 442 requirement
t Procedure and skills courses (6 credits): Chosen from any general practice *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
procedure and skills courses and LGST 327, 330, 360, 363A, 425, 486A,
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
and 486B
CCJS 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
t Substantive law courses (6 credits): Chosen from any general practice
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
substantive law courses and LGST 335, 343, 411, 415, 420, 432, 434,
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
445, and 450 social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
t Supplemental major course (3 credits): Chosen from any LGST courses; from first)
$$+4BOE$0..'4$/BOE(715#  
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
and 434
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
Note: A maximum of 6 credits in 1-credit LGST courses may be applied
to the major and used in any category except the foundation and general or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
practice coursework.
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
legal studies. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some rec- or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
ommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses sciences lecture requirement
for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allow- or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
able) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts and or speech requirement
humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, U LGST 101 Introduction to Law 3
mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8. U LGST 200 Techniques of Legal Research 3
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
(recommended elective)
Legal Studies Degree Courses Credits U LGST 201 Legal Writing 3
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) U LGST 204 Legal Ethics 3
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. *'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 computing requirement
(strongly recommended as first course)
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 65
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and t Assess and develop performance measures, feedback, and
foundation courses) coaching that facilitate employee development.
WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3 t Employ self-reflection and mindfulness of individual and
or other course to fulfill the communications/ cultural differences when interacting with others.
upper-level advanced writing requirement
U LGST 320 Criminal Law and Procedures 3
t Research, plan, and develop processes and procedures that
or other general practice procedure and skills course ensure organizational performance.
for the major
U LGST 312 Torts 3 Degree Requirements
or other general practice substantive law course
for the major A degree with a major in management studies requires the
U LGST 325 Litigation 3 successful completion of 120 credits of coursework, including
or other procedure and skills course for the major 36 credits for the major; 41 credits in general education require-
U LGST 315 Domestic Relations 3 ments; and 43 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree
or other substantive law course for the major requirements. At least 18 credits in the major must be earned in
U LGST 322 Evidence 3 upper-level courses (numbered 300 or above).
or other procedure and skills course for the major
U LGST 316 Estates and Probate 3
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MANAGEMENT STUDIES MAJOR
or other substantive law course for the major
U LGST 486A or 486B Legal Studies Internship Through Co-op 3 Coursework for a major in management studies includes the following:
or other supplemental major course t Required foundation courses (12 credits): BMGT 110 (or prior business
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits experience and an additional supplemental course), ACCT 220, ECON
along with required major courses) 40 201 (or 203), and STAT 230
t Required core courses (6 credits): BMGT 364 and HRMN 302
Total credits for BS in legal studies 120 t Supplemental major courses (18 credits): Any ACCT, BMGT, ENMT,
'*/$ '4$/ )3./ .(45 BOE.3,5DPVSTFT
t Required related course (3 credits), which may be applied anywhere in

Management Studies
UIFEFHSFF"$$5PS*'4.

RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
Students may seek an academic major in management studies. The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in
management studies. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since
some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting
Major in Management Studies courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to
The management studies major provides an interdisciplinary meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever
and holistic approach to developing skills and knowledge in taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where
decision making, problem solving, and leadership. The curricu- allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts
lum includes a foundation in business, accounting, economics, and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sci-
ences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
statistics, communications, and management theory and focuses
on analysis and decision making across a wide spectrum of man-
agement activities. The major prepares students for a variety of Management Studies Degree Courses Credits
management-related careers.
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
Intended Program Outcomes
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
The student who graduates with a major in management studies (strongly recommended as first course)
will be able to LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
t Apply leadership skills to promote communication, ethical WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
behavior, and quality performance. ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or a higher-level math course
t Implement appropriate employment practices, encourage team
U BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3
building, and mentor junior members of the staff. (students with business experience should substitute
t Effectively communicate with culturally diverse audiences a supplemental major course in the last 60 credits
using a variety of formats and technology. of study)

66 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits) U HRMN 302 Organizational Communication 3
GVPT 170 American Government 3 U MRKT 310 Marketing Principles 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, or other supplemental major course
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or U'*/$ #VTJOFTT'JOBODF 
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and or other supplemental major course
social sciences requirement
U HRMN 300 Human Resource Management 3
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 or other supplemental major course
and NSCI 101 Physical Science Laboratory 1 U BMGT 392 Global Business Management 3
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical or other supplemental major course
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
U BMGT 496 Business Ethics 3
U ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 or other supplemental major course
or ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics U BMGT 495 Strategic Management 3
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 or other supplemental major course
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
Minor and Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
requirement
along with required major courses) 40
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software Total credits for BS in management studies 120
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
or a foreign language course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement Marketing
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
Students may seek either an academic major or minor in
U STAT 230 Business Statistics 3
marketing.
or STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
U ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting I 3
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 Major in Marketing
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology The marketing major prepares students with the marketing skills
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ and business acumen necessary for professional and personal
from first) success in today’s global business environment. The curriculum
BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 provides a balanced course of study that exposes students to a
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy common body of knowledge and leads them to understand mar-
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical keting processes and situations, think independently, communi-
sciences lecture requirement cate effectively, and appreciate their own and other cultures.
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 Students with a major in marketing will be well-positioned to
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 enter a broad spectrum of marketing positions in private and pub-
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts lic corporations, marketing agencies, or entrepreneurial endeavors.
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  Intended Program Outcomes
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers The student who graduates with a major in marketing will be
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement able to
*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT  t Apply marketing knowledge and skills to meet organizational
or ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems goals through analytic and managerial techniques related to
(related requirement for the major; also fulfills the customers, executives, finance, information technology, law,
interdisciplinary issues/computing requirement; operational domains, and customer relations.
students should note prerequisites)
t Employ strategic marketing skills, including scenario plan-
U BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3
ning, market intelligence, customer profiles, marketing plans,
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and and competitive analysis, to respond to organizational market-
foundation courses) ing challenges.
WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 67
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
t Conduct research, analyze data, create an effective marketing WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
plan, and support decisions that meet the needs and wants of ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
global customers. or a higher-level math course
BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3
t Utilize verbal and nonverbal communication skills, includ-
(strongly recommended elective for students with
ing strategic communication, technology, fluency in business no prior business experience)
language, and effective customer communication, to achieve
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
personal and organizational goals.
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
t Act with personal and professional integrity, conveying an (related requirement for the major; also fulfills the
ethical orientation in the global marketplace of employers, first behavioral and social sciences requirement)
peers, and customers. NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
t Cultivate and maintain positive interpersonal relationships and NSCI 101 Physical Science Laboratory 1
based on demonstrated character, behavior, engagement, and or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
positive interaction with teams, managers, and customers. sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
Degree Requirements requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
A degree with a major in marketing requires the successful
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 36 credits
U STAT 230 Business Statistics 3
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
43 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
or a foreign language course
At least 18 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
courses (numbered 300 or above). PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MARKETING MAJOR Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
Coursework for a major in marketing includes the following: PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
t Required business courses (15 credits): ACCT 221 (or 301); BMGT or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
364, 380, and 496; and STAT 230 or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
t Required marketing courses (12 credits): MRKT 310, 410, 412, and 454
from first)
t Supplemental major courses (6 credits): Any MRKT courses
BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
t Required capstone course (3 credits): MRKT 495
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
t Required related courses (9 credits), which may be applied anywhere in or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
UIFEFHSFF"$$5 PS*'4.
BOE&$0/BOE sciences lecture requirement
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
marketing. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some recom- and humanities requirement in historical perspective
mended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses for (discipline must differ from other humanities course)
those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet degree ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics 3
requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage (related requirement for the major)
of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill U ACCT 301 Accounting for Nonaccounting Majors 3
general education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities, or ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II
behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics, (students should note prerequisite)
and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8. 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
Marketing Degree Courses Credits or speech requirement
U BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
*'4. *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT 
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
or ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 (related requirement for the major; fulfills the
(strongly recommended as first course) interdisciplinary issues/computing requirement;
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 students should note prerequisite)

68 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
U MRKT 310 Marketing Principles
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
3
Mathematical Sciences
foundation courses) Students may seek an academic minor in mathematical sciences.
WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
upper-level advanced writing requirement Minor in Mathematical Sciences
U BMGT 380 Business Law I 3
U MRKT 354 Integrated Marketing Communications 3
The mathematical sciences minor complements the skills the
or other supplemental major course student gains in his or her major discipline by developing skills
U MRKT 395 Managing Customer Relationships 3 in solving mathematical problems and addressing complex and
or other supplemental major course technical materials and by providing a mathematical background
U MRKT 410 Consumer Behavior 3 to support study in other areas, such as business and manage-
U BMGT 496 Business Ethics 3 ment, computer and information technology, and the biological
U MRKT 454 Global Marketing 3 and social sciences.
U MRKT 412 Marketing Research Applications 3
Capstone Course for Major (to be taken in the last 15 credits) Requirements for the Minor
U MRKT 495 Marketing Policies and Strategy 3 A minor in mathematical sciences requires the completion of
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits 17 credits of coursework in mathematics. All MATH courses
along with required major courses) 34 numbered 130 or above apply.
Total credits for BS in marketing 120 Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
major or general education) may not be applied toward the
minor. At least 6 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
Minor in Marketing (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
The marketing minor complements the skills the student gains in 'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
his or her major discipline by enhancing the knowledge and skills students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
related to marketing situations and processes and the emerging
global marketplace.

Requirements for the Minor


A minor in marketing requires the completion of 15 credits of
coursework in marketing. All MRKT courses apply. It is recom-
mended that students take MRKT 310 as the first course in the
minor (if they have not already applied the course toward other
degree requirements).
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
major or general education) may not be applied toward the
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 69
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA

Microbiology Natural Science


Students may seek an academic minor in microbiology. Students may seek an academic minor in natural science.

Minor in Microbiology Minor in Natural Science


The microbiology minor complements the skills the student The natural science minor complements the skills the student
gains in his or her major discipline by providing a laboratory- gains in his or her major by providing an underlying scientific
based approach to the study of microorganisms, with applica- basis upon which to build a career in natural science, life science,
tions to biotechnology, molecular and cellular biology, research physical science, and the allied health fields, as well as bioinfor-
and development, and public health. matics, environmental management, science journalism, and
science education.
Requirements for the Minor
Requirements for the Minor
A minor in microbiology requires the completion of 15 credits
of coursework in microbiology, drawn from various disciplines as A minor in natural science requires the completion of 17 credits
appropriate. of coursework in natural science, chosen from any courses in
Students must take one course from the following: astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, natural science, and
physics.
BIOL 230 General Microbiology
BIOL 331 Concepts in Microbiology Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
BIOL 430–439 Advanced microbiology series major or general education) may not be applied toward the
Students may choose the remaining courses from those above minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
and the following: (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
BIOL 220 Human Genetics 'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
BIOL 222 Principles of Genetics students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
BIOL 301 Human Health and Disease
BIOL 305 The Biology of AIDS
#*0-
BIOL 330–339
BIOL 350
'PSFOTJD#JPMPHZ
Applied microbiology series
Molecular and Cellular Biology
Philosophy
BIOL 356 Molecular Biology Laboratory Students may seek an academic minor in philosophy.
BIOL 400 Life Science Seminar
BIOL 486A or 486B Internship in Life Science Through Co-op
Minor in Philosophy
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
The philosophy minor complements the skills the student gains
major or general education) may not be applied toward the
in his or her major discipline by providing a study of the rela-
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
tionships between personal opinions and real-world issues faced
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
by members of a pluralistic, open society.
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. Requirements for the Minor
A minor in philosophy requires the completion of 15 credits of
coursework in philosophy. All PHIL courses apply. It is recom-
mended that students take PHIL 140 and a course in critical
thinking or logic, such as PHIL 110 or 170 (if they have not
already applied the courses toward other degree requirements).
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
major or general education) may not be applied toward the
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.

70 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Political Science REQUIREMENTS FOR THE POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR
Coursework for a major in political science includes the following:

Students may seek an academic major or minor in political t Required foundation course (3 credits): GVPT 100
science. t Core courses (15 credits): GVPT 101 (or 444), 170 (or 475), 200 (or
401), and 280 and STAT 200 (Note minimum requirements for upper-
level coursework.)
Major in Political Science t Supplemental major courses (12 credits): Any upper-level GVPT courses
A major in political science provides students with valuable,
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
comprehensive knowledge of American government and global
politics, preparing them to analyze complex political problems The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS
and recognize potential solutions in both the public and private in political science. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since
sector. Students gain an understanding of political structure, some recommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting
courses for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to
theory, and methodology. They develop their research skills
meet degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever
and sense of intellectual property using libraries, archives, and
taking advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where
online sources. They develop their writing skills and learn the allowable) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts
responsibility for clearly presenting and interpreting political and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sci-
issues using the language of the discipline. Students with a major ences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
in political science will be able to analyze complex political prob-
lems and recognize potential solutions in both the public and
private sectors. Political Science Degree Courses Credits

First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)


Intended Program Outcomes Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.

The student who graduates with a major in political science will EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3
be able to (strongly recommended as first course)
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
t Analyze and participate in the formulation and implemen-
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
tation of public policy at the local, state, federal, and inter-
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
national level by building consensus and using effective or a higher-level math course
lobbying techniques. U GVPT 100 Introduction to Political Science 3
t Participate in and/or influence government at all levels
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
through an understanding of the establishment, structure,
SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology 3
and interaction of such governmental institutions. or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
t Use effective writing, research, analysis, advocacy, and PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
coalition-building skills to develop and influence policy at the WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
national and international levels. social sciences requirement
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
t Conduct, analyze, and evaluate theoretical and empirical
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
research for specific problems to affect domestic and inter-
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
national policy by applying political theory, systems, and or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
processes in organizational environments. sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
t Apply knowledge of ethical principles and issues to public- WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
policy and politics. or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
Degree Requirements
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
A degree with a major in political science requires the successful PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 30 credits or a foreign language course
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements. PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement
At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level
U GVPT 280 Comparative Politics and Government 3
courses (numbered 300 or above).

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 71
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits) Requirements for the Minor
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
A minor in political science requires the completion of 15 credits
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts of coursework in government and politics. All GVPT courses
and humanities requirement in historical perspective apply. It is recommended that students take GVPT 100, 101,
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) or 170 as the first course in the minor (if they have not already
U GVPT 170 American Government 3 applied the course toward other degree requirements).
or GVPT 475 The Presidency and the Executive Branch
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
major or general education) may not be applied toward the
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
from first) (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 'PSBMJTUPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF TUV-
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy dents should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement
U GVPT 200 International Political Relations 3
or GVPT 401
41$)
Problems of World Politics
'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
Psychology
or COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts Students may seek either an academic major or minor in psy-
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
chology.
or speech requirement
U STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics 3
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF  Major in Psychology
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/
computing requirement The psychology major provides students with a knowledge base
of theory, research, and practice in psychological sciences. The
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
curriculum enables students to use the principles of psychology
foundation courses)
and prepares students for graduate study or for careers in profes-
WRTG 391/391X Advanced Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
sions for which psychological training is crucial.
upper-level advanced writing requirement
U GVPT 444 American Political Theory 3 Intended Program Outcomes
or GVPT 101 Introduction to Political Theory
The student who graduates with a major in psychology will
U GVPT 403 Law, Morality, and War 3
or other supplemental major course
be able to
U GVPT 406 Global Terrorism 3 t Apply major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical find-
or other supplemental major course ings, and historical trends in psychology to prepare for graduate
U(715 "NFSJDBO'PSFJHO1PMJDZ  studies or careers in which psychological training is relevant.
or other supplemental major course t Apply basic knowledge of research methodology, statistics,
U GVPT 404 Democratization 3 measurement, guidelines, ethical standards, laws, and regula-
or other supplemental major course
tions to design, participate in, and evaluate research in a
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits along variety of contexts.
with required major courses) 46 t Apply knowledge of human behavior to inform personal
Total credits for BS in political science 120 growth, communicate effectively, solve problems, make
decisions, and interact with individuals, communities,
and organizations.
Minor in Political Science t Use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and
(where possible) appropriate technology and the scientific
The political science minor complements the skills the student
approach to solve problems related to current and emerging
gains in his or her major discipline by providing systematic study
trends within the domains of psychology.
of politics and government. It exposes the student to the basic
concepts, theories, policies, and the role of government at local, t Value diversity and different perspectives, tolerate ambiguity,
state, and national levels in domestic and foreign settings. and act ethically to communicate appropriately with various
sociocultural and international populations.

72 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Degree Requirements Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
A degree with a major in psychology requires the successful or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 33 credits or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
46 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements. WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
At least 17 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level or other course to fulfill the communications/
courses (numbered 300 or above). writing requirement
U PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
Coursework for a major in psychology includes the following:
SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology 3
t Required foundation courses (9 credits): PSYC 100 and 305 and or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
STAT 225 PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
t Natural science psychology courses (6 credits): Chosen from BIOL 362 WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
and PSYC 301, 310, 315, 341, and 441 social sciences requirement
t Social science psychology courses (6 credits): Chosen from PSYC 321, U STAT 225 Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology 3
345, 351, 354, 355, 357, 361, and 424 or STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
t Clinical science psychology courses (6 credits): Chosen from PSYC 353, Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
432, 435, 436, and 437 GVPT 170 American Government 3
t Supplemental major courses (6 credits): Any PSYC courses (but no more or GERO 100 Introduction to Gerontology
than three 1-credit courses) or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE from first)
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
psychology. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some recom- or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
mended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses for or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement
those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet degree
requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
general education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities, or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics,
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
*'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/
Psychology Degree Courses Credits computing requirement
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) (recommended elective)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 or COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts
(strongly recommended as first course) or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
U PSYC 305 Research Methods in Psychology 3
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT  Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory and
or a higher-level math course foundation courses)
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits) WRTG 391/391X Advanced Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 upper-level advanced writing requirement
or a foreign language course U PSYC 321 Social Psychology 3
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, or other social science psychology course
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill for the major
the arts and humanities requirement
U PSYC 301 Biological Basis of Behavior 3
or other natural science psychology course
for the major

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 73
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
U PSYC 353 Abnormal Psychology
or other clinical science psychology course
for the major
3
Social Science
U PSYC 354 Cross-Cultural Psychology 3 Students may seek an academic major in social science.
or other social science psychology course
for the major
U PSYC 310 Sensation and Perception 3 Major in Social Science
or other natural science psychology course
for the major The social science major provides breadth of knowledge in the
U PSYC 432 Introduction to Counseling Psychology 3 social sciences through interdisciplinary study in areas such
or other clinical science psychology course as anthropology, behavioral sciences, economics, gerontology,
for the major government and politics, psychology, and sociology and depth
U PSYC 355 Child Psychology 3 through focused study in a single area. It also offers depth and
or other supplemental major course focus through selection of core courses in one social science
U PSYC 341 Introduction to Memory and Cognition 3 area. Graduates in social science may pursue a variety of careers
or other supplemental major course in which understanding of social science issues is important,
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits including business administration, elder care, government, health
along with required major courses) 40 services, law enforcement, human resources, and community
Recommended Electives service.
PSYC 415 History of Psychology
(for students who plan to go on to graduate school) Intended Program Outcomes
PSYC 451 Principles of Psychological Assessment
The student who graduates with a major in social science will
Total credits for BS in psychology 120 be able to
t Analyze issues, identify improvements, and recommend solu-
tions using statistics, data analysis, and appropriate quantita-
Minor in Psychology tive and qualitative methods for social science research and/or
The psychology minor complements the skills the student gains program evaluation.
in his or her major discipline by investigating the nature of mind t Communicate effectively to professional and nonprofessional
and behavior, including the biological basis of behavior, percep- individuals and groups through an appropriate media to
tion, memory and cognition, the influence of environmental and provide information about social science research, services, or
social forces on the individual, personality, lifespan development programs.
and adjustment, research methods, and statistical analysis.
t Apply an understanding of the relationship between micro-
and macro-level problems and issues to identify and evaluate
Requirements for the Minor
individual and community needs.
A minor in psychology requires the completion of 15 credits of t Analyze complex social problems and work towards realistic
coursework in psychology. solutions using diversity awareness and global multicultural
Students must choose one of the following foundation courses: perspectives.
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology t Recognize and apply ethical principles and standards to sup-
PSYC 305 Research Methods in Psychology port the professional responsibilities and conduct of social
STAT 225 Introduction to Statistical Methods in Psychology scientists in the workplace.
They must also choose one natural science psychology course, t Apply critical and creative thinking, information literacy, tech-
one social science psychology course, and one clinical science nology, and an interdisciplinary perspective to solve practical
psychology course from those listed under the requirements problems in the social sciences
for the major. The remaining course may be chosen from any
PSYC course. Degree Requirements
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g., A degree with a major in social science requires the successful
major or general education) may not be applied toward the completion of 120 credits of coursework, including 30 credits
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses for the major; 41 credits in general education requirements; and
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses. 49 credits in the minor, electives, and other degree requirements.
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF  At least 15 credits in the major must be earned in upper-level
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. courses (numbered 300 or above).

74 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE SOCIAL SCIENCE MAJOR *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
Coursework for a major in social science includes the following: or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
t Required statistics course (3 credits): STAT 230 (or 200 or 225)
or a foreign language course
t Required introductory courses (6 credits): BEHS 210 and SOCY 100 or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
t 'PVOEBUJPODPVSTF DSFEJUT
$IPTFOGSPN$$+4 &$0/BOE PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
203, GEOG 100 and 110, GERO 100, GVPT 100, and PSYC 100 the arts and humanities requirement
t Core courses (9 credits in a single area): Chosen from applicable 3-credit PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
CCJS courses (350, 360, 454, and 461); any 3-credit ANTH and SOCY or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
courses; any 3-credit GVPT courses; any 3-credit GERO courses; or any social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
3-credit PSYC courses (Note: Anthropology and sociology are considered from first)
to constitute a single area; in all other cases, courses must be chosen from U BEHS 210 Introduction to Social and Behavioral Science 3
a single discipline.)
Foundation Courses (to be taken within the first 60 credits)
t Supplemental major courses (9 credits): Chosen from any ANTH,
U STAT 230 Business Statistics 3
BEHS, ECON, GERO, GVPT, PSYC, and SOCY courses and CCJS
350, 360, 454, and 461 or STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the BS in sciences lecture requirement
social science. Coursework for the major is indicated by U. Since some rec-
U SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology 3
ommended courses fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
for those listed may make it necessary to take additional courses to meet
degree requirements. Students should consult an advisor whenever taking or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
advantage of other options. Information on alternate courses (where allow-
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
able) to fulfill general education requirements (in communications, arts and (discipline must differ from other humanities course)
humanities, behavioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences,
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
or COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
Social Science Degree Courses Credits or speech requirement
U GERO 100 Introduction to Gerontology 3
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) or ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. or other foundation course for the major
EDCP 100 Principles and Strategies of Successful Learning 3 *'4. &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF 
(strongly recommended as first course) or other course to fulfill the interdisciplinary issues/
computing requirement
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics 3
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
(recommended elective)
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or a higher-level math course Additional Required Courses (to be taken after introductory
and foundation courses)
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
WRTG 391/391X Advanced Expository and Research Writing 3
Note: General education courses may not be applied to major requirements.
or other course to fulfill the communications/
GVPT 170 American Government 3 upper-level advanced writing requirement
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
U The first of three core courses in a single area 3
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
(recommendations available on social science
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
degree planning worksheet)
social sciences requirement
U A second core course for the major 3
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
(in the same discipline as the first)
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
U A third core course for the major 3
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology (in the same discipline as the first and second)
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
U A supplemental major course 3
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
(recommendations available on social science
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 degree planning worksheet)
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
U A supplemental major course 3
requirement
U A supplemental major course 3

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 75
BACHELOR’S DEGREE CURRICULA
Minor and/or Elective Courses (to be taken in the last 60 credits
along with required major courses) 43 Speech Communication
Recommended Elective
&%51 1SPGFTTJPOBM'VOEBNFOUBMTPG5FBDIJOHBOE-FBSOJOH
Students may seek an academic minor in speech communication.
(for qualified students who plan to enter the MAT pro-
gram at UMUC; students should note prerequisites and
consult an advisor) Minor in Speech Communication
The minor in speech communication complements the skills
Total credits for BS in social science 120
the student gains in his or her major discipline by developing
communication skills, particularly oral communication, as well
as providing a greater understanding of human interaction in a

Sociology variety of personal and professional contexts.

Students may seek an academic minor in sociology. Requirements for the Minor
A minor in speech communication requires the completion of
15 credits of coursework in speech communication. All SPCH
Minor in Sociology and COMM courses apply, but at least 9 credits must be earned
The sociology minor complements the skills the student gains in in SPCH courses. It is recommended that students take COMM
his or her major discipline by providing a study of contemporary 300 and SPCH 100 as the first courses for the minor (if they
sociological theory and research and applying it to social issues, have not already applied the courses toward other degree
including globalization, social inequality, diversity, health care, requirements).
education, family, work, and religion.
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
major or general education) may not be applied toward the
Requirements for the Minor minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
A minor in sociology requires the completion of 15 credits of (numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
coursework in sociology. All SOCY courses apply. Students Note: Students should have taken SPCH 100 or have compa-
should take SOCY 100 as the first course in the minor (if they rable public speaking experience before enrolling in courses for
have not already applied the course toward other degree require- the speech communication minor.
ments).
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g., students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.
major or general education) may not be applied toward the
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.

76 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Strategic and Women’s Studies
Entrepreneurial Students may seek an academic minor in women’s studies.

Management Minor in Women’s Studies


Students may seek an academic minor in strategic and entrepre- The women’s studies minor complements the skills the student
neurial management. gains in his or her major discipline by providing an interdisci-
plinary study of the history, status, and experiences of women.

Minor in Strategic and Requirements for the Minor


Entrepreneurial Management
A minor in women’s studies requires the completion of 15 credits
The strategic and entrepreneurial management minor comple- of coursework in women’s studies, chosen from the following
ments the skills the student gains in his or her major discipline courses:
by providing a study of current issues in the effective use of
WMST Any courses
information, the globalization of business, and strategic man-
BEHS 220 Diversity Awareness
agement and by exploring the mind-set of an innovator and an
BEHS 343 Parenting Today
entrepreneur.
BEHS 453 Domestic Violence
BMGT 312 Women in Business
Requirements for the Minor BMGT 313 Women as Entrepreneurs
A minor in strategic and entrepreneurial management requires BMGT 314 Women as Leaders
the completion of 15 credits of coursework in strategic and BMGT 315 Gender Relations in Business
entrepreneurial management, chosen from the following courses: ENGL 354 American Women Writers Since 1900
BMGT 339 Government and Business Contracting ENGL 358 British Women Writers Since 1900
BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory GERO 311 Women and Aging
BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership HIST 375 Modern European Women’s History
BMGT 392 Global Business Management )*45 8PNFOBOEUIF'BNJMZJO"NFSJDBUP
BMGT 464 Organizational Behavior HIST 377 Women in America Since 1870
BMGT 495 Strategic Management PHIL 343 Sexual Morality
BMGT 496 Business Ethics PHIL 346 Contemporary Sexual Ethics
'*/$ &OUSFQSFOFVSTIJQBOE/FX7FOUVSF1MBOOJOH PSYC 334 Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships
HRMN 302 Organizational Communication PSYC 338 Psychology of Gender
SOCY 325 The Sociology of Gender
Students are recommended to take BMGT 364 as the first course
40$: ɨF'BNJMZBOE4PDJFUZ
for the minor (if they have not already applied the course toward
SOCY 462 Women in the Military
other degree requirements).
SPCH 324 Communication and Gender
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g., Students are recommended to take WMST 200 as the first
major or general education) may not be applied toward the course for the minor (if they have not already applied the course
minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses toward other degree requirements).
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
Courses already applied toward other degree requirements (e.g.,
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF  major or general education) may not be applied toward the
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9. minor. At least 9 credits must be earned in upper-level courses
(numbered 300 or above). Prerequisites apply for all courses.
'PSBMJTUJOHPGBMMUIFSFRVJSFNFOUTGPSUIFCBDIFMPSTEFHSFF 
students should refer to their major and pp. 8–9.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 77
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
The curricula and courses listed below are available only to CURRICULA
active-duty military personnel and certain others who conform
to special stipulations.
General Curriculum
REQUIREMENTS
The Associate of Arts general curriculum is for adult students
who wish to pursue their own educational goals.
The Associate of Arts degree (AA) requires the completion of
a minimum of 60 credits, at least 15 of which must be taken REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GENERAL CURRICULUM
through UMUC. Of these 60 credits, 35 credits must be earned Students may choose related courses from several disciplines, explore several
in courses that fulfill the general education requirements listed interests at once, or choose a variety of courses from UMUC’s offerings.
below. The remaining 25 credits must satisfy the requirements of Students in this program accept responsibility for developing a curriculum
the curriculum the student has selected. that meets their intended learning outcomes. They are encouraged to seek
assistance from academic advisors in arranging their curriculum as appropri-
A grade point average of 2.0 or higher in all courses taken ate to their personal interests and future educational plans.
through UMUC is required. A student should complete one
associate’s degree before applying for another. RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the AA
General Education Requirements (35 credits) in general studies. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one
requirement, substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to
The general education requirements for the associate’s degree take additional courses to meet degree requirements. Students should con-
generally correspond to those for the bachelor’s degree (listed sult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on
on p. 8), with the following exception: The second comput- alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements
ing course and the upper-level advanced writing course are not (in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences,
required for the associate’s degree. biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues)
may be found on p. 8.

Curriculum Requirements (25 credits)


General Curriculum Courses Credits
In addition to the general education requirements, students
must take 25 credits of coursework related to their educational First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
goals. They may choose a general curriculum (described below) Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
or a specialized curriculum with its own particular requirements LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
(detailed on the following pages). Students must earn a grade of WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
$PSIJHIFSJOBMMDPSFPSDPSFSFMBUFEDVSSJDVMVNDPVSTFT'PS ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
the specialized curricula, at least 9 credits of coursework taken or a higher-level math course
through UMUC must be earned in core or core-related courses Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
for the chosen curriculum. Students who anticipate seeking a HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
bachelor’s degree should select courses that will advance that goal. or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts and
humanities requirement in historical perspective
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software

78 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
GVPT 170 American Government 3 Accounting Curriculum
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ACCOUNTING CURRICULUM
social sciences requirement Coursework for the accounting curriculum includes the following (students
Curriculum course (to be selected based on educational and career goals) 3 should note prerequisites and other sequencing requirements):
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after first and introductory t Required core courses (6 credits): ACCT 220 and 221
courses) t "EEJUJPOBMDPSFDPVSTFT DSFEJUT
"OZ"$$5 #.(5 '*/$ PS
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 MGST courses in accounting or finance (except MGST 140)
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology t Accounting-related courses (9 credits): Chosen from any ACCT and
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and '*/$DPVSTFT#.(5    BOE$.*4
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ $.45&$0/BOE*'4..3,5BOE
from first) STAT 200 (or 230)
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 t Elective (1 credit): Any course related to interests and goals
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
sciences lecture requirement
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the AA in
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
accounting. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one require-
or a foreign language course
ment, substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to take
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill additional courses to meet degree requirements. Students should consult
the arts and humanities requirement (discipline must an advisor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on
differ from other humanities course) alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  (in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences,
or JOUR 201 Writing for the Mass Media biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues)
or other course to fulfill the communications/ may be found on p. 8.
writing or speech requirement
Curriculum course (to be selected based on educational and career goals) 3
Accounting Curriculum Courses Credits
Curriculum course (to be selected based on educational and career goals) 3
Curriculum course (to be selected based on educational and career goals) 3 First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
Elective Courses (to be chosen from any courses to complete the Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
60 credits for the degree) 13 LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
Total credits for AA with general curriculum 60
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or a higher-level math course
U BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3
Specialized Curricula (recommended accounting-related course for the
curriculum for students with no prior business
The Associate of Arts specialized curricula are for adult students experience)
who wish to pursue a specific career or educational goal, often as U ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting I 3
a basis for further study toward the bachelor’s degree. Each of the
specialized curricula has its own requirements. In the following Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
curricula, coursework for the individual curriculum is indicated U ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II 3
by U. Students should take careful note of course prerequisites ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
and recommended course sequences. Curricula may be available or ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics
(required for BS in accounting)
only in limited geographic areas. or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible GERO or CCJS course
to fulfill the first behavioral and social sciences
requirement
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 79
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 Business and Management Curriculum
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BUSINESS
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
AND MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
Coursework for the business and management curriculum includes the
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after first and introductory
following:
courses)
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 t Core courses (15 credits): Chosen from BMGT 110 (required for
students with no previous business experience), ACCT 220 and 221,
or a foreign language course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, ECON 201 and 203, and STAT 230 (or 200)
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill t Management-related courses (6 credits): Chosen from any ACCT,
the arts and humanities requirement #.(5 $.*4 &$0/ '*/$ )3./ *'4. .(45 BOE
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 MRKT courses; any 3-credit CMST courses; GVPT 210; and
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology PSYC 321 and 361
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and t Electives (4 credits): Any courses related to interests and goals
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first) RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the AA in
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy business and management. Since some recommended courses fulfill more
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
than one requirement, substituting courses for those listed may make it
sciences lecture requirement
necessary to take additional courses to meet degree requirements. Students
U A core course for the curriculum 3
should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other options.
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general educa-
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 tion requirements (in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisci-
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
plinary issues) may be found on p. 8.
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers Business and Management Curriculum Courses Credits
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
U BMGT 380 Business Law I 3 Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
or STAT 230 Business Statistics LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
or other accounting-related course
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
for the curriculum
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
U BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3
or a higher-level math course
or other accounting-related course
for the curriculum U BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3
(required core course for the curriculum for students
U A core course for the curriculum 3
with no prior business experience; also required
U A core course for the curriculum 3 for BS in business administration)
Elective Course (to be chosen from any course to complete the Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
60 credits for the degree) 1 ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
(required for BS in business administration;
Total credits for AA with accounting specialization 60 strongly recommended)
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement

80 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3 Computer Studies Curriculum
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE COMPUTER STUDIES CURRICULUM
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software Coursework for the computer studies curriculum includes the following:
U ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting I 3 t Required core courses (6 credits): CMIS 102 and 141 (or CMIS 170 or
(core course for the curriculum) other appropriate programming language course)
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3 t Additional core courses (6 credits): Chosen from CMIS 242 and 310,
or a foreign language course *'4. BOEBOZ$.45DPVSTFT VQUPDSFEJUT

or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC, t Computer studies–related course (3 credits): Any CMIS, CMST, CMIT,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill $.4$ $4*" PS*'4.DPVSTF
the arts and humanities requirement
t Electives (10 credits): Any courses related to interests and goals
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after first and introductory
courses) RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
U STAT 230 Business Statistics 3 The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the AA in
(core course for the curriculum)
computer studies. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 requirement, substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology take additional courses to meet degree requirements. Students should con-
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and sult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements
from first)
(in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences,
U ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II 3
biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues)
(core course for the curriculum)
may be found on p. 8.
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical Computer Studies Curriculum Courses Credits
sciences lecture requirement
U ECON 203 Introduction to Microeconomics 3 First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
(core course for the curriculum) Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
or a higher-level math course
(discipline must differ from other humanities course)
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers U CMIS 102 Introduction to Problem Solving and
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing Algorithm Design 3
or speech requirement (required for BS in computer studies; first
U Management-related course for the curriculum 3 required core course for the curriculum)
(course required for BS in business administration U CMIS 141 Introductory Programming 3
is recommended) (required core course for the curriculum)
U Management-related course for the curriculum 3 PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
(course required for BS in business administration or a foreign language course
is recommended) or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
Elective Courses (to be chosen from any courses to complete PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement
the 60 credits for the degree—courses applicable to the BS in
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
business administration are recommended) 4
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
Total credits for AA with business and management specialization 60 or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 81
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
U CMIS 242 Intermediate Programming 3 Criminal Justice Curriculum
(required for BS in computer studies)
or other core course for the curriculum
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE CURRICULUM
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing Coursework for the criminal justice curriculum includes the following:
requirement t Core courses (12 credits): Any CCJS courses
GVPT 170 American Government 3 t Electives (13 credits): Any courses related to interests and goals
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE
social sciences requirement The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the AA
in criminal justice. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after first and introductory
requirement, substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to
courses)
take additional courses to meet degree requirements. Students should con-
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
sult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
(in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences,
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues)
from first)
may be found on p. 8.
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical Criminal Justice Curriculum Courses Credits
sciences lecture requirement
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865 Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or a higher-level math course
or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing U CCJS 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
or speech requirement or CCJS 105 Introduction to Criminology
U Additional core course for the curriculum 3 or other core course for the curriculum
U Additional computer studies–related course for the curriculum 3 Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
Elective Courses (chosen from any courses to complete 60 credits for the GVPT 170 American Government 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
degree—CMIS, CMST, or IFSM courses that may be applied to the BS in
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
computer studies are recommended) 10 WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
Total credits for AA with computer studies specialization 60
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
U CCJS 230 Criminal Law in Action 3
or other core course for the curriculum
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
or a foreign language course
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement

82 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after first and Foreign Language Area Studies Curriculum Courses Credits
introductory courses)
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits)
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses.
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and social LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
sciences requirement (discipline must differ from first) WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3 ."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy or a higher-level math course
or other course to fulfill the biological and physical U Language core course (numbered 111) for the curriculum 3
sciences lecture requirement
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
and humanities requirement in historical perspective or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
(discipline must differ from other humanities course) or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO  sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
or COMM 380 Language in Social Contexts WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement requirement
U CCJS 320 Introduction to Criminalistics 3 *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or other core course for the curriculum or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
U CCJS 350 Juvenile Delinquency 3 HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
or other core course for the curriculum or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
Elective Courses (chosen from any courses to complete 60 credits for
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
the degree—courses that may be applied to the BS in criminal justice
U Language core course (numbered 112) for the curriculum 3
are recommended) 13
U Language core course (numbered 114) for the curriculum 3
Total credits for AA with criminal justice specialization 60 GVPT 200 International Political Relations 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
Foreign Language Area Studies Curriculum WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
U Language core course (numbered 115) for the curriculum 3
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE FOREIGN LANGUAGE
AREA STUDIES CURRICULUM Additional Required Courses (to be taken after first and introductory
courses)
Coursework for the foreign language area studies curriculum includes the
following (see also the specific requirements for each language area): U Related area studies course for the curriculum 3
U Related area studies course for the curriculum 3
t Language core courses (12 credits): Sequential courses in a single lan-
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
guage, usually numbered 111–112 and 114–115 (or 211–212)
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
t Related area studies courses (12 credits): Any courses in the culture, or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
history, language, literature, or government and politics of the area sciences lecture requirement
(see specific courses for each language area) ANTH 102 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural
t Elective (1 credit): Any courses related to interests and goals Anthropology and Linguistics 3
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the AA in from first)
foreign language area studies if the appropriate core and related courses for U Related area studies course for the curriculum 3
the specific language area are selected. Since some recommended courses PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
fulfill more than one requirement, substituting courses for those listed may or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
make it necessary to take additional courses to meet degree requirements. PHIL, THET, dance, literature, or foreign language
Students should consult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other course to fulfill the arts and humanities requirement
options. Information on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general (discipline must differ from other humanities course)
education requirements (in communications, arts and humanities, behav- 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
ioral and social sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and or other course to fulfill the communications/
interdisciplinary issues) may be found on p. 8. writing or speech requirement

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 83
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
U Related area studies course for the curriculum 3 *'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
Elective Course (to be chosen from any courses to complete the
CCJS 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
60 credits for the degree) 1
or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
Total credits for AA with foreign language area studies specialization 60 or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first)
Legal Studies Curriculum Additional Required Courses (to be taken after first and introductory
courses)
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE LEGAL STUDIES CURRICULUM HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
Coursework for the legal studies curriculum includes the following: or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
t Required core courses (12 credits): LGST 101, 200, 201, and 204
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
t Legal studies–related courses (6 credits): Any LGST courses (discipline must differ from other humanities course)
t Electives (7 credits): Any courses related to interests and goals NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the AA sciences lecture requirement
in legal studies. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
requirement, substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to or WRTG 390 Writing for Managers
take additional courses to meet degree requirements. Students should con- or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
sult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on or speech requirement
alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements U LGST 101 Introduction to Law 3
(in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, (required core course for the curriculum)
biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues) U LGST 200 Techniques of Legal Research 3
may be found on p. 8. (required core course for the curriculum)
U LGST 201 Legal Writing 3
(required core course for the curriculum)
Legal Studies Curriculum Courses Credits U LGST 204 Legal Ethics 3
(required core course for the curriculum)
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) U LGST 320 Criminal Law and Procedures 3
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. (or other legal studies–related course
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 for the curriculum)
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 U LGST 312 Torts 3
(or other legal studies–related course
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT 
for the curriculum)
or a higher-level math course
Elective Courses (to be chosen from any courses to complete
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
60 credits for the degree—courses that may be applied to the
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
or a foreign language course BS in legal studies are recommended) 7
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill Total credits for AA with legal studies specialization 60
the arts and humanities requirement
GVPT 170 American Government 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement

84 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Management Studies Curriculum WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MANAGEMENT STUDIES CURRICULUM
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
Coursework for the management studies curriculum includes the following: or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
t Management-related courses (15 credits): Chosen from any ACCT, PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
#.(5 $.*4 $.45 &$0/ '*/$ )3./ *'4. .(45 BOE or a foreign language course
MRKT courses; WRTG 390; GVPT 210; PSYC 321 and 361; and or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
STAT 230 (or 200) PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
t Electives (10 credits): Any courses related to interests and goals the arts and humanities requirement
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after first and introductory
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE courses)
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the AA in U STAT 230 Business Statistics 3
management studies. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than (recommended management-related course for the
one requirement, substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary curriculum; required for BS in management studies)
to take additional courses to meet degree requirements. Students should NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
consult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
on alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education require- or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
ments (in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences lecture requirement
sciences, biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3
issues) may be found on p. 8. or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
Management Studies Curriculum Courses Credits (discipline must differ from other humanities course)
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) or WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1 or speech requirement
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 U BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT  or MGST 160 Principles of Supervision
or a higher-level math course or other management-related course
for the curriculum
U BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management 3
(recommended management-related course U Management-related course for the curriculum 3
for the curriculum for students with no (course that may be applied to BS in management
prior business experience; also required for studies is recommended)
BS in business administration) U Management-related course for the curriculum 3
(course that may be applied to BS in management
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits) studies is recommended)
GVPT 170 American Government 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT, Elective Courses (chosen from any courses to complete 60 credits
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or for the degree—courses that may be applied to BS in management
WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and studies are recommended) 10
social sciences requirement
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3 Total credits for AA with management studies specialization 60
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
or ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics
(required for BS in management studies)
or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
from first)

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 85
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE
Mathematics Curriculum ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
or ECON 203 Principles of Microeconomics
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
Coursework for the mathematics curriculum includes the following: WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
social sciences requirement
t Required mathematics core courses (18–20 credits): MATH 130, 131,
and 132 (or 140 and 141); 240 (or 246); 241; and STAT 230 (or 200) U MATH 130 Calculus A 3
(required core course for the curriculum)
t Mathematics-related course (3 credits): Chosen from any ACCT or
U MATH 131 Calculus B 3
'*/$DPVSTFT$)&.BOE$.*4  PS$.4$

(required core course for the curriculum)
and 242; ECON 201, 203, 430, and 440; any MATH course numbered
U MATH 132 Calculus C 3
108 or higher; and PHYS 111 or higher
(required core course for the curriculum)
t Electives (2–4 credits): Any courses related to interests and goals
Additional Required Courses (to be taken after first and introductory
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE courses)
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the AA BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
in mathematics. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
requirement, substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement
take additional courses to meet degree requirements. Students should con-
sult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements or SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology
(in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues)
from first)
may be found on p. 8.
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
or a foreign language course
Mathematics Curriculum Courses Credits or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) the arts and humanities requirement (discipline
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. must differ from other humanities course)
41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 or speech requirement
MATH 107 College Algebra 3 U MATH 241 Calculus III 4
(fulfills general education requirement in mathematics) (required core course for the curriculum)
or a higher-level math course
U MATH 246 Differential Equations 3
Note: Courses applied to general education requirements may not be
or MATH 240 Introduction to Linear Algebra
applied to the major.
(required core course for the curriculum)
MATH 108 Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry 3 U STAT 230 Business Statistics 3
(prerequisite for later courses) or STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits) (required core course for the curriculum)
HIST 142 Western Civilization II 3 U A mathematics-related course for the curriculum 3
or HIST 157 History of the United States Since 1865
Total credits for AA with mathematics specialization 60
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts
and humanities requirement in historical perspective
NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
and NSCI 101 Physical Science Laboratory 1
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4UVEJFT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software

86 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Women’s Studies Curriculum GVPT 200 International Political Relations 3
or other ANTH, BEHS, ECON, GEOG, GVPT,
PSYC, SOCY, or eligible AASP, CCJS, GERO, or
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE WOMEN’S STUDIES CURRICULUM WMST course to fulfill the first behavioral and
Coursework for the women’s studies curriculum includes the following: social sciences requirement
U Women’s studies–related course for the curriculum 3
t Required core course (3 credits): WMST 200
t Women’s studies–related courses (15 credits): Chosen from ARTH 199U Additional Required Courses (to be taken after first and introductory
and 478, BEHS 220, PHIL 343, and related women’s studies and special courses)
topics courses (with prior approval) 41$) 'PVOEBUJPOTPG4QFFDI$PNNVOJDBUJPO 
t Electives (7 credits): Any courses related to interests and goals or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
or speech requirement
RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE U Women’s studies–related course for the curriculum 3
The following course sequence will fulfill all the requirements for the AA in NSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science 3
women’s studies. Since some recommended courses fulfill more than one or ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy
requirement, substituting courses for those listed may make it necessary to or other course to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture requirement
take additional courses to meet degree requirements. Students should con-
sult an advisor whenever taking advantage of other options. Information on ANTH 102 Introduction to Anthropology:
alternate courses (where allowable) to fulfill general education requirements Cultural Anthropology 3
(in communications, arts and humanities, behavioral and social sciences, or other course to fulfill the second behavioral and
social sciences requirement (discipline must differ
biological and physical sciences, mathematics, and interdisciplinary issues)
from first)
may be found on p. 8.
PHIL 140 Contemporary Moral Issues 3
or other ARTH, ARTT, HIST, HUMN, MUSC,
Women’s Studies Curriculum Courses Credits PHIL, THET, dance, or literature course to fulfill
the arts and humanities requirement (discipline must
First Courses (to be taken within the first 18 credits) differ from other humanities course)
Note: Placement tests are required for math and writing courses. U Women’s studies–related course for the curriculum 3
U Women’s studies–related course for the curriculum 3
LIBS 150 Information Literacy and Research Methods 1
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3 Electives Courses (chosen from any courses to complete
."5) 'JOJUF.BUIFNBUJDT  60 credits for the degree) 7
or a higher-level math course
Total credits for AA with women’s studies specialization 60
U WMST 200 Introduction to Women’s Studies:
Women and Society 3
(required core course for the curriculum)
Introductory Courses (to be taken within the first 30 credits)
Both BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology 3
and BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology 1
or BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology
or other course(s) to fulfill the biological and physical
sciences lecture and laboratory requirement
WRTG 291 Expository and Research Writing 3
or other course to fulfill the communications/writing
requirement
*'4. *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
or CMST 303 Advanced Application Software
HIST 141 Western Civilization I 3
or HIST 142 Western Civilization II
or other ARTH or HIST course to fulfill the arts and
humanities requirement in historical perspective
U BEHS 220 Diversity Awareness 3
or other women’s studies–related course
for the curriculum

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 87
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
To help nontraditional students meet their educational goals, REQUIREMENTS
UMUC offers a full range of certificate programs that respond to
current trends in today’s demanding job market. Certificate programs t Students pursuing certificate programs must be admitted as
offer working adults a convenient, flexible way to earn credentials for UMUC students.
career advancement. Many programs are available online. t Students are responsible for notifying UMUC of their inten-
The undergraduate certificate programs generally require 16 to tion to complete certificate work before completion of their last
21 credits (except for the certificate in Paralegal Studies, which course. (The application is available at https://my.umuc.edu.)
requires 60 credits). All courses for the certificate programs carry t Students may pursue a degree and certificate simultaneously
college credit and may be applied toward a degree. or pursue a degree after completing the certificate, but the
application for any certificate completed while in progress
toward the bachelor’s degree must be submitted before award
CURRICULA of the bachelor’s degree.
t Students may not use the same course toward completion of
In addition to the certificates listed below, some certificates more than one certificate. In cases where the same course is
are available only to active-duty military personnel and certain required for two certificates, the student must replace that
others who conform to special stipulations. course with an approved substitute for the second certificate.
Accounting—Introductory t No more than half of the total credits for any certificate may
Accounting—Advanced be earned through credit by examination, prior-learning
Applied Behavioral and Social Sciences portfolio credit, internship/cooperative education credit, or
Business Project Management transfer credit from other schools.
Clinical Mental Health Care t Certificates consisting primarily of upper-level coursework
Computer Graphics and Design may assume prior study in that area. Students should check
prerequisites for certificate courses. Prerequisites for certificate
Computer Networking
courses may be satisfied by coursework, credit by examination,
Criminal Justice Intelligence
or prior-learning portfolio credit, under current policies for
Database Design and Implementation such credit.
Database Management t At least half of the total credits for any certificate must be
Desktop Publishing earned through graded coursework.
Diversity Awareness t Students must complete all required coursework for the
'JOBODJBM.BOBHFNFOU certificate with a minimum grade of C (2.0) in all courses.
'SBVE*OWFTUJHBUJPO Certificate courses may not be taken pass/fail.
Game Development The individual certificate coursework requirements specified in
Health Issues for the Aging Adult the following section are applicable to students enrolling on or
Human Development after August 1, 2010. However, should certificate requirements
Human Resource Management change, students must either complete these requirements within
two years of the change or fulfill the new requirements.
Information Assurance
Information Management
Internet Technologies
.BOBHFNFOU'PVOEBUJPOT
Object-Oriented Design and Programming
Paralegal Studies
Project Management for IT Professionals
Terrorism and Institutions: Prevention and Response
UNIX System Administration
Visual Basic Programming
Web Design
Workplace Communications
Workplace Spanish

88 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
CERTIFICATE DESCRIPTIONS
Accounting—Advanced
Unless otherwise specified, course sequences for each certifi-
cate suggest but do not require that courses be taken in a The advanced accounting certificate is designed to meet the
prescribed order. needs of accounting professionals who want to enhance their
accounting skills. Before starting the certificate program,
students are encouraged to take courses in economics, basic
mathematics, and statistics in addition to fulfilling all prerequi-
Accounting—Introductory sites. With appropriate choice of courses, this certificate may be
completed while pursuing the Bachelor of Science in accounting.
The introductory accounting certificate is designed to meet the
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
needs of nonaccounting personnel and managers who feel they
require knowledge of accounting to advance in their professions.
It can also be used by individuals who are interested in pursuing Accounting—Advanced
new careers in accounting and need to learn the major elements. Certificate Requirements Credits
Students without a background in economics, basic mathemat-
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
ics, and statistics are encouraged to take courses in those subjects
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
before starting the certificate program. With appropriate choice
of courses, this certificate may be completed while pursuing the Four required courses:
Bachelor of Science in accounting. ACCT 310 Intermediate Accounting I 3
ACCT 311 Intermediate Accounting II 3
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. "$$5  'FEFSBM*ODPNF5BY** 
ACCT 422 Auditing Theory and Practice 3
Accounting—Introductory A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
Certificate Requirements Credits ACCT 321 Cost Accounting
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites "$$5  'FEFSBM*ODPNF5BY*
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses. ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems
ACCT 410 Accounting for Government and
Four required courses:
Not-for-Profit Organizations
ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting I 3
ACCT 411 Ethics and Professionalism in Accounting
ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II 3
ACCT 424 Advanced Accounting
ACCT 321 Cost Accounting 3
ACCT 425 International Accounting
"$$5  'FEFSBM*ODPNF5BY* 
ACCT 426 Advanced Cost Accounting
One supporting elective chosen from the following: 3 ACCT 427 Advanced Auditing
ACCT 310 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT 436 Internal Auditing
ACCT 311 Intermediate Accounting II '*/$  #VTJOFTT'JOBODF
ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
ACCT 328 Accounting Software
ACCT 426 Advanced Cost Accounting Total credits for certificate in Accounting—Advanced 18
ACCT 486A Internship in Accounting
'*/$  #VTJOFTT'JOBODF
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3

Total credits for certificate in Accounting—Introductory 18

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 89
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Applied Behavioral Business Project


and Social Sciences Management
The certificate in applied behavioral and social sciences is The business project management certificate prepares students
designed to provide a range of skills and knowledge in the behav- for supervisory and midlevel management positions involving
ioral and social sciences. The key ideas and methods of various project management and team management. It enables project
disciplines within the behavioral and social sciences are explored managers, project team members, and other employees assigned
to gain an understanding of contemporary social and cultural to project teams within a private- or public-sector organization
JTTVFT'PDVTJTPOQSBDUJDBMBQQMJDBUJPOTɨFDFSUJëDBUFJTVTFGVM to upgrade their skills with the theory and practical knowledge
for students seeking career opportunities and/or graduate study in needed to advance to a higher level.
social work, human services, and public health. With appropri- Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
ate selection of courses, this certificate may be completed while
pursuing the Bachelor of Science in social science.
Business Project Management
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. Certificate Requirements Credits

Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites


Applied Behavioral and Social Sciences
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
Certificate Requirements Credits
Three required courses:
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses. BMGT 487 Project Management I 3
Three required courses: BMGT 488 Project Management II 3
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
BIOL 160 Human Biology 3 ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting I
PSYC 351 Lifespan Development Psychology 3 ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II
A statistics course chosen from the following: 3 BMGT 304 Managing E-Commerce in Organizations
STAT 200 Introduction to Statistics BMGT 317 Problem Solving for Managers
STAT 225 Introduction to Statistical Methods BMGT 339 Government and Business Contracting
in Psychology BMGT 366 Global Public Management
STAT 230 Business Statistics '*/$  #VTJOFTT'JOBODF
A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3 '*/$  3JTL.BOBHFNFOU
ANTH 350 Medical Anthropology HRMN 363 Negotiation Strategies
BEHS 320 Disability Studies WRTG 494 Grant and Proposal Writing
BEHS 343 Parenting Today A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
BEHS 364 Alcohol in U.S. Society
A third supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
BEHS 453 Domestic Violence
GERO 306 Programs, Services, and Policies Total credits for certificate in Business Project Management 18
PSYC 305 Research Methods in Psychology
PSYC 432 Introduction to Counseling Psychology
A Cooperative Education internship in the social sciences
(ANTH, BEHS, GERO, PSYC, or SOCY 486A)
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3

Total credits for certificate in


Applied Behavioral and Social Sciences 18

90 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Clinical Mental Health Care Computer Graphics
The clinical mental health care certificate is designed to meet
the needs of individuals who currently work or desire to work
and Design
in mental health care settings. The program focuses on mental The computer graphics and design certificate is for students who
health disorders, diagnostic procedures, and treatment proto- seek to develop design and composition skills in a computer
cols. It is designed to better prepare students to work in clinical environment. Emphasis is on integrating effective design prin-
settings (such as hospitals, outpatient clinics, and nonprofit ciples with Internet applications and mixed media.
outreach programs) under the supervision of a licensed psycholo-
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
gist or medical doctor. With appropriate choice of courses, the
certificate may be completed while pursuing the Bachelor of
Science in psychology. Computer Graphics and Design
Certificate Requirements Credits
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
Clinical Mental Health Care may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
Certificate Requirements Credits Four required courses:
ARTT 250 Elements of Commercial Design 3
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites ARTT 354 Elements of Computer Graphics 3
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses. ARTT 479 Advanced Computer Graphics 3
Five required courses: CMST 386 Advanced Internet and Web Design 3
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3 A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
PSYC 353 Abnormal Psychology 3 CMST 310 Electronic Publishing
PSYC 435 Personality Theories 3 CMST 311 Advanced Electronic Publishing
PSYC 436 Introduction to Clinical Psychology 3 CMST 450 Web Design with XML
PSYC 451 Principles of Psychological Assessment 3 COMM 493 Strategies for Visual Communication

A supporting elective or electives totaling 3 credits chosen from A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
the following: 3
Total credits for certificate in Computer Graphics and Design 18
PSYC 301 Biological Basis of Behavior
PSYC 307X Substance Abuse: An Introduction
PSYC 309C Psychology of Eating Disorders
PSYC 309X Ethics in Mental Health and
Psychological Treatment
PSYC 310 Sensation and Perception
PSYC 405 Principles of Behavior Modification

Total credits for certificate in Clinical Mental Health Care 18

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 91
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Computer Networking Criminal Justice Intelligence


Certificate Requirements Credits

The computer networking certificate is appropriate for students Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
who want to work as network administrators for a business, may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
government, or nonprofit organization. The program provides Six required courses:
hands-on training in state-of-the art computer technology. With CCJS 341 Criminal Investigation 3
appropriate choice of courses, this certificate may be completed CCJS 411 History of Intelligence and the U.S. National
while pursuing the Bachelor of Science in computer information Intelligence Community 3
technology. CCJS 412 The Intelligence Cycle 3
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. CCJS 413 Legal and Ethical Issues in Intelligence 3
CCJS 414 Intelligence Analysis 3
CCJS 415 Advanced Intelligence Analysis 3
Computer Networking
Certificate Requirements Credits Total credits for certificate in Criminal Justice Intelligence 18

Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites


may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
Four required courses:
CMIT 265 Networking Essentials 3
Database Design
CMIT
CMIT
368
376
Windows Server
Windows Network Infrastructure
3
3 and Implementation
CMIT 377 Windows Directory Services Infrastructure 3
The certificate in database design and implementation is appro-
A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3 priate for technical professionals who want to work as advanced
CMIT 320 Network Security users or database designers or administrators. Students are taught
CMIT 331 Wireless Network Administration
Structured Query Language (SQL) and learn about issues in
CMIT 350 Interconnecting Cisco Devices
database design and implementation. With appropriate choice
CMIT 480 Designing Security for a Windows Network
of major and elective courses, this certificate may be completed
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3 while pursuing the Bachelor of Science in computer studies or in
Total credits for certificate in Computer Networking 18
computer and information science.
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.

Criminal Justice Intelligence Database Design and Implementation


Certificate Requirements Credits

The criminal justice intelligence certificate prepares students Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
for work in high-intensity drug trafficking areas nationwide. may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
Students learn about the importance of interagency communi- Four required courses:
cation and cooperation among officers and personnel in this CMIS 170 Introduction to XML 3
area, the history of the intelligence community and the political CMIS 320 Relational Databases 3
underpinnings for its current structure and processes, and the CMIS 420 Advanced Relational Databases 3
current intelligence cycle. Legal and ethical issues are presented CMIS 485 Web Database Development 3
within given scenarios. The program also provides experience
with the decision-making process and reviews possible outcomes A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
$.*4  %BUBCBTF'PSNT
in common situations. With appropriate choice of major and
CMIS 375 Programming in Perl
elective courses, this certificate may be completed while pursuing
CMST 385 Internet and Web Design
the Bachelor of Science in criminal justice.
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
Total credits for certificate in Database Design and Implementation 18

92 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Database Management Desktop Publishing
The database management certificate offers an introduction to The desktop publishing certificate is designed for entry-level
the design and management of database systems in a business personnel whose goal is to become proficient using popular soft-
environment. In-depth practice in the use of Structured Query ware programs in desktop publishing. It includes study of both
Language (SQL) is provided in the context of business-related desktop publishing techniques and design elements.
case studies. The program covers advanced database concepts, Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
including database administration, database technology, and
selection and acquisition of database management systems. Sup-
porting elective courses include database mining and the systems Desktop Publishing
analysis required to begin developing the information technology Certificate Requirements Credits
(IT) infrastructure in a business environment. With appropriate Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
choice of courses, this certificate may be completed while pursu- may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
ing the Bachelor of Science in computer studies.
Four required courses:
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. CMST 310 Electronic Publishing 3
ARTT 354 Elements of Computer Graphics 3
Database Management COMM 493 Strategies for Visual Communications 3
Certificate Requirements Credits CMST 311 Advanced Electronic Publishing 3
A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
CMST 103 Application Software
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
*'4.  *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT
An introductory computing course chosen from the following: 3 WRTG 289 Introduction to Principles of Text Editing
CMIS 102 Introduction to Problem Solving and WRTG 489 Advanced Technical Editing
Algorithm Design
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
CMST 306 Introduction to Visual Basic Programming
or previous workplace experience with C, C++, Visual
Total credits for certificate in Desktop Publishing 18
Basic, Ada, COBOL, or another high-level language plus
an additional supporting elective from the list below
Three required courses:
*'4.  %BUBCBTF$PODFQUT 
*'4.  42- 
*'4.  "EWBODFE%BUBCBTF$PODFQUT 
A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
CMIS 485 Web Database Development
CMIT 261 Introduction to Oracle
CMIT 361 Developing PL/SQL Applications
*'4.  &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF
*'4.  4ZTUFNT"OBMZTJTBOE%FTJHO
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3

Total credits for certificate in Database Management 18

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 93
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Diversity Awareness PSYC


PSYC
338
357
Psychology of Gender
Psychology of Adulthood and Aging
SOCY 325 The Sociology of Gender
The diversity awareness certificate provides an interdisciplinary SPCH 324 Communication and Gender
perspective on diversity in contemporary society, geared toward
A course in specialized aspects of diversity chosen from
practical application in the workplace. The program is based in
the following: 3
UIFTPDJBMTDJFODFTBOEHSPVOEFEJOTPDJPMPHJDBMDPODFQUT'PDVT
BEHS 320 Disability Studies
is on applying social science concepts to foster an awareness and
HUMN 351 Myth and Culture
sensitivity to the diverse groups that an individual is likely to
PHIL 315 Workplace Ethics
encounter in today’s workplace. It provides students with the req-
SOCY 426 Sociology of Religion
uisite concepts to adapt, think flexibly, and appreciate the inter-
SOCY 432 Social Movements
relatedness of different groups and perspectives in the workplace.
The certificate allows those currently working in human resource, Total credits for certificate in Diversity Awareness 18
personnel, and management sectors to update and expand their
knowledge, understanding, and awareness of contemporary
diversity issues. It is appropriate for students pursuing degrees
in business administration, communication studies, criminal
justice, gerontology, global business and public policy, humani-
Financial Management
ties, human resource management, legal studies, management The financial management certificate is designed to meet the
studies, political science, or psychology. With appropriate choice needs of new financial managers, other managers who feel they
of courses, this certificate may be completed while pursuing the require greater knowledge of finance to advance in their profes-
Bachelor of Science in social science. sions, individuals interested in pursuing new careers in financial
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. management, and financial management professionals who want
to upgrade their skills. With appropriate choice of courses, this
certificate may be completed while pursuing the Bachelor of Sci-
Diversity Awareness
ence in finance.
Certificate Requirements Credits
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
Financial Management
Two required foundation courses: Certificate Requirements Credits
BEHS 220 Diversity Awareness 3
SOCY 100 Introduction to Sociology 3 Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
A course in anthropology chosen from the following: 3
ANTH 102 Introduction to Anthropology: A finance course chosen from the following: 3
Cultural Anthropology '*/$  #VTJOFTT'JOBODF
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics '*/$  'JOBODFGPSUIF/POëOBODJBM.BOBHFS

A course in cultural/racial aspects of diversity chosen from Four required courses:


the following: 3 '*/$  *OWFTUNFOUT 
PSYC 354 Cross-Cultural Psychology '*/$  3JTL.BOBHFNFOU 
SOCY 423 Ethnic Minorities '*/$  'JOBODJBM.BOBHFNFOU 
SOCY 424 Sociology of Race Relations '*/$  *OUFSOBUJPOBM'JOBODF 
SPCH 482 Intercultural Communication
A course in gender- and age-related aspects of diversity chosen
from the following: 3
BMGT 314 Women as Leaders
BMGT 315 Gender Relations in Business
GERO 311 Women and Aging
GERO 327 Ethnicity and Aging

94 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3 One of the following courses: 3
ACCT 301 Accounting for Nonaccounting Managers $$+4  $PNQVUFS'PSFOTJDT
ECON 430 Money and Banking CCJS 496 Cyber Crime and Security
'*/$  'VOEBNFOUBMTPG#VJMEJOH8FBMUI ACCT 433 Audit and Control of Information Technology
'*/$  -JGF*OTVSBODF The following required course:
'*/$  4FDVSJUZ"OBMZTJTBOE7BMVBUJPO "$$5  'PSFOTJDBOE*OWFTUJHBUJWF"DDPVOUJOH 
'*/$  'VUVSFT$POUSBDUTBOE0QUJPOT
'*/$  $PNNFSDJBM#BOL.BOBHFNFOU Total credits for certificate in Fraud Investigation 18

Total credits for certificate in Financial Management 18

Game Development
Fraud Investigation The game development certificate prepares students for entry-
level programming positions in the gaming industry. Through a
The fraud investigation certificate provides an interdisciplinary hands-on, project-based approach, students are able to cre-
foundation of the core knowledge needed in the field of fraud ate their own video games and become familiar with the core
investigation, both by law enforcement personnel and inter- programming language skills necessary for game development.
nal organizational personnel and consultants. The certificate is The certificate also helps them become proficient in the areas of
designed to enhance one’s understanding of fraud, including mathematics common to most game projects. To gain a thor-
motives, rationalization, and opportunity (the fraud triangle). ough understanding of the main concepts involved in real-time
Case studies and current events are used to analyze fraud from 3D graphics programming, students are given the opportunity to
various points of view: incentives and pressures, the capacity to work with an industry-standard gaming engine. With appropri-
commit fraud, opportunity, and integrity (the fraud diamond). ate choice of major and elective courses, students may complete
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. this certificate while pursuing the Bachelor of Science in com-
puter science.
Fraud Investigation Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
Certificate Requirements Credits

Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites Game Development
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses. Certificate Requirements Credits

One of the following accounting foundation courses: 3 Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
ACCT 301 Accounting for Nonaccounting Managers Four required courses:
The following criminal justice foundation course: CMSC 230 Computer Science II 3
CCJS 234 Criminal Procedure and Evidence 3 CMSC 335 Object-Oriented and Concurrent Programming 3
One of the following investigation and deterrence courses CMSC 325 Game Design and Development 3
in accounting: 3 CMSC 425 Building Applications for Mobile Devices 3
"$$5  'SBVE%FUFDUJPOBOE%FUFSSFODF A supporting elective chosen from the following courses: 3
"$$5  'SBVEBOE'PSFOTJD"DDPVOUJOH CMIS 445 Distributed Systems
One of the following investigation and deterrence courses CMSC 480 Advanced Programming in Java
in criminal justice: 3 MATH 240 Introduction to Linear Algebra
CCJS 341 Criminal Investigation A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
CCJS 453 White-Collar and Organized Crime
Total credits for certificate in Game Development 18

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 95
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Health Issues for A required practicum experience:


GERO 486A Internship in Gerontology Through Co-op
3

the Aging Adult A course specific to the student’s academic goals chosen from
the following: 3
GERO 306 Programs, Services, and Policies
The certificate in health issues for the aging adult is designed for
GERO 380 End of Life: Issues and Perspectives
students who seek the knowledge and skills necessary to effec-
tively work with older adults in a variety of roles. The certificate Total credits for certificate in Health Issues for the Aging Adult 18
integrates gerontological knowledge and skills from the fields
of health/biology, sociology, psychology, and policy/services
and provides the opportunity to apply these skills to work with
older adults. Coursework may help students seeking a bachelor’s
degree in a variety of areas to integrate gerontology knowledge
Human Development
with their major area of academic study or prepare students who The human development certificate is designed to meet the needs
are vocationally oriented and not seeking a higher education of individuals who work in health care settings that require a
degree to improve work skills. Through a practicum or Co-op thorough background in human development from birth to an
experience, students work with professionals to apply knowledge advanced age. It enables students to understand and recognize
acquired through coursework to practical experience with aging developmental milestones across the lifespan and examines age-
individuals or aging issues in different settings that address the specific related topics. The program is particularly useful for indi-
needs of older adults (e.g., assisted living centers, retirement viduals either currently working or desiring to work in settings
communities, nursing homes, hospitals, senior centers, com- such as childcare, adult care, boys’ and girls’ clubs, and other
panies producing products and services for seniors, or area agen- community-related settings. With appropriate choice of courses,
cies on aging). this certificate may be completed while pursuing the Bachelor of
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. Science in psychology.
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
Health Issues for the Aging Adult
Certificate Requirements Credits Human Development
Certificate Requirements Credits
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses. Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
A required course: may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
GERO 100 Introduction to Gerontology 3 Five required courses:
A course on the sociocultural aspects of aging chosen from PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
the following: 3 PSYC 351 Lifespan Development Psychology 3
GERO 331 Sociology of Aging PSYC 355 Child Psychology 3
GERO 410 Cross-Cultural Perspectives of Aging PSYC 356 Psychology of Adolescence 3
PSYC 357 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging 3
A psychology course chosen from the following: 3
GERO 220 Psychological Aspects of Aging A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
PSYC 357 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging PSYC 332 Psychology of Human Sexuality
PSYC 334 Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships
A life health and science course or courses totaling 3 credits
PSYC 338 Psychology of Gender
chosen from the following: 3
BIOL 307 The Biology of Aging Total credits for certificate in Human Development 18
GERO 302 Health and Aging
GERO 355 Nutritional Concerns of Aging
GERO 495D Adaptation to Sensory Changes and Aging
GERO 495H Illness and Aging
GERO 495K Geriatric Nutrition

96 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Human Resource Information Assurance
Management The information assurance certificate supports those who wish to
acquire or improve information security knowledge in response
The human resource management certificate prepares students to the national imperative for maintaining the security of the
for supervisory and midlevel management positions in human technology and information infrastructure of government and
resource management and enables employees in public- and industry. Students gain specific skills and are instructed in areas
private-sector organizations to upgrade their skills with the the- of policy formation, needs assessment, security applications,
ory and practical knowledge necessary to advance to a higher and disaster prevention and recovery. Laboratories employing
level. The certificate prepares the student for the Professional in both state-of-the-art and industry-standard tools are used.
Human Resources (PHR) and Senior Professional in Human With appropriate choice of major and elective courses, this
Resources (SPHR) certification examinations. With appropriate certificate may be completed while pursuing the Bachelor of
choice of major and elective courses, this certificate may be com- Science in cybersecurity.
pleted while pursuing the Bachelor of Science in human resource Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
management.
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. Information Assurance
Certificate Requirements Credits
Human Resource Management
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
Certificate Requirements Credits
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites Two required courses:
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses. CSIA 302 Telecommunications in Information Systems 3
Three required courses: $4*"  'PVOEBUJPOTPG*OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFN4FDVSJUZ 
BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3 A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
HRMN 300 Human Resource Management 3 CMIT 265 Networking Essentials
HRMN 400 Human Resource Management: Analysis CMIT 320 Network Security
and Problems 3 CSIA 454 Information System Security Mechanisms
A labor management course chosen from the following: 3 CSIA 457 Cyber Crime and Cyber Terrorism
HRMN 362 Labor Relations CSIA 459 Security Issues and Emerging Technologies
HRMN 365 Conflict Management in Organizations *'4.  %JTBTUFS3FDPWFSZ1MBOOJOH
*'4.  *OGPSNBUJPO4FDVSJUZ/FFET"TTFTTNFOU
A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
and Planning
BMGT 391 Motivation, Performance, and Productivity
BMGT 464 Organizational Behavior A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
BMGT 465 Organization Development and Change A third supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
BMGT 484 Managing Teams in Organizations
A fourth supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
HRMN 367 Organizational Culture
HRMN 395 The Total Awards Approach to Compensation Total credits for certificate in Information Assurance 18
Management
HRMN 406 Employee Training and Development
HRMN 495 Contemporary Issues in Human Resource
Management Practice
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3

Total credits for certificate in Human Resource Management 18

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 97
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Information Management Internet Technologies


The information management certificate offers an overview of The Internet technologies certificate is designed to provide an
information systems, their role in organizations, and the relation introduction to Internet applications and their design and devel-
of information systems to the objectives and structure of an opment. Hands-on experience is provided in Web site manage-
organization. An introduction to the design and management of ment and design, with an emphasis on subject-related projects.
database systems in a business environment is provided. A study Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
of the methods used in analyzing information needs and specify-
ing application system requirements is complemented with a
study of the concepts and techniques used in specifying the Internet Technologies
physical design of the targeted system. With appropriate choice Certificate Requirements Credits
of courses, this certificate may be completed while pursuing the Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
Bachelor of Science in information systems management. may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. Four required courses:
CMST 385 Internet and Web Design 3
Information Management CMST 386 Advanced Internet and Web Design 3
Certificate Requirements Credits CMST 430 Web Site Management 3
CMST 450 Web Design with XML 3
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
CMIS 242 Intermediate Programming
An introductory computing course chosen from the following: 3 CMIS 345 Object-Oriented Design and Programming
CMIS 102 Introduction to Problem Solving and CMIS 375 Programming in Perl
Algorithm Design CMSC 480 Advanced Programming in Java
CMST 306 Introduction to Visual Basic Programming CMST 460 Web Application Development Using
or previous workplace experience with C, C++, Visual
$PME'VTJPO
Basic, Ada, COBOL, or another high-level language plus
an additional supporting elective from the lists below A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
Three required courses:
Total credits for certificate in Internet Technologies 18
*'4.  *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT 
*'4.  %BUBCBTF$PODFQUT 
*'4.  4ZTUFNT"OBMZTJTBOE%FTJHO 
A 300-level supporting elective course chosen from the following: 3
*'4.  8PSLQMBDF1SPEVDUJWJUZ
*'4.  )VNBO'BDUPSTJO*OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNT
*'4.  &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF
A 400-level supporting elective course chosen from the following: 3
$4*"  'PVOEBUJPOTPG*OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFN4FDVSJUZ
*'4.  42-
*'4.  1SPKFDU.BOBHFNFOU

Total credits for certificate in Information Management 18

98 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Management Foundations Object-Oriented Design
The management foundations certificate prepares students for
supervisory and midlevel management positions and enables
and Programming
employees in public- and private-sector organizations to upgrade The certificate in object-oriented design and programming is
their skills with the theory and practical knowledge necessary to appropriate for technical professionals who will be working as
advance to a higher level. With appropriate choice of courses, programmer/analysts or application developers. Students are
this certificate may be completed while pursuing the Bachelor of taught introductory and advanced features of object-oriented
Science in business administration. languages, as well as program design concepts. Students should
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. check course descriptions to ensure that they have taken all pre-
requisites for each course. With appropriate choice of major and
elective courses, this certificate may be completed while pursuing
Management Foundations the Bachelor of Science in computer and information science.
Certificate Requirements Credits
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
Object-Oriented Design and Programming
Four required courses: Certificate Requirements Credits
*'4.  *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT 
BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory 3 Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
MRKT 310 Marketing Principles 3 may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
HRMN 300 Human Resource Management 3 Three required courses:
A finance course chosen from the following: 3 CMIS 141 Introductory Programming 3
'*/$  #VTJOFTT'JOBODF CMIS 242 Intermediate Programming 3
'*/$  'JOBODFGPSUIF/POëOBODJBM.BOBHFS CMIS 345 Object-Oriented Design and Programming 3

A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3 A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership CMIS 330 Software Engineering Principles and Techniques
BMGT 380 Business Law I CMIS 440 Advanced Programming in Java
BMGT 464 Organizational Behavior CMIS 455 Requirements Development
BMGT 496 Business Ethics CMIS 460 Software Design and Development
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
Total credits for certificate in Management Foundations 18
A third supporting elective chosen from the above list 3

Total credits for certificate in Object-Oriented Design and Programming 18

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 99
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Paralegal Studies A general practice substantive law elective chosen from


the following: 3
LGST 312 Torts
The paralegal studies certificate focuses on the legal concepts, LGST 315 Domestic Relations
procedures, and skills used in a wide variety of legal environ- LGST 316 Estates and Probate
ments. The program addresses the organization, functions, and LGST 340 Contract Law
processes of institutions in the U.S. legal system; roles and issues LGST 442 Business Organizations
in the paralegal field; legal ethics; and selected specialty areas.
A supporting elective or electives totaling 3 credits chosen
The curriculum emphasizes important skills, including legal
from any LGST course 3
analysis, communication, legal research, computer competence,
legal drafting, investigation, organization, and specialized legal A supporting elective or electives totaling 3 credits chosen
skills. With appropriate choice of courses, this certificate may from any LGST course 3
be completed while pursuing the Bachelor of Science in legal
Total credits for certificate in Paralegal Studies 60
studies. (However, students may not pursue the paralegal studies
certificate within the associate of arts curriculum in legal studies.)
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
Project Management
for IT Professionals
Paralegal Studies
Certificate Requirements Credits

General education and other college coursework 36 The certificate in project management for IT professionals offers
This requirement may be fulfilled through transfer credit, and up to an overview of information systems, their role in organizations,
30 credits may be earned through credit by examination or prior-learning
and the relationship of information systems to the objectives
portfolio credit. Total must include 18 credits in general education courses
and structure of an organization. The planning, scheduling, and
(described on p. 8) covering at least three different disciplines and WRTG
101/101X (unless the student already has earned an associate’s or bachelor’s
controlling of a system project during its life cycle is explored. A
degree before taking the first legal studies course). survey of techniques for improving the productivity of workplace
practices and procedures is included. With appropriate choice
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites of courses, this certificate may be completed while pursuing the
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses. No more Bachelor of Science in information systems management.
than six 1-credit courses may be applied toward this certificate. No more
than 12 credits of certificate coursework as listed below may be fulfilled Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
through transfer credit.
Four required legal studies courses: Project Management for IT Professionals
LGST 101 Introduction to Law 3 Certificate Requirements Credits
LGST 200 Techniques of Legal Research 3 Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
LGST 201 Legal Writing 3 may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
LGST 204 Legal Ethics 3
Four required courses:
A general practice procedure and legal skills elective chosen *'4.  *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
from the following: 3 *'4.  *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNTJO0SHBOJ[BUJPOT 
LGST 320 Criminal Law and Procedures *'4.  1SPKFDU.BOBHFNFOU 
LGST 322 Evidence *'4.  4ZTUFNT"OBMZTJTBOE%FTJHO 
LGST 325 Litigation
LGST 400 Advanced Legal Research and Analysis
LGST 401 Advanced Legal Writing

100 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3 A specialized supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
CSIA 302 Telecommunications in Information Systems CCJS 462 Protection of Business Assets
$4*"  'PVOEBUJPOTPG*OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFN4FDVSJUZ CCJS 463 Security: A Management Perspective
CSIA 457 Cyber Crime and Cyber Terrorism CCJS 496 Cyber Crime and Security
*'4.  8PSLQMBDF1SPEVDUJWJUZ CMIS 335 Software Safety
*'4.  )VNBO'BDUPSTJO*OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNT ENMT 305 Hazardous Materials Toxicology
*'4.  &UIJDTJOUIF*OGPSNBUJPO"HF ENMT 310 Emergency Planning and Operations
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3 Management
'4$/  'JSF*OWFTUJHBUJPOBOE"OBMZTJT
Total credits for certificate in Project Management '4$/  %JTBTUFS1MBOOJOHBOE$POUSPM
for IT Professionals 18 *'4.  %JTBTUFS3FDPWFSZ1MBOOJOH
A second specialized supporting elective chosen from the above list 3

Total credits for certificate in Terrorism and Institutions:


Terrorism and Institutions: Prevention and Response 18

Prevention and Response


The certificate in terrorism and institutions explores how insti-
tutions confront terrorism and the aftermath of terrorist acts.
UNIX System
Institutions examined include government agencies, private secu-
rity organizations, schools, and commercial enterprises. The cer-
Administration
tificate addresses emerging terrorist threats and the institutional The UNIX system administration certificate is designed to
response to terrorist acts. It can benefit security individuals who provide an understanding of the UNIX operating system, its
are in charge of protecting government facilities, private security maintenance and security, and related theory and implementa-
agency employees, police officers, detective agents, public health tion issues.
and public safety administrators and officers, counterterrorism Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
professionals, and the general public.
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. UNIX System Administration
Certificate Requirements Credits
Terrorism and Institutions: Prevention and Response
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
Certificate Requirements Credits
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites Six required courses:
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses. CMIS 141 Introductory Programming 3
Three required courses: CMIS 325 UNIX with Shell Programming 3
CCJS 491 Institutional Security 3 CMIS 375 Programming in Perl 3
GVPT 406 Global Terrorism 3 CMIS 415 Advanced UNIX and C 3
GVPT 409 Terrorism, Antiterrorism, and Homeland Security 3 CMIT 391 UNIX/Linux System Administration 3
An institutional response elective chosen from the following: 3 CMIT 491 Advanced UNIX/Linux System Administration 3
GVPT 240 Political Ideologies Total credits for certificate in UNIX System Administration 18
GVPT 407 State Terrorism
GVPT 408 Counterterrorism
HIST 319A History of Terrorism
PSYC 386 Psychology of Stress

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 101
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Visual Basic Programming Web Design


The Visual Basic programming certificate is designed for students The Web design certificate prepares students to use Internet
seeking entry-level programming positions. Hands-on experience applications and design principles to produce effective Web
using Visual Basic software is provided. With appropriate choice pages. The program is appropriate for nontechnical employees
of major and elective courses, this certificate may be completed who wish to advance within their organizations and who want
while pursuing the Bachelor of Science in computer studies. to learn how to establish, develop, and maintain a Web site.
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.

Visual Basic Programming Certificate Requirements Credits Web Design


Certificate Requirements Credits
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses. Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
An introductory course: 3 may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
CMIS 102 Introduction to Problem Solving and Five required courses:
Algorithm Design CMST 385 Internet and Web Design 3
Two required courses: ARTT 250 Elements of Commercial Design 3
CMST 306 Introduction to Visual Basic Programming 3 CMST 386 Advanced Internet and Web Design 3
CMST 416 Advanced Visual Basic Programming 3 ARTT 354 Elements of Computer Graphics 3
CMST 450 Web Design with XML 3
A computer systems course chosen from the following: 3
CMIS 310 Computer Systems and Architecture A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
*'4.  4PGUXBSFBOE)BSEXBSF$PODFQUT ARTT 479 Advanced Computer Graphics
CMIS 375 Programming in Perl
A supporting elective chosen from the following: 3
CMSC 480 Advanced Programming in Java
CMIS 242 Intermediate Programming
CMST 460 Web Application Development
CMIS 345 Object-Oriented Design and Programming
  6TJOH$PME'VTJPO
CMSC 480 Advanced Programming in Java
CMST 385 Internet and Web Design A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3
CMST 386 Advanced Internet and Web Design Total credits for certificate in Web Design 21
*'4.  %BUBCBTF$PODFQUT
*'4.  "EWBODFE%BUBCBTF$PODFQUT
A second supporting elective chosen from the above list 3

Total credits for certificate in Visual Basic Programming 18

102 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
Workplace Communications Workplace Spanish
The workplace communications certificate is designed to prepare The workplace Spanish certificate combines language and profes-
students in the basics of communication vehicles and modes in sional study to give students a language foundation that will
the modern workplace. It introduces them to the vocabulary of prepare them to work and communicate in a Spanish-speaking
the field and to the tools and techniques used to create work- environment.
place documents. With appropriate choice of major and elective Note: This certificate is not intended for students who already
courses, this certificate may be completed while pursuing the have native or near-native ability in Spanish. Students may send
Bachelor of Arts in communication studies. an e-mail to languages@umuc.edu for additional information on
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88. course content and eligibility.
Overall certificate requirements are listed on p. 88.
Workplace Communications
Certificate Requirement Credits
Workplace Spanish
Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites Certificate Requirements Credits
may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses. Note: Courses may be applied to only one certificate; some prerequisites
Four required courses: may need to be fulfilled before beginning certificate courses.
WRTG 101/101X Introduction to Writing 3
Five required courses:
*'4.  *OUSPEVDUJPOUP$PNQVUFS#BTFE4ZTUFNT 
SPAN 111 Elementary Spanish I 3
CMST 310 Electronic Publishing 3
SPAN 112 Elementary Spanish II 3
COMM 495 Seminar in Workplace Communication 3
SPAN 211 Intermediate Spanish I 3
A writing course chosen from the following: 3 SPAN 212 Intermediate Spanish II 3
WRTG 393/393X Advanced Technical Writing SPAN 318 Commercial and Workplace Spanish 4
WRTG 394/394X Advanced Business Writing Total credits for certificate in Workplace Spanish 16
An editing course chosen from the following: 3
WRTG 289 Introduction to Principles of Text Editing
WRTG 489 Advanced Technical Editing

Total credits for certificate in Workplace Communications 18

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 103
INFORMATION ON COURSES
THE UNIT OF CREDIT KEY TO COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

The unit of credit defines the amount of university-level credit to Undergraduate courses that have been (or may be) offered by
be awarded for course completion, transfer of coursework from UMUC are listed on the following pages. They are arranged
another institution, or evaluation of college-level prior learn- alphabetically by academic discipline or subject. The number
ing. One credit is awarded on the basis of either of two sets of of credits is shown by an arabic numeral in parentheses—e.g.,
criteria, as follows: (3)—after the title of the course.
t At least 15 hours (50 minutes each) of actual class meeting or Course numbers are designated as follows:
the equivalent in guided learning activity (exclusive of registra- 000–099 Noncredit and institutional credit courses (which do not
tion and study days, holidays, and final examinations); count toward any degree or certificate)
t At least 30 hours (50 minutes each) of supervised laboratory 100–199 Primarily freshman courses
or studio work (exclusive of registration and study days, holi- 200–299 Primarily sophomore courses
days, and final examinations). 300–399 Upper-level, primarily junior courses
400–499 Upper-level, primarily senior courses
PREREQUISITES 500–599 Senior-level courses acceptable for credit toward some
graduate degrees
Prerequisites, normally stated in terms of numbered courses,
represent the level of knowledge a student should have acquired
before enrolling in a given course. It is each student’s personal
responsibility to make certain he or she is academically prepared
UPUBLFBDPVSTF'BDVMUZNFNCFSTBSFOPUFYQFDUFEUPSFQFBU
material listed as being prerequisite. Catalog Number
Subject Number Title of Credits
Students may be barred from enrolling in or may be removed
from courses for which they do not have the necessary prerequi-
sites. Students who have not taken prerequisite courses recently BMGT 394 Real Estate Principles II (3)
should consult advisors or teachers and follow their recommen- (Designed to fulfill the requirements for the Maryland
EBUJPOT'BDVMUZNFNCFSTBSFBMXBZTBWBJMBCMFUPEJTDVTTXIFUIFS licensing examination to sell real estate.)1 Prerequisite:
a student has the preparation necessary to perform well in a BMGT 393.2 A continuation of the study of real estate.
given course. Topics include principles, definitions, professional issues
WRTG 101 Introduction to Writing is prerequisite to any and problems, construction and ownership problems,
higher-level course in English, communication studies, or writ- and other major aspects of real estate sales.3 Students
ing. MATH 107 College Algebra is prerequisite to any higher- may receive credit for only one of the following courses:
MFWFMDPVSTFJONBUIFNBUJDT 'VSUIFSHVJEBODFJTJOUIFTFDUJPO BMGT 394 or BMGT 398H.4
describing courses in mathematics.)
1. Explanatory material, if needed, may
Students who have not successfully completed the equivalent
N Explain course sequence, purpose, or audience.
of an introductory collegiate course in writing (WRTG 101)
at UMUC will be tested for placement. Placement testing is N Identify courses fulfilling general education requirements
also required for certain courses in mathematics (p. 198). More (listed on p. 8).
N Identify courses requiring a special fee, equipment, or materials.
information may be obtained by calling 800-888-UMUC or by
visiting www.umuc.edu/testing. 2. Prerequisites represent the level of knowledge a student should have
acquired before enrolling in this course. A prerequisite is usually stated
Another way to fulfill prerequisites is to obtain credit by course- as a specific numbered course; sometimes the prerequisite calls for a
challenge examination (described on p. 232). Advisors can specific course “or equivalent experience.”
explain the procedures. The goal is for students to earn college
3. The course description describes the focus and level of the course.
credit in areas in which they can demonstrate prior learning by
4. Statements beginning “Students may receive credit for only one of
successfully completing comprehensive tests of material normally
the following courses” are designed to avoid course duplication and,
covered in a semester-long course. These examinations are spe- therefore, loss of credit. The courses listed are courses that duplicate
cifically prepared for the required level of knowledge in a given or significantly overlap content. If a course in the list is not described
subject. Students may not take course-challenge examinations for elsewhere in the catalog, that means that the course has changed
lower-level courses that are prerequisite to courses for which they designator or number over the years or that the course is not offered
have already received credit. at all UMUC locations.

104 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
INDEX TO COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 'JOBODF '*/$
...................................................................161
'JSF4DJFODF '4$/
............................................................164
The courses summarized in the following pages are listed alpha-
betically by discipline or subject, as follows. The discipline desig- Geography (GEOG)* ...........................................................166
nators that precede the course numbers are listed in parentheses. Geology (GEOL)*................................................................166
Students should check the course descriptions carefully to avoid German (GERM)* ...............................................................166
duplicating previous coursework. UMUC will not award credit
Gerontology (GERO) ..........................................................167
for courses that repeat material the student has already been
credited with learning. Government and Politics (GVPT) ........................................171
Accounting (ACCT) ............................................................106 History (HIST) ....................................................................175
African American Studies (AASP)* .......................................109 Homeland Security (HMLS) ................................................181
Anthropology (ANTH)* ......................................................109 Humanities (HUMN) ..........................................................182
Arabic (ARAB)* ...................................................................111 Human Resource Management (HRMN) ............................183
Art (ARTT)..........................................................................112 *OGPSNBUJPO4ZTUFNT.BOBHFNFOU *'4.
..........................186
Art History (ARTH)*...........................................................113 Japanese (JAPN)* .................................................................188
Asian Studies (ASTD)* ........................................................114 Journalism (JOUR)* ............................................................189
Astronomy (ASTR)* ............................................................115 Legal Studies (LGST) ...........................................................190
Behavioral and Social Sciences (BEHS) ................................115 Library Skills and Information Literacy (LIBS)* ...................195
Biology (BIOL) ....................................................................117 Marketing (MRKT) .............................................................196
Business and Management (BMGT) ....................................121 Mathematics (MATH) .........................................................198
Career Planning (CAPL)*.....................................................128 Music (MUSC)* ..................................................................200
Chemistry (CHEM)* ...........................................................128 Natural Science (NSCI) .......................................................201
Chinese (CHIN)* ................................................................128 Philosophy (PHIL)* .............................................................202
Communication Studies (COMM) ......................................129 Psychology (PSYC)...............................................................204
Computer and Information Science (CMIS) ........................130 Sociology (SOCY) ................................................................209
Computer Information Technology (CMIT)........................134 Spanish (SPAN)* ..................................................................211
Computer Science (CMSC) .................................................137 Speech Communication (SPCH) .........................................213
Computer Studies (CMST)..................................................140 Statistics and Probability (STAT)* ........................................214
Cooperative Education .........................................................143 Theatre (THET)* .................................................................216
Criminology/Criminal Justice (CCJS) ..................................144 Women’s Studies (WMST)* .................................................216
Cybersecurity (CSIA) ...........................................................149 Writing (WRTG) .................................................................216
Economics (ECON) ............................................................151
Educational Principles (EDCP)* ..........................................152
Education: Teacher Preparation (EDTP)* ............................153
Emergency Management (EMGT).......................................153
English (ENGL)...................................................................154
Environmental Management (ENMT) ................................158
Experiential Learning (EXCL) ..............................................160

* Only a limited number of courses are available each session in this discipline.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 105
INFORMATION ON COURSES
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES ACCT 221 Principles of Accounting II (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 220. Continuation of the study of financial
The following entries describe courses offered through University accounting (emphasizing accounting for liabilities, equity, and
of Maryland University College. Requirements pertain only to corporate forms of ownership), followed by an introduction to
degrees conferred at UMUC. To use these courses toward degrees managerial accounting. Topics include responsibility account-
offered by other institutions in the University System of Mary- ing, budgets, cost control, and standard costing procedures and
land, students should refer to the catalogs of those institutions variances. Emphasis is on management reporting. Students may
for restrictions that may apply. In transferring to UMUC—par- receive credit for only one of the following courses: ACCT 221,
ticularly from a community college—students should be careful ACCT 301, BMGT 221, MGMT 301, or MGST 301.
not to enroll in courses that duplicate their previous studies.
ACCT 301 Accounting for Nonaccounting Managers (3)
(May not be applied toward a major or minor in accounting.) A
Accounting survey of principles of accounting relevant in making managerial
decisions on the basis of accounting information. Topics include
Courses in accounting (designated ACCT) may be applied as internal controls, financial planning and reporting, analysis of
appropriate (according to individual program requirements) financial statements, and elements of managerial cost account-
toward ing and budgeting. Students may receive credit for only one of
the following courses: ACCT 221, ACCT 301, BMGT 221,
t a major in accounting, business administration, finance,
MGMT 301, or MGST 301.
global business and public policy, human resource manage-
ment, management studies, or marketing;
ACCT 310 Intermediate Accounting I (3)
t a minor in accounting, business administration, customer
service management, human resource management, manage- (Students should be cautious about enrolling in ACCT 310 or
ment studies, marketing, or strategic and entrepreneurial ACCT 311. These are professional courses requiring intensive
management; study and analysis and are not to be undertaken casually. Stu-
dents who have not taken ACCT 221 within the last two years
t a certificate in Introductory Accounting, Advanced Account-
may have difficulty.) Prerequisites: BMGT 110 (or at least two
JOH 'SBVE*OWFTUJHBUJPO PSBOVNCFSPGPUIFSCVTJOFTTSFMBUFE
years of business or management experience) and ACCT 221. A
areas;
comprehensive analysis of financial accounting topics involved
t certain UMUC graduate degree programs, where recognized
in preparing financial statements and in external reporting.
as equivalent coursework (specific equivalencies are detailed in
Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses:
the UMUC graduate catalog); and
ACCT 310 or BMGT 310.
t electives.
A description of the curriculum for the accounting major and ACCT 311 Intermediate Accounting II (3)
minor begins on p. 13. Descriptions of related curricula may be (A continuation of ACCT 310. Students should be cautious
found on the following pages: business administration (p. 19), about enrolling in ACCT 310 or ACCT 311. These are profes-
business supply chain management (p. 22), customer service sional courses requiring intensive study and analysis and are not
management (p. 33), finance (p. 41), global business and public to be undertaken casually. Students who have not taken ACCT
policy (p. 47), human resource management (p. 56), manage- 310 within the last two years may have difficulty.) Prerequisite:
ment studies (p. 66), marketing (p. 67), and strategic and entre- ACCT 310. A comprehensive analysis of financial accounting
preneurial management (p. 77). topics, including preparation of financial statements and external
reports. Students may receive credit for only one of the following
ACCT 220 Principles of Accounting I (3) courses: ACCT 311 or BMGT 311.
An introduction to the basic theory and techniques of contem-
porary financial accounting. Topics include the accounting cycle
and the preparation of financial statements for single-owner busi-
ness organizations that operate as service companies or merchan-
disers. Students may receive credit for only one of the following
courses: ACCT 220 or BMGT 220.

106 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
ACCT 320 Fraud Detection and Deterrence (3) ACCT 327 Enterprise Management Systems for
Prerequisite: ACCT 301 or ACCT 220. A study of the principles Accountants (3)
and standards for examination, identification, detection, and 1SFSFRVJTJUFT"$$5BOEFJUIFS"$$5PS*'4.
NJOJNJ[BUJPOPGGSBVE'PDVTJTPOUIFGSBVEUSJBOHMF PQQPSUV- An overview of integrated financial and business resource infor-
nity, incentive, and rationalization). Topics include cash larceny, mation systems, with an emphasis on accounting information
check tampering, skimming, register disbursement schemes, system and management reporting. Topics include the impact
billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement issues, asset of information systems on business operations; economic value
misappropriations, corruption, accounting principles and fraud, of financial systems, financial and economic considerations in
fraudulent financial statements, whistle blowing, interviewing software selection, organizational culture and its impact on enter-
witnesses, and writing reports. prise management systems, and implementation strategies and
operational reengineering. An introduction to enterprise-wide
ACCT 321 Cost Accounting (3) project management is provided using current software tools.
Prerequisites: BMGT 110 (or at least two years of business
or management experience) and ACCT 221. A study of the ACCT 328 Accounting Software (3)
basic concepts of determining, setting, and analyzing costs for Prerequisite: ACCT 221. An introduction to accounting soft-
purposes of managerial planning and control. Emphasis is on ware, focusing on evaluation of the benefits, costs, and risks of
the role of the accountant in the management of organizations specific programs. Topics include payroll, inventory, accounts
and in the analysis of cost behavior, standard costing, budgeting, payable, accounts receivable, job cost, and point-of-sale applica-
responsibility accounting, and costs that are relevant for making tions. Popular software packages in the areas of tax and financial
decisions. Various techniques are used to study cost and manage- statement preparation are introduced. Projects and assignments
rial accounting concepts; these may include the use of problem integrate the principles of accounting information systems with
sets, case studies, computer applications, and other materials. the evaluation of accounting software. Students may receive
Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: credit for only one of the following courses: ACCT 328 or
ACCT 321 or BMGT 321. ACCT 398A.

ACCT 323 Federal Income Tax I (3) ACCT 410 Accounting for Government and Not-for-Profit
Organizations (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 220. An introduction to federal taxation.
Discussion covers different components of taxable income, Prerequisite: ACCT 310. An introduction to the theory and
including property transactions. Examples and problems illus- practice of accounting and auditing as applied to governmental
trate tax laws. Computer applications may be used to analyze entities and not-for-profit organizations. Various techniques are
specific examples. Students may receive credit for only one of the used to study fund accounting concepts; these may include the
following courses: ACCT 323 or BMGT 323. use of problem sets, case studies, computer applications, and
other materials. Students may receive credit for only one of the
ACCT 326 Accounting Information Systems (3)
following courses: ACCT 410 or BMGT 410.
Prerequisite: ACCT 221. A study of the control aspects of
ACCT 411 Ethics and Professionalism in Accounting (3)
accounting systems. Topics include setting standards; defining
and imposing administrative, operational, and security controls; Prerequisite: ACCT 311. Analysis and discussion of issues relat-
and judging cost-effectiveness of systems. Various techniques are ing to ethics and professionalism in accounting. The AICPA
used to study accounting information-systems concepts; these Code of Professional Conduct and the reasoning, philosophy,
may include the use of problem sets, case studies, computer and application of that code are examined.
applications, and other materials. Students may receive credit for
only one of the following courses: ACCT 326, BMGT 320, or ACCT 417 Federal Income Tax II (3)
BMGT 326. Prerequisites: ACCT 311 and 323. A study of federal income
taxation of business entities, including C corporations, S cor-
porations, and partnerships. Discussion covers federal estate,
gift, and trust taxation. Various techniques are used to study tax
concepts; these may include the use of problem sets, case studies,
and computer applications. Students may receive credit for only
one of the following courses: ACCT 417 or BMGT 417.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 107
INFORMATION ON COURSES
ACCT 422 Auditing Theory and Practice (3) ACCT 428 Advanced Accounting for Information Systems (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 311. Recommended: ACCT 326. A study of Prerequisite: ACCT 326. A comprehensive review of accounting
the independent accountant’s attest function. Topics include gen- information systems (AIS). Topics include AIS core requirements
erally accepted auditing standards, tests of controls and substan- (transactional processing) and an evaluation process for migrat-
tive tests, and report forms and opinions. Various techniques are ing to a new system. Midrange accounting systems are reviewed.
used to study auditing concepts and practices; these may include 'PDVTJTPOBEWBODFEDPODFQUTTVDIBTDPOUSPMGSBNFXPSLTBOE
the use of problem sets, case studies, computer applications, and AIS audit considerations. Assignments require using applications
other materials. Students may receive credit for only one of the to perform advanced accounting functions and include a major
following courses: ACCT 422 or BMGT 422. project designing an accounting information system using a
commercial database software package. Course materials may be
ACCT 424 Advanced Accounting (3) helpful in preparing for various certifications, including CMA,
Prerequisite: ACCT 311. Recommended: ACCT 326. A study CPA, IIA, and CISA.
of advanced accounting theory, applied to specialized topics and
contemporary problems. Emphasis is on consolidated statements ACCT 433 Audit and Control of Information Technology (3)
and partnership accounting. Various techniques are used to 1SFSFRVJTJUF"$$5BOEFJUIFS"$$5PS*'4.
study accounting theory and practice; these may include the use Analysis and discussion of issues related to audit and control of
of problem sets, case studies, computer applications, and other JOGPSNBUJPOUFDIOPMPHZ'PDVTJTPOUIFQFSTQFDUJWFTPGQVCMJD 
materials. Students may receive credit for only one of the follow- internal, and private accountants. Discussion covers the prin-
ing courses: ACCT 424 or BMGT 424. ciples and standards for proactive and reactive auditing, as well as
management and control of information technology.
ACCT 425 International Accounting (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 311. A study of accounting in a multina- ACCT 436 Internal Auditing (3)
tional context. Topics include evolving international account- Prerequisite: ACCT 311. An introduction to internal auditing,
ing and reporting standards, problems of foreign exchange and its rapid growth, and its role in the modern corporation. Topics
taxation, intercompany transfer pricing, and emerging issues in include internal auditing standards, scope, responsibilities, ethics,
international accounting. Students may receive credit for only controls, techniques, and reporting practices. Material included
one of the following courses: ACCT 425 or ACCT 498A. in the Certified Internal Auditor examination is considered.
Various techniques are used to study internal auditing theory and
ACCT 426 Advanced Cost Accounting (3) practice; these may include the use of problem sets, case studies,
Prerequisite: ACCT 321. A study of advanced cost accounting computer applications, and other materials. Students may receive
that emphasizes the managerial aspects of internal systems of credit for only one of the following courses: ACCT 436, ACCT
recordkeeping, performance management, and control. Various 498E, or BMGT 498E.
techniques are used to study cost and managerial accounting
practices and problems; these may include the use of problem ACCT 438 Fraud and Forensic Accounting (3)
sets, case studies, computer applications, and other materials. Prerequisite: ACCT 311. Analysis and discussion of issues related
Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: UPGSBVEBOEGPSFOTJDBDDPVOUJOH'PDVTJTPOUIFQFSTQFDUJWFTPG
ACCT 426 or BMGT 426. public, internal, and private accountants. Discussion covers the
principles and standards for proactive and reactive investigation,
ACCT 427 Advanced Auditing (3) as well as detection and control of fraud.
Prerequisite: ACCT 422. An examination and a thorough study
of special auditing topics. Topics include statistical sampling, ACCT 440 Forensic and Investigative Accounting (3)
information systems auditing, attestation standards, assurance Prerequisite: ACCT 320 or ACCT 438. Analysis and discussion
services, and SEC accounting. Various techniques are used to of issues relating to forensic and investigative accounting, based
study auditing theory and practice; these may include the use POBGPVOEBUJPOPGBDDPVOUJOHLOPXMFEHFBOETLJMMT'PSFOTJD
of problem sets, case studies, computer applications, and other and investigative methods are demonstrated. Cases, problems,
materials. Students may receive credit for only one of the follow- and examples are used to examine practical concepts in the areas
ing courses: ACCT 427 or BMGT 427. of litigation support and criminal justice, including investigative
auditing techniques, criminology, and courtroom procedures.

108 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
ACCT 486A Internship in Accounting Through Co-op (3)
1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSPHSBN African American Studies
requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to combine
Courses in African American studies (designated AASP) may be
academic theory with new, career-related experience in account-
applied as appropriate (according to individual program require-
ing. At least 12 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks
ments) toward
for a minimum of 180 hours during the Co-op session; four
new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the t a minor in African American studies;
course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon t the general education requirement in behavioral and social
approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new sciences; and
tasks and objectives related to accounting and that continues t electives.
to advance application of academic theory in the workplace. UMUC offers only a limited number of courses each session in
Students may earn up to 15 credits in all internship course- this discipline.
work through Co-op toward a first bachelor’s degree and up
to 9 credits toward a second bachelor’s degree. Co-op credits A description of the curriculum for the African American studies
may not be used for general education requirements and, unless minor begins on p. 15.
otherwise specified, no more than 6 Co-op credits may be used
in the academic major and minor (combined). AASP 201 Introduction to African American Studies (3)
'VMëMMTUIFHFOFSBMFEVDBUJPOSFRVJSFNFOUJOCFIBWJPSBMBOE
ACCT 486B Internship in Accounting Through Co-op (6) social sciences.) An interdisciplinary study of significant aspects
1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSPHSBN of African American history and culture, emphasizing the
requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to combine development of African American communities from the Middle
academic theory with new, career-related experience in account- Passage to the present. Topics include definitions of African
ing. At least 20 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks American identity, influences and achievements within American
for a total of 300 hours during the Co-op session; five to eight culture, and issues confronting African Americans. Students may
new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the receive credit for only one of the following courses: AASP 100 or
course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon AASP 201.
approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new
tasks and objectives related to accounting and that continues
to advance application of academic theory in the workplace.
Students may earn up to 15 credits in all internship course-
Anthropology
work through Co-op toward a first bachelor’s degree and up Courses in anthropology (designated ANTH) may be applied
to 9 credits toward a second bachelor’s degree. Co-op credits as appropriate (according to individual program requirements)
may not be used for general education requirements and, unless toward
otherwise specified, no more than 6 Co-op credits may be used t the general education requirement in the behavioral and social
in the academic major and minor (combined). sciences;
t a major in social science;
ACCT 495 Contemporary Issues in Accounting Practice (3)
t a major or minor in Asian studies;
(Intended as a final, capstone course to be taken in a student’s last
t a certificate in Diversity Awareness; and
15 credits.) Prerequisites: ACCT 311, 321, and 422 and BMGT
364. A study of accounting that integrates knowledge gained t electives.
through previous coursework and experience and builds on that Descriptions of related curricula may be found on the following
conceptual foundation through integrative analysis, practical pages: Asian studies (p. 16) and social science (p. 74).
application, and critical thinking. Emerging issues in accounting,
business transactions, and financing are considered. Web account- ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology: Archaeology and
ing and business technology, accounting theory, and management Physical Anthropology (3)
techniques are used to research and analyze developing issues in A survey of general patterns in the development of human
the workplace. Topics include e-commerce, financial derivatives, culture, addressing the biological and morphological aspects of
balanced scorecards, and the changing nature of financial report- humans viewed in their cultural setting. Students who complete
ing and risk management. Students may receive credit for only both ANTH 101 and 102 may not receive credit for ANTH 340,
one of the following courses: ACCT 495 or ACCT 498C. BEHS 340, or BEHS 341.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 109
INFORMATION ON COURSES
ANTH 102 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural ANTH 351 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology (3)
Anthropology (3) Recommended: BIOL 160 or BIOL 201. An introduction to
A survey of social and cultural principles inherent in ethno- the study of forensic anthropology, designed to provide a basic
graphic descriptions. Students who complete both ANTH 101 understanding of the analysis of human skeletal remains and
and 102 may not receive credit for ANTH 340, BEHS 340, or how forensic anthropologists work as part of the medical forensic
BEHS 341. team. Topics include the investigative methods used in forensic
anthropology; the standards for forensic anthropological inves-
ANTH 298 Special Topics in Anthropology (1–3) tigations; and methods for determining sex, ancestry, time since
A presentation of anthropological perspectives on selected top- death, and personal identity of human remains. Specific examples
ics of broad general interest. May be repeated to a maximum of of forensic anthropology cases are reviewed.
6 credits when topics differ.
ANTH 398 Intermediate Special Topics in Anthropology (1–3)
ANTH 343 Physical Anthropology and Archaeology (3) A presentation of anthropological perspectives on selected top-
An interdisciplinary, intermediate-level exploration of contempo- ics of broad general interest. May be repeated to a maximum
rary and applied issues in physical anthropology and archaeology. of 6 credits when topics differ.
Discussion covers evolution, human biological variation, primate
TUVEJFT BOEBSDIBFPMPHJDBMGSBNFXPSLTBOEDIBMMFOHFT'PDVT ANTH 398C Parenting in Monkeys (1)
is on theory and its application in dealing with concerns in our An exploration of parental care systems in monkeys, from evolu-
global society. Students may receive credit for only one of the fol- tionary and socioecological perspectives. Topics include maternal,
lowing courses: ANTH 340, ANTH 343, or BEHS 340. paternal, and sibling care; the costs and benefits of parental care;
parental investment; allomothering (nonmaternal infant care);
ANTH 344 Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics (3) and parent-offspring conflict.
An interdisciplinary, intermediate-level, exploration of contem-
porary issues in cultural anthropology and linguistics. Discussion ANTH 398F Human Skeletal Remains (1)
covers variation in human social organization, ethnographic field A fundamental overview of investigative methods used by
methods, world views, and relationships amongst cultures, as anthropologists and archaeologists in the study of human skeletal
XFMMBTDVMUVSBMEJNFOTJPOTPGMBOHVBHF'PDVTJTPOUIFPSZBOE remains. Discussion covers the application of forensic anthropol-
its application in dealing with concerns in our global society. ogy and archaeology to crime scene investigations, mass disasters,
Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: human rights work, and historical reconstructions.
ANTH 340, ANTH 344, or BEHS 340.
ANTH 398K The Great Apes (1)
ANTH 350 Medical Anthropology (3) An introduction to the behavior, ecology, and life history of great
Recommended: ANTH 102 or ANTH 344. A global survey of apes (bonobos, chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans), empha-
health, illness, and healing. Discussion covers the interactions sizing conservation of great ape populations in the wild. Great
between health, culture, and disease, as well as Western and ape taxonomy is reviewed. Topics include great ape behaviors
non-Western biomedical traditions and biocultural approaches and adaptations (such as hunting, tool use, self-medication) and
to health. Emphasis is on application of anthropological research whether great apes exhibit culture and language.
methods (e.g., observational, qualitative, and ethnographic
approaches) to the study of health and disease. ANTH 398S Peoples and Cultures of the World: South Asia (1)
Recommended: ANTH 102 or ANTH 344. An anthropological
overview of peoples and cultures of South Asia, comprising the
modern nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka,
the Maldives, and Bhutan. A survey of the geography, archaeol-
ogy, history, and languages of South Asia is provided. Discussion
covers social and religious traditions, with particular emphasis on
the caste system of social hierarchy and its impact on society from
an anthropological point of view.

110 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
ANTH 486A Internship in Anthropology Through Co-op (3)
1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSPHSBN Arabic
requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to combine
Courses in Arabic (designated ARAB) may be applied as appro-
academic theory with new, career-related experience in anthro-
priate (according to individual program requirements) toward
pology. At least 12 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks
for a minimum of 180 hours during the Co-op session; four t the general education requirement in the arts and humanities;
new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the t a major or minor in humanities; and
course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon t electives.
approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new UMUC offers a limited number of foreign language courses
tasks and objectives related to anthropology and that continues each session.
to advance application of academic theory in the workplace.
Students may earn up to 15 credits in all internship course- A description of the curriculum for the humanities major and
work through Co-op toward a first bachelor’s degree and up minor begins on p. 55.
to 9 credits toward a second bachelor’s degree. Co-op credits
may not be used for general education requirements and, unless ARAB 111 Elementary Arabic I (3)
otherwise specified, no more than 6 Co-op credits may be used (Not open to native speakers of Arabic; assumes no prior
in the academic major and minor (combined). knowledge of Arabic.) An elementary study of modern standard
Arabic. Emphasis is on oral communication skills as a founda-
ANTH 486B Internship in Anthropology Through Co-op (6) tion for building balanced proficiency in the four communica-
1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSPHSBN tion skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Topics
requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to combine include basic structures, vocabulary, pronunciation, and writing,
academic theory with new, career-related experience in anthropol- as well as elements of culture, history, and geography. Authentic
ogy. At least 20 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks for text from native speakers is used as much as possible.
a total of 300 hours during the Co-op session; five to eight new
tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the course ARAB 112 Elementary Arabic II (3)
requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon approval (Not open to native speakers of Arabic.) Prerequisite: ARAB 111.
of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new tasks and Continued basic study of modern standard Arabic, emphasizing
objectives related to anthropology and that continues to advance oral communication as a foundation for building balanced pro-
application of academic theory in the workplace. Students may ficiency in the four communication skills of listening, speaking,
earn up to 15 credits in all internship coursework through Co-op reading, and writing. Topics include basic structures, vocabu-
toward a first bachelor’s degree and up to 9 credits toward a sec- lary, pronunciation, and writing, as well as further elements of
ond bachelor’s degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general culture, history, and geography. Oral and written authentic text
education requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more from native speakers is used as much as possible.
than 6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and
minor (combined). ARAB 114 Elementary Arabic III (3)
(Not open to native speakers of Arabic.) Prerequisite: ARAB 112.
'VSUIFSEFWFMPQNFOUPGTLJMMTJOMJTUFOJOH TQFBLJOH SFBEJOH BOE
writing in Arabic. Arabic culture, history, current events, and
geography provide the context for instruction in grammatical
TUSVDUVSFT WPDBCVMBSZ QSPOVODJBUJPO BOEDPNQPTJUJPO'PDVT
is on acquiring the skills necessary to communicate with native
Arabic speakers orally and in writing at an advanced elementary
level. Oral and written authentic text is used as much as possible.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 111
INFORMATION ON COURSES
ARAB 115 Elementary Arabic IV (3) ARTT 250 Elements of Commercial Design (3)
(Not open to native speakers of Arabic.) Prerequisite: ARAB 114. A study of essential design concepts focusing on the creative
Improvement of skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills needed to better solve internal corporate and external
in Arabic. Arabic culture, history, current events, and geography advertising/marketing problems in visual media. Theoreti-
provide the context for instruction in grammatical structures, cal and practical applications include corporate/institutional
WPDBCVMBSZ QSPOVODJBUJPO BOEDPNQPTJUJPO'PDVTJTPOBDRVJS- identity programs, collateral corporate and marketing materials,
ing the skills necessary to communicate with native Arabic speak- and advertising campaigns. Discussion also covers the primary
ers orally and in writing at a basic intermediate level. Oral and relationship between word and image communications. Empha-
written authentic text is used as much as possible. sis is on creative problem solving in media communications. An
exploration of symbolism and its relationship to image addresses
visual structure, continuity, and coherence. Psychological and

Art sociocultural questions are also examined as they relate to ethical


standards and practices.
Courses in art (designated ARTT) may be applied as appropriate
ARTT 320 Elements of Painting (3)
(according to individual program requirements) toward
Prerequisite: ARTT 110. Practice in the basic tools and vocabu-
t the general education requirement in the arts and humanities;
lary of painting. Oil and/or water-based paints are used.
t a minor in art;
t a major in graphic communication; ARTT 354 Elements of Computer Graphics (3)
t a major or minor in humanities; Recommended: One lower-level ARTT course (or equivalent
t a certificate in Computer Graphics and Design, Desktop experience in graphic design) and experience in art fundamen-
Publishing, or Web Design; and tals, Microsoft Office applications, and Windows. An intro-
t electives. duction to computer graphics programs and basic concepts
A description of the curriculum for the art minor begins on JOFMFDUSPOJDEFTJHO'PDVTJTPODSFBUJOHBSUXPSLJOWBSJPVT
p. 15. Descriptions of related curricula may be found on the formats, including print and the Web. Projects require six hours
following pages: graphic communication (p. 49) and humanities of computer work per week, some of which must be completed
(p. 55). independently.

ARTT 110 Elements of Drawing I (3) ARTT 418 Drawing (3)

An introduction to various media and related techniques. Prob- Prerequisite: ARTT 210. Creation of original compositions
lems for study are based on the figure, still life, and nature. based on the figure and nature, supplemented by problems of
personal and expressive drawing. May be repeated to a maximum
ARTT 205 Art Appreciation (3) of 12 credits.
An introduction to a variety of two- and three-dimensional
ARTT 428 Painting (3)
art forms, with particular emphasis on two-dimensional arts.
Examples from different media—including illustration; painting Prerequisite: ARTT 320. Creation of original compositions based
with oils, acrylics, and watercolors; and sculpture—are used to on the figure, nature, and still life, as well as expressive painting.
examine form, light, color, perspective, and other elements of art. Emphasis is on the development of personal directions. May be
repeated to a maximum of 12 credits.
ARTT 210 Elements of Drawing II (3)
ARTT 458 Graphic Design and Illustration (3)
Prerequisite: ARTT 110. Drawing taught with an emphasis on
understanding organic form as related to study of the human An introduction to the basic elements of design. Projects focus
figure and pictorial composition. Students may receive credit for on problems central to the commercial arts. Basic skills with a
only one of the following courses: ARTS 210 or ARTT 210. variety of media and techniques are developed.

ARTT 470 Watercolor (3)


An opportunity for further development of painting in water-
colors at beginning or advanced levels. May be repeated to a
maximum of 6 credits.

112 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
ARTT 479 Advanced Computer Graphics (3)
Prerequisite: ARTT 354. A study of advanced techniques in and Art History
the theory behind computer imaging, graphics, illustration, and
Courses in art history (designated ARTH) may be applied as
mixed media. Projects require six hours of computer work per
appropriate (according to individual program requirements)
week, some of which must be completed independently.
toward
ARTT 486A Internship in Art Through Co-op (3) t the general education requirements in the arts and
humanities;
1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSP-
gram requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to t a minor in art history;
combine academic theory with new, career-related experience t a major or minor in humanities; and
in art. At least 12 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks t electives.
for a minimum of 180 hours during the Co-op session; four UMUC offers a limited number of ARTH courses each session.
new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the To complete a minor, students may need to take courses at other
course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon institutions in the University System of Maryland or extend
approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new the time spent fulfilling the degree requirements. Students are
tasks and objectives related to art and that continues to advance advised to consult an advisor before selecting this discipline.
application of academic theory in the workplace. Students may
earn up to 15 credits in all internship coursework through Co-op A description of the curriculum for the art history minor begins
toward a first bachelor’s degree and up to 9 credits toward a sec- on p. 15. A description of the curriculum for a major or minor
ond bachelor’s degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general in humanities begins on p. 55.
education requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more
than 6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and ARTH 204 Film and American Culture Studies (3)
minor (combined). 'PSNFSMZ)6./
&YQMPSBUJPOPGUIF"NFSJDBOëMNGSPN
a historical perspective, illustrating the motion picture’s role as an
ARTT 486B Internship in Art Through Co-op (6) institutional phenomenon, as a form of communication, and as
1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSP- a source of cross-cultural study. Students may receive credit for
gram requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to only one of the following courses: AMST 204, HUMN 204, or
combine academic theory with new, career-related experience ARTH 204.
in art. At least 20 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks
for a total of 300 hours during the Co-op session; five to eight ARTH 334 Understanding Movies (3)
new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the 'PSNFSMZ)6./
"OBOBMZTJTPGPOFPGUIFNPTUJNQPS-
course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon tant means of artistic expression of the 20th century. The goal
approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new is to acquire a deeper understanding of the aesthetic qualities of
tasks and objectives related to art and that continues to advance film by considering the stylistic elements of film as it has evolved
application of academic theory in the workplace. Students may throughout the century and weighing the special relationship
earn up to 15 credits in all internship coursework through Co-op between cinema and literature. Students may receive credit for
toward a first bachelor’s degree and up to 9 credits toward a sec- only one of the following courses: ARTH 334, HUMN 334, or
ond bachelor’s degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general HUMN 498D.
education requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more
than 6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and ARTH 370 History of World Art I (3)
minor (combined). A survey of the development of world visual art in its various
forms, examining and comparing the expression of cultural and
ARTT 495 Graphic Communication Portfolio (3) aesthetic values in different parts of the world from prehistory to
(Intended as a final, capstone course to be taken in a students last 1400, when the European Age of Exploration began and world
DSFEJUT'VMëMMTUIFHFOFSBMFEVDBUJPOSFRVJSFNFOUJOUIFBSUT cultures came into contact.
and humanities.) Development of a portfolio that demonstrates
competencies in graphic communication.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 113
INFORMATION ON COURSES
ARTH 371 History of World Art II (3)
A survey of the development of world visual art in its various Asian Studies
forms, examining and comparing the expression of cultural and
Courses in Asian studies (designated ASTD) may be applied
aesthetic values in different parts of the world from 1400, when
as appropriate (according to individual program requirements)
the European Age of Exploration began, to modern day. The
toward
effects of contact among world cultures on both the form and
content of artistic expression is examined. t the general education requirements in the arts and humani-
ties or the behavioral and social sciences (based on course
ARTH 380 Masterpieces of Painting (3) content);
Analysis of selected masterworks of painting, intended to reveal t a major or minor in Asian studies or humanities; and
the creative process, the personality of the artist, and the cultural t electives.
context. Students may receive credit for only one of the following UMUC offers a limited number of courses each session in this
courses: ARTH 320 or ARTH 380. discipline. To complete a major or minor, students may need
to take courses at other institutions in the University System of
ARTH 486A Internship in Art History Through Co-op (3) Maryland or extend the time spent fulfilling the degree require-
1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSPHSBN ments. Students are advised to consult an advisor before selecting
requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to combine this discipline.
academic theory with new, career-related experience in art his- A description of the curriculum for the Asian studies major and
tory. At least 12 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks minor begins on p. 16. A description of the curriculum for the
for a minimum of 180 hours during the Co-op session; four humanities major and minor begins on p. 55.
new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the
course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon ASTD 150 Introduction to Asian Studies I (3)
approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new tasks
'VMëMMTUIFHFOFSBMFEVDBUJPOSFRVJSFNFOUTJOUIFBSUTBOE
and objectives related to art history and that continues to advance
humanities or the social sciences.) An interdisciplinary exami-
application of academic theory in the workplace. Students may
nation of the classical Asian tradition, encompassing a general
earn up to 15 credits in all internship coursework through Co-op
survey of the region.
toward a first bachelor’s degree and up to 9 credits toward a sec-
ond bachelor’s degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general
ASTD 160 Introduction to Asian Studies II (3)
education requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more
than 6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and 'VMëMMTUIFHFOFSBMFEVDBUJPOSFRVJSFNFOUTJOUIFBSUTBOE
minor (combined). humanities or the social sciences.) An interdisciplinary examina-
tion of the modern period in Asian history, beginning approxi-
ARTH 486B Internship in Art History Through Co-op (6) mately with the 17th century.
1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSPHSBN
ASTD 198 Special Topics in Asian Studies (3)
requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to combine
academic theory with new, career-related experience in art his- An investigation of a special topic, problem, or issue of particular
tory. At least 20 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks relevance to countries or peoples of the Pacific Rim or Indian
for a total of 300 hours during the Co-op session; five to eight Ocean. Typical investigations include historical or contemporary
new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the subjects focusing on cultural, economic, military, or political
course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon issues.
approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new tasks
and objectives related to art history and that continues to advance ASTD 309 Business in Asia (3)
application of academic theory in the workplace. Students may 'VMëMMTUIFHFOFSBMFEVDBUJPOSFRVJSFNFOUJOUIFTPDJBMTDJFODFT

earn up to 15 credits in all internship coursework through Co-op An integrative study of business conditions and practices in the
toward a first bachelor’s degree and up to 9 credits toward a sec- Asian/Pacific region from the perspective of contemporary his-
ond bachelor’s degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general tory, economics, government, and cross-cultural interests.
education requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more
than 6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and
minor (combined).

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ASTD 380 American Relations with China and Japan: ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy (3)
1740 to Present (3) (Not open to students who have taken or are taking any astron-
'VMëMMTUIFHFOFSBMFEVDBUJPOSFRVJSFNFOUJOUIFTPDJBMTDJFODFT
 PNZDPVSTFOVNCFSFEPSIJHIFS'PSTUVEFOUTOPUNBKPSJOH
A study of American political, economic, and cultural relations or minoring in a science.) Prerequisite: MATH 012 or higher. A
with China and Japan from the American colonial era to modern discussion of the major areas of astronomy. Topics include the
times. Topics include diplomacy and power politics; Christian solar system, stars and stellar evolution, and galaxies. Current
missions; immigration and exclusion; overseas education; art and topics in astronomy are also discussed. Students may receive
literature; and trade, investment, and technology. credit for only one of the following courses: ASTR 100, ASTR
101, ASTR 120, or GNSC 125.
ASTD 398 Advanced Special Topics in Asian Studies (3)
An investigation of a special topic, problem, or issue of particular ASTR 399 Independent Study in Astronomy (1–6)
relevance to countries or peoples of the Pacific Rim or Indian Prerequisite: 6 credits in ASTR courses and agreement of faculty
Ocean. Typical investigations include historical or contemporary member to act as supervisor. Directed independent study of top-
subjects focusing on cultural, economic, military, or political ics of special interest not covered by regularly scheduled courses
issues. Assignments include advanced reading and research. in astronomy. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits when
topics differ.
ASTD 438 Japanese Literature in Translation (3)
'PSNFSMZ+"1/$POEVDUFEJO&OHMJTI'VMëMMTUIFHFOFSBM
education requirement in the arts and humanities.) A study of rep-
resentative works of Japanese literature in English translation. May
be repeated for a total of six credits when course content differs. Behavioral and
ASTD 485 Great Issues in Asian Studies (3) Social Sciences
(Intended as a final, capstone course to be taken in a student’s
MBTUDSFEJUT'VMëMMTUIFHFOFSBMFEVDBUJPOSFRVJSFNFOUJO Courses in behavioral and social sciences (designated BEHS)
the arts and humanities.) Prerequisites: ASTD 150 and 160. A may be applied as appropriate (according to individual program
study of Asian issues that integrates knowledge gained through requirements) toward
previous coursework and experience and builds on that concep- t the general education requirement in the behavioral
tual foundation through integrative analysis, practical applica- and social sciences;
tion, and critical thinking. Emerging issues in Asian studies are t a major in social science or environmental management;
DPOTJEFSFE'PDVTJTPOUIFCSPBEJTTVFPGNPEFSOJ[BUJPOJO t a minor in environmental management or women’s studies;
Asian nations. t a certificate in Applied Behavioral and Social Sciences or
Diversity Awareness; and
t electives.
Astronomy A description of the curriculum for the social science major
begins on p. 74. A description of the curriculum for the women’s
Courses in astronomy (designated ASTR) may be applied as studies minor may be found on p. 77.
appropriate (according to individual program requirements)
toward BEHS 198A Sociology of Astrology (1)
t the general education requirement in the biological and Recommended: Concurrent or previous enrollment in ASTR
physical sciences; 100. An exploration of social and psychological reasons for
t a minor in natural science; and CFMJFWJOHJOUIJOHTUIBUDBOOPUMPHJDBMMZCFUSVF'PDVTJTPOUIF
t electives. pseudo-science of astrology, including its historical origins, its
UMUC offers only a limited number of courses each session in mechanics, and its persistence in modern culture.
this discipline.
A description of the curriculum for the natural science minor
begins on p. 70.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 115
INFORMATION ON COURSES
BEHS 210 Introduction to Social and Behavioral Science (3) BEHS 364 Alcohol in U.S. Society (3)
An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of society that An interdisciplinary examination of the use and abuse of alco-
addresses what it is to be a social scientist from a variety of holic beverages from the perspectives of psychology, physiology,
social science perspectives. Empirical and theoretical contribu- sociology, medicine, and public health. The effects of alcohol on
tions of the different social science disciplines are used to better all age groups throughout the lifespan are explored in relation to
understand the nature of society. Survey covers culture, geogra- gender, families, race, the workplace, and public safety. Analysis
phy, the individual, family, education, stratification in society, covers current research and trends in the treatment of alcohol-
government and politics, and economics. Topics also include the ism, including prevention, assessment, and intervention, as well
scientific method and research methods in the social science dis- as legal aspects.
ciplines and the current relationships among the different social
science disciplines. A historical overview of the development of BEHS 365 Individuals, Society and Environmental
the social sciences is provided, and an analysis of social phenom- Sustainability (3)
ena that integrates insights from the social sciences is presented. 'PSNFSMZ#&)40
"OJOUFSEJTDJQMJOBSZTUVEZPGUIFSPMF
Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: of individual human behavior and social institutions in environ-
BEHS 201 or BEHS 210. mental sustainability, stewardship, and conservation. Ways in
which our own conduct contributes to larger global patterns are
BEHS 220 Diversity Awareness (3) examined. Emphasis is on consumer behavior and the concept of
An interdisciplinary study of diversity issues designed to encour- reduce, reuse, and recycle. Discussion covers the identification of
age critical thinking about their impact in today’s world. Empha- barriers to participation in sustainability and mechanisms for the
sis is on consciousness of diversity and awareness that each elimination of those barriers. Students may receive credit for only
individual lives within a diverse environment. Topics include one of the following courses: BEHS 365 or BEHS 398O.
issues related to age, disability, race, creed, gender, sexual orienta-
tion, national origin, and socioeconomic status, as well as current BEHS 453 Domestic Violence (3)
issues in diversity studies. An examination of the complex phenomenon of domestic
violence from a systems perspective that integrates individual,
BEHS 320 Disability Studies (3) social, political, cultural/ethnic, economic, legal, and medical
An interdisciplinary study of disability issues that focuses on viewpoints from the past and present. Topics include the physi-
understanding and evaluating traditional and current interpreta- cal, emotional, and sexual abuse of children, partners, and the
tions of the meaning of disability. Topics include the construc- elderly. Discussion also covers response systems and mechanisms
tion of images of people with disabilities by people without to prevent and treat violence. Students may receive credit for
disabilities; attitudes and actions toward those with disabilities by only one of the following courses: BEHS 453 or BEHS 454.
those without disabilities; approaches taken by major social insti-
tutions (e.g., law, education, religion, the arts) toward disability; BEHS 486A Internship in Behavioral Science Through Co-op (3)
distinctions between a sociocultural approach to disability and 1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSPHSBN
the medical model; and current issues in disability studies. requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to combine
academic theory with new, career-related experience in behav-
BEHS 343 Parenting Today (3) ioral and social sciences. At least 12 hours per week must be
An overview of critical issues of parenthood in the United devoted to new tasks for a minimum of 180 hours during the
States today. Topics include characteristics of effective parenting Co-op session; four new tasks must be delineated in the Learn-
styles and capable parents, the role of nontraditional parenting ing Proposal; and the course requirements must be completed.
techniques, and the social forces that cause changes in parent/ May be repeated upon approval of a new Learning Proposal
child relationships and give rise to varying styles of parenting as that demonstrates new tasks and objectives related to behavioral
developed in the United States. Some cross-cultural comparisons and social sciences and that continues to advance application
are included. of academic theory in the workplace. Students may earn up to
15 credits in all internship coursework through Co-op toward a
first bachelor’s degree and up to 9 credits toward a second bach-
elor’s degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general educa-
tion requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more than
6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and minor
(combined).

116 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
BEHS 486B Internship in Behavioral Science Through Co-op (6) BIOL 102 Laboratory in Biology (1)
1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSPHSBN 'PSTUVEFOUTOPUNBKPSJOHJOBTDJFODF'VMëMMTUIFMBCPSBUPSZ
requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to combine science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for
academic theory with new, career-related experience in behav- BIOL 101.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 101. A laboratory
ioral and social sciences. At least 20 hours per week must be study of the concepts underlying the structure and functioning
devoted to new tasks for a total of 300 hours during the Co-op of living organisms. Laboratory exercises emphasize the scientific
session; five to eight new tasks must be delineated in the Learn- method and explore topics such as the chemical foundations of
ing Proposal; and the course requirements must be completed. living organisms, pH, cell structure and function, metabolism,
May be repeated upon approval of a new Learning Proposal DNA structure and function, mechanisms and patterns of inheri-
that demonstrates new tasks and objectives related to behavioral tance, evolution, classification, and population biology and eco-
and social sciences and that continues to advance application systems. Students may receive credit for only one of the following
of academic theory in the workplace. Students may earn up to courses: BIOL 102, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BSCI 105.
15 credits in all internship coursework through Co-op toward a
first bachelor’s degree and up to 9 credits toward a second bach- BIOL 103 Introduction to Biology (4)
elor’s degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general educa- (Not open to students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL
tion requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more than 'PSTUVEFOUTOPUNBKPSJOHJOBTDJFODF'VMëMMTUIFMBCPSB-
6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and minor tory science requirement.) An introduction to the concepts
(combined). underlying the structure and function of living organisms. The
organization, chemical foundations, metabolism, genetics, evolu-
tion, ecosystems, and interdependence of living organisms are
Biology explored. Laboratory activities emphasize the scientific method in
exploring these topics. Students may receive credit for only one of
Courses in biology (designated BIOL) may be applied as appro- the following courses: BIOL 101, BIOL 102, BIOL 103, BIOL
priate (according to individual program requirements) toward 105, or BSCI 105.
t the general education requirement in the biological and
BIOL 160 Human Biology (3)
physical sciences;
(Science background not required.) A general introduction to
t a major in biotechnology, homeland security, investigative
human structure, functions, genetics, evolution, and ecology. The
forensics, or laboratory management;
human organism is examined from the basic cellular level and
t a minor in biology, forensics, microbiology, or natural science;
genetics, through organ systems, to interaction with the outside
and
world. Pertinent health topics are also discussed. Students may
t electives (including related requirements for the environmen- receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 160 or
tal management major). GNSC 160.
A description of the curriculum for the biology minor begins on
p. 17. Descriptions of related curricula may be found on the fol- BIOL 181 Life in the Oceans (3)
lowing pages: biotechnology (p. 18), environmental management A study of the major groups of plants and animals in various
(p. 39), forensics (p. 45), homeland security (p. 53), investigative marine environments, as well as their interactions with each
forensics (p. 61), laboratory management (p. 63), microbiology other and the nonliving components of the ocean. The impact
(p. 70), and natural science (p. 70). of human activity on life in the ocean and the potential uses and
misuses of the ocean are discussed. Students may receive credit
BIOL 101 Concepts of Biology (3) for only one of the following courses: BIOL 181 or ZOOL 181.
'PSTUVEFOUTOPUNBKPSJOHJOBTDJFODF
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living things in light of knowledge of physical, chemical, and BIOL 211 Environmental Science (3)
biological principles. The organization, processes, interdepen- A survey of ecological principles as they apply to the interrelated
dence, and variety of living organisms are explored. Emphasis is dilemmas of sustainability. Topics include overpopulation, pol-
on understanding the impact of biological knowledge on human lution, over-consumption of natural resources, and the ethics of
societies. Current events that involve biological systems are con- land use. Students may receive credit for only one of the follow-
sidered. Students may receive credit for only one of the following ing courses: BIOL 211, BOTN 211, or PBIO 235.
courses: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BSCI 105.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 117
INFORMATION ON COURSES
BIOL 215 Population Biology and General Ecology (3) BIOL 302 Bacteria, Viruses, and Health (3)
A general introduction to population and community biology. 'PSTUVEFOUTNBKPSJOHJOCPUITDJFODFBOEOPOTDJFODFEJTDJ-
Topics include evolution, population genetics, population growth plines.) An introductory study of the basic structure, genetic and
and steady states, age structure of populations, multispecies regulatory systems, and life cycles of bacteria and viruses. Student
dependencies, and ecosystem energetics. Illustrations are drawn may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL
both from both natural and human populations. Students may 230, BIOL 302, BIOL 331, BIOL 398G, BSCI 223, MICB 200,
receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 215 or MICB 388A.
or ZOOL 270.
BIOL 304 The Biology of Cancer (3)
BIOL 220 Human Genetics (3) 'PSTUVEFOUTNBKPSJOHJOCPUITDJFODFBOEOPOTDJFODFEJT-
'PSTUVEFOUTOPUNBKPSJOHJOBTDJFODF
"OJOUSPEVDUJPOUP ciplines.) An overview of the biological basis of cancer. The
genetics, focusing on the human organism. Topics include development and progression of cancer are considered at the level
transmission and biochemical genetics, mutation, the behavior of cell structure and function. The roles of genes and proteins are
of genes in populations, and genetic engineering. The roles of also examined. Students may receive credit for only one of the
recent discoveries in the treatment of genetic diseases, cancer, and following courses: BIOL 304 or GNSC 398C.
organ transplantation are examined. Students may receive credit
for only one of the following courses: BIOL 220, BIOL 346, BIOL 305 The Biology of AIDS (3)
ZOOL 146, or ZOOL 346. 'PSTUVEFOUTNBKPSJOHJOCPUITDJFODFBOEOPOTDJFODFEJTDJ-
plines.) An overview of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
BIOL 222 Principles of Genetics (3) (AIDS) from a biological perspective. The development and
Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, or BIOL 105. Recom- treatment of AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
mended: CHEM 103. A study of the principles and mechanisms infection are considered with respect to cells, viruses, genes, and
of heredity and gene expression. Plant, animal, and microbial proteins.
organisms are considered. Students may receive credit for only one
of the following courses: BIOL 220, BIOL 222, or BSCI 222. BIOL 307 The Biology of Aging (3)
'PSTUVEFOUTNBKPSJOHJOCPUITDJFODFBOEOPOTDJFODFEJTDJ-
BIOL 226 Evolution (3) plines.) An overview of the biological basis of aging. Topics
Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BIOL 161. include typical changes that occur in cells, molecules, metabo-
An introduction to biological evolution, its principles, and lism, and structure during the aging process. The development
their application to understanding the history of life on Earth. and progression of several diseases associated with aging (includ-
Discussion covers the history and evidence for modern evolution- ing cancer, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzeheimer’s and
ary concepts and mechanisms, the origin of life, the molecular Parkinson’s disease, osteoporosis, and loss of visual acuity and
mechanisms of evolution, the evolution of plants, the evolution memory) are discussed with respect to the role of genes, proteins,
of animals (including man), the relationship between ontogeny and environmental influences. Students may receive credit for
and phylogeny, and the reciprocal relationships of evolution to only one of the following courses: BIOL 307 or BIOL 398V.
the environment (including human culture).
BIOL 320 Forensic Biology (3)
BIOL 301 Human Health and Disease (3) An introduction to the basic principles of biology as applied to
'PSTUVEFOUTNBKPSJOHJOCPUITDJFODFBOEOPOTDJFODFEJTDJ- the field of forensic science. Topics include the biological features
plines.) A survey of the mechanisms of disease and their expres- and characteristics of various types of evidentiary materials, as
sion in major organ systems of the human body. Topics include well as the basic principles of chemistry, cell biology, microbiol-
infections, cancer, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, stroke, ogy, and genetics that underlie various types of forensic analysis.
malnutrition, poisoning by environmental toxins, stress, inflam-
mation, disorders of the immune system, and aging. Emphasis is
on prevention of disease through control of risk factors and early
detection. Students may receive credit for only one of the follow-
ing courses: BIOL 301 or BIOL 398H.

118 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
BIOL 331 Concepts in Microbiology (4) BIOL 357 Bioinformatics (3)
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1SFSFRVJTJUF#*0- Recommended: Some background in either computer science or
102, BIOL 103, or BIOL 105. An examination of the morphol- introductory biology. An introduction to the use of computers in
ogy, genetics, ecology, physiology, immunology, and pathogenesis the analysis of DNA and protein sequences and the significance
of microorganisms. The use of microorganisms in the fields of of these analyses. Topics include genome analysis, evolutionary
medicine, food design and safety, and biotechnology are also relationships, structure-function identification, pattern recogni-
explored. Students may receive credit for only one of the follow- tion, database searches and structures, and algorithms. Students
ing courses: BIOL 230, BIOL 302, BIOL 331, BIOL 398G, may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL
BSCI 223, MICB 200, or MICB 388A. 357 or BIOL 398U.

BIOL 334 Vaccines and Society (3) BIOL 360 Developmental Biology (3)
'PSTUVEFOUTNBKPSJOHJOCPUITDJFODFBOEOPOTDJFODFEJTDJ- Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, or BIOL 105. An overview
plines.) An overview of the development and testing of vaccines, of animal development, with an emphasis on the underlying
the prevention of disease by vaccines, and the role of vaccines in cellular and molecular mechanisms that guide it. Topics include
society. The scientific, clinical, and practical aspects of vaccines fertilization, embryonic cleavage, gastrulations, early vertebrate
and vaccination are considered with regard to the immune sys- morphogenesis, neural development, fate determination by
tem. Vaccine development is considered from a historical perspec- cytoplasm specification and cell-cell interactions, transcriptional
tive, as well as in the context of current vaccine research. Students and post-transcriptional gene regulation mechanisms that medi-
may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL ate developmental processes, homeobox gene families, protein
334, BIOL 335, BIOL 398R, GNSC 398H, or MICB 388D. gradients, pattern formation, and sex determination and gameto-
genesis. Students may receive credit for only one of the following
BIOL 350 Molecular and Cellular Biology (3) courses: BIOL 360 or BIOL 398T.
'PSTUVEFOUTNBKPSJOHPSNJOPSJOHJOBTDJFODF
1SFSFRVJ-
site: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, or BIOL 105. An introduction to BIOL 362 Neurobiology (3)
the basic structure and function of cells, with an emphasis on 'PSTUVEFOUTNBKPSJOHPSNJOPSJOHJOBOBUVSBMTDJFODFPS
eukaryotic cell biology. Topics include cell-cycle growth and psychology.) Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, or BIOL 105.
death; protein structure and metabolism; gene replication, repair, An in-depth discussion of the biology and development of the
recombination, and expression; RNA processing and metabolism; nervous system. Topics include neuronal structure and function,
and molecular transport, traffic, and signaling. The principles and communication at the synapse, membrane receptors and intra-
uses of recombinant DNA and genetic engineering technology and intercellular signaling systems, gene regulation, gross orga-
are also discussed. Students may receive credit for only one of the nization of the brain and spinal cord, the processing of sensory
following courses: BIOL 350 or BIOL 398S. information, the programming of motor responses, and higher
functions such as learning, memory, cognition, and speech.
BIOL 356 Molecular Biology Laboratory (4)
'PSTUVEFOUTNBKPSJOHPSNJOPSJOHJOBTDJFODF'VMëMMTUIF BIOL 398A Human Evolution and Ecology (1)
laboratory science requirement.) Prerequisite: BIOL 222, BIOL An examination of the varied biological evidence for the theory
230, or BIOL 350. A laboratory study of current molecular of evolution, including fossil records, DNA analysis, and geologi-
biology and genetic engineering procedures. Topics include the cal and biogeographical changes. Discussion covers the struggle
isolation of DNA, RNA, and proteins; electrophoresis; the use of for existence, the survival of the fittest, and adaptation to the
restriction enzymes; cloning procedures; polymerase chain reac- environment. Topics include Darwinian medicine, the evolution
tion (PCR) analysis; and gene expression analysis. Students may of disease, and the role of evolution in the human ecosystem.
receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 355 or
BIOL 356.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 119
INFORMATION ON COURSES
BIOL 398J The Role of Nutrition in Cancer and BIOL 434 General Virology (3)
Heart Disease (1) (Students seeking to satisfy the laboratory science requirement
A study of the relationship between diet and the development of should take BIOL 435). Prerequisite: BIOL 230. A broad investi-
cancer and heart disease at the level of molecules, cells, and genes. gation of viruses. Topics include the physical and chemical nature
Topics include the scientific and epidemiological evidence sup- of viruses, methods of cultivation and assay, modes of replication,
porting the roles of various foods, nutrients, antioxidants, fiber, characteristics of the major viral groups, and the types of viral
fats, and genetics in the progression or prevention of these two diseases. Emphasis is on viral genetics and the oncogenic viruses.
major causes of mortality. Students may receive credit for only Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses:
POFPGUIFGPMMPXJOHDPVSTFT#*0-+PS(/4$' BIOL 434, BIOL 435, MICB 460, or MICB 461.

BIOL 398K Stem Cells in Society (1) BIOL 435 General Virology with Laboratory (4)
An introduction to the biological principles that govern the 'VMëMMTUIFMBCPSBUPSZTDJFODFSFRVJSFNFOU
1SFSFRVJTJUF#*0-
origin, development, and utility of stem cells. Topics include the 230 or BIOL 302. Comprehensive survey of viruses and tech-
features of stem cells; their various sources; and their potential niques for their investigation. Topics include the physical and
uses in medicine, agriculture, and industry. The risks and legal chemical nature of viruses, methods of cultivation and assay,
and ethical issues associated with stem cell technologies are also modes of replication, characteristics of the major viral groups,
examined. and the types of viral diseases. Emphasis is on viral genetics and
the oncogenic viruses. Students may receive credit for only one
BIOL 398P Pesticides and the Environment (1) of the following courses: BIOL 434, BIOL 435, MICB 460, or
A survey of the history of pesticides, their importance in MICB 461.
America’s environmental “awakening,” and their significance as
contaminants. The evolution of pesticide usage, from overdepen- BIOL 438 Immunology (4)
dence to attempts at reduction, is also covered. 'VMëMMTUIFMBCPSBUPSZTDJFODFSFRVJSFNFOU
1SFSFRVJTJUF#*0-
230 or BIOL 302. An exposition of the principles of immunity
BIOL 400 Life Science Seminar (3) and hypersensitivity. The fundamental techniques of immunol-
'PSTUVEFOUTNBKPSJOHPSNJOPSJOHJOBTDJFODF
1SFSFRVJTJUF ogy are presented. Students may receive credit for only one of the
BIOL 101, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BSCI 105. An examina- following courses: BIOL 438 or MICB 450.
tion of current topics in the life sciences through seminars and
discussions based on representative publications in the recent and BIOL 486A Internship in Life Science Through Co-op (3)
primary literature. 1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSPHSBN
requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to combine
BIOL 422 Epidemiology of Emerging Infections (3) academic theory with new, career-related experience in the life
Prerequisite: BIOL 230, BIOL 302, or BIOL 398G. An investi- sciences. At least 12 hours per week must be devoted to new
gation of factors contributing to the emergence of new infectious tasks for a minimum of 180 hours during the Co-op session; four
diseases and the resurgence of diseases once thought to have been new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the
controlled. Disease symptoms, patterns of spread, and possible course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon
control measures are examined for new infectious diseases (such approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new tasks
as Lyme disease and AIDS and those caused by E. coli 0157, and objectives related to biology and that continues to advance
the Ebola virus, hantaviruses, and cryptosporidia). Resurgent application of academic theory in the workplace. Students may
diseases (such as small pox, anthrax, botolism, bubonic plague, earn up to 15 credits in all internship coursework through Co-op
dengue, influenza, tuberculosis, cholera, and malaria) and those toward a first bachelor’s degree and up to 9 credits toward a sec-
caused by flesh-eating bacteria are also discussed. Students may ond bachelor’s degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general
receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 422 education requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more
or MICB 388E. than 6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and
minor (combined).

120 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
BIOL 486B Internship in Life Science Through Co-op (6) BMGT 110 Introduction to Business and Management (3)
1SFSFRVJTJUF'PSNBMBENJTTJPOUPUIF$PPQQSPHSBN QSPHSBN 'PSTUVEFOUTXJUIMJUUMFPSOPCVTJOFTTCBDLHSPVOE3FDPN-
requirements are listed on p. 233). An opportunity to combine mended preparation for many other BMGT courses.) A
academic theory with new, career-related experience in the life survey of the field of business management. Topics include
sciences. At least 20 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks human relations, technology in business, ethical behavior,
for a total of 300 hours during the Co-op session; five to eight the environment, global and economic forces, organization,
new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the quality, products and services, functional management, and
course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon current issues and developments.
approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new tasks
and objectives related to biology and that continues to advance BMGT 304 Managing E-Commerce in Organizations (3)
application of academic theory in the workplace. Students may An introduction to the history and design of Internet-based busi-
earn up to 15 credits in all internship coursework through Co-op ness models (i.e., e-commerce) in organizations. Topics include
toward a first bachelor’s degree and up to 9 credits toward a sec- e-commerce management principles, management of different
ond bachelor’s degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general types of organizations, integration of human and information
education requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more technology resources, training and development, and use of
than 6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and information systems. Investigation also covers knowledge man-
minor (combined). agement strategies; the management of business units to imple-
ment technological marketing (or e-marketing); the creation of
new roles and responsibilities for managers in the e-commerce
Business and Management environment of organizations; relationships among the Internet,
government, and society; and future prospects of e-commerce.
Courses in business and management (designated BMGT) may Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses:
be applied as appropriate (according to individual program BMGT 304 or BMGT 388M.
requirements) toward
BMGT 305 Knowledge Management (3)
t a major in business administration, emergency management,
finance, global business and public policy, homeland security, An introduction to the ways in which organizations create,
human resource management, laboratory management, man- identify, capture, process, and distribute knowledge. Topics
agement studies, or marketing; include knowledge generation and coordination, knowledge
markets, knowledge transfer and skills, and knowledge manage-
t a minor in business administration, business law and public
ment principles. Discussion also covers new organizations and
policy, business supply chain management, customer service
intellectual capital; the integration of human resources, training
management, finance, human resource management, interna-
and development, information systems and security, and business
tional business management, management studies, marketing,
units to implement knowledge management strategies; and new
or strategic and entrepreneurial management;
roles and responsibilities for knowledge workers. Students may
t a certificate in various business-related areas;
receive credit for only one of the following courses: BMGT 305
t certain UMUC graduate degree programs, where recognized or BMGT 388C.
as equivalent coursework; and
t electives. BMGT 312 Women in Business (3)
A description of the curriculum for the business administra- Prerequisite: BMGT 110 or at least two years of business and
tion major and minor begins on p. 19. Descriptions of related management experience. An examination of women’s evolv-
curricula may be found on the following pages: business law ing roles in the business world and the forces that have created
and public policy (p. 21), business supply chain management change and opportunities. Discussion explores how organiza-
(p. 22), customer service management (p. 33), finance (p. 41), tional theory, human resource practices, industrialization, and
global business and public policy (p. 47), homeland security information technology have created new paths for professional
(p. 53), human resource management (p. 56), international growth. Students may receive credit for only one of the following
business management (p. 60), laboratory management (p. 63), courses: BMGT 312, BMGT 398I, or MGMT 398I.
management studies (p. 66), marketing (p. 67), and strategic and
entrepreneurial management (p. 77).

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 121
INFORMATION ON COURSES
BMGT 313 Women as Entrepreneurs (3) BMGT 324 Introduction to Entrepreneurship: Starting a
A study of the qualities that help women excel in business. Small Business (1)
Topics include the rapid increase in female-owned companies, An introduction to entrepreneurship and the concept of starting
especially small businesses, and ways women have overcome the a small business. Topics include the costs and benefits of operat-
barriers they face in starting a business. Discussion also covers ing a small business venture and types of small businesses that
the reasons for female exclusion from traditional financing alter- can be successfully operated. Special considerations and laws that
natives and current funding options for women. Inspirational apply to small business operations are also covered. Students may
real-life examples of women who have achieved success are pre- receive credit for only one of the following courses: BMGT 324,
sented. Students may receive credit for only one of the following #.(5' .(.5 .(.5# PS4#64#
courses: BMGT 313 or BMGT 388H.
BMGT 325 The Small-Business Plan (1)
BMGT 314 Women as Leaders (3) An introduction to the preparation of a business plan for entry
A study of the opportunities and challenges for women in leader- into small business. Topics include locating and using primary
TIJQQPTJUJPOT'PDVTJTPOJODSFBTJOHBXBSFOFTTPGUIFVOJRVF and secondary research to prepare a business plan, assessing
talents and skills of women and identifying ways to help women formats for presenting it, finding sources of assistance in prepar-
change historically self-limiting beliefs. Topics include personal ing it, writing it, and identifying who should prepare it. Students
perceptions, traditional stereotypes of femininity, and the evalu- may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BMGT
ation of leadership and coaching skills. Success stories of leading 325, BMGT 398G, MGMT 325, MGMT 330, MGMT 398C,
women managers illustrate the key principles. Students may SBUS 200, or SBUS 398C.
receive credit for only one of the following courses: BMGT 314
or BMGT 388J. BMGT 339 Government and Business Contracting (3)
(Designed for aspiring entrepreneurs, executives, and administra-
BMGT 315 Gender Relations in Business (3) tors in the public and private sectors involved in evaluating con-
An exploration of how gender differences affect the way that tracting and grant opportunities in domestic and global environ-
women and men interact at work, receive and perceive work- ments.) An investigation of the opportunities available for new
place information, and make workplace decisions. Discussion business development and government and business contracting,
is based on the premise that men and women are different and as well as the problems involved throughout the contracting life
that those differences profoundly influence their productivity cycle—from planning, evaluation, and negotiation of new con-
in the modern business workplace. Situations that can result in tracts to the administration and closeout of contracts after award.
gender-based misunderstanding, miscommunication, conflict, Topics include various methods governments and businesses use
and organizational ineffectiveness are examined. The goal is to in determining requirements, choosing the procurement method,
use understanding of gender differences to improve harmony and evaluating contractors and grant proposals, setting terms and
collaboration among staff members. conditions for contracts, awarding contracts, and administering
contracts. Students may receive credit for only one of the follow-
BMGT 317 Problem Solving for Managers (3) ing courses: BMGT 339, MGMT 220, or MGMT 339.
Presentation of the theoretical and practical aspects of strategies
used in solving problems, an activity that takes up much of the BMGT 361 Health Management (3)
manager’s day. Approaches evaluated include holistic thinking, Conceptual and functional analysis and application of manage-
the use of analogy, internal brainstorming and other methods of ment principles and theories for effective leadership in the health
creative thinking, the development of an ability to shift perspec- care services environment. Topics include relevant theories of
tives, the scientific method, the analysis of language, systems organization and management, leadership, communication,
analysis, and graphic representations. Case studies illustrate motivation, and decision making; organizational change and
the definition of the problem, the formulation of hypotheses, strategic planning; human resource administration; and manage-
the collection and analysis of data, and application to improve ment control systems. Discussion covers the structure of health
quality. Students may receive credit for only one of the following systems in the United States and in other countries, current
courses: BMGT 317 or TMGT 310. policy issues, and advocacy for public health and health care
reform. Students may receive credit for only one of the following
courses: BMGT 361 or HMGT 320.

122 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
BMGT 364 Management and Organization Theory (3) BMGT 369 Health Practice Management (3)
Prerequisite: BMGT 110 or at least two years of business and Prerequisite: BMGT 361. Examination and application of
management experience. A study of the development of theories health care practice theories and concepts in the management of
about management and organizations. Processes and functions of medicine, health, and dental group services. Topics include both
management discussed include the communication process, the managed care and fee-for-service payment arrangements and
role of the manager as an organizer and director, the determina- the influence of insurance. Group practices examined include
tion of goals, and the allocation of responsibilities. Students may preferred provider organizations, physician hospital organiza-
receive credit for only one of the following courses: BMGT 364, tions, independent practice associations, management service
TEMN 202, TEMN 300, TMGT 301, or TMGT 302. organizations, and dental group practice networks. Analysis
covers applied issues such as structuring compensation packages
BMGT 365 Organizational Leadership (3) for professionals; negotiating contractual arrangements with
Prerequisite: BMGT 364. An exploration of the challenges to insurance companies; and implementing regulatory guidelines
effective leadership and management that the contemporary for medical equipment, pharmaceutical storage, and dispensing.
NBOBHFSGBDFTJOBSBQJEMZDIBOHJOHFOWJSPONFOU'PDVTJTPO Discussion also reviews policy issues relevant to managed care,
leadership styles and motivational techniques conducive to high public financing, insurance, the employment of health care pro-
performance in various organizational settings with a very diverse fessionals, and legislative politics that affect health care manage-
workforce. Topics include issues in the design of organizations, ment and practice. Students may receive credit for only one of
the corporate/organizational culture, the design and enrichment the following courses: BMGT 369 or HMGT 498E.
of jobs, and communication within organizations. Students may
receive credit for only one of the following courses: BMGT 365, BMGT 372 Supply Chain Management (3)
MGMT 300, MGST 310, or TEMN 310. Prerequisite BMGT 364. An examination of supply chain man-
agement systems with a focus on maximizing the value generated
BMGT 366 Global Public Management (3) by a company. Topics include supply chain management strategy,
A conceptual and functional analysis and application of manage- planning, designing and operations; the role information tech-
ment principles and strategies encompassing state and non-state nology, and financial factors that influence decisions. Discussion
institutional actors, such as intergovernmental and nongovern- also covers the trade-offs between cost and service and between
mental organizations (IGOs and NGOs), in the global environ- the purchase and supply of raw materials; the warehousing and
NFOU'PDVTJTPOUIFOBUVSF TDPQFBOEBQQMJDBUJPOPGQVCMJD control of inventory; transportation; facilities and handling;
management. Topics include the evolution of public sector man- information; and the distribution of finished goods to custom-
agement, theoretical, administrative, ethical, and policy models ers required to minimize costs, maximize profits, or increase
of decision making and accountability; the dynamics of organiza- customer service levels.
tional behavior, bureaucratic structures, and processes; core func-
tionalities, strategic planning, and issues involving public-sector BMGT 375 Purchasing Management (3)
management, planning, leadership, human resources, collective Prerequisite: BMGT 364. A study of purchasing management
bargaining, communications, and e-government; marketing; and the roles of certified purchasing managers in medium to
public finance; and governance. Students may receive credit for large organization from the perspective of the chief purchasing
only one of the following courses: BMGT 366 or TMGT 305. PïDFS'PDVTJTPOQVSDIBTJOHUFDIOJRVFTQSPWFOJOUIFHMPCBM
marketplace. Topics include ethical guidelines, commodity
councils, supply chain interface, balanced performance measures,
total ownership cost analysis, supplier relationship management,
negotiation techniques, and global structures for purchasing
operations. Students may receive credit for only one of the fol-
lowing courses: BMGT 375, MGMT 375, or TEMN 360.

w w w.u m u c .e d u / u g p 123
INFORMATION ON COURSES
BMGT 378 Legal Environment of Business (3) BMGT 391 Motivation, Performance, and Productivity (3)
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"OPWFSWJFXPG Prerequisite: BMGT 364. An examination of the challenges of
fundamental legal concepts and principles that affect business in motivating employees. Topics include effective principles for job
the relevant functional and regulatory environments in domestic design, theories and practices of successful leadership, the setting
and global settings. Emphasis is on the definition and application of goals and objectives, the development of reward systems, and
of legal principles and concepts through illustrative examples and the attributes of effective managerial communication. The causes
cases. Topics include the interplay among business, ethics, and and impact of performance problems and methods for measur-
law; legal reasoning and research; the judicial system and conflict ing management practices are explored. Students may receive
resolution; and torts and business crimes. Key concepts relating credit for only one of the following courses: BMGT 391, BMGT
to transactional aspects of business are defined; these include 398S, or HRMN 394.
contracts and business organizations, property, and government
regulations in the human resource, marketing, and financial BMGT 392 Global Business Management (3)
dimensions of business. Assignments include conducting relevant Prerequisite: BMGT 110 or at least two years of business and
research using computer databases and networks (such as Lexis management experience. Examination and analysis of global
and the Web) as well as other methods for accessing information. business in its historical, theoretical, environmental, and func-
Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: UJPOBMEJNFOTJPOT'PDVTJTPOVOEFSTUBOEJOHUIFHSPXJOHFDP-
BMGT 378 or BMGT 480. nomic interdependence of nations and its impact on managerial
and corporate policy decisions that transcend national boundar-
BMGT 380 Business Law I (3) ies. Topics include the nature and scope of international busi-
(Strongly recommended for students seeking careers as CPAs, ness; the institutional, sociocultural, political, legal, ethical, and
lawyers, or managers.) A conceptual and functional analysis and economic environments; trade, foreign investment, and develop-
application of legal principles relevant to the conduct and under- ment; transnational management (including global operations),
standing of commercial business transactions in the domestic and strategic planning, human resources, marketing, and finance;
global environment. Topics include the legal, ethical, and social and international business diplomacy and conflict resolution.
environment of business; agencies, partnerships, and other forms Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses:
of business organizations; and contracts and sales agreements. BMGT 392, MGMT 305, or TMGT 390.

BMGT 381 Business Law II (3) BMGT 393 Real Estate Principles I (3)
(Strongly recommended for students seeking careers as CPAs, (Designed to fulfill the requirements for the Maryland licensing
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1SFSFRVJTJUF#.(5'VSUIFSDPO- examination to sell real estate.) Recommended: ECON 203. A
ceptual and functional analysis and application of legal principles survey of the principles, definitions, and uses of real estate. Top-
relevant to the conduct and understanding of commercial busi- ics include real estate as a business, problems of construction and
ness transactions in the domestic and global environment. Topics home ownership, city planning, and public control and owner-
include personal and real property, government regulations affect- ship of real estate.
ing employment and marketing, negotiable instruments, debtor/
creditor relationships, and bankruptcy and reorganization. BMGT 394 Real Estate Principles II (3)
(Designed to fulfill the requirements for the Maryland licens-
BMGT 388G Effective Business Presentations (1) ing examination to sell real estate.) Prerequisite: BMGT 393. A
An overview of the process of creating and delivering effective continuation of the study of real estate. Topics include principles,
CVTJOFTTQSFTFOUBUJPOT'PDVTJTPOUIFJNQPSUBODFPGFêFDUJWF definitions, professional issues and problems, construction and
communication in business. Topics include audience analysis, ownership problems, and other major aspects of real estate sales.
presentation planning, outline development, style alternatives, Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses:
presentation structure (i.e., the beginning, body, ending, and BMGT 394 or BMGT 398H.
questions and answers), visual aids, and delivery techniques.
BMGT 398 Special Topics in Business and Management (1–3)
Intensive inquiry into special topics in business and manage-
ment that reflect the changing needs and interests of students
and faculty.

124 U N D E R G R A D U AT E C ATA L O G | 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11
BMGT 405 Environmental Management and Business (3) BMGT 412 Managing for Organizational Effectiveness (3)
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&YBNJOBUJPOBOEBOBMZTJTPGTBMJFOU An overview of management techniques and methodologies that
environmental issues and their impact on business management are used to develop and adapt business processes for competi-
and institutional policies and strategies in both domestic and tive advantage in dynamic and rapidly changing environments.
global settings. Topics include air- and water-quality controls, Assessment tools for achieving desired organizational capabilities,
toxic substances, hazardous waste, energy and natural resources, such as the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence, ISO
deforestation, biological diversity, global warming, and ozone 9000, and CMMI (Capability Maturity Model Integration), are
depletion. These issues are examined from the perspectives of examined. Discussion also covers specific approaches—such as
ecology, ethics, the law, and public policy. The implications of customer relationship management, supply chain management,
sociopolitical and economic issues (e.g., population, poverty, Six Sigma methodology, and other process improvement tools—
trade, business growth, sustainable development, and competi- that contribute to high performance and organizational effective-
tiveness) on the environment are also discussed. Students may ness. Successful applications of these strategies and approaches
receive credit for only one of the following courses: BMGT 405, are illustrated. Students may receive credit for only one of the
#.(5' PS.(.5' following courses: BMGT 412 or TMGT 412.

BMGT 407 Managing Global Trade (3) BMGT 428 Legal Aspects of Technology Management (3)
An exploration and analysis of managing global trade within 'PSNFSMZ#.(5+
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today’s fast-paced, highly interconnected global economy. Dis- and policy issues involving the development, acquisition, appli-
cussion covers international trade policy, export-import strategies cation, and use of technology and their impact on business and
(including licensing and franchising), direct investment, conflict management in the domestic and global environments. Topics
resolution, safety and security, and current policy issues. Top- include intellectual property issues encompassing patent, copy-
ics also include sales negotiation, price quotations, landed cost, right, and trademark protections in information and biotechnol-
standard international commercial terms, commercial financ- ogy; privacy and security concerns; domain names; government
ing, trade documentation, global e-commerce, transportation regulation and antitrust; software licensing; tort and computer
logistics, and compliance with import and export regulations. crimes, and consumer protection. The role of global institutions
Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: is also explored. Students may receive credit for only one of the
BMGT 407 or BMGT 498S. following courses: BMGT 428 or BMGT 498J.

BMGT 411 Business Performance (3) BMGT 437 International Business Law (3)
Presentation of analytical approaches to comprehend and solve 'PSNFSMZ#.(51
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CVTJOFTTQFSGPSNBODFQSPCMFNT'PDVTJTPOQPXFSGVMUFDIOJRVFT tual and functional analysis and application of transnational legal
for solving problems of managing people and for understanding principles relevant to the cond