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[Updated: June 2010]

Agenda for Change (AfC) Party

P. O. Box 37119 / Lusaka, Zambia


www.agenda123.com / agenda@zambia.co.zm

MANIFESTO: 2011—2016

PART 1:
INTRODUCTION
1.1 The Agenda for Change EXECUTIVE AGENCIES
1.2 Vision, Mission and 3.1 Zambia Revenue
Ideology Authority
1.3 A New Breed of 3.2 Anti-Corruption
Leaders Commission
1.4 Beware of Inept 3.3 Electoral Commission of
Leaders! Zambia
1.5 A Few Seasoned 3.4 Human Rights
Leaders Commission
1.6 Volatile Circumstances 3.5 Labor Standards and
1.7 State of the Economy Occupational Safety
1.8 A Solemn Invitation Board
3.6 Public Utilities and
PART 2: Environ-
A PEOPLE’S GOVERNMENT Mental Management
COMETH! Agency
2.1 Devolution of Power 3.7 Zambia Public
2.2 Abolition of Procurement
Sinecures Authority
2.3 Re-Deployment / Early 3.8 Drug Control Agency
Retirement 3.9 Food Reserve Agency
2.4 Competent Civil Service 3.10 Bureau of Statistics
2.5 The National Plan and
2.6 Political Appointments Archives
2.7 Crime and Corruption 3.11 National Housing
2.8 A Smaller Authority
Government 3.12 National Transport
2.9 Agenda for Change Safety
Policies Board
3.13 National Emergency
PART 3: Management Agency

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3.14 Fire Arms and Criminal Traditions
Investigations Bureau 7.4 Other Projects and
3.15 National Science and Programs
Technology Council 7.5 Existing Healthcare
Facilities
PART 4: 7.6 A Selection of Existing
OTHER CRUCIAL MATTERS Schools
4.1 Democratic Governance
4.2 The “PIG” Phenomenon PART 8:
4.3 Elective Vice-Presidency COPPERBELT PROVINCE
4.4 Funding of Political 8.1 Public Health and
Parties Sanitation
4.5 Government News 8.2 Education and Skills
Media Training
4.6 The Barotseland Accord 8.3 Culture and Local
4.7 Abortion and Human Traditions
Cloning 8.4 Other Projects and
4.8 Capital Punishment Programs
4.9 The Issue of Land 8.5 Existing Healthcare
4.10 Annual Inter-Party Facilities
Indaba 8.6 A Selection of Existing
4.11 Face-the-Nation Schools
Briefings
PART 9:
PART 5: EASTERN PROVINCE
BRACING FOR CHANGE 9.1 Public Health and
5.1 Necessity of Change Sanitation
5.2 Appropriateness 9.2 Education and Skills
5.3 Potential Effects Training
5.4 Time and Resources 9.3 Culture and Local
5.5 Citizen Participation Traditions
5.6 Effective 9.4 Other Projects and
Communication Programs
5.7 Open-Door Policy 9.5 Existing Healthcare
Facilities
Part 6: 9.6 A Selection of Existing
IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE Schools

PART 7: PART 10:


CENTRAL PROVINCE LUAPULA PROVINCE
7.1 Public Health and 10.1 Public Health and
Sanitation Sanitation
7.2 Education and Skills 10.2 Education and Skills
Training Training
7.3 Culture and Local 10.3 Culture and Local
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Traditions 13.3 Culture and Local
10.4 Other Projects and Traditions
Programs 13.4 Other Projects and
10.5 Existing Healthcare Programs
Facilities 13.5 Existing Healthcare
10.6 A Selection of Existing Facilities
Schools 13.6 A Selection of Existing
Schools
PART 11:
LUSAKA PROVINCE PART 14:
11.1 Public Health and SOUTHERN PROVINCE
Sanitation 14.1 Public Health and
11.2 Education and Skills Sanitation
Training 14.2 Education and Skills
11.3 Culture and Local Training
Traditions 14.3 Culture and Local
11.4 Other Projects and Traditions
Programs 14.4 Other Projects and
11.5 Existing Healthcare Programs
Facilities 14.5 Existing Healthcare
11.6 A Selection of Existing Facilities
Schools 14.6 A Selection of Existing
PART 12: Schools
NORTHERN PROVINCE
12.1 Public Health and PART 15:
Sanitation WESTERN PROVINCE
12.2 Education and Skills 15.1 Public Health and
Training Sanitation
12.3 Culture and Local 15.2 Education and Skills
Traditions Training
12.4 Other Projects and 15.3 Culture and Local
Programs Traditions
12.5 Existing Healthcare 15.4 Other Projects and
Facilities Programs
12.6 A Selection of Existing 15.5 Existing Healthcare
Schools Facilities
15.6 A Selection of Existing
PART 13: Schools
NORTH-WESTERN PROVINCE
13.1 Public Health and Zambia: A Nation Is
Sanitation Born!
13.2 Education and Skills SELECTED SOURCES OF
Training INFORMATION

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PART 1:
INTRODUCTION

Today, more than ever before, our country needs to set goals
and generate policies that are comprehensive, radical and
realistic enough to significantly overhaul its socio-economic
system so that it can adequately meet the current and future
needs of its people. Such goals and policies should constitute
our beloved country’s national agenda in the 21st century.
Good news, fellow Zambians! We, in the Agenda for Change
(AfC) party, have generated such an agenda, and have studied
—and will continue to study—the extent to which the
government can be re-organized and streamlined in order to
free enough tax-payer funds to finance the pursuit of our
country’s long-term goals and aspirations.
The agenda constitutes our covenant with all our fellow
Zambian citizens—in Central Province, Copperbelt Province,
Eastern Province, Luapula Province, Lusaka Province, Northern
Province, North-Western Province, Southern Province, and
Western Province.
Fellow Zambians, there is no time to waste on politicking;
we have a lot of work to do in order to redeem our Motherland
from the current state of decay and backwardness. And we
need to get down to work now rather than later!

1.1 THE AGENDA FOR CHANGE PARTY

The “Agenda for Change” is a political party whose purpose is


to create a Zambian government that is truly a people’s
government. The party represents change – comprehensive,
well-conceived and coordinated change. It is designed to bring
about change that will unlock our country’s potential to meet
the needs and expectations of both present and future genera-
tions – change that we cannot afford to delay in implementing
if we are really serious about redressing the chronic socio-
economic problems currently facing our beloved country.
In August 2004, Uganda’s Yoweri Museveni asked the
following question (during his State visit to Zambia) which the
Agenda for Change (AfC), if given the mandate to form the
next national government, will answer by transforming our
country into an exemplary socio-economic system to be
emulated by other developing nations:

“You cannot pick a single black African country which has


transitioned from backwards to modern in the last 47
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years…. Those which have been at war are backwards,
those which were in peace are backwards, those which were
single parties are backwards, the ones which were multi-
party are backwards; so, what is the problem?”

Let us now consider the Agenda for Change party’s political


philosophy, the need for competent leaders and, among other
things, a summary of the various elements of the party’s
people-centered socio-economic agenda that is befitting of our
beloved country in the 21st century.

1.2 VISION, MISSION AND IDEOLOGY

1.2.1 Our Vision:


The Agenda for Change party’s vision is to create a more
democratic, more peaceful, more prosperous, more egalitarian,
and more environmentally sustainable Zambian society.

1.2.2 Our Mission:


The party’s mission is to seek the people’s mandate to form
government in order to attain its vision.

1.2.3 Political Ideology:


We, in the Agenda for Change party, believe that:

(a) All human beings are born free and equal in dignity,
freedoms and rights, and no individual should be denied
any of the rights and freedoms enshrined in the
Zambian constitution, and the rights and freedoms
stipulated in both the United Nation’s Universal Declara-
tion of Human Rights and the African Union’s African
Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights;
(b) Leaders are servants of the people and should, as such,
serve the people in a diligent, honest and equitable
manner;
(c) Leaders have a moral obligation to create a Government
that is smaller, more frugal, highly decentralized, and
more responsive to the development needs of our
country;
(d) Leaders have a duty to create a socio-economic environ-
ment in which business undertakings can generate
goods and services to meet the changing needs and
expectations of our people at lower costs and prices;
(e) The national Government needs to spearhead the crea-
tion of a socio-economic environment in which ethnic,
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cultural, racial, and religious diversity is appreciated,
tolerated and celebrated;
(f) Local authorities and the national Government need to
create a socio-economic environment in which
burglaries, robberies, vandalism, and other criminal
activities can be efficiently and effectively put under
control;
(g) Leaders need to create a society that is compassionate,
peace-loving, virtuous, and steadfastly united;
(h) The national Government and local authorities need to
exercise greater environmental stewardship by seriously
considering the fragile natural environment in both the
generation and implementation of socio-economic
policies; and
(i) Our national Government needs to work hand in hand
with other governments worldwide in creating a more
humane, more affluent, more egalitarian, and more
peaceful global community.

1.3 A NEW BREED OF LEADERS

The Agenda for Change will make an earnest effort to avail our
country the kinds of leaders it needs in an era of democratiza-
tion, globalization, and knowledge-based economic manage-
ment; that is, leaders who are:

(a) Patriotic, selfless, law-abiding, visionary, fair-minded,


self-critical, and moderately flexible;
(b) Enlightened enough to make prudent and effective deci-
sions on socio-economic issues affecting our nation in
the context of a highly complex and turbulent global
economy;
(c) Truly committed to the noble cause of redressing the
development needs of our beloved country; and
(d) Capable of enlisting the advice and administrative skills
of experienced politicians in setting up administrative
procedures and protocols.

1.4 BEWARE OF INEPT LEADERS!

Some politicians have a great deal of experience in defending


failure and mediocrity in governance. Others have extensive
experience in siphoning public resources for their own private
use. There are also those who have clocked many years in

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governmental leadership positions doing nothing more than
sitting idly in their offices, fattening themselves, and drawing
hefty salaries from the public treasury for goofing off.
We also have individuals who have been shunted from one
government ministry to another as Ministers without the basic
knowledge and understanding of the core functions and
rationales of the ministries involved. Besides, the political
landscape is littered with the so-called seasoned politicians
who are extensively experienced in castigating, discrediting
and demonizing other politicians who may have dissenting
views.
Mr. David Saviye, quoted by Mukula Mukula in October
2001 in a Zambia Daily Mail article, summed up the ineptness
of such politicians as follows: “Most politicians ... [have] held
strategic positions in government through which they would
have delivered what they [may] now ... [promise to deliver].”
Clearly, the kinds of leaders I have just described have no-
thing new to offer to our country because their extensive
experience in generating and nurturing socio-economic decay
and stagnation is detrimental to our quest for heightened and
sustained socio-economic development. They represent an era
that should have passed long before now – an era charac-
terized by idol-worshipping, and an era in which the rewards of
labor are largely measured in terms of one's willingness to lick
the shoes of those who wield power rather than competence
and excellence.
If we truly love our country, and if we are really serious
about redeeming it from its current state of decay and back-
wardness, we need to renounce our interest in inept leaders by
denying them our precious votes – even if they attempt to use
the massive wealth they might have corruptly accumulated to
buy our votes in a deliberate attempt to hold on to power so
that they can continue to safeguard their selfish interests. After
all, the “electability” of an individual to public office needs to
be based largely on the viability and progressiveness of his or
her contemplated national programs.
So my fellow citizens, the question to ask about a candidate
is not whether he or she has prior experience in politics or
government. Rather, it is to ask whether he or she will support
the provision of free life-saving medical care, free education up
to Grade 12 at least, greater food security, rural electrification,
clean water, lower taxes and interest rates, greater safety and
security in our communities, political and economic
empowerment, and so forth.
After all, the following attribution of much of Africa’s plight
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to incompetent leadership by the late Mwalimu Julius Nyerere
of Tanzania (in his speech delivered at the Conference on
Governance in Africa held in Addis Ababa in March 1998) does
not exclude our country at all: “[W]e cannot avoid the fact that
a lot of our problems in Africa arise from bad governance.”

1.5 A FEW SEASONED LEADERS

Nevertheless, we shall seek to blend new blood and a few of


the current crop of the seasoned politicians who have
demonstrated their desire and dedication to save our beloved
country from further socio-economic deterioration. Such a
blend will enable us to zealously pursue the contemplated
national agenda and, at the same time, seek the counsel of
seasoned politicians on potential and costly blunders and
miscalculations made by previous leaders.
In November 2001, Senior Chief Bright Nalubamba in
Southern Province observed that the object of Zambian politi-
cians was to acquire personal wealth by all means repugnant
to society, and that the country needed leaders with a greater
sense of service to their fellow citizens.
We would like to assure the Honorable Chief and all other
concerned citizens that the Agenda for Change will strive to
assemble an exceptionally potent and disciplined team of
leaders to redress the nagging socio-economic malaise which
has persistently haunted our beloved country!

1.6 VOLATILE CIRCUMSTANCES

Socio-economic conditions in the domestic, regional and global


environments are changing constantly. As such, yesterday's
approaches to the resolution of our country's problems are not
likely to do an effective job; after all, they have evidently and
lamentably failed to do the job in the past!
We, therefore, need leaders who are willing to develop new
attitudes, skills and strategies in order to wrestle successfully
with the complex and volatile socio-economic conditions of our
time. In short, we shall expect all government leaders to con-
sider themselves as being on job-on-training regardless of the
extent of their previous experience in politics and governance.
We shall, therefore, have no room for know-it-all kind of
leaders. As past experience has taught us, political leaders
who brag about having extensive experience in politics tend to
be trapped in what is referred to as the “status-quo tendency”
in Management literature.
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Such a tendency manifests itself in resistance to change
among such leaders and, thus, makes those who are trapped
in it to continue to pursue and defend outdated goals and
policies which cannot save our country from the vagaries of
the highly complex and turbulent global socio-economic setting
of our time.

1.7 STATE OF THE ECONOMY

Since independence in October 1964, the majority of Zambians


have wallowed in what Mr. Bill Clinton, former U.S. president,
has described as “astonishing poverty.” A brief account of the
grim socio-economic conditions which characterized the last
several decades is perhaps in order at this juncture.

1.7.1 The UNIP Era:


As the World Bank has observed, Zambia was the richest
country in sub-Saharan Africa at independence in 1964. Twenty
years later, however, it was one of the poorest, with nearly
70% of its people wallowing in abject poverty. The decline in
the country’s socio-economic well-being was a culmination of
several factors described in a nutshell below.

(a) Dependency on Copper: Zambia’s initial failure to


diversify economic activities away from the mining
industry has subjected the national economy to the
vagaries of steep decreases in copper prices and
production levels, which, together with low mining
taxes, has resulted in dwindling government
revenues to cater for essential public services and
infrastructure.
(b) Petroleum Prices: Unprecedented hikes in
petroleum prices by the Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries (OPEC) in 1973/74 and 1979/80
resulted in a steep rise in the price of imported oil
from US$2.50 to US$35 per barrel, thereby draining
the public treasury and making it difficult for the
government to meet the basic needs and
expectations of citizens.
(c) Mismanagement: Rampant economic and public-
sector mismanagement resulted in diversion of
human, financial and other national resources to
unproductive projects and programs. For example,

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the creation of the Central Committee (a somewhat
parallel structure to the National Assembly) and the
position of Prime Minister that followed the
introduction of a one-party State in 1972
contributed greatly to the misappropriation of
public resources.
Other examples of the mismanagement of
national resources in the country include the
following: the creation of sinecures like the position
of District Commissioner, unnecessary expansion of
ministerial and deputy ministerial positions,
excessive number and staffing of the country’s
foreign missions, the recommendation by the
National Constitutional Conference (NCC) to
increase the size of the National Assembly from
158 to 280 members, procurement of the over-
priced hearses and the controversial mobile
hospitals, and the excessive and costly foreign trips
by the Republican president.
(d) National Service Program: The compulsory
recruitment of Grade 12 students to undergo
military training and engage in agricultural
production activities between 1975 and 1980 at
Zambia National Service (ZNS) camps (as
mandated by ZNS Act No. 121 of 1972) contributed
to the draining of public coffers. A lot of money was
wasted on ZNS personnel, the construction of
facilities to accommodate Grade 12 graduates,
payments of stipends to the graduates, and on
procurements of food, uniforms, semi-automatic
rifles (SARs), and live ammunition and blanks for
training purposes.
(e) Postponement of Adjustment: The postponement
of macro-economic adjustment by the United
National Independence Party (UNIP) government on
May 1, 1987—which would have enabled us to crea-
te a competitive and more productive socio-
economic system—exacerbated the socio-economic
problems facing the country.
(f) Cost-Sharing Schemes: The introduction of cost-
sharing arrangements in the dispensation of
educational and healthcare services during the late
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1980s has continued to make education and
healthcare less accessible to a lot of citizens. The
unprecedented numbers of street children and the
lower life expectancy obtaining in the country
today bear witness to this fact.
(g) Socialist Policies: UNIP’s socialist policies barred
both local and foreign private investors from
certain commercial and industrial sectors of the
country's economy and recommended the creation
of state companies to operate in such sectors of the
economy from the late 1960s to 1991. The policies
—which former president, Dr. Kenneth D. Kaunda,
promulgated through his April 1968, August 1969
and November 1970 speeches to the UNIP National
Council—ushered in an era of state enterprises.
Naturally, the monopolistic position enjoyed by
state companies in the country’s economy
culminated in complacence and gross inefficiency
because, in the absence of competition, they
apparently found it unnecessary to seek innovative
ways and means of improving the quality and qua-
ntity of their product offerings. The rampant
commodity shortages which the country experie-
nced during the late 1970s and the 1980s were
largely a direct result of the socialist policies of the
government of the day.

These factors, directly or otherwise, have continued to


compel the government to borrow heavily from external sour-
ces of funds in order to keep the economy and the Party and
its Government afloat. During the 1980s, Zambia was engulfed
in unprecedented socio-economic problems that partly evoked
a nationwide clamor for a new breed of leaders. The resound-
ing victory scored by the Movement for Multi-party Democracy
(MMD) in 1991 was a clear reflection of such a clamor.

1.7.2 The MMD Era:


Zambia, to paraphrase Wilfred Mwenya, continued to be re-
duced to a nation that could be best described as poverty-
stricken during the MMD era, with everything in the country
having apparently fallen apart. In October 2001, Mwana
Muchende provided a bird's-eye view of the socio-economic
conditions that characterized such an era: access to healthcare
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services, basic material necessities of life, and education and
vocational training had become almost impossible by over 70%
of the population.

1.7.3 The Status Quo:


The socio-economic situation in Zambia today is,
unfortunately, not much different from that described by
Mwana Muchende in The Post newspaper in October 2001:

“We all know that the ordinary Zambian is visibly poorer


than he has ever been. People are out of jobs, and those
who work do not receive salaries unless the `hand that
giveth’ donates. Most children under five years of age are
malnourished. Farmers who once fed ... [us] are now in
urban areas begging for food. Graveyards bury tens of
bodies an hour due to the proliferation of deaths resulting
from a deteriorating economic environment.”

If this depiction of the depressing state of affairs obtaining


in our country cannot compel us to seek 21st century
leadership that 21st century Zambia desperately needs, then
consider the following excerpt from a 2004 Social Watch report
(cited by Bivan Saluseki in The Post newspaper of July 2, 2004)
with an honest heart:

“Even though the country has not formally been at war


since independence in 1964, prevailing conditions affecting
human existence are equivalent to those in a country at
war.”

1.7.4 Whither Zambia?


Clearly, our country is at the crossroads. We should,
therefore, remember that the choices we are going to make
when we go to the polling booths during the forthcoming
Presidential and General Elections will determine its destiny.
We, in the Agenda for Change party, are exceedingly con-
vinced that the entire nation is determined to redeem our
Motherland from its current socio-economic decay and
backwardness.
Compatriots, you have a historic opportunity to give your-
selves a team of development artists—a team of competent
and enthusiastic government leaders who will diligently serve
your interests. We are fully aware that you have all waited long
enough for political leaders who will not hoodwink you into
casting a vote for them and then forget about you in their
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priorities once you have voted them into office.
The Agenda for Change party has established a pool of
potential leaders who will not shun you after the elections—
leaders who consider the need to deliver on their promises as a
virtue in political life.
Fellow citizens, our Manifesto is unique; it is overly specific
on crucial national issues, and is exceptionally comprehensive.
It is unlike any other Manifesto that has ever been devised for
our beloved country; it is essentially the Agenda for Change
party’s “game plan” for redressing the seemingly elusive and
self-perpetuating socio-economic problems which have torme-
nted us for too long now. Simply, it is our covenant with the
Zambian nation!
As voters, you can play a vital role in this endeavor: you
can ensure that the people you are going to send to Parliament
as your representatives are going to serve your interests by
readily approving Ministerial budgets that will enable the
Agenda for Change party to deliver on its promises.
You, therefore, need to find out if Parliamentary candidates
in your constituency stand for free education, free life-saving
medical and healthcare, enhanced food security, greater care
for disadvantaged citizens, and the other Agenda for Change
party’s people-centered programs. Do not waste your vote on
candidates who do not have your interests and the long-term
well-being of our beloved country at heart!
Fellow Zambians, heightened and sustained socio-economic
development will not come to our country like manna from
heaven; it will need to be adequately planned for and diligently
pursued. We have a historic opportunity to turn our country
around and set it on the right course for economic take-off.
This is the challenge our nation is currently facing.
The remainder of the Manifesto will provide a summary of
the essential elements of what should constitute the Republic
of Zambia’s overall agenda for meeting such an enormous
challenge, and the “whys” and “hows” of the contemplated
national development projects and programs.

1.8 A SOLEMN INVITATION

At this juncture, we wish to invite all Zambians who have a


genuine and profound interest of our Motherland at heart to
join us in our quest to chart a new, multi-faceted strategy that
will improve the socio-economic well-being of all Zambian
citizens. Together, we can certainly create a more peaceful,
more democratic, more prosperous, and more egalitarian
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socio-economic setting.
Accordingly, our modus operandi in national governance
shall be one that shall genuinely provide for stakeholders to
participate—individually and/or collectively—in governmental
decision making, particularly with respect to issues and
matters that shall directly affect them.

PART 2:
A PEOPLE’S GOVERNMENT COMETH!

2.1 DEVOLUTION OF POWER

We shall devolve economic and decision-making (political)


power to provinces by providing for the administration of
provinces through 9 elected provincial governors and 72
district mayors. In this respect, compatriots, we have an
important message for all residents in our country’s nine
provinces: get ready to assume and exercise greater authority
over the affairs of your local communities!
The basic components of the envisaged devolution of eco-
nomic and political power to provinces—which shall be sought
upon a repeal of Article 109 of the Republican constitution—sh-
all include the following: uniform application of the provisions
of the Republican constitution and national laws and
regulations in all the provinces, local generation and appropria-
tion of revenues, unrestricted domestic trade and investment
across provincial borders, a common national monetary policy,
and restricted external relations.

2.1.1 Law of the Land:


To forestall the potential for anarchy in our beloved
country, national laws and regulations and the provisions of
the Republican constitution shall uniformly and forever be
applied in all the provinces without exception.
We need to prevent the confusion being experienced by
countries like the USA, where some states have passed their
own laws relating to such critical matters as marriage and
capital punishment.

2.1.2 Province-Based Sinecures:


The Agenda for Change will not need the services of Deputy
Ministers or District Commissioners, and other leaders who
hold sinecures in provinces and/or districts, although the ap-
pointment of some of these leaders is provided for in Article 47
and other parts of the Republican constitution. Each and every
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government ministry shall directly perform mandated functions
in all parts of the country, and shall directly coordinate their
respective services and operations with those of local
governments and private institutions.
Incumbents of positions to be affected by the new political
dispensation shall be afforded the opportunity to seek early
retirement or compete for positions in the civil service. In any
case, they shall be allowed to retain the personal-to-holder
vehicles they are currently entitled to in order to maintain the
mobility their families have become accustomed to.

2.1.3 Local Public Revenues:


Each of the nine provinces shall have the authority to
generate, as well as appropriate, their own revenues in line
with the need to attract investors and skilled labor. Potential
sources of revenue for provincial governments and the national
Government shall include the following:

(a) Provincial Governments: We shall seriously consider the


prospect of letting local authorities to collect their own
revenues from businesses and residents, and to retain
the revenues for local service delivery and development
projects and programs. The Potential sources of such
revenues shall include the following: water rates,
municipal housing rent, commercial undertakings,
provincial lottery, property taxes, traffic violation
charges, motor vehicle registration fees, personal levy,
business licence fees, birth certificate fees, sale of
unclaimed impounded property, and national Govern-
ment grants.
(b) The National Government: Potential revenue sources for
the national Government shall include the following:
personal and business income taxes, value-added tax,
postal revenues, nominal rentals of National Housing
Authority units, commercial undertakings, customs
duties, passport fees, fire-arm registration fees, excise
taxes, hunting licence fees, work permit fees, citizenship
and naturalization fees, NRC replacement fees, and 25%
of surplus of provincial revenues.
(c) The selling and/or buying of government bonds (by the
Bank of Zambia) through LuSE and regional stock
markets on behalf of the government (by means of
“open market operations”) shall also be an important
source of revenue.

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2.1.4 Trade and Investment:
Provincial governments shall not regulate inter-province
trade or investment, nor charge duties on commodities sold
across provincial borders.

2.1.5 Movement of People:


Provincial governments shall not regulate, nor place any
restrictions on, the movement of people wishing to seek jobs
and/or residence across provincial borders.

2.1.6 Monetary Issues:

(a) Provincial governments shall not mint/coin money, nor


demand payments for commodities produced in their
areas of jurisdiction and sold in other provinces in a
currency other than the national currency.
(b) They shall have the freedom to borrow capital from both
local and foreign financial institutions on terms that shall
not subject public property in their areas of jurisdiction
to the risk of seizure in the event of a delinquent loan. In
the case of foreign borrowing, ratification shall be
sought from the Minister of Finance and Revenue prior
to the consummation of arrangements for such
borrowing.

2.1.7 Water and Electricity:


There shall be direct local and national Government
involvement in the supply of both water and electricity due to
safety, cost and strategic reasons. Details concerning the
issues of water and electricity supply are provided elsewhere
in this Manifesto.

2.1.8 Local Public Facilities:


The national Government shall collaborate with local
governments in the provision and management of fire-fighting
facilities, facilities for garbage collection and disposal, and
modern sewer systems.

2.1.9 Public Libraries:


Provincial governments shall be expected to provide and
run public libraries in their areas of jurisdiction. The national
government shall bolster the efforts of provincial governments
in this endeavor through financial and material support.

2.1.9 Rural Development:


Page 16 of 190
In modern Zambia, municipal authorities are, by and large,
faced with the problem of congestion in urban centers. The
problem has particularly become more profound and mind-
boggling due to the lack of adequate resources to provide
decent social services and amenities to unprecedented num-
bers of people in such centers.
By and large, the problem is a result of what development
economists have referred to as the “dual economy,” that is,
uneven development in the national economy between the
agriculture-based rural sector and the manufacturing-based
urban sector, whereby the latter sector is relatively more
developed than the former. There are several situations which
can lead to such uneven development in a country’s economy;
they include the following:

(a) The general lack of transportation, recreational facilities,


decent housing, healthcare, educational institutions, and
other basic facilities and services in the agriculture-
based rural sector causes a drift of people to the
relatively more developed manufacturing-based urban
sector;
(b) Distorted government policies and incentives that are
more favorable to the manufacturing sector and less
favorable to agricultural activities; and
(c) Relatively higher wages in manufacturing facilitated lar-
gely by collective bargaining attract skilled people away
from the generally non-unionized and low-wage agricul-
tural sector.

Larger populations in urban areas overwhelm existing


public facilities in such areas, as well as diminish municipal au-
thorities' ability to cater to the basic needs of communities in
their areas of jurisdiction. Besides, the emigration makes the
rural areas even more unattractive to private investment than
before, and discourages local and national governments from
providing educational, recreational, healthcare, and other
essential public services and facilities in depopulated rural
areas.
The unsavory symptoms of uneven development are easy
to notice: widespread unemployment, frequent outbreaks of
communicable diseases, an increase in crime and social vices,
and a mushrooming of spontaneously created shanty town-
ships in and/or around the towns and cities.
Uneven development will need to be redressed by local
authorities through special incentives designed to lure
Page 17 of 190
investors and job seekers from urban centers to rural and sub-
urban areas. However, local authorities will need to provide
essential public services and facilities in designated rural and
sub-urban areas if businesses and job seekers are to be
enticed to move to such areas.
In all, an understanding of important factors which
determine the location of a business entity is essential in this
endeavor—that is: the attractiveness of government
incentives; adequacy of public services and facilities (including
police protection, inter-modal road network, fire protection,
low-cost housing, and educational, vocational, recreational,
and healthcare facilities); and the supply of raw materials,
water, energy, and labor.

2.1.11 Garbage Collection and Disposal:


Zambia’s towns and cities are currently experiencing
serious problems at all stages of solid-waste management—
that is, the collection, sorting, transportation, and disposal of
garbage. Unfortunately, the accumulated garbage in our midst
is a very serious health hazard. For instance, piles of
uncollected solid-wastes facilitate the formation of pools of
stagnant water and create breeding grounds for mosquitoes
and, as such, dispose residents to the deadly malaria parasite.
Besides, outbreaks of cholera, meningitis and other
contagious diseases in the country have been directly linked to
the absence of effective solid-waste disposal systems, together
with the lack of potable water in some communities and
unhygienic street-vending of foodstuff.
We shall, therefore, provide for adequate financial grants
and incentives to local councils and private organizations in
order to facilitate the regular collection and recycling of solid
wastes, the production of biodegradable products which can
naturally break down into elements that are less harmful upon
being discarded, and the manufacturing of reusable products
and parts of products.
Meanwhile, it is important to recognize the efforts of
members of the MANGOKA Secretariat—who represent the
residents of Marapodi, Ng’ombe and Kamanga residential
areas in matters of sanitation and garbage collection and
disposal in Lusaka city, and the Copperbelt-based Asset
Holding Company. We also appreciate the contribution of
cooperative endeavors in solid-waste management and
sanitation, including the Sustainable Lusaka Project (SLP)
financed by Ireland Aid, the Lusaka-Dayton partnership created
by the Lusaka City Council and the Dayton municipality in the
Page 18 of 190
USA, the “Keep Lusaka Clean” campaign, the “Make Zambia
Clean and Healthy” campaign, the Zambian Red Cross Society
door-to-door community health-education campaign, the
Lusaka Solid Waste Management Project funded by the Danish
Development Agency, and the Resource Cities Programme
sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development
(USAID).

2.1.12 External Relations:


Provincial governments shall not enter into treaties,
alliances or confederations of any kind.

2.1.13 Accountability of Governors: Provincial Governors


shall be accountable to the electorate in their respective
provinces. Besides, the code of conduct established by the
Parliamentary and Ministerial Code of Conduct Act of 1994 for
deputy ministers, Cabinet ministers and members of the
National Assembly should also apply to elected local
government officials.
Moreover, provincial governors and provincial councils
should ultimately be accountable to the Parliamentary
Committee on Local Governance, whose functions would need
to be altered (upon the abolition of the Ministry of Local
Government and Housing) to include the following:

(a) To study, report and make recommendations to the


central Government through Parliament on the mandate,
management and operations of provincial councils;
(b) To carry out detailed scrutiny of activities undertaken by
provincial governors and provincial councils, and to
make appropriate recommendations to Parliament for
ultimate consideration by the central Government;
(c) To consider the annual reports and any other reports of
provincial councils; and
(d) To consider any Bills referred to the Committee by
Parliament and, if necessary, make recommendations to
the central Government on the need to review existing
policies and/or existing legislation relating to local
government, and to the National Assembly, and shall be
in attendance during Parliamentary proceedings.

2.1.14 Governors’ Conference:


The Agenda for Change shall provide for an “Annual
Governors’ Conference” to be presided over by any of the
governors of the envisioned semi-autonomous provinces on a
Page 19 of 190
rotational basis. The Conference, which shall be held annually
in December to discuss and address issues affecting local
communities, shall be attended by the Republican president
(or a representative appointed by him or her) as an ex officio.

2.2 ABOLITION OF SINECURES

To reiterate, we shall discontinue the appointment of deputy


ministers, provincial ministers, provincial permanent
secretaries, and district commissioners. Provinces and districts
shall be administered by elected provincial governors and
district mayors, respectively.

(a) Standardized organization / administrative structures for


districts and provinces shall be devised by the Cabinet,
and shall include the following positions: (i) district level
—Mayor, District Secretary and District Treasurer; and
(ii) provincial level—Provincial Governor, Provincial
Secretary, Provincial Treasurer, Provincial Public Works
Superintendent, and Provincial Police Commanding
Officer.
(b) Superintendence over the civil police shall be devolved
to provincial administrations; and Acting Provincial
Governors—to provide leadership during the transition
to Mayor-administered and Governor-administered
districts and provinces, respectively—shall be appointed
by the newly elected Agenda for Change Republican
president.
(c) The central government shall be involved in the
administration of provinces through the Ministry for
Culture and Community Services.

2.3 RE-DEPLOYMENT / EARLY RETIREMENT

By and large, civil servants in ministries to be abolished or


merged shall be encouraged to seek early retirement with full
benefits. Professional and skilled civil servants shall be re-
deployed in the new government ministries and agencies.
For example, professional and skilled civil servants in the
current ministries of Science and Technology and Sports and
Youth Development shall be re-deployed in the contemplated
Ministry of Education, Training and Sport. Those in the
ministries of Tourism and Mines and Mineral Development shall
be re-deployed in new Ministry of Commerce and Industry. And
so forth.
Page 20 of 190
We shall make an earnest effort to take good care of each
and every civil servant who shall be affected by the
contemplated changes in the size and functions of our national
government.

2.4 COMPETENT CIVIL SERVICE

Without a competent civil service, none of the plans stipulated


in this Manifesto are likely to be satisfactorily implemented.
We shall, therefore, strive to create a smaller, more efficient,
more effective, highly professional, and well-remunerated civil
service. Also, we shall earnestly provide for the independence
of the Civil Service Commission to ensure that public service
personnel are recruited, hired, retained, and promoted on
merit rather than on the basis of political patronage.
Further, we shall ensure that the knowledge and skills of
public service personnel are continually improved and
upgraded through seminars, in-house training, workshops,
refresher courses, and on-the-job training. Besides, we shall
strive to improve the operations of the Public Service Pensions
Fund so that it can serve civil service pensioners in a timely
and equitable manner.

2.5 THE NATIONAL PLAN

Our country needs sound, formalized national planning. How-


ever, such planning should not be the preponderance of a
government ministry like the Ministry of Finance that is already
overwhelmed by other equally vital functions. Also, it would
not be prudent for the national Government to create a
separate “Ministry for National Planning,” or any semblance
thereof, to generate Zambia’s annual and/or longer-term socio-
economic plans.
Moreover, there is no need for the National Economic
Advisory Council (NEAC), which was established in 1999 to
engage in policy articulation, advising the government and the
Republican president on the most efficient ways of
implementing economic reform programs, identifying obstacles
to socio-economic development, and, inter alia, undertaking
research on the application of socio-economic policies.
By and large, the capacity for generating, implementing
and evaluating policies should exist within government
ministries. After all, government ministries are supposed to be
staffed with our fellow citizens who are the finest in their
respective fields of endeavor.
Page 21 of 190
We shall, therefore, require each and every government
ministry to bear the responsibility for making estimates of
expenditures and stipulating the projects and programs on
which the expenditures shall be committed. Thereafter, each
ministry’s budget and project proposals shall be presented to
the Cabinet for scrutiny.
The composite of government ministries’ refined budget
and project proposals shall ultimately constitute the Republic
of Zambia’s “National Plan” for a stipulated period of time.
Here are a few suggestions of what will need to be included in
each ministry’s proposals: role of the ministry; existing
projects, progress made on them, and extenuating circum-
stances (if any); contemplated projects; and any other
pertinent matters related to the ministry’s mandate.

2.6 POLITICAL APPOINTMENTS

In all appointments to leadership positions, our Government’s


criteria for evaluating potential candidates shall be restricted
to individuals’ demonstrated competence and moral carriage,
regardless of their gender, religious beliefs, ethnic extraction,
political views or affiliation, and any other perceptible identity.
And we shall ensure that every province is represented in the
Executive branch of the national Government by at least one
Cabinet Minister and one Permanent Secretary.
Besides, we shall seek to introduce a system that will
require Cabinet-level appointments and reshuffles, and all
other appointments made by the Republican president that are
not currently subject to Parliamentary confirmation or ratifica-
tion, to be conclusively discussed and confirmed by Parliament
to ensure that only individuals with acceptable credentials are
honoured with the opportunity to serve their fellow citizens in
national leadership portfolios involved.
Also, we shall seek to repeal Articles 46(2) and 47(3) of the
Republican constitution (which restrict an incumbent Republi-
can president to make ministerial appointments from members
of Parliament) to provide for Cabinet-level appointments from
the Zambian society at large. This can afford incumbent
Presidents a larger pool of people from which they can consti-
tute their Cabinets, as well as provide for greater separation of
the legislative and executive branches of the government.
Appointment of Cabinet Ministers from non-Members of
Parliament can also afford presidential aspirants enough time
to identify potential ministerial appointees well before tripartite
elections rather than waiting for Parliamentary elections to be
Page 22 of 190
concluded.

2.7 CRIME AND CORRUPTION

2.7.1 The Fight against Corruption:


Corruption is a universal problem, and it is a scourge that
has tended to permeate countries worldwide throughout
human history, irrespective of their levels of development, the
nature of their socio-economic systems, the kinds of their
systems of belief, or the make up of local ethnic groupings.
But be that as it may, the adverse effects of the scourge on
fragile economies are perhaps more profound, particularly due
to the fact that it has actually compounded the problems of
economically beleaguered countries—countries that are
overwhelmed by a catalogue of other bottlenecks to
sustainable socio-economic development, including poor
leadership, economic mismanagement, bloated national
governments, and the debt burden.
In Zambia, and in all other less-developed countries as a
matter of fact, these bottlenecks—together with corruption—
have diminished the country’s ability to harness its abundant
natural and human resources to meet the basic needs,
expectations and aspirations of the common people.
In the fight against corruption, it is essential to understand
the causes and effects of the scourge.

The Causes of Corruption: The abuse of public office for


private gain is fostered by a diversity of factors, including the
following:

(a) An unstable political setting, which can create an atmo-


sphere of job insecurity, uncertainty and anarchy in
government institutions—situations which can tempt
government leaders and civil servants to engage in
unscrupulous schemes in order to amass wealth quickly
in anticipation of a sudden change in their employment
status.
(b) Regular reshuffles of political appointees, which can
make the appointees to feel insecure in their jobs and,
like political instability, lead to unscrupulous schemes
designed to amass wealth swiftly in anticipation of a
possible loss of employment.
(c) A weak legislative system (including parliament and any
other law-making organs of a country’s government),
which can foster corruption by not being able to enact
Page 23 of 190
stringent anti-corruption laws, and/or by being
participants in unscrupulous schemes.
(d) A weak judicial system, which can foster corruption by
not being able to adjudicate fairly, impartially and
professionally in matters relating to corrupt practices by
government leaders and civil servants due to inadequate
financial resources and/or lack of independence of the
judiciary from the executive branch of a country’s
government.
(e) Excessive, cumbersome and/or rigid administrative
routines and procedures, which are likely to cause
delays and inaction in the dispensation of public services
and, thereby, create opportunities for public officials and
civil servants to seek or accept bribes from impatient
and/or frustrated clients.
(f) Inadequate wages, salaries and fringe benefits, which
can prompt morally deficient public officials and civil
servants to engage in self-remunerating activities in the
workplace in order to meet their families’ subsistence.
Delayed payment of wages and salaries by a govern-
ment can inevitably exacerbate the problem.
(g) The desire to fulfill one’s selfish motives and lack of
professional integrity can dispose a public official or civil
servant to potential abuse of public office for private
gain. An inability to live within one’s regular earnings
can also compel an individual to seek irregular ways of
meeting the demands of his or her lifestyle.
(h) The general lack of professional integrity partly resulting
from inadequate professional bodies and associations to
instill professionalism and ethical behavior of members,
monitor the conduct of members, and impose sanctions
on unprofessional and unethical behavior has deprived
civil servants and public officials of professional direction
and basic ethical guidelines.

Effects of Corruption: Corruption can have grave effects on


a country; it can, for example, subvert political processes,
thwart economic growth and stability, undermine honest
enterprise, discourage foreign direct investment, tarnish the
country’s image, and erode its moral fiber.

Redressing the Scourge: Corruption is, of course, not an


insurmountable phenomenon; it can actually be brought under
control through governmental and private initiatives. Let us
consider some of the many ways in which the scourge can be
Page 24 of 190
contained at the national, international and individual levels.

(a) At the national level, corruption can be contained


through sustained political will, zero tolerance,
streamlining of cumbersome bureaucratic procedures,
provision of adequate remuneration to civil servants and
public officials, compulsory ethics education, and,
among other measures, provision for an anti-graft
hotline.
Other remedial measures which can be taken to stem
corrupt practices by business executives, public officials
and civil servants include the following: (i) passage of
strict pieces of legislation designed to prevent conflicts
of interest in institutional settings; (ii) limitation of
recourse to immunity by public officials and business
leaders and their organizations; and (iii) fostering the
development of a free press to facilitate the exposure of
unscrupulous activities in institutional settings.
(b) At the international level, a country would do well to
participate actively in bilateral and multilateral
conventions, protocols and declarations designed to
contain the scourge, particularly in the areas of
prevention, prosecution, asset recovery, and
international cooperation in generating rules for
extraditing alleged fugitive perpetrators of corrupt
practices.
(c) At the individual level, a high sense of morals and self-
respect can enable a civil servant or public official, for
example, to overcome the temptation of engaging in
corrupt practices.

To elicit ethical behavior and professionalism among


government leaders, the Agenda for Change shall strictly
enforce the code of conduct established by the Parliamentary
and Ministerial Code of Conduct Act (1994) for deputy
ministers, Cabinet ministers and members of the National
Assembly. The Act prohibits any of the foregoing from
acquiring dishonestly or improperly any pecuniary advantage
or assisting in the acquisition of pecuniary advantage by
another person by:

(a) Improperly using or benefiting from information which is


obtained in the course of their official duties and which
is not generally available to the public.
(b) Disclosing any official information to unauthorized per-
Page 25 of 190
sons;
(c) Exerting any improper influence in the appointment,
promotion, discipline or removal of a public officer.
(d) Directly or indirectly converting government property for
personal or any other use.
(e) Soliciting or accepting transfers of economic benefit
other than: benefits of nominal value including custom-
ary hospitality and token gifts; gifts from close family
members; or transfers pursuant to an enforceable
property right of the member or pursuant to a contract
for which full value is given. And, as suggested by civil
society organizations,
(f) A breach of any written law.

The Act also provides for any member of the general public
to file a complaint with the Chief Justice concerning any
Cabinet Minister, Deputy Minister or Member of the National
Assembly suspected of contravening the Act; a tribunal is then
appointed by the Chief Justice, consisting of members who
have held high judicial office.
The tribunal so constituted has to conduct its inquiry in
public, which augurs well for transparency. The tribunal may,
after due inquiry, make such recommendations as to adminis-
trative actions, criminal prosecutions or other further actions to
be taken as it determines fit.
In addition to the enforcement of the code of conduct, we
shall require all educational and training institutions in the
country to provide basic ethics education by incorporating a
topic on ethical and professional conduct in selected core
subjects or courses. Such a measure is certainly in the public
interest because “to educate a [person] ... in mind and not in
morals,” as the late Theodore Roosevelt of the United States
once warned, “is to educate a menace to society.”
In all, corruption, as The Post newspaper has advised
African legislators in an article entitled “African Leaders and
the Fight against Corruption” of August 11, 2005, “can only be
fought resolutely and relentlessly by people who are free from
it.” In the Agenda for Change (AfC) party, we shall relentlessly
seek leaders with a high sense of morals and probity,
demonstrated through their previous positions.

2.7.2 The Fight against Crime:


In addition to a spirited fight against corruption, we shall
make an earnest effort to contain other criminal activities in
our country. Today, every family and business has been
Page 26 of 190
directly or indirectly affected by robberies, burglaries, van-
dalism, and other senseless crimes. Let us consider a few
initiatives for addressing the cancerous scourge:

National Crime-Prevention Board.—We shall create a


“National Crime-Prevention Board” under the auspices of a
new Ministry of Justice, Prisons and Immigration to formulate
an effective and efficient national crime-prevention strategy.
The Board shall be made up of police, prisons and paramilitary
commanding officers, and representatives of chambers of
commerce and industry, private legal practitioners, relevant
government agencies, and civil rights organizations.

Local Control over the Police.—We shall seriously consider


the prospect of transferring the responsibility over the civil po-
lice to provincial governments after creating semi-autonomous
provinces to be administered by elected provincial governors
and district mayors. In the interim, superintendence over the
operations of the civil police shall fall under the jurisdiction of a
new Ministry for Culture and Community Services—in which
case the Ministry of Home Affairs would need to be dissolved.
Close superintendence over police functions by local gove-
rnments will more likely to make it possible for police officers
to discharge the following duties more effectively: (a) pro-
tection of life and property; (b) preservation of peace, and
prevention of crime; (c) detection and apprehension of law
breakers; (d) enforcement of laws and ordinances; (e)
safeguarding the rights and freedoms of members of society;
and (f) developing sound police-community relations.
Sound police-community relations are indispensable in the
fight against crime. Without adequate involvement by local
communities in combating crime, for example, police officers
are not likely to succeed in their endeavors. And, in the same
manner as accused individuals are protected by the
presumption of innocence until they are proven otherwise by a
competent court of law, we shall provide for adequate
protections to both alleged victims and witnesses. Also,
individuals who voluntarily report criminal activities need to be
assured of adequate protection of their rights and identities if
they are to share vital information on criminal activities with
law-enforcement personnel and agencies.
Upon devolving the superintendence over the civil police to
provincial governments, the national government shall work
hand in glove with provincial governments through the Ministry
for Culture and Community Services in providing logistical and
Page 27 of 190
other essential forms of support to the civil police.
To bolster the fight against crime and other social vices
nationwide, the national government shall allocate adequate
financial and material resources to police units in order to
enhance their capabilities in terms of communications,
transportation, crime-fighting gadgets and equipment, and
security cameras for installation in town centers and on major
roads and streets.

Public Complaints Authority.—We shall continue with the


concept of a Police and Prisons Public Complaints Authority at
the district level in order to provide an effective mechanism
through which members of the public shall be afforded the
opportunity to keep the operations and conduct of police and
prisons officers in check.

A Multi-Faceted Strategy.—The fight against crime involves


more—much, much more—than rounding up alleged criminals
and/or handing out stiff punishment. It is of the utmost
importance to address the factors that induce criminal activity.
Although habitual criminals cannot be easily reformed, creation
of adequate jobs by stimulating supply and demand through
lower taxes and interest rates can greatly reduce the number
of citizens who are disposed to engage in criminal activities for
the purpose of obtaining financial and/or material resources in
order to meet their basic needs. And, as an age-old maxim
tells us, “An idle mind is the devil’s workshop.”

Police and Prisons Academy.—In due course, we shall be


consulting defence and security experts to determine whether
it would be in the best interest of the nation to make the
training of prisons, corrections, and civil police officers the res-
ponsibility of the Defence and Security ministry.

(a) If such an arrangement shall be deemed to be viable, we


shall convert the Lilayi training school into a “Police and
Prisons Academy” to provide centralized, state-of-the-art
training for prisons, corrections and civil police officers.
Training costs shall be met by the central government,
while stipends and room and board for trainees shall be
financed by sponsors—that is, provincial governments.
(b) The Academy would also be open for enrolment of
trainees sponsored by local security companies, and
governments and security companies in member-
countries of the African Union (AU). Private and foreign
Page 28 of 190
government sponsors shall meet the full cost of training
for their sponsorees.
(c) The “Police and Prisons Academy” shall also provide for
driving lessons to all trainees who shall need such
training. Selected trainees shall be provided with
training designed to equip them with skills in operating
security helicopters.
(d) The government shall purchase at least ten (10)
helicopters—one for training purposes at the “Prisons
and Police Academy,” and the remaining 9 shall be
shared among provincial governments for security
operations by the civil police. A maintenance facility for
the helicopters shall be established in Kabwe district.

2.8 A SMALLER GOVERNMENT

We shall re-organize the government machinery in order to


make it more responsive to the needs of the people by making
it much smaller, more frugal, and more effective. The contem-
plated re-organization is intended to eliminate costly
duplication of effort by government units, and to reap financial
and other savings for re-allocation to critical government
projects and programs.
A prudently re-structured and streamlined national govern-
ment shall enable us to meet the needs of education and
training, health and medical care, agriculture and food
security, infrastructure, national defence and security, and
other critical national projects and programs at greatly reduced
cost.
Besides, the organization of closely related government
departments, functions, and programs under a single ministry
can bring about proper coordination and, consequently, the
effective execution of the functions and programs involved. An
essential requirement here shall be the creation of semi-
autonomous units or departments under each ministry to
ensure that efficiency in the dispensation of government ser-
vices is not sacrificed.
We shall re-distribute vehicles, office furnishings and other
assets to be spared through the creation of a smaller national
government to vital institutions nationwide – including
hospitals, educational institutions, the civil police, government
executive agencies, orphanages, centers for the handicapped,
and duly registered political parties.
In 1993, Mr. Murray Sanderson echoed our country’s
misgivings regarding the excessive size of the national
Page 29 of 190
government; as reported in the Profit Magazine of July 1993, he
said, “high inflation and high taxes [arise ... from] bloated and
inefficient [government] institutions which serve themselves
instead of serving the public.”
In all, nothing short of a dramatic and radical reduction in
the size of our national government will enable us to
adequately meet the basic needs and expectations of all our
people. The savings to be made per year in this regard are
enormous, as calculated below using data mainly from the
Ministerial and Parliamentary Offices (Emoluments)
(Amendment) Act No. 18 of 2008.

Expenditure per Government Official:

Cabinet Minister:

Salary: Special Allowance: Utility:


K75,117,124 + 26,382,673 + 26,680,000 =
K128,179,797

Deputy Minister:

Salary: Special Allowance: Utility:


K70,953,196 + 24,107,904 + 26,680,000 =
K121,741,090

Permanent Secretary:

Salary: Special Allowance: Utility:


K102,866,638 - - =
K102,866,638

Savings to Be Made:
By reducing the number of Cabinet Ministers, Deputy
Ministers and Permanent Secretaries for the current 23
government Ministries to 10 Ministries, Zambia would make
the following savings:

13 Ministers x K128,179,797 = K1,666,337,361


43 D/Ministers x K121,741,090 = K5,194,866,870
13 P/Secretaries x K102,866,638 = K1,337,266,294
----------------------
Total Savings: K8,198,470,525

These savings plus savings from the abolition of the


Page 30 of 190
positions of 72 District Commissioners plus savings from
allocations of automobiles and other assets for affected
government officials could be re-allocated to the provision of
essential public services and facilities.
They could, for example, be re-allocated to the Ministry of
Health, Ministry of Education and Ministry of Agriculture, whose
2007 projected expenditures provided in the 2005—2007
Green Paper were K535,849,654,488, K1,184,242,305,538 and
K306,048,511,634, respectively.

Innovation in Government:
We shall create a government that will do more with less by
fostering a climate of innovation and creativity among
government employees. Among other things, we shall encour-
age each and every employee on government payroll to suggest
new ideas which shall result in reduced operational and mainte-
nance costs, improved quality of public services, improved
administrative efficiency, and greater levels of performance.
Some of the viable initiatives which we shall introduce in this
regard include the following:

(a) Town Hall Meetings: We shall require all government


ministers together with Permanent Secretaries to hold
Town Hall Meetings semi-annually in an effort to gauge
employees’ views and suggestions on how the provision
of public services could be enhanced, and to act on
recommendations made at such Meetings.
(b) Gripe System: We shall require all supervisory personnel
to introduce hotlines and suggestion boxes through which
employees shall anonymously or otherwise suggest
changes intended to benefit their agencies or work units.
In this endeavor, supervisors shall be required to
promptly analyze and, if feasible, implement suggested
changes in order to build employees’ trust in intentions
for initiating such a suggestion system.
(c) Open-Door Policy: We shall have formal policy that will
encourage administrators and supervisors to adopt an
open-door posture in order to make it possible for their
subordinates to freely call on them any time to suggest or
discuss ways in which quality, productivity, work-related
stress, employee morale, and so forth, could be im-
proved.
There is one serious problem that is likely to emanate
from an open-door policy which administrators and
supervisors need to be aware of – that is, the potential for
Page 31 of 190
some employees to attempt to use their one-on-one
interactions with superiors as a forum for despising or
back-biting other employees. If it is not prevented from
taking root, such a situation can very easily create a
hostile work environment – an environment that would be
gripped by mistrust, suspicion and interpersonal rivalry.
(d) Quality Circles: We shall require all departmental and
agency heads to adopt a Japanese management practice
referred to as “quality circles,” which essentially provides
for work groups to meet regularly (say, once in 3 months)
to discuss operational and other work-related problems,
and how the existing modus operandi could be altered to
yield improved performance.

To enhance the viability of these four initiatives, ministers,


Permanent Secretaries, administrators, and supervisory
personnel shall be expected to introduce special incentive
schemes designed to reward employees who shall contribute
useful ideas or innovations.
Innovation and creativity, as it is often said in Management,
are never out of style. There are always better ways of doing
things waiting to be discovered by those who dare to reach
beyond what is already known and tried.

2.9 AGENDA FOR CHANGE POLICIES

The 10 portfolios to be created by the Agenda for Change party


– including their functions – are presented below in their
relation to the party’s contemplated policies.

2.9.1 Education Policy:

Responsible Ministry: Education, Training and Sport.—To


be directly responsible for advising the President on, and
spearheading the implementation of policies relating to, the
following: general and tertiary education; vocational training;
the training of teachers; adult literacy programs; matters
concerning remuneration for teachers, lecturers, trainers, and
researchers; and sporting programs in all educational and
training institutions. And coordination of national programs and
activities pertaining to education, training and sport with those
of private institutions, as well as provincial and municipal
governments nationwide.

Urgent Matters:
Page 32 of 190
1) Expenditure: We shall provide for an allocation of at least
15% of the national budget to the Ministry of Education,
Training and Sport. At a National Council for Catholic Youth
(NCCY) meeting in Lusaka in October 2001, Brother John
Meade, Head of the Education Department of the Catholic
Secretariat, provided a good reason for the provision of free
education in Zambia, which may be paraphrased thus:

The Government wants to shirk its responsibility to provide


accessible education by pursuing a cost-sharing arrange-
ment when it is obvious that citizens cannot afford to pay.
73% of Zambians live on below US$1 per day. This being
the case, how can they contribute to education? It is
impossible! If people are too poor to invest in education,
the Government has to shoulder the responsibility.

In 1917, a philosopher by the name Alfred North Whitehead


warned about the ill-fated destiny of a society which does not
make meaningful investments in its people's education that is
perhaps truer today than it was during his time: “In the condi-
tions of modern life, the rule is absolute ... [a nation] which
does not value [education] ... is doomed.”
It should be obvious, therefore, that accessible and high-
quality education can be said to be the most important invest-
ment a government can make. It is not possible for any society
to succeed in the pursuit of other human endeavors without
adequate pools of enlightened citizens. In general, education is
among societal members’ fundamental rights enshrined in the
Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 26(1):

“Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be


free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages.
Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and
professional education shall be made generally available,
and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on
the basis of merit.”

2) Free Formal Education: We shall provide free education up


to Grade 12, and eliminate Grades 7 and 9 examinations to
give all pupils the opportunity to expand their knowledge base
through Grade 12 at least. Among other benefits, this arra-
ngement is expected to reduce the rampant juvenile delin-
quency apparently occasioned by dislodging youngsters from
the educational system at a time when they are not yet mature
Page 33 of 190
enough to face the social, economic, and other facets and
challenges of modern society.

3) Compulsory Education: Education in Zambia shall be com-


pulsory from Grade 1 through Grade 12. In the information age
in which we live today, all Zambian children need to be
afforded the opportunity to be in school for at least twelve (12)
years in order for them to expand their knowledge base and/or
gain the necessary vocational skills to at least make it possible
for them to venture successfully into the real world.
To accommodate primary school leavers in secondary
schools, as well as continuing Grade 9 students, we shall take
the following measures:

(a) Provide for immediate expansion of facilities at


secondary schools which do not currently have extra
space for Grades 8 and 10 classes;
(b) Allow interested secondary school teachers destined for
retirement to delay their retirements, as well as hire
more of the trained teachers who are currently
unemployed; and
(c) Step up enrolments in training programs for secondary
school teachers by at least 5%.

4) The Quality of Education: We shall ensure that pupils are


afforded high-quality education at every level. End-of-term
tests and end-of-year examinations shall, therefore, continue
to be administered to gauge each and every pupil's intellectual
development. Moreover, homework shall be mandatory and
shall be given out to each student weekly. And parents and
guardians shall be furnished with end-of-term and end-of-year
transcripts detailing pupils’ performance. We expect this to
afford families an opportunity to bolster school authorities’
efforts to counsel and motivate pupils.

5) Low-Cost School Supplies: We shall create a self-sustaining,


government-controlled textiles company to supply low-cost
school uniforms nationwide, and ensure that publishers of
educational books like the Zambia Educational Publishing
House, and the University of Zambia Press have the necessary
material and financial resources to saturate the local market
with low-cost reading materials.
We shall also remove taxes on all kinds of school supplies
and reading materials in order to make them more affordable
and provide greater opportunities for Zambians to enhance
Page 34 of 190
their knowledge and skills. Moreover, we shall reduce postal
rates for all reading materials and school supplies packed in
the presence of a postal supervisor.

6) Higher Education: We shall increase spending on higher


education in order to enhance the quality of instruction, basic
research and administration at the University of Zambia, the
Copperbelt University, Northrise University in Ndola,
Mulungushi University, and the government-funded colleges
which are earmarked for conversion into universities.

7) Vocational Training: We shall ensure that the training to be


provided in technical and vocational training institutions is
designed to develop and enhance trainees’ technical knowl-
edge and skills consistent with the changing needs of agricul-
tural, commercial and industrial enterprises. The Technical
Education and Vocational and Entrepreneurship Training Au-
thority (TEVETA) shall be incorporated into the Ministry of Edu-
cation, Training and Sport.

8) Loans and Scholarships: We shall constitute a “Loans and


Scholarships Committee” under the auspices of the Ministry of
Finance and Revenue and charge it with the responsibility of
disbursing scholarships and loans to students and trainees in
both private and public colleges and universities as stipulated
below.

(a) Scholarship Fund: A scholarship fund to finance the


sponsorship of gifted Zambian scholars, researchers and
apprentices to pursue educational and training programs
within Zambia or abroad as follows: high-school
graduates who shall obtain a Division 1 shall be
automatically awarded scholarships upon being
accepted at any Zambian college or university.
All other high-school graduates shall be granted with
low-interest loans to pursue studies at Zambian colleges
or universities where they shall have initially obtained
places. And all citizens who shall graduate from
Zambian colleges or universities with “Distinction” shall
be automatically awarded scholarships to pursue higher
educational and/or training programs upon securing
places at accredited colleges or universities.
(b) Research Funding: Sustained and enhanced funding of
research projects earmarked for execution by educa-
tional and training institutions funded by the Govern-
Page 35 of 190
ment through the public treasury.
(c) Loans and Recovery: A loan disbursement and recovery
scheme through which Zambian students and trainees in
public educational and training institutions will have the
opportunity to secure loans from the public treasury for
both tuition and subsistence.
(d) Debt Forgiveness: To promote scholarship and academic
excellence in tertiary education, loan recipients who
shall graduate with “distinction” shall be absolved of
75% of their debt obligations, while those who shall
graduate with “merit” shall be absolved of 50% of their
debt obligations.
And loan recipients who shall decide to work in the
educational, agricultural and healthcare sectors for at
least 4 years shall be absolved of 100% of their debt
obligations.
(Note: Provision for debt forgiveness shall inevitably
require private tertiary institutions to adopt objective
and strict admissions criteria and academic standards to
be generated by the Ministry of Education, Training and
Sport in collaboration with all relevant stakeholders.)

Applicants for government loans and their co-signers shall


be required to sign enforceable contracts at participating
financial institutions to be designated by the Ministry of
Finance obliging them to repay the loans through their part-
time, vocational, and/or permanent employment at five (5)
percent of their gross monthly incomes, regardless of the
countries where the incomes are to be earned. Locally based
employers shall be required to effect the deductions.

9) Working Men and Women: Low-interest government loans


shall also be made accessible to working Zambian men and
women wishing to pursue further studies and/or training in
order to enhance their professional and general knowledge and
skills. We believe in life-long learning! As Alvin Toffler, the
author of Future Shock (1970), has maintained, illiterate
individuals in the 21st century are not going to be those who
cannot read and write; rather, it is going to be “those who
cannot learn, unlearn and re-learn.”

10) The State-Finance Bank Scheme: Unlike the current


financing of higher education (introduced by the MMD
government in 2004) which phased out the bursaries scheme
and required the re-payment of loans within 4 years of
Page 36 of 190
beneficiaries’ engagement in gainful employment, the Agenda
for Change shall continue the bursaries scheme through a
“Scholarship Fund,” “Research Funding” and debt-forgiveness
schemes described above.

11) Curbing the Brain Drain: Zambia continually loses a signi-


ficant number of trained nationals, who decide to emigrate and
live abroad in search of higher incomes and a better standard
of living, among a host of other reasons. This is in spite of the
fact that the country is in dire need of trained personnel to
anchor and facilitate the process of socio-economic develop-
ment.
We shall, therefore, take the necessary measures in order
to curb the brain drain which is adversely affecting education
and training, public health and sanitation, agricultural
production and food security, economic development, the
development of infrastructure, and Zambia’s competitiveness.
Such measures shall include the following:

(a) Conditions of Service: Improving conditions of service for


civil servants, including remuneration for teachers,
lecturers, trainers, researchers, and administrators in
order to attract Zambians working abroad back to their
Motherland;
(b) Appointments in the Civil Service: Inclusion of foreign-
based Zambian professionals in appointments to
substantive positions in the civil service;
(c) Low-interest Loans: Provision for low-interest loans for
Zambian professionals who are currently in the country,
and for those who are based in foreign countries, to start
and manage their own business undertakings within
Zambia;
(d) Retention Allowances: Introduction of retention
allowances for skilled personnel on government payroll;
(e) Research Grants: Provision for research grants for
academic staff in government-supported educational
institutions;
(f) Car and Home Ownership: Provision for car-ownership
and home-ownership schemes; and
(g) Enhanced Socio-Economic Wellbeing: Provision for free
formal education, free life-saving healthcare, greater
food security, safer communities, greater employment
opportunities, and so forth.

Page 37 of 190
12) The Swahili Language: The adoption of Kiswahili as the
African Union’s working language—officially announced by
Mozambique’s Joaquim Chissano in July 2004—poses an
additional challenge in the provision of education.
We, therefore, need to provide adequately for classes
designed to teach the Swahili language at educational
institutions nationwide. We need to do so in order to equip our
people with the language skills they will need in their business
and non-business pursuits across the African Union.
And it is perhaps not too early to start learning the
language with the following Swahili interpretation (provided by
Eric Otieno of Kenya and Hassan Wardere of Somalia) of the
paragraph above:

“Uchaguzi wa Kiswahili kama lugha rasmi ya chama cha


Umoja wa ki Africa ilitangazwa kirasmi na rais wa
Mozambique Joaquim Chissano mwezi wa July 2004. Uamuzi
huu unaongeza ugumu wa ziada kwa kuhifadhi elimu.
Inafaa tuhifadhi madarasa yaliyo sawa kwa kufunza
lugha ya Kiswahili katika shule zote nchini. Inafaa tufanye
hivyo ili tuwapatie watu wetu msingi wanaohitaji kwa
kufanya biashara na mahitaji yasiyo ya biashara katika
Umoja wa ki Africa”.

13) Nationwide Internet Access: We shall strive to narrow what


has been referred to as the “digital divide”—that is, the gap
between people in a given country who have access to the
Internet and those who do not have access to such a facility—
by making the Internet available at centrally located public
libraries nationwide.
Provision for greater numbers of our people to gain instant
access to news and information is essential in our efforts to
nurture Zambia's nascent democracy. After all, we live in an
information age. The emergence of the “Internet” or “informa-
tion superhighway” has made it possible for people worldwide
to readily gain access to news, information, and goods and
services from any part of the globe, and to instantaneously
communicate with other people across national and regional
borders.
Yet, the majority of our people nationwide have no access
to such an essential facility. We cannot continue to deny them
the opportunity to venture into the information superhighway.

14) Sport and Recreation: “All work and no play makes Jack a
dull boy,” an anonymous and time-honored maxim tells us.
Page 38 of 190
Physicians, for example, usually recommend sporting activities
as being essential to good health. Management specialists,
too, usually advise that one takes some kind of sport or
physical exercise as a remedy for tension and an antidote for
stress. Besides, sporting activities provide increased stamina,
mental alertness, and an enhanced feeling of well-being.
We shall, therefore, promote sporting programs at all
educational and training institutions. Also, we shall promote
private investments in the local manufacture of sporting goods
for track and field, soccer, basketball, netball, tennis, and
badminton, among other sporting activities.

2.9.2 Public Health Policy:

Responsible Ministry: Public Health and Sanitation.—To be


directly responsible for advising the President on, and spear-
heading the implementation of policies relating to, the follo-
wing: medical care, medical research, child health and
development, family planning, disease control and prevention,
food safety (local and imported foodstuff), drug safety (local
and imported medicines), safety of herbal medicines, public
health education, public health inspections, and matters con-
cerning remuneration for public health personnel. And coordi-
nation of national public health programs and activities with
those of private healthcare facilities and provincial and
municipal governments.

Urgent Matters:

1) Expenditure on Public Health: We shall allocate at least


15% of the national budget to public health and sanitation.

2) Free Life-Saving Care: We shall provide for free life-saving


medical and healthcare for all Zambian citizens, without
inhibiting the operations of private healthcare providers to
cater to the needs of wealthy people. We are geared to assure
each and every eligible person the right to receive free life-
saving medical care that is respectful, that recognizes personal
dignity, and that adequately provides for personal privacy.
Cosmetic surgery, orthodontics, vision-correction, and other
non-life-saving health services shall not be financed through
the public treasury.

3) Proper Identification: To be attended to at government-


operated health centers and pharmacies, patients (except in
Page 39 of 190
emergency situations) shall be required to show their National
Registration Cards and/or any other acceptable form(s) of
identification to be determined by the Ministry for Public Health
and Sanitation.

4) Responsible Use of Free Services: Economic theory would


discourage the provision of free services, arguing that free
services inevitably lead to wasteful use by recipients. We shall,
however, not falter in our commitment to provide free life-
saving medical and healthcare. In this respect, we shall expect
each and every recipient of such care to guard themselves
against wasteful use of medical and healthcare resources.

5) Other National Programs: The Agenda for Change shall also


make financial resources available for the following purposes:
HIV/AIDS, TB, cancer, and other forms of medical research;
disease control and prevention; food safety (both local and
imported foodstuff); drug safety (both local and imported
medicines); safety of herbal medicines; public health edu-
cation; public health inspections; National AIDS Council opera-
tions and logistics; and improvements in health and medical
personnel’s conditions of service.

6) The HIV/AIDS Pandemic: Good nutrition and medical


breakthroughs are now making it possible for HIV/AIDS
patients worldwide to live normal and reasonably more
productive lives. We shall, therefore, encourage all Zambians
to undergo a voluntary and confidential HIV/AIDS test in order
for them to privately determine whether or not they need to
seek the necessary medical care at an early stage.

(a) “Life-Saving” Status: The HIV/AIDS pandemic shall fall


under the free life-saving healthcare program, and shall
be financed through both external and governmental
funding.
(b) Prevention of Infection: “Prevention is better than cure,”
an age-old maxim tells us. We shall, therefore, provide
for sustained governmental funding of programs
designed to dissuade the citizenry from risky social
relationships, including abstinence.
(c) Safe In-Hospital Practices: To forestall the potential for
accidental spread of HIV/AIDS infection, we shall provide
for enhanced funding of programs designed to promote
safer utilization of syringes, donated blood, medical
gloves, and so forth.
Page 40 of 190
7) Unborn Children: The Agenda for Change shall consider
each and every pregnant woman as nursing a child that is
deserving of governmental support to meet his or her
healthcare, nutritional and developmental needs. By the way,
we wish to recognize Hon. Inonge Wina’s effort in securing “ox-
cart ambulances” for the Nalolo constituency (during her
tenure as Member of Parliament for Nalolo constituency) in
order to curb maternity-related deaths occasioned by delays in
the transportation of expecting mothers to healthcare centers.
Needless to say, it would be prudent for a government to
allocate financial and material resources that are likely to be
channeled into the expansion of Parliament to 200 members,
among other potentially wasteful initiatives, to the acquisition
of at least two reliable ambulances for each of Zambia’s
districts.

8) Harmful Products: We shall strictly enforce all existing


pieces of legislation designed to prevent teenage smoking and
beer-drinking, as well as prohibit beer and cigarette advertise-
ments in media that are mainly designed for minors. As devel-
oped nations worldwide have found out, strict enforcement of
such legislation is essential—particularly in the initial stages of
a country's socio-economic development—to circumvent the
excessive cost of rehabilitating a society besieged by unprece-
dented moral decay, as well as ailments associated with
alcoholism, drug abuse, and tobacco addiction.

9) Conditions of Service: We shall strive to improve the condi-


tions of service for all medical and healthcare personnel in
order to afford them a decent standard of living as well as
stem the nagging exodus of such essential personnel to foreign
countries.

2.9.3 Agricultural Policy:

Responsible Ministry: Agriculture and Food Security.—To


be directly responsible for advising the President on, and
spearheading the implementation of policies relating to, the
following: sustainable agricultural development and long-term
food security -- including the provision of agricultural incen-
tives, support to agribusiness establishments and agricultural
research centers, damming rivers, and construction of irriga-
tion canals. And coordination of national programs and
activities pertaining to agriculture and food security with those
Page 41 of 190
of the private sector and both provincial and municipal govern-
ments.

Urgent Matters:

1) Expenditure on Agriculture: We shall devote at least 6% of


the national budget on projects and programs relating to
agriculture and food security.

2) National Food Security: Food security, according to the


resolutions of the World Food Summit held in Italy in November
1996, “exists when all people, at all times, have physical and
economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet
their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and
healthy life.” Such is the situation the Agenda for Change shall
strive to attain for our country and all its people.

3) Enhanced Agricultural Output: In 2000, the COMESA Secre-


tary General identified an array of factors limiting increased
agricultural production in Zambia in a keynote address at a
workshop convened to discuss the findings of a study on
Zambia’s agricultural comparative advantage.
They are as follows: non-availability of financial capital, and
the high cost of agricultural credit; inadequate transport and
storage infrastructure, and the high cost of transport; the
under-provision and high cost of agricultural inputs; an
inefficient agricultural marketing system; inadequate skills in
agricultural production and marketing; inconsistent and
unrealistic agricultural policies; and inadequate investment in
agricultural development by the national government.
We are overly committed to the attainment of sustainable
agricultural development and long-term food security through
the following measures and initiatives, among other things:

(a) Zambia National Service: We shall fully and promptly


revive and revitalize the Zambia National Service (ZNS)
production camps, which shall accept enrollment by
Zambian citizens on a voluntary basis, as well as promo-
te and bolster agricultural production in the camps thro-
ugh greater financial support and generous conditions of
service for ZNS personnel in order to make the camps
the major sources of agricultural produce for the envi-
saged National Food Reserve. We want the ZNS to
spearhead Zambia’s agrarian revolution!
Vacated refugee camps dotted across Zambia shall
Page 42 of 190
also be utilized for agriculture-related training, crop
production, and other vocations to be facilitated by a
cadre of skilled and professional trainers.
(b) Provincial Agricultural Estates: We shall require all
provinces to create revenue-generating agricultural
schemes, and to use a portion of the output of the
schemes to maintain their own local food reserves.
(c) District Councils: District councils which currently run
municipal farms as part of their commercial undertak-
ings shall be encouraged to continue running such
farms.
(d) School Production Units: All educational and training
institutions shall be encouraged to join in the nation’s
quest for greater agricultural output and food security.
In this endeavor, we shall require each and every
student and trainee to actively participate in agriculture-
based production units at their schools, colleges and
universities. Their participation in such units shall be
graded and noted in their testimonials. We want all
Zambians to appreciate the value of agriculture and
food security.
(e) Agricultural Incentives: We shall provide for attractive
agricultural incentives to boost both small-scale and
large-scale farmers. As provided for in the World Trade
Organization’s Uruguay Round accord concluded in
December 1993 in Punta del Este, Uruguay, WTO mem-
ber-countries’ quest for enhanced food security
precedes the need for progressive reduction of
governmental support for, and protection of, agricultural
activities in order to enhance market access and com-
petitiveness internationally.
We shall support all kinds of agricultural pursuits and
endeavors, including dairy farming, ranching, fish
farming, horticulture, and crop husbandry.
(f) The Military, Prisons and Civil Police: Police camps,
prisons and military barracks and garrisons which do not
currently have agricultural production units should also
be expected to initiate and maintain such units.
(g) Agricultural Inputs: We shall promote efficiency in
processing, sourcing, and distribution of agricultural
inputs by providing for informal trade in agricultural
inputs among farmers, and the creation of a “Farmers’
Holding Company” by farmers (through a low-interest
loan, if needed), to supply low-cost inputs nationwide at
zero value-added tax—including seeds, seedlings, ferti-
Page 43 of 190
lizers, pesticides, insecticides, stock feeds, and grain
bags.
The cooperating farmers shall assume ownership of
the company as founding shareholders, and the com-
pany shall preferably be registered and operated as a
corporate entity.
Besides, we shall encourage farmers to engage in
direct and informally initiated farmer-to-farmer trade in
low-cost and organic agricultural inputs—including
compost, chicken-droppings and cattle-dung manures—
and young birds, animals and species of fish intended
for breeding.
(h) Agriculture-Related Imports: All the various kinds of
imports that are currently exempted from customs duty
shall continue to enjoy the duty-free status—including
fertilizer, irrigation equipment, irrigation pumps,
tractors, machinery for soil preparation and cultivation,
harvesting and threshing machinery, poultry machinery,
fungicides, and herbicides.
(i) Marketing of Produce: We shall create—in collaboration
with the Zambia National Farmers Union (ZNFU), the
Millers Association of Zambia (MAZ), the Zambia
Cooperative Federation (ZCF), and other relevant
stakeholders—a marketing system for all kinds of agri-
cultural produce designed to provide for the following:
direct sourcing of such produce from farmers by millers,
retailers and other industrial buyers; and procurement of
unsold produce by the Food Reserve Agency at
wholesale prices for preservation and/or distribution to
government institutions like boarding schools, colleges
and hospitals.
(j) Irrigation Schemes: We shall actively seek to create and
maintain irrigation schemes at tax-payer expense,
including the damming of rivers and construction of irri-
gation canals nationwide. We want to promote all-
season crop production—January through December. In
this regard, we appreciate the pledge made by donor
countries to bolster the viability of the envisaged
National Irrigation Plan (NIP), which we shall earnestly
embrace.
(k) Other Imperatives: We shall create feeder roads and
maintain old ones nationwide, improve training
conducted in agricultural research centers, provide for
low-interest loans for erecting secure storage facilities,
and extend incentives to agribusinesses and canners
Page 44 of 190
and processors of agricultural produce.

4) Disadvantaged Children: Our country is currently facing the


problem of caring for increasing numbers of orphaned,
dumped, neglected, and other less-advantaged children. We
shall devise a program for addressing the nutritional needs of
such children, as well as provide for direct financial and mate-
rial support to the Kasisi Orphanage and other such institutions
so that the nutritional needs of orphans of victims of AIDS and
other ailments and unfortunate circumstances are adequately
catered for by the institutions—particularly those that are
members of the Children In Need (CHIN) organization.

2.9.4 Economic Policy:

Responsibility for Economic Policy: Finance and Revenue,


Commerce and Industry and the Bank of Zambia.

Finance and Revenue:


To be directly responsible for advising the President on, and
spearheading the implementation of policies relating to, the
following: financial matters and monetary issues, including the
stock / securities market; national debt management and
external debt resolution; management of all state-owned
enterprises; administration, dispensation and recovery of loans
granted to students and trainees admitted to institutions of
higher learning, and management of a government scholarship
fund through a “Loans and Scholarships Committee” to be
created in due course; and revenue generation through taxat-
ion, customs and excise duties, service fees / charges,
superintendence over the National Road Fund Agency (NRFA),
and provision of postal services through the Zambia Postal
Services Corporation (ZAMPOST).

Urgent Matters:

1) Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP): We shall make


an earnest effort to continue to pursue the projects and
programs set forth in the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper—
particularly with respect to such critical issues as expenditure
management and control, education and training, HIV/AIDS
and other matters relating to healthcare, and economic
liberalization (including privatization and trade liberalization).

2) Ambitious Tax Reform: The Agenda for Change party shall


Page 45 of 190
introduce new and lower Pay-As-You-Earn (PAYE), corporate
and value-added tax rates. The tight PAYE income tax bands
that Zambia has continued to use over the years, for example,
shall be expanded. There is a need to expand the bands in
order to make them fairer to tax payers by narrowing the gap
between 0% and 25% in the 2010 income bands as follows:

2011 Income Bands and Tax Rates:

K0 -- 1,000,000 per month 0%


K1,000,001 -- K1,735,000 per month 25%
K1,735,001 -- K4,200,000 per month 30%
K4,200,001 and above per month 35%??

Proposed Income Bands and Tax Rates:

K0 – K1,000,000 per month 0%


K1,000,001 -- K1,435,000 per month 10%
K1,435,001 -- K1,970,000 per month 15%
K1,970,001 -- K2,370,000 per month 20%
K2,370,001 -- K3,170,000 per month 25%
K3,170,001 -- K3,970,000 per month 30%
K3,970,001 and above per month 35%
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Corporate Tax (maximum): 30%
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Value-Added Tax: from 16% to 12.5%
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Apart from being fairer to tax payers, the suggested system


would make it possible for some of the people who pay PAYE to
keep more of their hard-earned incomes for savings,
investment and consumption.
Fellow citizens and the business community, we want you
to keep more of your incomes for saving and investment. And
that is just one of the many sweet rewards you will earn for
investing your vote wisely! In addition to the stimulation of
investment and savings, the tax cuts will foster greater
spending by households and business undertakings and, as
such, function as an effective economic stimulus.

3) Customs Duties: We shall maintain customs duties at cur-


rent levels. However, the following, if unavailable locally, shall
be imported duty-free:

Page 46 of 190
(a) Industrial production inputs;
(b) Agricultural inputs;
(c) Machinery and equipment;
(d) Computers and accessories;
(e) Educational books and supplies;
(f) Any other essential imports which shall be deemed to be
deserving of duty-free importation; and
(g) All the various kinds of imports that are currently
exempted from customs duty.

4) Tax Relief on Food: We are also seriously considering the


prospect of reducing, or completely removing, value-added tax
on essential foodstuffs to make them more affordable to the
economically vulnerable members of society. Since demand for
food is generally inelastic over time, the tax relief—if comple-
mented by a spirited national effort to improve both the
production and distribution of food—should result in lower
average food prices.
To compensate for revenues relinquished through tax relief
on foodstuffs, we intend to increase excise taxes on luxury
goods, among a host of other measures. We shall, however,
provide for relief on foodstuff only after the introduction of free
basic education and socialized life-saving health and medical
care.

5) Macro-Economic Adjustment: Often times, government


leaders in poor, debt-ridden countries like Zambia have tended
to use both the IMF and the World Bank as convenient scape-
goats for their own failures and mediocrity in handling their
respective countries’ socio-economic affairs. If anything, the
blame should actually be laid at the feet of government
leaders who caused the economic crises that prompted af-
fected countries to seek IMF/World Bank funding and the as-
sociated intervention in the first place.
While the conditionalities or austerity measures imposed by
these two Bretton Woods institutions have tended to cause
unprecedented socio-economic problems in such countries,
there is a lot leaders in affected countries can do to alleviate
the unsavory impacts of structural adjustments.
Structural adjustment programs (or SAPs) are essentially in-
tended to induce greater fiscal discipline and efficiency in the
application of available national resources. The necessity for
such programs is, therefore, obvious: we cannot permanently
avoid making the needed macro-economic adjustment by

Page 47 of 190
continuing to live beyond our means as a nation, and per-
petually misusing our meager productive resources.
However, our people’s well-being during the structural
adjustment process is of paramount importance. Therefore, we
cannot afford to subject the people to illiteracy, ill-health and
starvation in the name of future development. After all, mean-
ingful socio-economic development cannot be attained in an
economy where the labor force is composed of sickly, illiterate
and starving citizens.
Article 25(1) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
provides for governmental responsibility over the socio-eco-
nomic well-being of citizens which the IMF and the World Bank
cannot override:

“Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for


the health and well-being of himself and of his family,
including food, clothing, housing and medical care and
necessary social services, and the right to security in the
event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood,
old age, or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond
his control.”

And, as the late Julius Nyerere maintained in his speech


delivered at the Conference on Governance in Africa held in
Addis Ababa in March 1998, a government bears “the final
responsibility for the State of the Nation … and the well-being
of its people.”

(a) SAP with a Human Face: We shall, therefore, ensure that


the adjustment program to be adopted for continued
implementation is capped with a human face—a
program designed to include safeguards intended to
reduce the negative impacts of a transition to a free-
market economy on vulnerable individuals and institu-
tions, including tax relief on foodstuff, and provision for
low-cost educational supplies, low-cost means of trans-
portation, low-cost public housing, a livable national
minimum wage, higher remittances to pensioners, and
pro-rated pay rises in the place of the infamous wage
freeze.
(b) Bolstering the SAP: To bolster the people-friendly struc-
tural adjustment process, we shall seriously consider the
following imperatives, among others:

i) Provision for adequate and accessible healthcare,


Page 48 of 190
formal education, and vocational training;

ii) Provision for greater and sustained investments in


transportation, telecommunications and agricultural
infrastructures;

iii) Sustained promotion of research and development


(R&D) endeavors in both private and public sectors of
the economy;

iv) Skilful management of our monetary and fiscal polic-


ies to induce local and foreign investment levels that will
not cause harmful inflationary trends;

v) Provision for a livable national minimum wage


intended to avail low-income Zambian workers a mea-
ningful share of the national cake; and

vi) Encourage employees and their employers to


consider the prospect of introducing a system of pro-
rated pay increments over an agreed period of time to
afford employers enough time to source funds for fina-
ncing negotiated pay rises. (Note: Pro-rated pay rises
can enable the national Government to meet IMF and
World Bank inflation targets by adequately planning for
the control of inflationary trends which are likely to be
triggered by a sudden nationwide escalation of employ-
ees’ earnings through appropriate monetary and fiscal
policies.)

Efforts aimed at bolstering our country’s quest for height-


ened socio-economic development are consistent with the
IMF’s statutory mandate, which may be paraphrased as
follows: “... to promote and maintain a high level of employ-
ment and real income, and to contribute to the productive
potential of member-countries.”

6) Redressing the Debt Burden: Our country’s external debt


obligations consist of bilateral debts owed to sovereign states
like OECD countries, multilateral debts owed to such institu-
tions as the IMF and the World Bank, and commercial debts
owed to private banks. These obligations are among the
country’s most serious fetters to the attainment of meaningful
socio-economic development. If we cannot generate viable
solutions to the external-debt problem, therefore, we should
Page 49 of 190
not expect to make any headway in socio-economic develop-
ment.
The external debt burden has overwhelmed our country in a
number of ways; first, living standards have drastically
declined due to wage freezes, restrictions on the importation of
some necessary consumer goods, reduction of government
expenditures on essential social services, and other austerity
measures imposed by the IMF and the World Bank.
And, among a host of other dire effects, investments in
development projects is greatly reduced, since a large chunk of
our meager export revenue is devoted to interest payments
and amortization.

(a) Causes of the Problem: The external debt burden is a


culmination of numerous factors. However, obvious
factors for which we can entirely blame ourselves as a
nation include our inability to discover alternative local
sources of energy to lessen our excessive dependence
on imported oil, and misappropriation of local finances—
which has continued to trigger the need to borrow—and
borrowed funds.

- Imported Oil: Unprecedented hikes in petroleum


prices by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting
Countries (OPEC) in 1973/74 and 1979/80 resulted in a
rise in the price of oil from US$2.50 to US$35 per barrel.
This inflated the import bills of non-oil-producing coun-
tries, prompting poor nations to resort to heavy
borrowing in order to meet the exorbitant cost of oil im-
ports.
Oil-exporting countries, too, resorted to heavy
borrowing in the late 1980s when sharp drops in oil
prices in 1985 and 1986 resulted in an acute price fall
from US$35 to about US$10 per barrel, drastically
reducing their export earnings and, consequently, their
ability to settle outstanding import bills.
Related to oil prices is the issue of relaxed lending.
Growing deposits of money, particularly through the
Eurocurrency market, from petroleum exporting nations
between 1973 and 1981 put a great deal of pressure on
banks to find borrowers; as a result, commercial banks
generally found it necessary to grant loans with little or
no consideration of the debt-service prospects of debt-
seeking countries, thereby contributing to a build-up of
debt.
Page 50 of 190
- Misuse of Loans Secured: From the early 1980s, a
significant portion of loans granted to us has been used
on keeping inefficient parastatal companies in operation,
financing the production of non-tradable goods,
subsidizing consumption, financing government leaders’
superfluous perquisites, and/or on other unproductive
schemes.

(b) Solutions to the Problem: A number of approaches have


been proposed and/or tried as possible remedies to the
cancerous external debt burden on the developing
world; they include the Baker and Brady plans of the
United States government and a host of other approach-
es.
The Agenda for Change will make an effort to
complement existing debt resolution plans with several
additional measures and approaches discussed in a
nutshell below.

i) The Local Currency: We shall guard ourselves against


maintaining an over-valued currency which can en-
courage imports and depress exports, thereby creating a
necessity to borrow from external sources of capital as a
means of financing the balance of trade deficit which
may result from rising imports and declining exports.

ii) Capitalize on Debt Relief: Many new debt relief initia-


tives have been conceived since the 1990s, when the
external debt burden on fragile economies worldwide
increasingly became unsustainable. This prompted
creditor-nations and institutions to seek swifter ways
and means of redressing the situation.
We shall take advantage of debt restructuring and
debt cancellations by creditor nations and institutions
and use debt-relief funds in a responsible and productive
manner, including investment of such funds in stimu-
lating the production of tradable goods in order to
enhance our country’s foreign exchange earning poten-
tial.

(c) Other Possible Approaches: We shall also ask the Minis-


ter of Finance and Revenue to try out the following new
external debt resolution strategies: the debt-for-
resources plan, to be targeted at both commercial and
Page 51 of 190
bilateral forms of debt; and the debt-for-tax plan, to be
targeted at commercial debt.

i) Debt-for-resources plan: This approach will requi-


re us to negotiate with creditor nations and/or
creditor institutions for repayment of portions of
debts owed to them by means Creditor insti-
tutions and governments that are willing to accept
re-payments of portions of outstanding debts in
kind can then auction the special commodities
obtained in their respective countries.

ii) Debt-for-tax plan: This plan entails inducing Zambia’s


creditor institutions to make direct investments in the
Zambian economy so that they can recover outstanding
debts through tax retentions—which may include
retentions of all or a percentage of taxes on sales,
income, imports, and/or exports. There are many lines of
business in which such investments can be made; they
include commercial and investment banking, as well as
non-banking fields of business like agriculture, agribusi-
ness, real estate, and tourism.
We can benefit from this arrangement in two related
ways; first, our economy can be greatly strengthened by
both the investments which may be made and the
foreign exchange which may be saved by settling com-
mercial debts through tax retentions by creditor institu-
tions. Second, a strengthened economy can generate
greater export revenue and be in a better position to
service bilateral and multilateral debts.
These benefits are certainly more vital to our country
than the potential tax revenue from creditor institutions
which would be relinquished in a bid to induce such
investments. Besides, the jobs which may be directly or
indirectly generated by creditor institutions' capital
investments can create an additional source of income
tax revenue for the Government, and partly compensate
for the loss in tax revenue occasioned by the tax retenti-
ons.
The viability of this plan is contingent upon the fulfill-
ment of two conditions; first, there should be genuine
and sustained willingness on the part of creditor insti-
tutions to contribute to our development efforts. Next,
there should be strong and demonstrated commitment
on our part to address the needs and concerns of private
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investors.

(d) Meeting the Requirements: We shall make an effort to


meet the requirements set in 1996 by the IMF and the
World Bank for debt relief in order to qualify for debt
forgiveness—including good governance, and being
under the tutelage of an IMF structural adjustment
program for at least six years. Further, we shall prove
our commitment to poverty reduction and wealth
creation, environmental protection, and the provision of
quality and accessible education and healthcare.
(e) Strategic Re-Orientation: We shall re-examine our
country’s priorities and re-consider existing
development strategies in order to minimize borrowing
from external sources of funds.

7) Public Servants Credit Union: We shall facilitate the


creation of a self-sustaining and revenue-generating Public
Servants Credit Union through a low-interest loan to provide
the initial capitalization of the Credit Union, which shall
preferably be operated as a corporate entity. Among other
services, the Credit Union shall provide consumer and business
loans at nominal interest rates to its members from the civil
service, the police service, the prison service, the military /
paramilitary service, the Zambia National Service (ZNS), and
all investigative organs of the Zambian government.
Membership of the Public Servants Credit Union shall be
extended to other segments of society at the discretion of the
Union’s Board of Directors, whose composition shall be
determined by the Minister of Finance and Revenue in
collaboration with the Minister of Commerce and Industry and
the Governor of the Bank of Zambia.
The Credit Union’s Headquarters shall preferably be based
in Kabwe, and a branch of the Union shall be established in
each of the country’s 9 provinces.

The National Road Fund Agency.—The National Road Fund


Agency (NRFA) is responsible for managing and administering
the road fund. It was created through the National Road Fund
Act No. 13 of 2002.

Zambia Postal Services Corporation.—ZAMPOST is a statutory


corporation established by an Act of Parliament under the
Postal Services Act No. 24 of 1994 after the dissolution of the
Posts and Telecommunications Corporration (PTC).
Page 53 of 190
We shall expand the functions of the current postal system
to include the dispensation of a diversity of souvenirs—inc-
luding T-shirts, caps, cups, plates, key holders, car stickers,
and postal cards depicting the national flag and/or our unique
natural endowments, historical sites, cultural artifacts, and the
like. This will enable us to recover from the loss of potential
postal revenues arising greater use of the Internet as a means
of communication by businesses and the citizenry.
Moreover, ZAMPOST shall also be expected to bolster its
revenues through an expansion of P. O. Box services, and the
lowering of P. O. Box rental fees to generate greater demand
for P. O. Box rentals nationwide.
Besides, it shall consider the prospect of promoting the
concept of information flyers and blurbs designed for
distribution / dissemination through postal boxes, mail bags,
and residential addresses by business and non-business
institutions. Nominal charges shall be determined and
collected as additional revenue by ZAMPOST for providing the
service.

Commerce and Industry:


To be directly responsible for advising the President on, and
spearheading the implementation of policies relating to, the
following: trade and industrialization strategy, tourism, mining,
business and investment promotion, regulation of imports and
exports, trade relations, registration of foreign companies, re-
search and development (R&D) support for local manufactur-
ers, and superintendence over the operations of the Zambia
Development Agency (ZDA). And coordination of national com-
mercial and industrial programs and activities with those of
provincial and municipal governments.

Urgent Matters:
Our country is in dire need of a sound industrial and trade
strategy to facilitate the attainment of important national
objectives, including the generation of high-paying manufac-
turing jobs, shifting of resources from the production of
primary commodities (whose prices in foreign markets are
generally very low and unstable) to the production of the more
profitable manufactured goods, creation of forward and back-
ward linkages in the national economy, and spurring indigeno-
us-based innovative capacity and technological development.
We shall pursue prudent and viable measures that will
propel the Zambian economy to sustained prosperity through
the attainment of each of the foregoing goals and aspirations.
Page 54 of 190
A national government’s relevance in matters of commerce
and industry, we believe, lies in its ability to nurture the
creation of new, innovative businesses, and to create socio-
economic conditions that are conducive to the long-term
success and survival of such businesses.

1) An Enabling Environment: We shall create an enabling


socio-economic environment in which hard-working Zambians
will be able to unleash their full potential and get rewarded
handsomely—whether they are shareholders, self-employed, or
on someone else’s payroll.

2) Jobs and Economic Growth: For too long now, government


leaders have tended to place a great deal of emphasis on
stabilizing inflation at the expense of job creation and
economic growth. The Agenda for Change shall reverse the
trend by placing greater emphasis on job creation and eco-
nomic growth through low interest rates and progressive
reductions in taxes in order to stimulate both investment and
consumption.
As Mwana Muchende advised in October 2001, “it is impor-
tant to achieve monetary targets that favor industrial growth
and output.” Needless to say, an increase in investment can
lead to the creation of new jobs, facilitate socio-economic
development, and create a more competitive economic setting
that can promote efficiency, as well as compel business
entities to improve the quality of their products, and charge
relatively lower prices.

3) “Operation Self-Employment”: As the United Nations has


maintained, a growing body of empirical evidence supports the
widely held view that small and medium-sized enterprises
(SMEs) are instrumental to economic development. The
Agenda for Change government will make an effort to promote
SMEs for the following specific reasons, among others:

(a) Alternative Employment: SMEs will create employment


opportunities for talented Zambians and family
members who cannot find jobs in large business esta-
blishments;
(b) Economic Empowerment: SMEs will collectively function
as a vehicle through which our Government will
economically empower its people by enabling them to
participate actively and directly in their country’s
commercial and industrial activities;
Page 55 of 190
(c) Income Distribution: SMEs will facilitate the generation
of wealth for all sectors of our country’s economy and
thereby reduce existing income disparities;
(d) Economic Backbone: SMEs operated by Zambians will
function as the backbone of our country’s economy
because it will be both indigenous and permanent, as
Mr. Andrew Sardanis has maintained; and
(e) Goods and Services: SMEs participate in elevating their
host communities’ social and economic welfare through
the provision of various kinds of needed goods and
services.

We shall support all fields of entrepreneurial endeavor—that


is, manufacturing, construction, agriculture, mining, retailing,
wholesaling, and services. Preferential treatment shall,
however, be accorded to investments in the local production of
building materials, hardware, and agricultural machinery and
equipment.

4) Economic Diversification: We shall step up current efforts


to diversify the national economy in order to lessen its depen-
dence on the mining industry. As Trevor Manuel of South Africa
advised the MMD Government in November 2001, “the
Zambian Government [should] ... quickly work towards the
diversification of its exports as the era of single commodity
dependence was long gone.”
The envisaged diversification is essential if we are to pull
the national economy out of the persistent dislocation which it
has suffered since independence due to its over-dependence
on the mining industry. Potential areas for such diversification
shall include manufacturing, agriculture, agribusiness, tourism,
gemstone mining, and hydro-electric power.
As the Civil Society for Poverty Reduction (CSPR) has noted,
there are seven major themes of economic diversification that
Zambia has sought to pursue over the decades with
comparatively little achievement; they include the following:

(a) Sector Diversification: Reduction of the dominance of


the copper mining sector by promoting agriculture,
tourism, gemstone mining, and hydro-electric power;
(b) Export Diversification: Promotion of a variety of non-
traditional exports (NTEs);
(c) Resource-Use Diversification: The use of local raw
materials in the production of goods and the provision of
services;
Page 56 of 190
(d) Technological Diversification: Movement from capital-
intensive production technologies to appropriate labor-
intensive technologies;
(e) Scale Diversification: Reduction in the dominance of
large-scale production by enhancing the role of medium-
scale and small-scale production activity;
(f) Structural Diversification: Strengthening of the
production structure by promoting activities with high
degrees of internal backward and forward linkages; and
(g) Regional Diversification: Tapping the comparative
advantages of the different provinces in the country with
the aim of uplifting the living standards of all the
inhabitants and bringing about balanced regional growth
and development.

There are many reasons why economic diversification into


agriculture, agribusiness, tourism, manufacturing, gemstone
mining and exportation, and hydro-electric power has not been
fully pursued in Zambia, such as the following:

(a) The initial lack of foresight by the UNIP government,


which could not apparently foresee the possibility of
steep decreases in copper prices and plummeting
production levels;
(b) Lack of political will to pursue economic diversification;
(c) The historic legacy of colonialism which focused on
mineral extraction in Zambia, agricultural production in
Zimbabwe and tourism in Malawi; and
(d) Poor implementation of the privatization process which
led to the collapse of many non-mining sectors.

5) Industrial and Trade Strategy: An appropriate industrial


and trade strategy is a critical element in our quest for sustain-
able and enhanced socio-economic development. From 1964 to
1991, our country was preoccupied with the implementation of
“import-substitution” policies aimed at promoting the use of
local inputs and the local manufacture of products traditionally
imported into the country in order to reduce the demand for
foreign exchange to import foreign products and inputs.
From 1992 to date, there has been a seemingly unplanned
and slight shift toward an “export-oriented” strategy, whose
emphasis is to promote the production of non-traditional
exports (NTEs)—that is, commodities initially constituting only
a small proportion of Zambia's export portfolio, if at all, which

Page 57 of 190
the Government has now decided to promote in its export
drive. Let us consider the pros and cons of these two
strategies.

(a) Import Substitution: This is advantageous for a number


of reasons; first, the local production of previously
imported commodities benefits from an already existing
local market for such commodities. Also, it is usually
much easier to protect local suppliers of import
substitutes from foreign competition and ensure that
they have a stable local customer base than to aid them
in gaining access to export markets. Moreover, import
substitution can be a viable means of lessening
Zambia's economic dependency on, and the linkage of
its development prospects to the health of the
economies of, foreign countries.
The major drawbacks with this strategy include the
huge capital outlays required in setting up local
industries to produce import substitutes, the greater
unemployment which is likely to be brought about by
the capital-intensive nature of the industries that may
be set up, and the diseconomies of scale associated with
creating industrial units to produce for a small and
limited local market. Besides, import-substitute
producers’ dependence on imported capital and
intermediate goods can lead to serious balance of pay-
ments (BOPs) problems.
Moreover, protected import-substitute suppliers can
become lax and complacent and lead to gross inefficien-
cy in protected “infant industries.” Further, the opportu-
nity cost associated with the concentration of resources
in one industry is very high for a poor country.

(b) Export-Oriented Strategy: Advantages of this strategy


include the economies of scale associated with local
firms having access to a larger and unlimited potential
market, and its potential to stimulate local industries to
seek innovative ways and means of producing
internationally competitive commodities.
Its major drawbacks emanate from the generally
impermeable nature of export markets and, like the
import-substitution strategy, the massive capital outlays
needed to create a viable export industry, the high
opportunity cost associated with the strategy, and the
high level of unemployment which may result from the
Page 58 of 190
capital-intensive nature of an export-oriented industry.

(c) Agenda for Change Strategy: Zambia and other


countries which have tried the import-substitution
strategy have generally been unable to achieve desired
end results. The export-oriented strategy, on the other
hand, has generally proved to be potent in revamping a
country’s economy, as evidenced by the success story of
the newly industrialized countries)—that is, Hong Kong,
Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand—which
have successfully used such a strategy.

Zambia, therefore, needs to pick a leaf from the tale of


these countries and strive to export its way out of economic
stagnation and despair by adopting an export-oriented trade
and industrialization strategy.
However, the Agenda for Change will consider the prospect
of providing for the protection of local “infant industries” over
a period of at least five (5) years from the first year of inaugu-
ration of an Agenda for Change-led Government—that is, new
and/or undeveloped business enterprises or groups of
enterprises whose financial and competitive positions shall be
ascertained to be weak and, therefore, incapable of competing
effectively against strong foreign competitors in the local
market.

6) Business Inducements: We are committed to the provision


of attractive incentives to locally based commercial and
industrial undertakings so that they can gain a high level of
competitiveness and participate prominently in the global
marketplace of the 21st century. We have defined such incen-
tives in terms of the basis on which they will be disbursed as
follows:

(a) Activity-based incentives to promote research and deve-


lopment (R&D), the use of local inputs, employee
training, contributions to the needy, and/or creation of
jobs for physically disadvantaged Zambian citizens;
(b) Organization-based incentives to be targeted at selected
local and/or foreign institutions which provide certain
essential goods and/or services;
(c) Industry-based incentives intended to facilitate the
success and survival of, say, the publishing industry, the
tourism industry, the iron and steel industry, and/or any
other industries which are critical to the overall perfor-
Page 59 of 190
mance of the Zambian economy;
(d) Sector-based incentives aimed at revamping particular
sectors of our country’s economy, such as the primary
sector, the secondary sector, or the tertiary sector;
(e) Region-based incentives designed to promote invest-
ments in particular regions or provinces of our country
that may be relatively under-developed; and
(f) General incentives to be provided indiscriminately to all
business and non-business institutions to spur greater
productivity, stimulate innovation, and/or promote eco-
nomic diversification.

7) Investment and Trade Promotion: We shall provide for two


aggressive Trade and Investment Attachés—to promote
tourism, trade and investment in commerce and industry—to
be based at the Zambian Embassies in the United Kingdom (to
cover Asia, eastern Europe, the Middle East, and western Eu-
rope) and the United States (to cover Canada, Central America,
South America, and the United States). We urgently need a
sharp increase in both local and foreign private investment in
order to facilitate the creation of new employment op-
portunities, and the delivery of high-quality goods and services
to meet the changing needs and expectations of both our
people and consumers in export markets.

8) National Competitiveness: To engender a steady flow of in-


ventions, innovations and new product offerings, we shall
create a stimulating environment for the conception of new
ideas and products as follows:

(a) Undertake a critical evaluation of existing policies,


incentives, institutions, and educational programs
designed to spur innovation and the generation of new
forms of technology in order to identify those which
have a greater potential to stimulate innovation,
inventiveness and research and development (R&D);
(b) Designate critical fields and areas where R&D is most
desirable, since available resources are not adequate to
support research projects that are presently of uncertain
value to society;
(c) Readily and adequately finance research projects
(including projects by the Zambia Academy of Science),
accept and utilize relevant and useful findings of the
research projects that may be undertaken, and adopt
recommendations that may be deemed to be useful for
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application in institutional settings;
(d) Introduce a two-tier antitrust law designed to foster
competition in the domestic market while simulta-
neously permitting and encouraging alliances among
locally based business entities which venture in export
markets so that they can develop innovative and
technological competencies and become sturdy competi-
tors in the international marketplace; and
(e) Actively engage in multilateral R&D initiatives with
willing countries worldwide through such arrangements
as research institute “sisterships” and joint R&D
pursuits.

9) Financial System: A viable and efficient financial system is


essential in our quest for heightened socio-economic develop-
ment. We shall, therefore, strive to bolster the functioning of
the Lusaka Stock Exchange (LuSE) and all other financial
institutions in the country by creating an environment that is
conducive to their operations.

10) Foreign Investors: Foreign direct investment (FDI) is


widely regarded as an important element in a country's quest
for heightened socio-economic development, especially for
developing countries like Zambia. Let us consider the potential
benefits and costs of foreign investors’ operations, what such
investors expect of us, what we expect of them, and the
inducement of foreign investment.

(a) Potential Benefits: Foreign investors can make it pos-


sible for our country to gain access to investment capital
and advanced technology; contribute to the creation of
employment opportunities; introduce new products,
thereby affording consumers greater choice; contribute
to tax revenue; promote exports, thereby contributing to
the generation of foreign exchange; boost competition
and, thus, prompt local businesses to strive for greater
efficiency; promote local businesses which supply inputs
and/or render services required by the MNEs; and
contribute to the development of local managerial
talent.
(b) Potential Costs: There are also potential costs to our
country associated with the operations of foreign
investors through multinational enterprises (MNEs). For
example, their operations can:

Page 61 of 190
i) Cause dislocations in our country’s balance of pay-
ments (BOPs), particularly if they externalize large sums
of money either scrupulously or through transfer pricing;

ii) Subject local businesses which do not have the neces-


sary human, material and financial resources to
compete effectively with them to unfair competition in
industrial, consumer and labor markets;

iii) Contribute to the degradation of the fragile physical


environment through air, water and solid-waste
pollution; and/or

iv) Introduce foreign social values and behavioral patte-


rns that are likely to disrupt our cherished moral and
cultural practices.

(c) Costs versus Benefits: For a country like ours, which is


striving to break the bondage of its people to misery,
want and destitution, the potential benefits of foreign
investment certainly outweigh the potential costs of
such investment. In fact, the potential costs associated
with such investment are normal effects of a live eco-
nomy, and which our Government will strive to reduce to
acceptable levels through regulatory and administrative
mechanisms.
(d) Investors’ Expectations: Foreign investors have certain
needs and expectations which we need to address; they
include the following:

i) A well-developed transportation infrastructure and


adequate transportation services to commercial, indu-
strial, and residential areas;

ii) Adequate public services and facilities, such as police


protection, fire protection, public utilities, and low-cost
housing, and modern educational, vocational, recre-
ational, and healthcare facilities;

iii) Equitable taxes, including attractive tax concessions,


and political and community leaders who are fair and
honest in their dealings with private businesses;

iv) Sound and stable economic policies, including a form-


al assurance that the Government would neither
Page 62 of 190
expropriate nor nationalize private businesses; and

v) Less-costly bureaucratic procedures and regulatory


requirements pertaining to the issuance of business
permits and licences.

(e) Our Expectations: We shall expect foreign investors to


cooperate with local businesses and other institutions in
improving community life, comply with stipulated laws
and regulations, respect local people's cherished cultural
and ethical values, respect our national goals and
policies, and refrain from engaging in transfer pricing
and other unscrupulous business practices. Also, we
shall expect foreign business operators to participate
prominently in local programs designed to benefit less-
advantaged members of society.
(f) Government Initiatives: We should not expect foreign
direct investment to flow into our country’s economy
like manna from heaven; a great deal of governmental
effort is needed to induce such investment. It will,
therefore, be imperative for us to create a conducive
investment environment in order to succeed in their
quest for such investment. In this endeavor, the
following initiatives will be particularly crucial in our
quest for greater foreign investment:

i) Privatization of state companies already earmarked for


sale to private investors;

ii) Provision of overly attractive investment incentives to


both existing and potential investors;

iii) Adequate provision for essential public services and


facilities needed to bolster the pursuit of economic
activities; and

iv) Creation of an economy that permanently provides


for both pricing and investment freedom.

11) Casualization of Labor: In Zambia today, it has become


common practice for companies to hire employees on part-
time and temporary conditions of employment in order to
circumvent the costs associated with catering for employees’
housing, medical, vacation, terminal, and other benefits that
are normally accorded to permanent or full-time employees.
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Besides, the high level of unemployment in the country has
made desperate job seekers to willingly accept casual
employment.
Moreover, the low incomes earned by individuals who are
employed on permanent conditions of service have contributed
to the casualization of labor by prompting such individuals to
actively seek part-time jobs in order to supplement their low
incomes.
As a result, a lot of Zambians today are subjected to a high
level of job insecurity, unstable incomes and lack of housing,
medical and other employment-related benefits. To redress the
rampant casualization of labor, we shall:

(a) Create more jobs through lower taxes and interest rates
designed to induce investments, savings and
consumption in order to make job seekers less
vulnerable to employers of casual workers.
(b) Provide for low-interest loans to small business
prospectors through the Zambia Development Agency
(ZDA) to lessen the over-reliance by Zambians on
employment in corporations.
(c) Reduce the costs borne by companies in providing for
fringe benefits to their full-time employees through free
life-saving healthcare for all Zambians, government-
financed low-cost housing schemes, and improvements
in social security and unemployment benefits. And
(d) Ensure that labor-related laws and regulations are not
flouted by employers.

12) ZNFU, ZAM, ZFCCI, AND EAC: The Agenda for Change
government shall seek the active involvement of the Zambia
National Farmers Union (ZNFU), Zambian Association of
Manufacturers (ZAM), the Zambia Federation of Chambers of
Commerce and Industry (ZFCCI), and the Economic Association
of Zambia (EAZ) in the provision of decision inputs pertaining
to commercial and industrial matters. The Minister for Com-
merce and Industry shall be expected to liaise with representa-
tives of these organizations at the beginning of his/her tenure
of office to outline the modalities for their involvement in this
endeavor.

13) South-South Cooperation: As maintained in the


stipulations of the New African Initiative—which assumed the
new name “New Partnership for African Development” or
“NEPAD” in October 2001—most African countries (including
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Zambia) are small both in terms of population and per capita
incomes. As a result, their limited markets do not provide
attractive returns to potential investors.
And, among other effects, investments in agricultural,
transportation and other forms of essential infrastructure
across uninhabited areas are inhibited. There is, therefore, a
profound need for our country to maintain its current member-
ship in the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa
(COMESA), the Southern Africa Development Community
(SADC) and the African Union (AU) in order to become more
competitive and be in a better position to venture in the
modern global economic system that is characterized by such
powerful regional groupings as the European Union (EU),
European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and North American
Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and Association of South-East
Asian Nations (ASEAN) blocs of countries. There are many
benefits associated with such membership:

(a) The integration of national socio-economic systems can


be a viable means by which cooperating countries can
do away with the disadvantages of small size, and of
making possible the attainment of desired levels of
socio-economic development by exploiting both econo-
mies of scale and economies of scope;
(b) The reduction or removal of trade barriers by cooperat-
ing countries can bring about a more competitive
market regional environment;
(c) The wider consumer and industrial markets created
through integration of national economies can make it
possible for cooperating countries to attract the foreign
capital needed to boost business activity and increased
levels of employment; and
(d) The eventual creation of a monetary union can facilitate
the creation of a larger and more stable financial
market, eliminate exchange-rate variability, and
eliminate the need for member-countries that may
experience a decline in the demand for their export
products to consider currency devaluations to make the
export products competitive.

14) Existing Protocols and Agreements: The Agenda for


Change government shall honor and follow through all trade
and investment agreements and protocols consented to by our
previous governments.

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15) The Zambia Development Agency: The Zambia
Development Agency (ZDA) came into effect on January 1,
2007 following the merging of the Zambia Privatisation
Agency, the Zambia Investment Centre, the Export Board of
Zambia, the Zambia Export Processing Zones Authority, and
the Small Enterprises Development Board. This was in
accordance with the Zambia Development Agency (ZDA) Act
No 11 of 2006.
The ZDA’s main aim is to foster economic development
through a whole-Zambia strategic view that will increase
investment and trade levels across the whole country.

16) A Social Welfare State: In all, we shall create what may


be referred to as a “social welfare state,” which is essentially
and ideally a dynamic free-market system that has a human
face; or, more precisely, a socio-economic setting that simulta-
neously provides for a highly competitive business system and
an effective mechanism for redistributing wealth to the needy.

The Bank of Zambia:

1) The Ideal Fiscal Policy.—The ideal fiscal policy for our


beloved country should be one designed to attain a diversity of
social and economic goals in a deliberate effort to improve the
well-being of all Zambians. We have in mind the following
goals:

(a) Maintaining macro-economic stability (through a policy


mix with monetary policy)—including sustained
economic growth through heightened promotion of
investment and domestic savings, low levels of
unemployment, low levels of inflation, and a favorable
balance of payments (BOPs) position. In this endeavor, it
is perhaps important to note that the taxation regime
that would be designed to achieve macro-economic
stability would need to be consistent with the provisions
of Article 114 of the Republican constitution as amended
by Act Number 18 of 1996.
(b) Provision for free formal education, free life-saving
healthcare, greater and sustained food security,
enhanced safety and security in local communities
nationwide, improved socio-economic conditions in rural
areas, and, inter alia, redistribution of income consistent
with the need to create a more egalitarian society.

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2) Important Considerations.—In all, the necessity for
equitable (fair) taxes, a transparent taxation system and
publication of public accounts, an efficient tax-collection
system (under the aegis of the Zambia Revenue Authority),
budgetary stringency, and enforceable limits on budget deficits
and public borrowing (as a percentage of GNP, for example)
cannot be overemphasized.
With respect to “equity,” we shall insist on the introduction
of “proportional” taxes so that all taxpayers in a given
category or classification can contribute a fixed percentage of
their incomes (e.g., 15% for individual income earners) to the
public treasury—in which case high-income earners would still
generally pay larger amounts of income tax than low-income
earners.
“Progressive” taxes (currently levied in Zambia) that
require high-income earners to contribute a higher percentage
of their incomes to the public treasury are not equitable.
“Regressive” taxes, which require high-income earners to
contribute a lower percentage of their incomes to the public
treasury, are equally unfair.

3) Monetary Policy.—Of necessity, and conventionally,


monetary policy needs to be coordinated with fiscal policy if
macro-economic stability is to be attained. A professional and
highly motivated cadre of executives, administrators and
support staff at the Bank of Zambia (BoZ) is indispensable in
our quest to attain such stability. Without such a cadre, BoZ
would not effectively perform the following traditional functions
of a country’s central bank:

(a) Controlling the quantity of money in the local economy;


(b) Acting as the banker to financial institutions in the
country (through “reserve requirements” and the
“discount window”);
(c) Supervision and inspection of such institutions; and
(d) Acting as the Zambian government’s bank, and the
seller and/or buyer of bonds through LuSE and regional
stock markets on behalf of the government (by means of
“open market operations”), and issuance of the Kwacha.

With respect to both fiscal and monetary policies, we shall


earnestly seek broad and genuine consultation on issues that
are in the national interest with such important stakeholders as
leaders in opposition parties, NGOs, the labor movement,
chambers of commerce and industry, and the Zambia
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Association of Manufacturers.

Measurable Targets:
Let us now consider a few specifics regarding some of the
measurable aspects of our contemplated economic policies.
We aim to achieve the following objectives by means of simple,
practical approaches cited in various parts of this Manifesto:

(a) Gross Domestic Product: At least 5% annual growth in


our national economy’s output in the first year, and at
least 7% annual growth thereafter.
(b) Employment: 2% annual growth in job creation in the
first year, and 3% growth annually thereafter.
(c) Per Capita Income: 2% annual growth in per capita inco-
me. [By and large, we have had a perpetual decline in
the per capita income since independence, averaging
well below US$ 1,000 per person per year.]
(d) VAT and Income Tax: Reductions in personal and
business income taxes by at least 5 percentage points
and value-added tax by at least 3.95 percentage points.
(e) Interest Rates: A reduction of at least 2 percentage
points in interest rates per year over a period of four (4)
years to stimulate the national economy and job
creation.
(f) Rate of Inflation: A relatively high annual rate of inflation
of around 20% owing to contemplated reductions in
income and value-added taxes and interest rates
intended to stimulate the supply of goods and services
and the demand for goods and services. We want to
reverse the current emphasis on stabilizing inflation at
the expense of job creation and economic growth.
An understanding of the nature of inflation is
important in this regard. Essentially, we can simplify
economic theory relating to the causes of inflationary
trends by designating inflation as being either “demand-
induced” or “supply-induced” as follows:

i) Demand-induced inflation (or demand-pull inflation):


This is caused by lavish government expenditure and a
bloated government, high wages / salaries and/or low
taxes resulting in excessive purchasing power by
consumers, and/or consumer credit at low interest rates
which can make money readily available to buyers; and

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ii) Supply-induced inflation: This is caused by the
following: high costs of production due to costly inputs
and/or inefficient suppliers (cost-push inflation), and/or
inadequate aggregate supply due to slack capacity
utilization (production below potential capacity) and/or
inadequate numbers of suppliers of essential
commodities in a country’s economy.

Since aggregate wages/salaries are generally low and


interest rates and taxes are high in Zambia, inflationary
trends can be said to be caused largely by excessive
government expenditure, high costs of production, and
inadequate aggregate supply. To control inflation,
therefore, a wage freeze, higher taxes, and high interest
rates are not the appropriate instruments. As experience
and common sense have taught us, such instruments
can stifle economic growth and job creation. The
appropriate instruments for lowering the aggregate price
levels in Zambia are, and should be, the following:

- Trimming the national government and strictly


controlling government expenditure.
- Finding viable ways and means of cutting the costs of
energy; water; telecommunications; and asset
protection and high insurance premiums due to the
high incidence of burglaries, robberies and vandalism.
And, among other initiatives,
- Striving to induce investments in commodity
production and research and development (R&D) to
create a more competitive and innovative economic
system where business entities can provide needed
goods and services at lower costs and prices.

Have we ever asked ourselves why industrialized


countries have very low levels of inflation and yet they
have extraordinarily high per capita incomes, very low
interest rates, very low levels of unemployment, and no
government-fostered wage/salary freezes?

(g) Balance of Trade: 3% growth in exports the first year,


and 5% annual growth thereafter, through an ambitious
promotion of non-traditional exports (NTEs) and
attractive incentives to local suppliers of products
currently being imported. And
(h) Government Deficits: Attainment of a lower government
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deficit by the end of the Agenda for Change party’s fifth
year in power through a gradual reduction in
government expenditure by making government opera-
tions more efficient, and expansion of sources of gover-
nment revenue.

Millennium Development Goals:


We also expect our people-centered projects and programs
to enable our country achieve, by the year 2015, the UN
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) generated by Heads of
State and Government in September 2000, especially the
following:

(a) Poverty and Hunger: Reduce by half the proportion of


people living on less than US$1 per day, and the
proportion of people who suffer from hunger;
(b) Primary Education: Ensure that all boys and girls
complete a full course of primary schooling [at least];
(c) Gender Equality: Eliminate gender disparity at all levels
of education;
(d) Child Mortality: Reduce by two thirds the mortality rate
among children under five years of age;
(e) Maternal Health: Reduce by three quarters the maternal
mortality ratio;
(f) Deadly Diseases: Halt and reverse the spread of
HIV/AIDS, and the incidence of malaria and other deadly
diseases; and
(g) The Environment: Integrate the principles of sustainable
development into country policies and programs,
reverse the loss of environmental resources, reduce by
half the proportion of people without sustainable access
to safe drinking water, and achieve a significant
improvement in the lives of slum dwellers by the year
2020.

2.9.5 Policy on Defence and Security:

Responsible Ministry: Defence and Security.—To be directly


responsible for advising the President on, and spearheading
the implementation of policies relating to, the following:
enhancement of national defence and security – including the
issues of training, equipment and matters concerning remu-
neration for defence and security personnel. And coordination
of national defence and security efforts with those of private

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security companies and provincial and municipal governments.

Urgent Matters:

1) Increase in Expenditure: We shall strive to enhance Zam-


bia’s national defence and security, and improve conditions of
service for defence and security personnel by allocating at
least 4% of the national budget to national defence and
security.

2) Zambia Defence Forces: Our country today is surrounded


by civilized and friendly nations which do not apparently pose
any threat to us—that is, Angola, (Botswana), Democratic
Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia,
Tanzania, and Zimbabwe. We expect the situation to remain
that way in the long term. Therefore, we need to guard
ourselves against reckless expenditures of our country’s
meager financial, material and other resources on the military
at a time when the educational, healthcare and other sectors
are in a deplorable state.
However, the age-old adage “If you want peace, you must
be prepared for war” beckons us to constantly maintain a high
level of military preparedness. Also, the potential for our
gallant military personnel's involvement in regional and global
peace-keeping missions calls for such preparedness. We,
therefore, advocate the need for a smaller, well-trained,
adequately remunerated, highly professional, and well-equip-
ped defence and security establishment that will effectively
and efficiently defend every centimeter of our Motherland.

3) National Security Council: We shall seek to provide for a


National Security Council (NSC) to be presided over by the
Republican President as Commander in Chief; it shall be
convened periodically to deliberate and strategize on matters
of national defence and security. Its composition shall include
the following non-political units: the Zambia Army, the Zambia
Air Force, Security Intelligence Services, the Engineering Squa-
dron (the technical services division), the paramilitary unit, and
the envisaged Criminal Investigations Bureau.
In the envisaged decentralized structure of government,
NSC meetings shall be attended by the Special Branch director,
provincial chiefs of police, the commissioner of prisons and
corrections, the director of the “Police and Prisons Academy,”
and the commandant of the Zambia National Service (ZNS).

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4) Strategic Public Installations: We shall provide for para-
military presence at, and/or regular patrols of, unsecured
strategic installations like public water works in major urban
centers, major electrical power stations, and major airports in
order to thwart any potential acts of sabotage by our country’s
enemies. Also, we shall seek the enactment of strict legislation
and ordinances against trespassing at strategic public installa-
tions.

2.9.6 Policy on Community Safety and Security:

Responsible Ministry: Public Safety and Security—To be


directly responsible for advising the President on, and spear-
heading the implementation of policies relating to, the follo-
wing: the protection of life and property; the preservation of
law and order; the detection and prevention of crime; and
cooperation with other security organs of the government and
local communities in dealing with public safety and security.
And coordination of these efforts with those of private security
companies and local governments.

Urgent Matters:

We shall also combat other forms of crime and social vices


nationwide by allocating more money to police units to
enhance their capabilities in terms of communications,
transportation, bullet-proof vests, night-vision goggles, security
cameras for installation in town centers and on major roads
and streets, and other forms of crime-fighting gadgets and
equipment.

Moreover, we shall build, as well as provide for the


electrification of, houses for police officers nationwide. There
are just too many law-enforcement officers who are having a
hard time preparing meals and uniforms in readiness for work
due to the lack of electricity in their houses.

We shall also provide for regular recruitment and training of


police officers in order to increase the number of officers from
the current 15,000 or so to around 27,000 officers.

2.9.7 Policy on Public Works, Supply and Transport:

Responsible Ministry: Works, Supply and Transport.—To be


directly responsible for advising the President on, and spear-
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heading the implementation of policies relating to, the follo-
wing: utilization and management of nationally owned pieces
of land; provision and maintenance of vital infrastructure
nationwide – including an efficient, inter-modal and safe
network of ground and air transportation; development of mal-
leable stretches of the Zambezi, Kafue, Luangwa and other
sizable perennial rivers for water transportation – including the
proposed Shire-Zambezi Waterway involving Zambia, Malawi
and Mozambique; construction, renovation and maintenance of
government facilities and pieces of property nationwide; the
supply of office supplies, fixtures and equipment, and
maintenance of office equipment; and physical arrangements
for state functions. And coordination of the provision and
maintenance of national public facilities with the efforts of local
governments.
With respect to transport, a great number of Zambians tod-
ay are highly stressed by having to walk long distances to and
from work or school mainly because they cannot afford to pay
exorbitant bus fares. We shall make local travel – in both rural
and urban areas – more affordable to low-income families by
facilitating the manufacture and nationwide distribution of low-
cost bicycles, motor cycles and related replacement parts by
both local and foreign investors. In this endeavor, we shall
provide for the following:

(a) A five-year suspension of taxes on bicycles, bicycle bells


and reflectors, bicycle spare parts and cyclist helmets;
(b) A set of special inducements for the local manufacture of
bicycles, bicycle parts and cyclist helmets in the form of
low-interest loans and tax incentives; and
(c) A nationwide program designed to create safe roadside
pedestrian and cycle routes in areas which have a high
level of automobile traffic, and erect secure bicycle
stands in shopping areas and schools for chaining
bicycles.

In this regard, we wish to welcome the coming back to


Zambia of Tata Motor Company. We trust that the Company,
together with other locally based companies, will work closely
with the AfC-led government in the provision of safe and
affordable transportation, and in creating high-wage jobs.

The Rural Electrification Agency:


We shall dissolve the Rural Electrification Authority (REA) so
that its functions shall become regular functions of the Ministry
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of Works, Supply and Transport. The REA was created through
the Rural Electrification Act No. 20 of 2003, which provided for
the creation of the REA and the Rural Electrification Fund
(REF). Its functions are to:

(a) Administer and manage the Rural Electrification Fund;


(b) Develop, implement and update rural electrification
master plans for the systematic electrification of rural
areas;
(c) Promote the utilisation of the available rural
electrification technological options to enhance the
contribution of energy to the development of agriculture,
industry, mining and other economic activities in rural
areas;
(d) Mobilize funds from within and outside Zambia in
support of rural electrification;
(e) Offer, on a competitive basis, the construction of rural
electrification projects and periodically publish
information on programs being carried out;
(f) Design and offer, on a competitive basis, to developers
or operators, smart subsidies for capital costs on
projects that are designed to supply energy for
development of rural areas;
(g) In conjunction with stakeholders, develop mechanisms
for operation of the grid extension networks for rural
electrification and other rural energy supply systems;
(h) Finance project preparation studies for rural
electrification projects in accordance with guidelines
developed and approved by the Authority;
(i) Recommend to Government policies for the
enhancement of access to electricity by the rural
population; and
(j) Undertake such other activities as are conducive or
incidental to the performance of its functions under the
Act.

The Road Development Agency:


We shall dissolve the Road Development Agency (RDA) so
that its functions shall become regular functions of the Ministry
of Works, Supply and Transport. These functions are presented
below. RDA is a statutory Institution created through the Public
Roads Act No. 12 of 2002 to provide for the care, maintenance
and construction of public roads in Zambia. Its functions
include the following:

Page 74 of 190
(a) Carry out routine and emergency maintenance of public
roads through its employees or independent contractors.
(b) Recommend to the Minister of Works and Supply the
appointment of any person or institution as a road
authority.
(c) In consultation with the Road Fund Agency, recommend
to the Minister funding for development of new roads.
(d) In consultation with the Road Fund Agency, recommend
to the Minister funding for development of new roads.
(e) Review design standards and classification of road and
traffic signs. and
(f) Make recommendations in relation to the sitting of
buildings on roads-sides.

In performing these functions, the Ministry of Works, Supply


and Transport shall be expected to seek the inputs of an
advisory board to be drawn from various stakeholder
organizations, such as the National Council for Construction,
Zambia National Farmers Union, Chartered Institute of
Transport and Logistics and government ministries.

2.9.8 Policy on Public Housing:

Responsible Ministry: Lands and Public Housing—To be


directly responsible for advising the President on, and spear-
heading the implementation of policies relating to, the fol-
lowing: delineation, administration and development of state
and customary lands; issuance of title deeds; resolution of
land-related disputes; provision of consent in the acquisition,
transfer and leasing of lands; implementation of home
ownership schemes for all civil servants; provision of low-cost
rental housing units for low-income families; management of a
home-ownership scheme for low-income families to be fi-
nanced through low interest mortgages; stipulation of fair
eligibility requirements to be met by applicants for low-income
rental public housing; generation of rules of occupancy, and
determination of rental and other related charges; and
derivation of a grievance procedure and guidelines for
resolving any and all the issues and matters relating to non-
compliance with rules of occupancy.

Urgent Matters:

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We shall create a new “Ministry of Lands and Public Housing,”
which shall incorporate all existing national public housing
programs, including the National Housing Authority (NHA). Its
mandate shall include the following functions:

(a) Provision for home-ownership schemes for civil servants


and low-income families to be financed through low interest
mortgages;

(b) Provision of low-cost rental housing units for low-income


families nationwide;

(c) Stipulation of fair eligibility requirements to be met by


applicants for low-income rental public housing;

(e) Generation of rules of occupancy, and determination of


rental and other related charges; and

(f) Derivation of a grievance procedure and guidelines for


resolving any and all the issues and matters relating to non-
compliance with this requirement. (The grievance procedure
and guidelines to be devised shall be consistent with the
principles of due process and non-discrimination.)

1) Community Service Requirement:


Each and every adult resident in a rental public housing
unit shall contribute sixteen (16) hours per month of
community service within the local community in which he/she
resides. Exemptions to this requirement shall be considered for
residents who would meet the following conditions or criteria:

(a) 55 years of age or older;

(b) Physically or mentally disabled;

(c) Primary caretaker of a disabled person, or a child who is


under seven (7) years of age;

(d) Attending school, a program of study or training; or

(e) Employed on a temporary, part-time or full-time basis.

2) Access to Rental Public Housing:


Priority in the allocation of rental public housing units shall
be given to bona fide Zambian citizens in the following order,
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and on a first-come-first-serve basis:

(a) Homeless widows who have minor dependants and/or their


own minor children;

(b) Homeless married couples who have minor dependants


and/or their own minor children;

(c) Widows who live in sub-standard housing units, and who


have minor dependants and/or their own minor children;

(d) Married couples who live in sub-standard housing units, and


who have minor dependants and/or their own minor children;

(e) Any bona fide citizen who is homeless;

(f) Any bona fide citizen who resides in a sub-standard housing


unit; and

(g) Any citizen who may wish to rent a public housing unit.

(Note: The term “sub-standard housing units” is used above to


refer to residential quarters which do not have piped water,
electrical power and modern toilets.)

3) Squatter Compounds:
We shall prohibit forced relocation of squatter compounds
nationwide until: (a) low-cost public housing units are made
available through the Ministry of Lands and Public Housing;
and (b) site and service areas designated by local authorities
for re-settlement are furnished with running water, electricity,
public transportation routes and portals, and other essential
public services and facilities.

To bolster the availability of low-cost building materials


nationwide, we shall provide attractive incentives designed to
induce investments in the production of cement, timber,
window panes and frames, paint, bricks, roofing materials,
doors and door frames, and construction equipment.

With respect to street vendors’ makeshift stalls or “tuntemba,”


which have sprang up in town centers across the country, we
shall recognize the fact that they are an important source of
income for so many of our fellow citizens who cannot find jobs
in the formal sector. As such, the government needs to work
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closely with municipal authorities and chambers of commerce
and industry to provide secure, hygienic and low-cost retail
stands in town centers, which are the major customer bases
for street vendors.

In this connection, we shall welcome the passage of the


Markets and Bus Stations Act Number 8 of 2007, which places
the control of markets and bus stations under management
boards consisting of representatives of local authorities,
marketeers, bus operators, consumers, and other relevant
stakeholders. The Act will certainly enable consumers, vendors
and other stakeholders to participate actively in making
decisions that have a bearing on their socio-economic welfare.

2.9.9 Socio-Cultural Policy:

Responsible Ministry: Culture and Community Services.—


To be directly responsible for advising the President on, and
spearheading the implementation of policies relating to, the
following: preservation of the country’s national treasures,
including national monuments, museums, historical sites, che-
rished traditional and cultural values; promotion of traditional
music and culture-related crafts; national unity and patriotism;
religious harmony; national ceremonies and festivals; and
issues relating to women, children, disabled citizens, the
needy, and retirees and the aged. And coordination of national
cultural and community programs and activities with those of
provincial and municipal governments, and liaison with such
governments on matters relating to the civil police.

Urgent Matters:

1) Promotion of Culture: Without the cherished cultures and


traditions, which our chieftains nationwide are expected to
play a vital role in preserving for their subjects and for poster-
ity, Zambians today would have been a lost and bogus people.
We shall, therefore, support the preservation of Zambian
cultures as follows:

(a) Promotion of traditional music and culture-related art


and crafts. In this endeavor, the Ministry for Culture and
Community Services shall bolster the activities of the
Arts Council of Zambia, which was created through the
National Arts Council Act (1994), and the construction of
arts galleries where artists shall have the opportunity to
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display their products. Mr. Tom Mtine provided a good
example of the importance of such an effort at the 2001
Ngoma Awards: “[P]romotion and appreciation of the
arts ... [can lead to the preservation of] culture.”
(b) Eventual conversion of the National Cultural Centre for
Zambia (NCCZ) into a self-sustaining autonomous
agency upon ensuring that it has an adequate sitting
capacity, a modern art gallery, a well-furnished crafts
workshop, a modern and well-equipped photographic
and recording studio, and a modern and well-equipped
printing press.]

However, we shall make an effort to discourage cultural be-


liefs and practices that are impertinent in a civilized society
like ours. The late Samuel C. Mbilishi counselled us in this
regard as follows: “Although we need to preserve our cultural
and traditional beliefs and practices, we should identify and
discard those which are unjust, divisive, and retrogressive.”
[Excerpted and adapted from Poewe, K., Religion, Kinship, and
Economy in Luapula, Zambia (Lewiston, New York: Edwin
Mellen Press, 1989), p. 218.

2) Sanctity of Marriage: Zambia shall continue to be forbidden


territory to lesbian and homosexual activism. Accordingly, we
shall promote the existing cultural and traditional tenet that
defines marriage as the union between a man and a woman.
All the 73 tribes in our beloved country have the same view of
the institution of marriage. Any other way of looking at
marriage would, therefore, be a taboo to Zambian society
because it would not be consistent with our common values
and traditions as a nation.

3) Our National Treasures: We shall make an earnest effort to


preserve our national monuments, museums, and historical
sites throughout the country.

4) Mementos for Posterity: We shall provide for Government


subventions to support the local publication of biographies on
notable citizens in any field of human endeavor. We have an
obligation to catalogue the exemplary accomplishments of our
fellow citizens for future generations. We are, in this regard,
thinking about outstanding individuals in sport, politics,
journalism, broadcasting, music, art, business, teaching,
science and technology, trade unionism, the military, law
enforcement, social work or community service, civil rights,
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and traditional leadership, among other facets and spheres of
human endeavor.
Such mementos, as the late Alexander Stevens of the
United States maintained in February 1881, will teach our fel-
low citizens in succeeding generations that: “[T]he chief end of
human effort in a sublunary view should be usefulness to
mankind, and that all true fame which should be perpetuated
by public pictures, statues and monuments is to be acquired
only by noble deeds and high achievements, and the establish-
ment of a character founded upon the principles of truth,
uprightness and inflexible integrity.”
Government subventions shall also be made available to
support the publication of treatises on traditional ceremonies
like the Mukulu Pembe, Kuomboka ceremony, the Shimunenga
ceremony, Lwiindi, Mutomboko, Kulamba, Mbambala, the
Lunda Lubanza, Chisemwa Cha Lunda, Lubinda Ntongo, the
Likumbi Lya Mize, Inchibwela Mushi, Musaka/Jikubi,
Chabalankata, N’cwala, Nsomo, Kunyanta Ntanda, Tuwimba,
and Ukusefya pa Ng’wena, among many others.

5) The Role of Chieftains: We shall actively seek the advice of


our country’s chieftains on cultural and traditional matters, as
provided for in Part XIII of the Republican constitution, and
shall seek the complete restoration of the House of Chiefs.
Also, we shall uphold Articles 65 (clauses 3 and 4) and 129 of
the Republican constitution, which bar chieftains from partici-
pating in partisan politics unless they formally abdicate their
traditional leadership roles. Following are a few caveats in this
regard:

(a) Potential for Abuse of Power: If chieftains are allowed to


participate in partisan politics, they may consciously or
otherwise abuse the absolute traditional authority they
wield by imposing their political views and choices on
their subjects—a situation which can lead to tribal
politics in our country. We need to prevent such a
situation from happening if we are really serious about
nurturing our nascent democracy.
(b) Potential for Disunity: Traditional leaders’ participation
in politics can also lead to disunity in, and disintegration
of, their chiefdoms. Let us consider a number of sce-
narios which can culminate in such a situation:

i) A chieftain is, ideally, an impartial leader of all the


people in his or her chiefdom regardless of their political
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affiliations. However, his or her participation in partisan
politics can inevitably place him or her in an adversarial
position against subjects who may have different
political alignments.

ii) The political arena naturally requires participants to


advocate certain causes and articulate their ideological
convictions which, for a traditional leader, are likely to
be at variance with the causes and convictions of some
of his or her subjects. And

iii) Partisan politics is fraught with slander, snobbery and


discourtesies to which traditional leaders can choose to
subject themselves only at the immense cost of losing
the abounding and unconditional respect accorded to
them by their subjects.

(c) Unfair Political Advantage: Chieftains’ participation in


active politics can frustrate efforts aimed at creating a
level playing field for all political contestants, since they
(the chieftains) already have a faithful following in their
areas of jurisdiction. We would do well to redress the
deep-rooted scourges of election-rigging, vote-buying
and access to public resources by a ruling political party
without opening up other avenues for unfair political
advantage.

We trust that our paramount chiefs and all the honorable


chieftains and village heads in their respective areas will
continue to serve the nation well in cultural and traditional
matters, and as unifying authorities in their respective areas of
jurisdiction. We cannot afford to lose our honorable chieftains
to the quick sands of politics.

6) Assistance to Chiefs: We shall initiate, by Executive Order,


the removal of public assistance to chiefs from the office of the
Republican president and place it under the aegis of the
Ministry for Culture and Community Services, which shall deal
directly with the House of Chiefs in matters relating to the
various forms of assistance extended to chiefs. Such
assistance includes chiefs’ subsidies, electrification of chiefs’
palaces, the purchasing of motor vehicles for chiefs, and any
other matters relating to the welfare of chiefs.

7) Curbing Immorality: To arrest Zambia’s current and unfor-


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tunate drift into unprecedented moral decay, we shall step up
the censorship of literature, movies, indecent exposure, and
any other products and activities which shall be deemed to
have the potential to corrupt our country’s morals.

8) Greater National Unity: We shall initiate and promote pro-


grams and activities aimed at bolstering national unity. In this
endeavor, we shall make an effort to build on the UNIP and Dr.
Kenneth Kaunda's concept of “One Zambia, One Nation” in
order to make our country more cohesive, more peaceful and
much stronger.
An editorial comment which appeared in The Post newspa-
per of October 18, 2001 summed up the necessity for such an
effort: “There is very little, if not nothing, that can be achieved
in our country without a very high level of national unity.” We
want to create a socio-economic setting in which ethnic, cult-
ural, racial, and religious diversity is both appreciated and
celebrated.

9) Engendering Patriotism: Currently, Zambian citizens are


prohibited from owning the national flag, let alone mounting it
on any of the pieces of property they own – such as a business,
a house, an automobile, or a bicycle. The Agenda for Change
shall seek to rescind any piece of legislation concerning such
prohibition in order to afford Zambian citizens the opportunity
to publicly express their patriotism to, and pride in, their
beloved country through unrestricted ownership and display of
our beautiful national flag.
Obviously, top government leaders are likely to resist the
lifting of restrictions on the popular ownership and use of the
national flag because the flag to them has become nothing
more than a symbol of honor and prestige and must, therefore,
be mounted only on the official cars of a few privileged
citizens!
In the United States of America, popular use of the count-
ry’s national flag by the citizenry has apparently elevated
people’s reverence for, rather than lessened the sanctity of,
the country’s flag.
Although the Zambian flag is apparently being freely
produced and sold in various forms and sizes in countries like
the United States, the Agenda for Change shall ensure that it is
not produced for profit by business entities without the
national Government’s permission through the patents,
trademarks and copyrights process.

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10) Gender-Related Issues: We shall seek to identify and add-
ress social, political and economic obstacles to women’s full
participation in the political and other development-related
affairs of our country. We strongly believe in what is implied by
the anonymous and age-old proverb “What is good for the
gander is also good for the goose.”
In this respect, we shall work hand in hand with national
and regional non-governmental organizations (NGOs) which
are designed to promote greater participation by women in all
facets of human endeavor at local, national and regional levels
in order to create a level-playing field for both men and
women.
The Minister for Culture and Community Services shall,
therefore, be expected to provide exceptional leadership in the
implementation of the National Gender Policy (NGP) adopted in
2000, and in bolstering the activities of both the Program for
the Advancement of Girls' Education (PAGE) and the Girls'
Education Movement (GEM).

11) The Youth, Zambia’s Future: The youth constitute our be-
loved country’s future. We shall, therefore, take the necessary
measures to create a conducive socio-economic environment
in which the youth shall be morally, physically, culturally,
intellectually, and technically enriched. Such measures shall
include:

(a) Free primary and secondary education, accessible


higher education and vocational training through
government loans, and greater access to computers and
the Internet to be provided in selected public libraries
nationwide;
(b) Provision for direct financial and material support of the
Kasisi Orphanage and other orphanages nationwide so
that the educational, nutritional and healthcare needs of
orphans of victims of AIDS and other ailments and fatal
circumstances are adequately catered for by the
Orphanage;
(c) Rendering financial and material support to youth and
other related groups and organizations, including JETS,
Boy Scouts, Girl Guides, YMCA, YWCA, the Mtendere-
based Youth Directions, the Kamwala Drop-In Centre,
and the Children of Africa Foundation founded by Dr. Ke-
nneth Kaunda;
(d) Removal of value-added tax on all kinds of baby food
and nutritional supplements;
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(e) Working hand in hand with provincial governments to
provide adequate recreational facilities and playing
fields in local communities for young people; and
(f) Addressing the governmental responsibilities and obli-
gations stipulated by the 1989/90 International Conven-
tion on the Rights of the Child, including the upholding
of the standards set by the Convention relating to the
educational, healthcare, developmental, and other
special needs of children.

12) Disabled Citizens: In September 2001, a Mr. Francis Chi-


shala, an Advanced Arts Services managing director, was
quoted by Mr. Speedwell Mupuchi of The Post newspaper as
having complained that the disabled had no one to fend for
them. Today, we have good news for all our fellow citizens who
are disabled: you have dependable friends in the Agenda for
Change party! Among other things, we shall work closely with
Disabled Persons’ Organizations (DPOs) in identifying and
meeting the educational, training and other basic needs of
disabled Zambians as provided for in Article 112(f) of the
Republican constitution, and by the Persons with Disabilities
Act of 1996. Besides:

(a) We shall actively support projects initiated for the


purpose of stimulating and fully engaging your creativity
—including metal fabrication, sewing, weaving, and
carpentry.
(b) We shall require all organizations, large and small and
profit and non-profit, to make their premises fully
accessible to employees, clients and other societal
members who are disabled. The Ministry of Culture and
Community Services shall diligently work with the
Zambia Agency for Persons with Disabilities and other
relevant institutions in these endeavors.
(c) The Minister for Culture and Community Services shall,
in collaboration with the director for the “Labor
Standards and Occupational Safety Board”, organize
activities annually at selected venues to celebrate
Handicapped People's Day on December 23rd.
(d) Disabled persons shall be represented in the governance
of the country through presidential appointments;
(e) The “Nothing about us, without us” slogan of the
international disability movement shall be supported
and promoted through active participation by disabled

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persons in the generation and implementation of
government policies that affect them.

13) Retirees and the Aged: We shall initiate and support


programs designed to improve the social and economic welfare
of elderly citizens and both civil and military retirees; as the
late Kebby Musokotwane maintained in March 1992, “The mark
of a civilized society lies in how people treat their senior citi-
zens.”

14) The Needy in Society: The Ministry shall also be expected


to provide assistance to the needy and shall, therefore,
incorporate the functions of the Public Welfare Assistance
Scheme currently administered through the Ministry of
Community Development and Social Services, and which
includes the Social Cash Transfer Scheme.
A lot of Zambians today are experiencing the social and
economic hardships associated with being unemployed. We
shall make the lives of unemployed people a little easier by
providing them with a small stipend and food coupons to be
redeemed at retail outlets to be designated by the Minister in
exchange for supervised community work.

15) The Place of Religion: The Agenda for Change shall genui-
nely recognize and safeguard each and every societal memb-
er’s freedom of worship, the freedom to choose one’s religion,
and the right to seek to be heard in governmental decision-
making, and to articulate one’s demands on the national
Government and other public institutions. At the community
and national levels, we shall expect the different religious
denominations in our country to function as eternal beacons
and unrelenting guardians of morality.
At the same time, we shall actively discourage, and request
Parliament to enact legislation against, the following in a
deliberate effort to forestall the potential disruption of public
order and socio-economic activities by cliques of fanatics from
any of our country’s religious denominations:

(a) The use of public funds by a local or national Govern-


ment to set up a church or mosque, and/or to provide
any form of support to any given religious group,
institution or activity;
(b) Official participation by government leaders in the
affairs of any given religious group or institution, or
official participation by any given religious leader or
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group in political or governmental affairs;
(c) The use of a religious platform by any individual or
group of individuals to form a political party;
(d) The use of a religious platform by any individual to seek
a leadership position in any of the three branches of
Government—that is, the legislature, the judiciary and
the executive;
(e) Inclusion of denominational religious subjects – Budd-
hist, Bahaist, Islamic, Christian, Jewish, or otherwise – in
the curricula of public-funded schools; and and
(f) Religious sermons or statements by any individual or
group of individuals belonging to any given religious
grouping or denomination which are contemptuous to,
or are designed to slight, other religious groupings or
denominations.

In countries where government leaders have not provided


for these safeguards due to lack of foresight, perhaps, violent
clashes among religious groups in their quest to dominate the
political sphere, and to impose their religious laws on the
citizenry, have become exceedingly difficult to contain.
The precarious problem currently facing Algeria, Nigeria,
the Sudan, Afghanistan, and a host of other countries around
the world which are beleaguered by religious conflicts should
serve as a clear warning to each and every peace-loving Zam-
bian to refrain from creating a similar situation that will dog
our beloved country in perpetuity.
Fellow citizens, we should not be blinded by our having had
no serious religious conflicts so far; we are not playing devil’s
advocate, but as our country's population and the membership
of each religious denomination swells, we would be short-
sighted not to anticipate and make an effort to forestall the
occurrence of such conflicts.
As it is often said, prevention is better than cure! Malaysia’s
Mahathir Mohamad summed up the perilous nature of religious
conflicts in his address to the World Evangelical Fellowship in
May 2001 thus: “Once started, religious ... [conflicts have] a
tendency to go on and on, [and] to become permanent feuds.”
In all, we are confident that religious institutions will conti-
nue to provide the moral and spiritual direction to our nation in
an era that has been high-jacked by unprecedented violence
and moral decay.

2.9.10 Policy on Immigration and Foreign Affairs:

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Responsible Ministries: Justice, Prisons and Immigration,
and Foreign Affairs.

Justice, Prisons and Immigration:


To be directly responsible for advising the President on, and
spearheading the implementation of policies relating to, the
following: legal matters (including representation of the
Government), protection of citizens’ rights and freedoms,
administration of the Zambia Prison Service, legal aid, national
registration, passports and immigration, citizenship and
naturalization, work permits, treaties and agreements with
other countries, intellectual property rights (patents,
copyrights and trademarks), and remuneration for judicial
personnel and support staff.

Urgent Matter:

An understanding of the provisions of the Republican consti-


tution and the functioning of the legal system by the citizenry
is cardinal to the nurturing of justice, and the exercise and
enjoyment of basic rights and freedoms by individuals.
As such, the Agenda for Change shall require all educational
and training institutions in the country to provide basic legal
education by incorporating a topic in selected core courses on
citizens' civic rights and responsibilities enshrined in the
Republican constitution, and the rights and freedoms of indi-
viduals stipulated in the United Nations’ 1948 Universal
Declaration of Human Rights and the African Union's African
Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights.
In this connection, it is important to acknowledge the exem-
plary work which members of the Women for Change have so
diligently and effectively performed over the years at human
rights, gender and development seminars and workshops.

Foreign Affairs:
To be directly responsible for advising the President on, and
spearheading the implementation of policies relating to, the
following: foreign political relations, including conflict
resolution and peace-keeping efforts; consular affairs and
services; profiles of foreign countries; services and vital infor-
mation to Zambians in, or traveling to, foreign countries;
publicizing Zambian society abroad; and management of a
program which shall confer rare and special “Zambian
Residency” status upon a selected number of distinguished
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foreigners.

Urgent Matters:

1) Foreign Policy: We shall generate a foreign policy that will


place a great deal of emphasis on the need for the Zambian
Government to work hand in hand with other peace-loving
nations worldwide in creating a more democratic, more peace-
ful, and more affluent global community. And, accordingly, we
shall maintain amicable relations with all the countries which
have already proved to be Zambia’s reliable and passionate
friends.

2) Zambia’s Image Abroad: We shall strive to educate other


countries about our beautiful country and its lovely and peace-
loving people. If we fail in this endeavor, other countries will
not readily engage in political, cultural and economic relations
with us.

3) Foreign-Country Profiles: We shall maintain up-to-date


profiles of foreign countries in order to continually fine-tune
Zambia’s relations with the rest of the world, and to furnish
Zambian travelers with useful information about foreign
countries to enhance their safety and/or business pursuits
abroad.

4) Consular Affairs and Services: We shall redress travelers’


frustrations caused by inadequacies in the processing of
passports and visas by streamlining bureaucratic procedures
and occasionally re-training consular personnel.

5) Zambian Travelers: We shall expect each and every Zam-


bian traveler to foreign countries to consider themselves as
dependable ambassadors of our Motherland, and to conduct
themselves in a civilized and lawful manner.

6) Honorary Zambian Residency: We shall grant special and


rare privileges (to be suggested by Cabinet) to foreign
nationals who shall be adjudged to have made exemplary
contributions to the promotion – in their own countries and/or
beyond – of peace, freedom, justice, democracy, prosperity,
philanthropy / altruism, poverty reduction, and other noble
causes and endeavors. Such privileges shall also be
posthumously extended to the families of the foreign nationals.
We want the recipients and/or families of the special
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Zambian residency to visit Zambia whenever they feel like and
enjoy the beauty, warmth, friendliness, and rich cultures and
traditions of our beloved country and its people. A provisional
list of such people and/or their families shall include the
following: We want the recipients and/or families of the special
Zambian residency to visit Zambia whenever they feel like and
enjoy the beauty, warmth, friendliness, and rich cultures and
traditions of our beloved country and its people. A provisional
list of such people and/or their families shall include the
following: Mr. Kofi Annan, U2’s Bono, Mr. Jimmy Carter, Mr.
Jimmy Cliff, Mr. Bill Clinton, the late Mr. Mahatma Gandhi, the
late Dr. John Garang, Mr. Mikael Gorbachov, Ms. Angelina Jolie,
Senator Edward Kennedy, the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.,
the late Mother Teresa, the late Mr. Samora Machel, Mr. Nelson
Mandela, Mr. Mahathir Mohamad, the late Mr. Joshua Nkomo,
Bishop Desmond Tutu, Ms. Oprah Winfrey, the late Mrs. Anita
Roddick, Ms. Clare Short, and Mr. Barack Obama.

PART 3:
EXECUTIVE AGENCIES

As provided for in the Republican constitution, performance of


the functions of the Executive branch of the national govern-
ment needs to be complemented by the work of several
autonomous government agencies. The Agenda for Change
party is committed to the improvement of the operational
efficiency and effectiveness of each of the complementary
executive agencies to be created in due course, and those
which are already provided for by the Republican constitution
through non-politicization and adequate financial and logistical
support. They are as follows:

* Zambia Revenue Authority;


* Anti-Corruption Commission;
* Electoral Commission of Zambia;
* Human Rights Commission;
* Labor Standards and Occupational Safety Board;
* Public Utilities and Environmental Management Agency;
* Zambia Public Procurement Authority;
* Drug Control Agency;
* Food Reserve Agency;
* Bureau of Statistics and Archives;
* National Housing Authority;
* National Transport Safety Board;
* National Science and Technology Council; and
Page 89 of 190
* Fire Arms and Criminal Investigations Bureau.

For reasons of cost, each of the autonomous government


agencies shall be managed by a small group of technocrats,
and shall be expected to enhance the national Government’s
ability to meet the changing needs and expectations of the
people. A brief description of these agencies is provided in the
ensuing sections.

3.1 ZAMBIA REVENUE AUTHORITY

The Zambia Revenue Authority was established in 1994 as a


corporate body through the Zambia Revenue Authority Act of
1993. It is charged with the responsibility of collecting revenue
on behalf of the national Government. It was created to
redress the serious shortfall in revenues available to the
national Government and the increasing dependency on donor
funding to support basic necessities of life.

3.2 ANTI-CORRUPTION COMMISSION

Established through the Anti-Corruption Commission Act of


1996. It is responsible for preventing, investigating and prose-
cuting cases of alleged corruption in public and private institu-
tions in order to create a corruption-free environment for good
governance and socio-economic development.
The Commission also assists institutions (both private and
public) in revising their methods of work and procedures so as
to remove or reduce opportunities which may facilitate corrupt
practices. Condition (l) in the Zambia Postal Services
Corporation’s application for a “Private Box/Bag Service
provides an excellent example of administrative procedures or
processes which foster corruption in institutional settings:

“On the expiration of any rental period, the Postmaster


General may in his discretion refuse to re-let a private box
to any renter without assigning any reason for doing so”.

It is, therefore, important for us to seize this opportunity to


urge both governmental and non-governmental institutions to
review their administrative and operating procedures to ensure
that they do not promote corrupt practices.

3.3 ELECTORAL COMMISSION OF ZAMBIA

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The Electoral Commission of Zambia was established by Article
76 of the Constitution of Zambia. It provides for the promulga-
tion of legislation to determine the composition and operations
of the Commission as per the Electoral Commission Act of
1996. The constitutionally mandated functions of the Commis-
sion are as follows: to supervise the registration of voters and
review the voters' registers, conduct the Presidential and
National Assembly Elections, and review the boundaries of the
Constituencies into which Zambia is divided for the purposes of
elections.
In addition to these constitutional functions, the Com-
mission is mandated to perform the following statutory funct-
ions: to supervise referendums as provided for by the Refer-
endum Act, conduct and supervise local government elections
as provided for by the Local Government Elections Act, and
formulate and review general electoral regulations and per-
form any other statutory function which the National Assembly
may assign to it.

3.4 HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

The Human Rights Commission was established through the


Human Rights Act No. 39 of 1996. Its functions are to: investi-
gate human rights violations and any maladministration of
justice; propose effective measures to prevent human-rights
abuses; visit prisons and other related facilities with a view to
assessing and inspecting conditions of the persons held in such
places and make recommendations to redress existing prob-
lems; and establish a continuing program of research, educa-
tion, information and rehabilitation of victims of human rights
abuse to enhance the respect for and protection of, human
rights.
[Note: The Commission shall continue to have the power to
recommend the punishment of any officer found by the Com-
mission to have abused human rights.]

3.5 LABOR STANDARDS AND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY BOARD

3.5.1 The LSOSB shall be responsible for the following, inter


alia: implementation of labor laws and regulations, regulation
of occupational health and safety, promotion of sound labor-
management relations to attain sustained industrial harmony,
implementation of a national minimum-wage policy intended
to avail Zambian workers a meaningful share of the national
cake, and coordination of national labor-related programs and
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activities with those of provincial and municipal governments.

3.5.2 Sustained industrial harmony is essential to the creation


of a vibrant economy – an economy in which economic units
can deliver economic and social values to society at reason-
able costs and prices. We shall, therefore, consider the pro-
spect of preventing industrial unrest by enacting legislation de-
signed to compel parties in collective bargaining situations to
consider mediation and/or arbitration in the event of a break-
down or deadlock in contract negotiations.

If we succeed in securing public support and approval in this


initiative, the envisaged legislation shall make compulsory
arbitration as the final and terminal step in the settlement of
all labor disputes in order for parties in collective bargaining
situations to resolve their disputes briskly and amicably to pre-
vent loss of employment, income and productivity.

3.5.3 The LSOSB shall be administered by the Labor


Commissioner as a semi-autonomous government agency,
whose functions shall, by and large, be in keeping with those
stipulated by the Industrial and Labor Relations Act.

3.6 PUBLIC UTILITIES AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AGENCY

We shall seriously consider the prospect of working with


Parliament to create an autonomous “Public Utilities and
Environmental Management Agency” (PUEMA) and structure it
to incorporate the functions currently performed by the Energy
Regulation Board (ERB), the Environmental Council of Zambia
(ECZ), and the National Water Supply and Sanitation Council
(NWASCO). Accordingly, the contemplated PUEMA shall be
responsible for advising the government and generating
strategies on issues relating to the management of Zambia’s
energy resources, environmental management, and water and
sewerage management.

PUEMA shall be accorded Cabinet-level status, and the Director


of the Agency shall, accordingly, attend Cabinet meetings. It
shall consist of the following units:

3.6.1 Energy Management Unit:


The Energy Management Unit shall assume the functions of
the Energy Regulation Board (ERB) – an autonomous
government agency established through the Energy Regulation
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Act of 1995; that is, to:

(a) Monitor the efficiency and performance of private


energy suppliers, having regard to the purposes for which
they were established;

(b) Receive and investigate complaints from consumers on


price adjustments made, or services provided, by any
undertaking, and to regulate such adjustments and services
by the attachment of appropriate conditions to licences held
by undertakings involved;

(c) Receive and investigate complaints concerning the


location or construction of any common carrier or any
energy or fuel facility or installation or the carrying out of
any works by any undertaking, and regulate such location
and construction by the attachment of appropriate condi-
tions to licences held by undertakings;

(d) Monitor, in conjunction with the Zambia Competition


Commission established by the Competition and Fair
Trading Act (1994), the levels and structures of competition
within the energy sector with a view to promoting competi-
tion and accessibility to any company or individual who
meets the basic requirements for operating as a business in
Zambia;

(e) Design, in conjunction with the Zambia Standards


Bureau established by the Standards Act (1994), standards
with regard to the quality, safety and reliability of available
forms of energy and fuels;

(f) Formulate, in conjunction with other government agenc-


ies, measures to minimize the environmental impact of the
production and supply of energy and the production, trans-
portation, storage and use of fuels and enforce such mea-
sures by the attachment of appropriate conditions to lice-
nces held by undertakings; and

(g) Make recommendations to the government as to the


measures to be taken through regulations to be made
under the Energy Regulation Act.

The Case of ZESCO.—In spite of our profound commitment to


economic liberalization, and in the best interest of the Zambian
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people, Zambia Electricity Supply Corporation (ZESCO) shall be
regarded as a sacred cow and shall, therefore, be a
commercial entity whose operations shall be closely monitored
by the government through the PUEMA. “Commercialization”
rather than “privatization” of the Company shall be deemed
necessary since privatization of an enterprise makes economic
sense only when the nature of activities in which it is involved
provide for entry of as many competitors as the size of its
market can allow. In general, the supply of electricity, like the
supply of water, is among obvious cases that call for direct
government involvement due to the following factors:

(a) Natural Monopoly: ZESCO is a natural monopoly; it


operates in an industry where it makes economic sense for
the existence of only one supplier. Privatization of the
company so that its operations can be dictated by the
market forces of supply and demand when there can never
be alternative suppliers of electricity to provide choices to
households and commercial and industrial consumers will
give the company absolute power to wreck the Zambian
economy through exorbitant and exploitative electricity
tariffs.

(b) Cost Considerations: There are a lot of vital projects


which are in the national interest but which a private enter-
prise can either be unwilling or unable to undertake for eco-
nomic reasons—such as the expansion of Zambia‘s
electricity grid nationwide for purposes of rural
electrification and improved agricultural output. A govern-
ment which has a genuine desire to implement such vital
projects would, therefore, do well not to privatize ZESCO
because the cost of implementing the projects through a
privately owned electricity company is likely to dry up the
public treasury.

(c) Security Considerations: We need to be mindful of the


enormous potential risks associated with becoming totally
dependent on a private electricity supplier to light up the
nation’s homes and power its commercial and industrial
undertakings. Our country’s enemies—terrorists included—
can bring the entire nation to a standstill by a single flip of
a switch!

(d) Strategic Considerations: Unreasonably high and unsta-


ble electricity tariffs which are likely to culminate from the
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privatization of a monopoly, among other inclement factors,
can very easily fan away skilled personnel and locally based
investors to other countries where utility and other costs
are relatively lower and more stable.

Strict and direct governmental control over the supply of


electricity shall, therefore, enable us to charge relatively
more affordable and stable electricity tariffs nationwide. In
fact, low and stable utility costs, among other factors, shall
enable the national government and provincial govern-
ments to lure investors from countries which have relatively
high and unstable utility costs, while retaining business
operators currently doing business in Zambia. Besides, the
rampant depletion of woodlands occasioned mainly by
charcoal burning and fire-wood collection can be reduced
greatly through affordable electricity tariffs.

(e) Source of Revenue: State ownership of ZESCO is among


the many viable ways in which we shall be assured of
governmental sources of revenue that do not over-burden
tax payers. Such alternative sources of revenue shall also
enable us to minimize or avoid borrowing needed funds
from external sources.

Other Energy Sources.—We shall, however, provide attractive


incentives to the private sector to engage in the exploration
and/or supply of other forms of renewable and environmentally
friendly sources of energy – including natural gas, solar energy,
wind-generated electricity, ethanol, methanol, and propane.

Energy Research.—We shall also invest massively in research


relating to low-cost and environmentally friendly sources of
energy, and in energy conservation. To be considered in this
endeavor will be research projects concerning the use of
natural gas, electric power, ethanol, methanol, and propane as
alternatives to gasoline in order to reduce air pollution, and to
lessen Zambia’s dependence on costly imported oil.

Oil Refining and Marketing.—We shall seriously consider the


findings of a study commissioned by the Chiluba
administration (completed in December 1999) in order to
streamline the importation, refining and nationwide
distribution of petroleum products. We want to determine how
the infrastructure and institutional framework of the oil
industry – consisting of the TAZAMA pipeline, Zambia National
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Oil Company (ZNOC), Indeni Petroleum Refinery, and private
oil distributors like Agip, BP, Caltex, Engen, Exxon Mobil,
Jovenna, Pegausus, and Total – can efficiently and effectively
serve Zambia’s long-term oil needs.
The management of strategic oil reserves shall also be
carefully studied and enhanced. Ultimately, we want
consumers of petroleum products – including gas oil (diesel),
premium gasoline (petrol), jet fuel, liquefied petroleum gas,
industrial and domestic kerosene, light and heavy fuel gas,
bitumen, and related products – to be afforded the least
possible prices.
Finally, we shall also seriously consider the prospect of
splitting ZESCO into (a) Generation, (b) Transmission, and (c)
Distribution functions if such a measure shall be deemed to
have the potential to result in greater efficiency and
effectiveness in the supply of electrical power nationwide.

3.6.2 Environmental Management Unit:


The Environmental Council of Zambia (ECZ), created under
the Environmental Protection and Pollution Control Act (1990)
to protect the environment and control pollution so as to
provide for the health and welfare of persons, and the environ-
ment as follows: coordination of environmental management;
promotion of awareness about the need to protect the fragile
natural environment; and enforcement of regulations pertain-
ing to the control and prevention of air, water and solid-waste
pollution.

(a) Environmental Stewardship: Both woodlands and grass-


lands in many parts of Zambia today are under a very
serious threat of destruction as a result of uncontrolled
production of fuel wood, charcoal production, shifting
cultivation systems, overgrazing, and/or uncontrolled
incineration. Wildlife, too, has become increasingly
vulnerable to irresponsible human activities and
insatiable greed. Also, environmental pollution has
become a very serious problem despite the relatively
lower levels of commercial, industrial and recreational
activities undertaken in our country.
In September 2000, Mr. Kofi Annan articulately por-
trayed the enormity of the challenge we face in this
regard as follows: “We shall look culpably irresponsible
in our grand children's eyes if we leave them a planet
that is largely uninhabitable, or unable to sustain human
life.”
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There is clearly an urgent need to take stringent
measures to redress all the threats to the ability of the
fragile environment to meet the needs of both present
and future generations. What, then, will be the Agenda
for Change party’s strategic initiatives and imperatives
in this endeavor?

(b) Expansion of Mandate: We shall seek to expand the


mandate of the Environmental Council of Zambia by
adding to it the functions of the Zambia Wildlife
Authority (ZAWA), which was established through the
Zambia Wildlife Act (1998). The Act repealed the
National Park and Wildlife Act (1991) and provided for
the establishment of the Zambia Wildlife Authority,
whose functions include the following:

i) Establishment, control and management of national


parks;

ii) Conservation and enhancement of wildlife ecosystems,


biodiversity, and of objects of aesthetic, pre-historic, histori-
cal, geological, archaeological and scientific interest in
national parks;

iii) Promotion of opportunities for the equitable and sustain-


able use of the special qualities of national parks;

iv) Establishment, control and management of game


management areas; the sustainable use of wildlife and the
effective management of the wildlife habitat in game
management areas;

v) Enhancement of the benefit of game management areas


to both wildlife and local communities;

vi) Involvement of local communities in the management of


game management areas, and the development and
implementation of management plans;

vii) Regulation of game ranching; the licensing of hunting


and control of the processing, sale, import and export of
wild animals and trophies; and

viii) Implementation of the policies of the Convention on


International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and
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Fauna, the Convention on Wetlands of International Impor-
tance Especially on Water Fowl Habitat, the Convention on
Biological Diversity and the Lusaka Agreement on Co-
operative Enforcement Operations Directed at Illegal Trade
in Wild Fauna and Flora.

(c) Proactive Strategy: We shall seek to create an elaborate


system for anticipating environmental issues and prob-
lems, and devise ways and means of resolving such
issues and problems before they become serious.
(d) Environmental Education: We shall require all education-
al and training institutions to provide basic environ-
mental education by incorporating a topic in selected
core courses concerning environmental pollution,
environmental protection, and conservation of natural
resources, among numerous other related issues.

The primary purpose of environmental education shall,


by and large, be the sensitization of all citizens – pupils,
students, trainees, researchers, and the general public –
about the intricacies and pervasiveness of environmental
issues and problems. To make it more effective, we shall
ensure that such education is interdisciplinary in nature,
and is specifically aimed at preparing citizens to be:

i) Cognizant of the ecological, economic, recreational, and


symbolic value of natural resources;

ii) Knowledgeable about the interrelatedness of biophysical


and socio-cultural environments of which humans are a
constituent part;

iii) Aware of environmental issues and problems and of via-


ble alternatives in resolving the issues and problems; and

iv) Motivated to work voluntarily toward the protection and


improvement of the fragile natural environment.

In the performance of functions relating to


environmental education, the Environmental Management
Unit of PUEMA shall seek to work in collaboration with
organizations like the Zambia Network of Environmental
Educators.

(e) Environmental Impact Statements: We shall require all


Page 98 of 190
business and non-business organizations operating
within our country’s borders to include an environmental
impact statement in their operational plans or corporate
charters. The statements shall incorporate the following,
among other things: (i) identification of potential
impacts of their operations on the environment; and (ii)
a description of measures they are geared to take in ma-
naging these impacts to tolerable levels.
(f) A Cooperative Effort: PUEMA shall provide for a partner-
ship among the business community, non-profit
organizations, and the government to deal with
environmental issues and problems for which no single
societal member shall be held responsible. And since
ecological problems in any one country cannot be
prevented from spilling over into other countries, the
Agency shall strive to forge a working partnership with
relevant government organs in neighboring countries
designed to resolve common environmental issues and
problems before they devastate our fragile natural
environments.

3.6.3 Water and Sewerage Management Unit:


The Water and Sewerage Management Unit (WSMU) shall
assume the functions of the National Water Supply and
Sanitation Council (NWASCO), which was established through
the Water Supply and Sanitation Act No. 28 of 1997. In the
performance of its functions, the Unit shall take into
consideration all other pieces of legislation which have a direct
or indirect bearing on sanitation and the supply of water; that
is: the Water Act (Chapter 198), the Environmental Protection
and Pollution Control Act (Chapter 204), the Public Health Act
(Chapter 295), the Local Government Act (Chapter 281), the
Zambezi River Authority Act (Chapter 467) – a Zambia-
Zimbabwe inter-state Act, the Mines and Minerals Act
(Chapter 213), and the Forests Act No. 7 of 1999.

(a) Operators’ Licences: All water supply and sanitation


service providers (except those which / who supply
water and sanitation services for their own use) shall
obtain operators’ licences as required by law—including
the 10 commercial utilities, the 22 local authorities, and
the 6 private providers that are currently operating in
the country.
(b) Municipal Water Works: We shall favor a trend toward
greater participation by municipal authorities in the
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supply of water and the provision of sanitation services.
The provision of water and sanitation services to clusters
of employees by private providers – that is, employer-
organizations—shall also be encouraged through tax
incentives. Here is why: it will not be possible for our
beloved country to achieve the Millennium Development
Goal of reducing by half the proportion of citizens who
do not currently have sustainable access to safe drinking
water by 2015 through profit-seeking water suppliers
and sewerage companies.

3.6.4 Cost-Cutting Measures:

(a) PUEMA shall work with executives of water supply and


sewerage companies to devise a standard and lean
organization structure to be adopted by the companies,
except private providers that exclusively serve their
employees.
(b) PUEMA shall provide for a forum at which utility
companies shall be afforded an opportunity to suggest
(to the Minister of Commerce and Industry and the
Minister of Finance and Revenue) viable ways and
means by which the government shall facilitate the
process of making public utilities less costly to
consumers.
(c) All public utility companies shall be expected to find
ways and means of reducing marketing, public relations
and administrative costs, and to seek low-cost suppliers
of machinery, equipment, office fixtures and supplies,
sub-contracted services, and so forth.

2.6.5 Reductions in Rates:


As a starting point in making water and electricity tariffs
low and affordable to both domestic and commercial users,
utility companies shall reduce electricity tariffs by at least 10
percentage points and water rates by at least 15 percentage
points.

3.7 ZAMBIA PUBLIC PROCUREMENT AUTHORITY

Former government leaders recognized the need for a centra-


lized Authority to deal with public procurement and set
standards for more efficient and progressive expenditure
patterns by all government wings in an effort to effectively
employ tax payers’ funds in the development of the country.
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The Agenda for Change, too, recognizes the necessity for such
an Authority (which came into being through the Public
Procurement Act of 2008 which re-named the Zambia National
Tender Board as the Zambia Public Procurement Authority) and
will strive to enhance its performance.

3.8 DRUG CONTROL AGENCY

The Drug Enforcement Commission Act of 1989 provided for


the creation of what is referred to as the “Drug Enforcement
Commission.” Unfortunately, the Commission's name
somewhat implies that it is designed to “abet” rather than
“curb” drug dealing. We shall, therefore, seek to change the
name “Drug Enforcement Commission” to “Drug Control
Agency” to accurately reflect the purposes for which it was
created.
As provided for by the Drug Enforcement Commission Act of
1989, the Commission's mandate and functions include the
following:

(a) To collect and disseminate information on narcotic drugs


and psychotropic substances;
(b) To receive and investigate any complaints of alleged or
suspected breach of the law, and subject to the directive
of the Director of Public Prosecutions, prosecute for
offences under the Act;
(c) To address and advise government ministries and de-
partments, public bodies, companies, institutions,
statutory bodies and corporations on ways and means of
preventing prohibited activities relating to narcotic drugs
and psychotropic substances, as well as suggest
measures, procedures or methods of work compatible
with the proper performance of their duties which in the
opinion of the Commission would reduce prohibited
activities relating to illicit drugs;
(d) To disseminate information intended to educate the
public on the evils and dangerous effects of abusing
drugs or psychotropic substances and the effect of
dealing in property acquired from trafficking; and
(e) To enlist and foster public support against the abuse of
drugs and, in this connection, liaise with similar
government agencies and non-governmental
organizations outside Zambia.

3.9 FOOD RESERVE AGENCY


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The Food Reserve Agency (FRA) was established in 1996 under
the Food Reserve Act of 1995 (amended in 2005) to perform
the following functions for the purpose of alleviating poverty
and hunger:

(a) Administering of national food reserves;


(b) Management of storage facilities;
(c) Assessment of storage requirements for marketing;
(d) Facilitation of the marketing of agricultural produce;
(e) Establishment and operation of a marketing information
system for agricultural produce; and
(f) Promotion of the use of weighing and grading standards.

FRA shall be detached from the Ministry of Agriculture and


converted into an autonomous government agency in order for
it to perform its duties without any political meddling or
manipulation by government officials to achieve partisan
objectives, and its functions shall also include the management
of the Fertiliser Support Programme (FSP).
It shall be accountable to the Parliamentary Committee on
Agriculture and Lands.

3.10 BUREAU OF STATISTICS AND ARCHIVES

To forestall the potential for fudging and/or manipulating vital


data and information, the Agenda for Change will eventually
seek to create an autonomous “Bureau of Statistics and Ar-
chives” to replace the Central Statistics Office (CSO) so that it
can freely and independently collect, process, maintain, and
publish essential data and information about our country, and
assume responsibility over the National Archives of Zambia.
The autonomy of the “Bureau of Statistics and Archives”
shall also be expected to lend a great deal of credence to the
data and information that shall be published about the country.

3.11 NATIONAL TRANSPORT SAFETY BOARD

We shall create a National Transport Safety Board (NTSB),


which shall incorporate the functions of the Road Transport
and Safety Agency (RTSA) that is currently under the Ministry
of Communications and Transport. The NTSB shall be charged
with the responsibility for generating and standardizing traffic
and parking rules and regulations covering air, road, rail, and
water transportation. Membership of the Board shall include
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relevant senior officers from the Ministry for Works, Supply and
Transport, provincial traffic control and civil police units, and
other relevant stakeholders.

3.12 FIRE ARMS AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS BUREAU

In July 2001, Zambia was openly disgraced by Scotland Yard's


refusal to assist local law enforcement officers in investigating
the assassination of Mr. Paul Tembo. Fellow citizens, we should
not continue to embarrass ourselves by relying on foreign ins-
titutions to conduct credible and state-of-the-art criminal inve-
stigations.
The Agenda for Change is, therefore, planning to create an
autonomous and non-military national criminal investigations
and research centre to be run by local experts, and to be
equipped with laboratories and other essential facilities for pro-
cessing and analyzing nebulous crime-related evidence from
local police units. The centre shall also assume responsibilities
relating to fire arm control and registration. It shall be referred
to as the “Fire Arms and Criminal Investigations Bureau.”

3.13 NATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COUNCIL

To forestall the potential for political meddling in scientific and


technological endeavors, we shall turn the National Science
and Technology Council (NSTC), which was established under
the Science and Technology Act (1997), into an autonomous
executive agency. The National Institute for Scientific and
Industrial Research (NISIR) shall be incorporated into the NSTC.
The NSTC and the National Technology Business Centre
(NTBC) shall be expected to fulfill Zambia’s stipulated science
and technology (S&T) policy of promoting and exploiting
science and technology as instruments for developing an
indigenous technological capability that is essential to the
attainment of sustainable socio-economic development.
We shall particularly promote the generation of technologi-
cal innovations and inventions whose features and
characteristics shall include the following:

(a) A high potential to create employment opportunities;


(b) Low operating costs and easy to maintain;
(c) Requiring the use of local inputs;
(d) Environmentally friendly; and
(e) Compatibility with our cherished cultural and traditional
values.
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We shall provide adequate financial support to the National
Science and Technology Council (NSTC) and the National Insti-
tute for Scientific and Industrial Research (NISIR) to make it
possible for them to effectively perform the following functions,
among others:

(a) Promotion of linkages: Enhance and promote long-term


linkages between researchers, private institutions and
the public sector;
(b) Monitoring S&T developments: Monitor inventions and
innovations nationwide, and publicize the same to
business, Government, and other institutions which may
need to develop or adapt them for application in improv-
ing their operations;
(c) Commercialization assistance: Provide commercializa-
tion assistance to initiators of new ideas and products in
order to facilitate the use of R&D outputs on a large
scale in commercial, industrial, and other institutions;
and
(d) Society-technology interfacing: Adequately provide for a
viable technology-society interface by initiating a
mechanism for assessing and minimizing the potential
negative impacts that may be associated with new prod-
ucts, technological innovations and new forms of
technology.

PART 4:
OTHER CRUCIAL MATTERS

4.1 DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE

Fellow Zambians, we should not expect our country to attain


meaningful socio-economic development in the absence of a
viable and genuine democratic system of government, the
creation of which hinges on meeting several prerequisites,
some of which are paraphrased from the conclusions of a study
conducted by the Global Coalition on Africa (GCA) on the
political transformation of a selected number of African coun-
tries.
These prerequisites, which the Reform Part shall strive to
institutionalize, are as follows:

(a) Genuine and full participation of the various segments of


society in making decisions concerning political issues
Page 104 of 190
and other matters that are of national importance;
(b) Serious consideration of ethnic and other special inte-
rests in the distribution of power, educational facilities,
health services, and so forth;
(c) Acceptance and tolerance of independent news media
and other local interest groups as important constituents
of a functioning pluralistic society;
(d) Maintaining a viable parliament and having regard for it
both as a body of people's elected representatives and
as the supreme legislative organ of Government;
(e) Creation of a truly free and just legal system, and
impartial and professional civil police units;
(f) Respect for, and protection of, the civic rights and free-
doms of Zambian citizens enshrined in the Republican
constitution and the rights and freedoms of individuals
stipulated in the African Charter on Human and Peoples'
Rights and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of
the United Nations (UN);
(g) Existence of political parties which have a sound and
long-term national agenda, rather than parties that exist
primarily to pursue partisan interests and/or the political
survival of their incumbent leaders;
(h) Recognition, by political leaders, of the populace as their
ultimate masters and stakeholders;
(i) A military establishment graced with, and run by, a
cadre of men and women who are adjudged to be
patriotic, apolitical, well-disciplined, and professional in
character; and
(j) Citizens who have a profound understanding of the
crucial role they can individually and collectively play in
the process of creating a more affluent, more peaceful,
more democritic, and more egalitarian Zambian society
– such as by putting personal, ethnic, and partisan
interests aside during local and/or national elections,
and by reflecting more seriously on the goals and poli-
cies political parties and contestants pledge to pursue.

4.2 THE “PIG” PHENOMENON

Since independence, government leaders have tended to be


preoccupied with serving the interests of their political parties
at the expense of pressing national concerns. In part, such a
situation has been fostered by a political system that allows
individuals to hold Government and party positions

Page 105 of 190


concurrently. This inevitably distorts the boundary between
Government and party business, and culminates into “the
party and its Government” phenomenon.
We shall, therefore, seek to delink the operations of a ruling
political party from the operations of the national Government.
In this endeavor, we shall strive for a constitutional proviso
that shall bar national leaders from actively performing
political party functions. It is high time for each and every
political leader in Zambia to put the national interest before all
other considerations!

4.3 ELECTIVE VICE-PRESIDENCY

Part IV of the Republican constitution provides for the


Republican Vice-President to preside over Cabinet and/or
govern the nation if and when any of the following obtains with
respect to the incumbent Republican President: absence from
office, resignation, impeachment, death, or incapacitation
(mental or physical).
Clearly, these responsibilities are too consequential to be
assumed by a Vice-President who is appointed by the President
(as provided for in section 45[2] of the Republican constitution)
rather than elected popularly by the Zambian people. As such,
we shall seek to introduce a constitutional proviso that will
require each and every candidate for the Republican
presidency to have a running mate so that the electorate can
cast votes with the full knowledge of potential vice-presidents.

The Issue of By-Elections:


To circumvent the costs associated with presidential,
parliamentary or any other by-elections, we shall seek to make
the following amendments to the Republican constitution:

1) A constitutional clause requiring each and every candidate


for the Re-publican presidency to have a running mate, who
would provide leadership until the next scheduled general
elections in the event of incapacitation, resignation,
impeachment, or death of the President.

2) A constitutional clause providing for a vacancy in the office


of the Republican Vice President to be filled by a person
elected by the Cabinet through a secret ballot from at least
three members of the Cabinet nominated by the Republican
President to provide leadership until the next scheduled
general elections in the event of incapacitation, resignation,
Page 106 of 190
impeachment, or death of the Vice President.

3) A constitutional clause providing for a political party that


loses a Member of Parliament or any other elected government
official due to death or incapacitation to appoint a replacement
to serve the remainder of the incumbent’s term.

4) A constitutional clause providing for a Member of


Parliament or any other elected government official who loses
a seat through a nullification of his or her election by a court of
law to be replaced by a candidate from another political party
or an independent candidate who secured the 2nd highest
number of votes to serve the remainder his or her term.

5) A constitutional clause providing for a parliamentary or any


other elec-tive seat that becomes vacant due to an
incumbent’s expulsion from his or her political party, or due to
his or her decision to voluntarily leave his or her party, to be
filled through an appointment of another member of the
political party by the party’s national executive committee to
serve the remainder of the term.

6) A constitutional clause providing for a Member of


Parliament or any other elected government official whose
political party ceases to exist due the dissolution or de-
registration of his or her political party to become an
independent elected official and serve the remainder his or
her term.

7) By-elections should be held only in the case of unopposed


office bear-ers; or in the case of non-availability of persons
with the 2nd highest num-ber of votes due to death or
incapacitation of the persons with the 2nd highest number of
votes, or due to a tie in the number of votes obtained by
persons with the 2nd highest number of votes, or due to any
other reasons.

Besides, Articles 46(2) and 47(3) of the Republican


constitution, which restrict an incumbent Republican president
to making ministerial appointments only from members of
Parliament, will need to be replaced so as to provide for
Cabinet-level appointments from the Zambian society at large.
This will afford an incumbent President a larger pool of people
to constitute a Cabinet from, as well as provide for greater
separation of the legislative and executive branches of
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government.
Appointment of Cabinet Ministers from non-Members of
Parliament will also afford presidential aspirants enough time
to identify potential minis-terial appointees well before
tripartite elections rather than waiting for Parliamentary
elections to be concluded.

4.4 FUNDING OF POLITICAL PARTIES

The Agenda for Change is committed to the idea of providing


for nominal governmental funding and support of all broad-
based, non-religious, non-socialist/communist, and duly
registered political parties.
In this connection, we shall seek to introduce ethical,
democratic, budgetary, and administrative standards which all
government-supported political parties shall be expected to
abide by in order to avoid de-registration and/or loss of public
support. The amounts and forms of such support shall be
determined by Parliament, which shall also provide for periodic
audits of the application of the funds, as well as consider the
prospect of requiring all duly registered political parties to
disclose all financial and/or material support from other
sources in consonance with Section 38 of the Societies Act.
We are in full support of the recommendations made by the
Mung’omba Constitutional Review Commission (CRC) in Part
VIII, Sections 120-128 of the Draft Republican Constitution
prepared in 2005 relating to the funding and regulation of the
activities of political parties.
Implicit in these recommendations is their ultimate
potential to promote intra-party democracy, democratic ideals
in general, harmonious inter-party relations, national unity,
patriotism, fair play, professionalism, and the evolvement of a
viable multi-party system.
[Observation: The requirement in Clause 1 of the
recommendations that a political party needs to have “seats in
the National Assembly” would need to be removed in order for
all duly registered political parties to receive nominal financial
support through public coffers.]
Public funding of political parties may not make economic
sense, but since political parties have an express moral
obligation to serve the interests of Zambia and all its citizens,
they need to be minimally supported through the public
treasury for the following reasons:

(a) To prevent them from falling prey to financiers with


Page 108 of 190
personal, corporate, partisan, and/or shady external
interests;
(b) To wean them from the influences of a few members
who have the wherewithal to fund party operations and
therby culminate in greater intra-party democracy;
(c) To reduce the enormous political advantage which the
ruling political party enjoys over opposition parties,
particularly during political campaigns when the
Republican president and vice president use public
resources at will to travel around the country for the
purpose of canvassing for votes; and
(d) To enable opposition parties to gain some limited access
to the mass media, to which the ruling party has free
access through ZNBC, ZANIS, Times of Zambia, and the
Zambia Daily Mail.

Without public funding of political parties, the ruling party


will continue to dominate political activity in parliamentary and
local government elections. During the 2006 tripartite
elections, for example, MMD was the only party that fielded
candidates in literally all the constituencies.

4.5 GOVERNMENT NEWS MEDIA

We shall privatize a large portion of the government-owned


news infrastructure in order to provide greater scope for
private initiative and investment in newspaper, radio and
television businesses. In this endeavor, we shall do the
following:

4.5.1 Maintain the Zambia Daily Mail under the auspices of the
planned Bureau of Statistics and Archives, and privatize all the
other print media operations over which it has control. And

4.5.2 Turn the government television and radio facilities into


an autonomous and self-sustaining “Public Broadcasting
Services” corporation designed to provide for the following:

(a) Coverage of parliamentary and judicial proceedings as


shall be allowed for by the Board of Directors to be
constituted by a relevant committee of Parliament;

(b) Regular broadcasts of Zambian, African and world news;

(c) Non-partisan and non-sectarian educational, cultural and


Page 109 of 190
informational programs to be generated by ministries and
government agencies;

(d) Coverage of sporting events and ceremonial activities;


and

(e) Programming of government-censored movies and


music which do not have the potential to promote moral
decay in our country.

4.6 THE BAROTSELAND ACCORD

The demand by the Barotse Royal Establishment for the


secession of Western Province from Zambia is a very thorny
and complex issue indeed. But like all other serious national
issues facing us, we need to summon our wisdom in finding a
lasting peaceful solution to it. A few observations about the
issue are perhaps in order at this juncture.

4.6.1 We Are One People!:


Although the majority of Zambian citizens today can
identify themselves as belonging to one or two of our country's
seventy-three (73) tribes, we are all essentially one and the
same people. In short, we are all members of the Zambian
family. And recognition of our oneness has, no doubt, been the
linchpin of the enhanced and unmatched national unity which
our country has enjoyed since independence.

None of us in the Agenda for Change would, therefore, find


pleasure in supporting any cause, genuine or otherwise, that
would lead to a disintegration of the Zambian nation.

4.6.2 An Era of Integration:


Integration of sovereign states has been one of the leading
aspirations of socio-economic policy over the last fifty years, so
much so that we can appropriately describe our era as an era
of integration. There are numerous motivations for such
integration, including the need to create larger financial and
goods markets, and the need to assume greater bargaining
power in international affairs.

In general, societal members worldwide have become true


believers in the concept of “strength in numbers,” or “in unity,
there is greater strength.” Secession in an era of integration is,
therefore, counterproductive at best!
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4.6.3 Decentralization of Power:
The Agenda for Change is committed to the idea of creating
semi-autonomous regions, and a federal or central Gove-
rnment with limited powers and functions. We believe in the
devolution of power to the provinces so that local people can
be afforded the opportunity to make their own decisions on
important issues which affect their lives. This kind of political
dispensation may well be a more prudent compromise to the
secession being contemplated by the Barotse Royal Establish-
ment.

4.6.4 Commission of Inquiry:


Nevertheless, it would be foolhardy for us not to lend a
receptive ear to the Barotse Royal Establishment's demand for
Western Province's autonomy. The Agenda for Change will,
therefore, make an effort to constitute a “Barotse Commission
of Inquiry,” whose terms of reference shall be to conduct an
intensive study of the issues involved, the general feelings of
the Lozi people about the agitation for secession from Zambia,
the general feelings of the Mbunda and Mankoya people about
the secession issue, and, among other things, the options for
resolving the issues surrounding the 1964 Barotseland
Agreement.

4.7 ABORTION AND HUMAN CLONING

4.7.1 The Abortion Issue:


We believe a human being’s life starts at the time when a
woman conceives a pregnancy and, therefore, advocate the
limitation of abortions in line with the provisions of the
Termination of Pregnancy Act of 1972, which provides for
abortion only when a pregnancy is to be terminated by a
registered medical practitioner in consultation with two other
registered medical practitioners—one of whom has to be
specialized in the branch of medicine in which the patient is
specifically required to be examined). Before reaching a
conclusion that the abortion should be recommended, the
three physicians should be of the opinion, formed in good faith,
that:

(a) The continuation of the pregnancy would involve: (i) risk


to the life of the pregnant woman, or (ii) risk of injury to the
physical or mental health of the pregnant woman, or (iii)
risk of injury to the physical or mental health of any
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existing children of the pregnant woman; and

(b) There is a substantial risk that if the child were born it


would suffer from such physical or mental abnormalities as
to be seriously handicapped.

However, partial birth abortions shall be outlawed irrespective


of circumstances surrounding pregnancies involved.

Zambian men and women who have the nerve to promote


and/or legitimize “abortion on demand”—that is, for any other
reasons—need to be mindful of the following:

(a) That our society does not consider the termination of a


pregnancy as a hobby or a sport. In April 1996, Mizinga
Mulomba made a statement in a Zambia Daily Mail
article concerning the issue of abortion which some of us
still remember vividly: that an unborn child is not part
of its carrier’s body, but “the body of another human
being.” Our laws should, therefore, not only protect
those of us who are already born but also the most
vulnerable and innocent members of society who are
still in their mothers’ wombs. And
(b) That tolerance of abortion on demand can induce
morally deficient women to seek to get pregnant so that
they can eventually terminate their pregnancies and sell
fetuses to medical research laboratories. In June 1992,
Mr. George Bush, Sr. provided a useful caveat when he
vetoed a bill passed by the U.S. Senate and the House of
Representatives intended to lift an earlier ban on
medical research using tissue from aborted fetuses.

He said: “I believe this moratorium is important in order


to prevent tax-payer funds from being used for research
that many ... [people] find morally repugnant and because
of its potential for promoting and legitimizing abortions.”

4.7.2 The Human Cloning Enigma:


The cloning of animals—that is, the process of manipulating
a cell from an animal so that it can grow into an exact
duplicate of the animal—is a highly contentious issue world-
wide. The successful cloning of a sheep at the Roslin Institute
in Scotland in 1997, for example, raised very serious moral and
ethical issues and dilemmas.

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Now there is an express desire by some scientists to start
cloning humans. In the industrialized world, the desire is
generally thwarted by legislative hurdles intended to protect
the dignity and integrity of human life. In the United States,
Mr. George Bush, Jr. welcomed a vote by the House of
Representatives in August 2001 to ban human cloning for any
objective as follows:

“The moral issues posed by human cloning are profound


and have implications for today and for future generations.
We must advance the promise and cause of science, but
must do so in a way that honors and respects life.”

In fact, even if animal cloning had not raised any moral and
ethical questions about the sanctity of human life, it would still
be utterly cruel and unacceptable to subject a cloned human
being to the health risks which have been detected in animals
that have been cloned so far—including developmental delays,
heart defects, lung problems, and malfunctioning immune sys-
tems.

But frenzied “human cloners” are still eager to fulfill their


quest by shifting their laboratories to unsuspecting and/or
undecided developing nations. The Agenda for Change will,
however, not allow them to bring their abominable scientific
endeavors to Zambia. We shall, therefore, ask Parliament to
outlaw human cloning and any other similar scientific resear-
ches, and to prescribe stiff penalties—including imprisonment
and pecuniary fines—for illegally undertaking or facilitating
such researches in the country.

Moreover, we shall provide for a viable mechanism for resolv-


ing the contentious moral and ethical issues and dilemmas that
may be evoked by other kinds of scientific discoveries and
technological breakthroughs.

4.8 CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

… There are many forms of crime which may attract capital


punishment in some countries; they include murder, treason,
economic sabotage, and large-scale drug-trafficking. Without
slighting the seriousness of other capital crimes, murder is
perhaps the most deserving of the death penalty; a person
who willfully takes the life of another person, therefore,
commits the ultimate crime—a crime for which the death
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penalty is a fitting and well-deserved form of punishment.

There are numerous caveats which lend support to such an inf-


lexible stance; let us briefly consider some of these caveats:

(a) By killing another person and, therefore, violating the


person's right to life, the murderer dehumanizes himself
or herself to the extent that he or she deserves to be
expelled from the community of living humans.
(b) People who commit murder in societies which have
corporal punishment already know the consequences
associated with such a heinous crime. For such people,
the punishment is, therefore, self-inflicted; after all, it is
a punishment every societal member can choose to
avoid in the first place! Is it not immoral to protect the
life of an individual who finds pleasure in committing
murders – the ultimate disregard for other people’s
lives?
(c) As Ernest van den Haag, a U.S. Professor of Jurispru-
dence and Public Policy, has concluded, “The severity
and finality of the death penalty is [commensurate
with] ... the seriousness and the finality of murder.” In
short, the death penalty functions as a reasonable and
generally acceptable form of retribution (or appropriate
punishment) for murder. The punishment fits the crime,
so to speak!
(d) The death penalty serves well as a more dreadful
deterrent to murder than life imprisonment and, among
other things, as an effective incapacitation of murderers.
(e) The death penalty is more likely to bring about closure
to the loss and grief endured by the kith and kin of a
murderer’s victim than life imprisonment;
(f) A constitutional proviso against capital punishment for
murder is likely to be conceived of as having sympathy
for the culprit—sympathy which the culprit could not
have for his or her victim;
(g) It would be immoral for the Government to collect tax
revenue from law-abiding members of society, some of
whom are kith and/or kin of murder victims, and commit
it to the protection and upkeep of duly convicted
murderers sentenced to life imprisonment.
(h) Prison escapes of hardcore criminals are not uncommon
– even in countries which can afford to provide highly
secure prison facilities, such as the United States. There

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is also the potential for criminals to be released from
prison by mistake; on March 26, 2002, for example,
Clifton Blecha – a convicted murderer concurrently
serving a life sentence and a 24-year prison term at
Colorado State Penitentiary in Canon city, United States
– was mistakenly paroled due to a paperwork mix-up. He
was initially jailed in 1988 on a burglary conviction, and
later convicted of murdering a fellow inmate in 1994.
(BeDan, M., “Paperwork Mix-Up Frees Murderer,” Rocky
Mountain News, May 3, 2002, p. 7A.)
(i) The application of capital punishment calls for a
fundamental redress of any apparent inadequacies in a
country's criminal justice system so that the punishment
can be administered fairly, impartially, with reasonable
consistency, and upon an objective and exhaustive
assessment of circumstances leading to the commission
of murder. Unfortunately, such expectations cannot
easily be met in poor countries like Zambia, pseudo
democracies, and totalitarian states worldwide.

The Agenda for Change will, therefore, constitute an ad hoc


panel of local legal experts to determine whether or not the
Zambian criminal justice system meets the foregoing
expectations. If it will be found to be wanting, we shall request
Parliament to seriously consider the prospect of placing a
moratorium on capital punishment, to commute the prison
sentences of any individuals who are currently on the death
row to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole, and
to decide on modalities for periodic reviews of the moratorium.
Over the years, we have heard calls by some segments of
Zambian society for the abolition of the death penalty in the
country. We believe a decision on whether or not capital
punishment should be abolished in Zambia can only be made
by the citizenry through a referendum.

4.9 THE ISSUE OF LAND

Land, as it is often said, is a highly contentious issue. In


Zambia today, there are some people who are not happy about
the Republican president's constitutionally bestowed authority
over the distribution of land with little or no consideration of
the needs and expectations of chiefs and their subjects.

The Agenda for Change government will, therefore, revisit the


Lands Act (1995) to determine how the land issue can be
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amicably resolved to the satisfaction of the majority of Zambi-
ans, taking into account the need to use available land wisely
so that it can sustain both present and future generations.

4.10 ANNUAL INTER-PARTY INDABA

The Agenda for Change is geared to provide for day-long inter-


party deliberations on national issues and affairs to be held
every year on the first Friday in the month of November,
except the year in which regularly scheduled Presidential and
General Elections are to be conducted; in that year, the
deliberations will have to be held on a conveniently selected
day in June.

4.11 FACE-THE-NATION BRIEFINGS

The Agenda for Change is also committed to provide for brief,


annual reviews of progress on national projects and programs
by the Republican President and Ministers at “Face the Nation”
briefings to be moderated by an expert from the Media Council
of Zambia (MECOZ) selected by members of the Council.

The briefings are to be held annually on the first Saturday in


the month of November, except the year in which regularly
scheduled Presidential and General Elections are to be
conducted; in that year, the briefings need to be held in June
on the day immediately following the annual inter-party
indaba.

At the briefings, the President and each of the Ministers shall


be given at least ten (10) minutes to brief the nation on impo-
rtant national issues and matters relating to their positions.
With respect to Ministers, the following guidelines, or any
semblance, thereof, shall apply:

(a) Role of the Ministry: Stipulation of the following: the


Ministry’s core or mandated responsibilities; its role and
importance in national development; and why tax pay-
ers should continue to provide funds for its continued
existence.
(b) Existing Projects: Provision of an outline concerning the
following: national projects and programs earmarked
during the previous year(s) for execution; progress
made, and extenuating circumstances (if any); and
planned corrective measures.
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(c) Contemplated Projects: Provision of an outline concer-
ning the following: new projects and programs earmar-
ked for execution in the forthcoming year(s); and the
ministry's budget (estimates of expenditure).
(d) Other Pertinent Issues: Any other matters related to the
Ministry’s mandate that are of interest to the nation.

In passing, one would perhaps do well to welcome the birth


of the Media Council of Zambia (MECOZ) in July 2004. We trust
that the Council will serve our country and its people well as a
“court of honor”.

PART 5:
BRACING FOR CHANGE

At this juncture, let us consider the need for each and every
patriotic Zambian to brace for change.
The late Harold Wilson, in his speech to the Consultative
Assembly of the Council of Europe in 1967, characterized
people who are inclined to resist this kind of change as “archi-
tect[s] of decay.” If there are any of such people in modern
Zambia, we believe they are very few indeed!
Change, as experience and observation have taught us, is a
fact of life; all living things must adapt to the demands of their
environments and their own stages of growth. History is full of
examples of plants and animals which have become extinct
because of their inability to change when it became necessary.
This fact of life applies to countries as well; if they cannot
change in order to align their goals, aspirations and develop-
ment strategies to the dictates of local, national, regional, and
global socio-economic conditions, therefore, they are not likely
succeed in improving their people's standards of living. And
our country is no exception!
But in spite of this obvious fact of life, we are all generally
and naturally resistant to change; the following paraphrased
observation made in 1514 by Niccolo Machiavelli, an Italian
political observer, succinctly depicts our nature in this regard:

There is nothing that is more difficult to arrange, more


doubtful of success, and more dangerous to carry through
than initiating changes. The change agent makes enemies
of all those who prospered under the old order, and only
lukewarm support can be expected from those who would
prosper under the new. Why? Because people are generally
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skeptical about new things until they have tested them by
experience.

There are many reasons why we are all inherently inclined


to resist change, including the fear that change will eventually
result in loss of employment, make us less competent in per-
forming our work, require us to perform complicated tasks,
and/or negatively affect the existing distribution of power or
resources.
To mitigate the negative effects of change, the Agenda for
Change shall be guided by a rational approach to the initiation
and implementation of all envisaged changes, which shall
essentially be designed to generate well-reasoned answers to
such important questions as the following:

5.1 Necessity of Change:


Is the change really necessary? In other words, is the change
likely to bring about greater returns to our country and its
people than the costs of implementing it?

5.2 Appropriateness:
Is the change the correct one, or are alternative change
programs likely to yield greater and more desirable end results
for our country and its people?

5.3 Potential Effects:


What are the likely negative impacts of the change on other
spheres and operations of the national government and local
authorities? Are these impacts likely to offset the benefits to be
gained from the change?

5.4 Time and Resources:


What are the estimated time limits within which the change
is to be implemented, and how are financial, human and other
resource requirements to be met?

5.5 Citizen Participation:


Has the contemplated change been adequately communi-
cated to societal members who are likely to be directly
affected by it, and have they genuinely participated in the
planning and/or implementation process either directly or
through their elected representatives?

5.6 Effective Communication:


Does the Government machinery formally provide for and
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encourage open, two-way communication among government
leaders, and between government leaders and the citizenry?

5.7 Open-Door Policy:


Have we developed a political culture that encourages, or
even compels, government leaders to adopt an open-door
posture so that societal members and interest groups can free-
ly call upon them to articulate their needs, demands and
expectations?

PART 6:
IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE:
THE TIME FOR EXCUSES IS OVER

Sound long-term planning is essential to our country’s future,


and to the well-being of future generations. But such planning
should be balanced with the needs of our generation because
in the long run, to paraphrase the words of the famous
economist John Maynard Keynes, we are all going to be dead!
For this reason, we have devised the following schedule for
implementing some of our short-term and medium-term
projects and programs to strike a balance between our needs
and expectations, and the needs and expectations of future
generations:

1. Inauguration Day:

(a) Appointment of 10 Cabinet Ministers.


(b) Abolition of the position of District Commissioner.
(c) Abolition of examination fees in formal education.
(d) Abolition of TV licensing and related levies.
(e) Creation of an autonomous “National Emergency
Management Agency” (NEMA), which shall incorporate
the functions of The Disaster Management and
Mitigation Unit (DMMU) that is currently vested in the
Office of the Vice-President in order for it to perform its
duties without any political meddling or manipulation.
(f) Detachment of the Food Reserve Agency (FRA) from the
Ministry of Agriculture and conversion of the Agency into
an autonomous body in order for it to perform its duties
without any political meddling or manipulation, which

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shall be expected to provide assistance to the needy
and, as such, shall incorporate the functions of the
Public Welfare Assistance Scheme currently
administered through the Ministry of Community
Development and Social Services, including the Social
Cash Transfer Scheme.

2. June 1, 2012:

(a) Abolition of the position of Provincial Permanent


Secretary.
(b) Abolition of the position of Provincial Minister.
(c) Appointment of Acting Provincial Governors.
(d) Privatisation of the Times of Zambia (TZ).
(e) Turning of the Zambia National Broadcasting
Corporation (ZNBC) into a public broadcaster not
controlled by the government.
(f) Reduction of Zambian foreign missions, appointment of
diplomats, and re-assignment of countries and regions
to be covered by each mission.
(g) Derivation of standardized organization / administrative
structures for districts and provinces.
(h) Creation of a fund for assisting orphanages.

3. October 2012:

(a) Start improving infrastructure in schools, colleges,


universities, ZNS camps, and vacated refugee camps.
(b) Start providing free seeds and fertilizer for 2 consecutive
years.
(c) Start upward revisions of compensation packages for
employees on government payroll.
(d) Devolution of superintendence over the civil police to
provincial governments.
(e) Removal of public assistance to chiefs from the office of
the Republican president and placed under the aegis of
the Parliamentary Committee on Local Governance,
Housing and Chiefs’ Affairs in order to forestall any
suspicions that assistance to chiefs is designed to woo
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their support during elections – including the provision
for chiefs’ subsidies, electrification of chiefs’ palaces, the
purchasing of motor vehicles for chiefs, and any other
matters relating to the welfare of chiefs.

4. January 1, 2013:

(a) Reductions in Pay-As-You-Earn (PAYE) and corporate


income tax by 5 percentage points.
(b) Reduction in value-added tax (VAT) from 16% to 12.5%.
(c) Reductions in interest rates by at least 2 percentage
points per year over a period of 4 years.
(d) Payment of all due retirement benefits owed by the
government.
(e) Free healthcare without inhibiting the operations of
private healthcare providers.
(f) Free formal education (up to Grade 12).
(g) Abolition of Grades 7 and 9 elimination examinations for
all school children.
(h) Provision of scholarships to Grade 12 students who shall
obtain a Division 1 in order for them to pursue studies at
locally based institutions of higher learning registered in
Zambia.
(i) Provision for low-interest government loans for Grade 12
students who shall not obtain a Division 1 to make it
possible for them to pursue studies at locally based
institutions of higher learning registered in Zambia.
(j) Mass enrolment (on a voluntary basis) of street kids and
other pan-handlers into skills training programs at ZNS
and vacated refugee camps.

5. January 1, 2014:

(a) Start the implementation of home ownership schemes


for the police and all civil servants, provision of low-cost
rental housing units for low-income families nationwide,
management of a home-ownership scheme for low-
income families to be financed through low interest
mortgages, and rehabilitation of shanty townships.

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(b) Start improving infrastructure in resettlement schemes
nationwide.

6. October 2014:

(a) Start providing a seed and fertilizer subsidy at 50%.

7. October 2016:

(a) Election of provincial governors and district mayors.


(b) Election of Provincial Treasurers and Secretaries.

PART 7:
CENTRAL PROVINCE
[1.01 million residents, 2001 CSO Census.]

7.1 Public Health and Sanitation

We shall provide for free life-saving healthcare for all


Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health
centres throughout Central Province, as well as build new ones.
Moreover, we shall improve conditions of service for healthcare
personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that
healthcare facilities throughout the province have adequate
stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment
regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries,
mining companies or the Zambian government.

Our efforts in these endeavours shall also apply to major


healthcare facilities in the Province, including Liteta, Kapiri
Mposhi, Mkushi, Mumbwa, Nangoma, Chitambo, Serenje, and
Kabwe hospitals.

7.2 Education and Skills Training

We are going to build more primary and secondary schools in


Central Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to
make it possible for each and every child in the Province to
have access to education near their homes in all the districts;
that is, in Chibombo, Kabwe, Kapiri Mposhi, Mkushi, Mumbwa,
and Serenje districts.

Besides, we want to ensure that higher education and


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vocational training in Central Province are enhanced by
rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional
institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to
offer training programs that will be consistent with the needs
of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, we shall
provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the
Province.

Further, we want to address the problems facing educational


and training institutions, including the lack of teachers,
instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment,
inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all
the educational and training institutions in Central Province.

We shall also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely


disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil
servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up
their money only to be told that their dues are not yet
available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’


physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and
productive citizens, we shall promote sport throughout Central
Province. In this endeavour, we shall provide sports facilities at
all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing,
basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

7.3 Culture and Local Traditions

We consider culture and both family and traditional values as


essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society.
Therefore, we shall make an earnest effort to promote cultural
and traditional events in Central Province, including the
following:

(a) The Inchibwela Mushi ceremony of the Bisa, Swaka and


Lala people in Mkushi district held in September;

(b) The Kulamba Kubwalo ceremony of the Lenje people in


Senior Chief Mukuni’s area in Chibombo district held in
October;

(c) The Musaka and Jikubi ceremonies of the Kaonde people in


Chiefs Mumba and Kaindu’s areas in Mumbwa district held in
September; and
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(d) The Likumbi Lya Malumbe ceremony of the Kaonde-Ila
people in Chief Chibuluma’s area in Mumbwa district held in
October.

7.4 Other Projects and Programs

There are a lot of important projects and programs that we are


going to work on in Central Province designed to improve the
socio-economic well-being of residents. These projects and
programs include the following:

(a) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water for


both rural and urban areas throughout the province through
boreholes, dams, water pipes, and protected shallow wells, and
also provide for modern sewage facilities and both public and
private conveniences.

(b) Promotion of large-scale investments in Central Province,


such as that made in recent years by Chiman Manufacturing
Limited from China in the development of the manganese plant
at the old Kabwe Mine, and at the company’s Kampumba Mine
in Mkushi district. This is one of the obvious ways in which we
can create greater employment opportunites for residents in
the province.

(c) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by


providing financial and material resources for constructing
and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams
and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics,
basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services
and facilities. Such schemes include the Katikulula, Lukanda
and Maimwene schemes.

7.5 Existing Healthcare Facilities

Chibombo District: Chitanda RHC


Liteta District Hospital Golden Valley RHC
Chibombo Rural Health Ipongo RHC
Centre Kabangalala RHC
Chikobo RHC Kaparu RHC
Chipembi RHC Kayosha RHC
Chipeso RHC Keembe RHC
Chisamba RHC Malambanyama RHC
Chisamba Z.N.S. RHC Mulungushi Agro RHC
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(Private) Chipili RHC
Mboshya RHC Chibefwe UHC
Mungule RHC Chipepo RHC
Muswishi RHC Kakulu RHC
Mwachisompola Demo RHC Kawama UHC
Mwachisompola RHC Luanshimba RHC
Naluyanda RHC Lunsemfwa Power Station
Shimukuni RHC RHC
(Private)
Kabwe District: Mpunde RHC (Mission)
Kabwe General Hospital Mukonchi RHC
Kabwe Mine General Mukubwe RHC
Hospital Mulungushi Power Station
Bwacha Urban Health RHC
Centre (Private)
Chindwin UHC NCMDS RHC
Chowa UHC Ngabwe RHC
Kasanda UHC Nshingo RHC
Kasavasa RHC Nkole RHC
Kawama UHC St. Paul RHC (Mission)
Kohima UHC Tazara Clinic UHC (Private)
Mahatma Gandhi UHC Waya RHC
Makululu UHC Kampumba RHC
Mpima UHC Zambia Railways UHC
Mukobeko Maximum Prison (Private)
UHC
Mukobeko Medium Prison Mkushi District:
UHC Mkushi District Hospital
Mukubeko Township UHC Chalata RHC
Nakoli UHC Chimika RHC
Natuseko UHC Chingombe Mission RHC
Ngungu UHC Fiwila RHC (Mission)
Z.N.S. RHC Luanshimba RHC
Pollen UHC Masansa RHC
Railways Surgery UHC Mboroma (ZFDS E3) RHC
Nkrumah UHC Mboshya (ZFDS E11) RHC
ZAF UHC Musofu RHC
Nkumbi RHC
Kapiri Mposhi District: Old Mkushi RHC
Kapiri Mposhi District
Hospital Mumbwa District:
Chankomo RHC Mumbwa District Hospital
Chibwe RHC Nangoma Mission Hospital
Chilumba RHC Chunga RHC
Chilwa Island RHC Dun Robin Mine RHC
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(Private) Sichobo RHC
Kaindu RHC ZAF Mumbwa RHC
Kalenda Z.N.S RHC
Kapyanga RHC Serenje District:
Keezwa RHC Chitambo Mission District
Luili RHC Hospital
Lungombe RHC0 Serenje District Hospital
Lutale RHC Chibale RHC
Muchabi RHC Chipundu RHC
Mukulaikwa RHC Chitambo RHC (Mission)
Mumbwa Prison Clinic RHC Chisomo RHC
Mumbwa Urban UHC Kabamba RHC
Mundia Clinic RHC (Private) Kabundi RHC
Mwembeshi Lutheran / Lusiwasi RHC
Lumano RHC Mailo RHC
(Mission) Malcom Moffat TTC Clinic
Myooye RHC RHC
Nalubanda RHC Mapepala RHC
Nambala RHC (Mission) Mecco Clinic RHC (Private)
Nampundwe Mine RHC Mpelembe RHC
(Private) Mpepetwe RHC
Nampundwe RHC Muchinka RHC
Nangoma RHC (Mission) Mulilima RHC
Shabasonje RHC Serenje RHC

7.6 A Selection of Existing Schools

Chibombo District: Chindwin ‘B’ Primary School


Chibombo Secondary School Chipembi Girls Secondary
Imansa Primary School School
Keembe Basic School Danford Chirwa Primary
Mukonchi Primary School School
Domican Convent School
Kabwe District: Ellensmere School
Angelina Tembo Primary Exellence Christian
School Academy
Ben Kapufi Primary School Freedom Way School
Broadway Basic School Highridge Secendary School
Broken Hill Trust School Jacaranda Trust School
Buseko Primary School Jasmine Street School
Bwacha School Kabwe Secondary School
Caritas Girls Convent High Kabwe Trust School
School Kalonga Secondary School
Chibwe Basic School Kasanda Malombe Primary
Chindwin ‘A’ Primary School School
Page 126 of 190
Katondo Middle Basic Myooye Basic School
School Nambala Basic School
King George VI School Sanje Basic School
Lombwa Primary School Shibuyunji Primary School
Lukanga Primary School
Mpima Major Seminary Serenje District:
Mpunde Girls School Ibolelo School
Mtshede Primary School Kabamba Primary School
Mukobeko Primary School Kamwala Primary School
Mukobeko Secondary Serenje Boma Basic School
School Serenje Boys Secondary
Mwashi Primary School School
Neem Tree Primary School
Ngungu Primary School Other C/Province
Nkwashi Primary School Institutions:
Ntasa School Computech
Paramount Primary School Dominican Convent School
Parker Primary School Neem Tree Primary School
Raphael Kombe Primary Banani Int’l Secondary
School School
Sacred Heart Nursery Bardie School
School Chisamba Primary School
St. Paul’s Secondary School Golden Valley School
St.Columbas Primary School Kabwe Trades Training
Institute
Kapiri Mposhi District: Kwame Nkhrumah Teachers
Chibwe Primary School College
Kipiri Mposhi Basic School Listic International College
Lukanda Primary School Malcolm Moffat Teachers’
Muteteshi Basic School College
Munano Primary School
Mkushi District: National College of
Chalata Primary School Management and
Chengelo Secondary School Developmental Studies
Mkushi Primary School Nkumbi International
Mkushi Secondary School College
Paglory College of
Mumbwa District: Education
Chabota Primary School UNZA Extension Studies
Kaindu Primary School Zambia Airforce Flying
Kalilwe Basic School Training School
Kasalu Primary School Zambia Military Academy
Mamvule Basic School Zambia Railways Training
Moono Primary School Centre
Mumbwa Basic School
Page 127 of 190
PART 8:
COPPERBELT PROVINCE
[0.7 million residents, 2001 CSO Census.]

8.1 Public Health and Sanitation

We shall provide for free life-saving healthcare for all


Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health
centres throughout the Copperbelt Province, as well as build
new ones. Moreover, we shall improve conditions of service for
healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and
ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have
adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and
equipment regardless of whether they are operated by
missionaries, mining companies or the government.

Our efforts in these endeavours shall also apply to major


healthcare facilities in the Copperbelt Province, including the
Konkola Mine Hospital, Nchanga South Hospital, Kalulushi Mine
Hospital, Nkana Mine Hospital, Wusakile Hospital, Luanshya
Mine Hospital, Roan Antelope Hospital, Thomson District
Hospital, Mpongwe Mission Hospital, St. Theresa Mission
Hospital, Kamuchanga Hospital, and Malcom Watson Hospital.

8.2 Education and Skills Training

We are going to build more primary and secondary schools in


the Copperbelt Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in
order to make it possible for each and every child in the
Province to have access to education near their homes in all
the districts; that is, in Chililabombwe, Chingola, Kalulushi,
Kitwe, Luanshya, Lufwanyama, Masaiti, Mpongwe, Mufulira,
and Ndola districts.

Besides, we want to ensure that higher education and


vocational training in the Copperbelt Province are enhanced by
rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional
institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to
offer training programs that will be consistent with the needs
of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, we shall
provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the
Province.

Page 128 of 190


Further, we want to address the problems facing educational
and training institutions, including the lack of teachers,
instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment,
inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all
the educational and training institutions in the Copperbelt
Province.

We shall also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely


disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil
servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up
their money only to be told that their dues are not yet
available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’


physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and
productive citizens, we shall promote sport throughout the
Copperbelt Province. In this endeavour, we shall provide sports
facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer,
boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

8.3 Culture and Local Traditions

We consider culture and both family and traditional values as


essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society.
Therefore, we shall make an earnest effort to promote cultural
and traditional events in the Copperbelt Province, including the
following:

(a) The Chabalankata ceremony of the Lamba people in Masaiti


district in Senior Chief Mushili’s area held in November;

(b) The Chitentamo and Nsengele Kununka ceremonies of the


Lamba people in Chief Machiya’s area in Mpongwe held in
November; and

(c) The Kwilimuna ceremony of the Bulima people in


Chieftainess Malembeka’s area in Mpongwe district held in
July/August.

8.4 Other Projects and Programs

There are a lot of important projects and programs that we are


going to work on in the Copperbelt Province designed to
improve the socio-economic well-being of residents. These
projects and programs include the following:
Page 129 of 190
(a) Ensuring that the relocation of shanty townships is
conducted only after low-cost public housing units are provided
by the government, and re-settlement areas are furnished with
running water, electricity, public transportation routes and por-
tals, and other essential public services and facilities.

(b) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water for


both rural and urban areas in the province through boreholes,
dams, water pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also
provide for modern sewage facilities and both public and
private conveniences.

(c) Ensuring that garbage collection and disposal are


undertaken on a more regular basis, and provide adequate
resources to facilitate the effective control of mosquitoes to
reduce the incidence of malaria.

(d) Extension of credit facilities to enterprising citizens who


want to get involved in the informal sector of the economy.

(e) Embarking on an ambitious program designed to improve


the infrastructure of health institutions throughout the
province, including mortuaries, laboratories, voluntary testing
centres for HIV/AIDS (VTCs), and other essential facilities.

(f) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by


providing financial and material resources for constructing
and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams
and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics,
basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services
and facilities. Such schemes include the Kakolo scheme in
Kitwe district, the Lufwanyama and Kambilombilo schemes in
Lufwanyama district, the Lukanga North scheme in Mpongwe
district, and the Kafubu West Dam scheme.

8.5 Existing Healthcare Facilities

Chililabombwe District: Konkola IV UHC (Private)


Konkola Mine Hospital Konkola V UHC (Private)
(Private) Lubengele Clinic UHC
Kakoso Clinic UHC Lubengele Mch UHC
Kasumbalesa UHC Shaft Number UHC (Private)
Konkola I UHC (Private) Shaft Number UHC (Private)
Konkola II UHC (Private)
Page 130 of 190
Chingola District: Zambia Railways UHC
Nchanga North General (Private)
Hospital Zamtan UHC
Nchanga South District Z.N.S UHC
Hospital
(Private) Luanshya District:
Chawama Clinic UHC Luanshya Mine Hospital
Chingola Council UHC (Private)
Chiwempala Clinic UHC Roan Antelope Hospital
Ipafu RHC (Private)
Kabundi East Clinic UHC Thomson District Hospital
Kalilo UHC 73 Independence UHC
Kasompe Clinic UHC (Private)
Lulamba UHC (Private) Baluba Clinic UHC (Private)
Muchinshi Clinic UHC Chaisa Clinic UHC
Mutenda RHC TVTC Clinic UHC
Nchanga Clinic I UHC Fisenge Clinic UHC
Nchanga Clinic II UHC Franco-Aiellos UHC
(Private) Hume UHC (Private)
Nchanga Clinic III UHC Kafubu Block Clinic RHC
(Private) Kawama Clinic UHC
Nchanga UHC (Private) Luanshya Main UHC
Mikomfwa Clinic UHC
Kalulushi District: Mikomfwa Health UHC
Kalulushi Mine District Mpatamato Section 23 UHC
Hospital (Private) (Private)
Chambishi UHC Mpatamato Section 26 UHC
Chambishi Mine UHC (Private)
(Private) Mpatamato Clinic UHC
Chibuluma UHC (Private)
Ichimpe UHC Mpatamatu Section 5 UHC
Kalulushi Clinic UHC (Private)
Kalulushi Main UHC Plant & Works UHC (Private)
Kalulushi Township RHC Shaft 8 UHC (Private)
Likoshi Clinic UHC Shaft 8 UHC (Private)
Mindolo Training Farm RHC Zamefa UHC (Private)
Plant Site Kalulushi UHC New Town UHC
(Private)
Lufwanyama District:
Kitwe District: Bulaya RHC
Ndeke Urban Clinic UHC Chati RHC
Nkana East UHC (Private) Chikabuke RHC
Nkana West UHC (Private) Chinemu RHC
Ohmb UHC Fungulwe RHC
Wusakile D4 UHC (Private) Kite RHC
Page 131 of 190
Lumpuma RHC Mushipashi RHC
Mukumbo RHC
Mukutuma RHC Mufulira District:
Mushingashi (ZFDS W2) Kamuchanga District
RHC Hospital
Shimukumani RHC Malcom Watson Hospital
St. Joseph’s RHC (Mission) (Private)
St. Mary’s RHC (Mission) Ronald Ross General
Hospital
Masaiti District: Butondo UHC
Chikumbi RHC Central Dressing UHC
Chilese RHC (Private)
Chinondo RHC Chibolya Clinic UHC
Chiwala RHC Kamuchanga Clinic UHC
Chondwe Prisons RHC Kansunswa Clinic UHC
Fiwale Hill RHC (Mission) Mokambo Clinic UHC
Kafulafuta RHC Mufulira UHC
Kafulafuta Misson RHC Mufulira UHC (Private)
(Mission) Mufulira UHC
Kaloko RHC Mufulira UHC (Private)
Kambowa RHC Mufulira UHC
Kashitu RHC Mufulira UHC (Private)
Masaiti Boma RHC Mufulira UHC (Private)
Masaiti Council RHC Mufulira UHC (Private)
Miengwe RHC Mufulira UHC (Private)
Mishikishiki RHC Mufulira Prisons RHC
Mupapa RHC Mufulira Teachers UHC
Mutaba RHC Murundu Clinic RHC
Njelemani RHC Mutundu Clinic RHC
Tangup Military Clinic UHC
Mpongwe District:
Mpongwe Mission District Ndola District:
Hospital Arthur Davison Specialised
St. Theresa’s Mission Hospital
Hospital Ndola Central Hospital
Ipumbu RHC Bank of Zambia UHC
Kanyenda RHC (Private)
Kasamba RHC Bwafwano Clinic UHC
Machiya RHC Chifubu UHC
Mikata RHC Chilanga Cement UHC
Mwinuma RHC Dola Hill UHC
Munkumpu RHC Hope Humana UHC (Private)
Mushiwe ZFDS RHC Indeni Petroleum UHC
Nampamba RHC (Private) (Private)
St. Anthony RHC Kabushi Clinic UHC
Page 132 of 190
Kalewa UHC Railway Surgery UHC
Kaloko UHC (Private)
Kaniki UHC Sathya Sai UHC
Kanshenshi Prison UHC Tazama Pipeline UHC
Kavu HC (Private)
Kawama UHC Telnor UHC (Private)
Kopa UHC (Private) Tug-Argan UHC
Lubuto UHC Twapia UHC
Mahatma Ghandi UHC ZFDS Medical Centre UHC
Masala Main UHC Z.S.I.C. UHC (Private)
Masala New UHC Zambia Breweries UHC
Mukango UHC (Private) (Private)
Mushili UHC Zambia Railways UHC
Mushili Commando UHC (Private)
Ndeke Clinic UHC Zambia Sugar UHC
Ndola Lime UHC (Private) ZESCO UHC (Private)
Nkhwazi UHC Miramar UHC (Private)
Peter Singogo UHC T.D.R.C UHC

8.6 A Selection of Existing Schools

Chililabombwe District: Kabundi Primary School


Chililabombwe Primary Kabundi Secondary School
School Kapisha Primary School
Chililabombwe Secondary Kapopo Primary School
School Kasompe Primary School
Kakoso Primary School Lubambe Primary School
Kamenza Basic School Lulamba Primary School
Konkola Trust School Maiteneke Primary School
Lubengele Primary School Malemba Primary School
Ming’omba Primary School Matelo School
Mitondo Primary School Mudzabwela Primary School
Muleya Secondary School Nakatindi Primary School
Twafwane Primary School Nchanga Primary School
Wendy House Nursery Nchanga Trust Primary
School
Chingola District: Sacred Heart Convent
7Th Street Nursery School School
Chabanyama Basic School Sekela School
Chikola Secondary School St. Barnabas School
Chingola Nursery School Twatasha Primary School
Chingola Primary School Twateka School
Chingola Secondary School Nchanga Primary School
Ipafu Primary
Jack and Jill Nersery School Kalulushi District:
Page 133 of 190
Alexander Mcneil Primary Kitwe High School
School Kitwe Main Primary School
Chamushalila Prmary School Kitwe Primary School
Chati Secondary School Kitwe Trades School
Chibuluma Trust School Kwacha Primary School
Kafubu Primary School Lady Bird Nursery School
Kalulushi Basic School Lechwe School
Kalulushi Secondary School Little Egypt School
Kalulushi Trust School Luela Primary School
Kalumbwa High School Lukasu School
Lubuto Primary School Machona Primary School
Masamba Primary School Matete Primary School
Mitobo Primary School Mindolo Ecumenical Centre
Zambian Catholic University Mindolo Secondary School
Miseshi Primary School
Kitwe District: Mitanto Middle Basic School
Antie Becky’s Nursery Mopani Nkana Primary
Bulangililo School School
Buntungwa Primary School Mpelembe Secondary
Bupe Primary School School
Buseko Primary School Mukuba Secondary School
Butotelo Primary School Mutende Primary School
Chamboli Primary Mwambashi Basic School
Chamboli Secondary School Natwange Primary School
Chibote Basic School Ndeke Primary School
Chimwemwe Basic School Ndeke Secondary School
Faith Trust School Nkana Junior Secondary
Fibale Primary School School
Frederick Knapp Nkana Primary School
Garnerton Primary School Parklands Nursery School
Hellen Kaunda Prince Charles School
Highland School Riverrain School
Ishuko School Riverside School
Jesus of The Most Sacred Rokana Basic School
Heart Rokana Primary School
High School Springboard Academy
Justin Kabwe Basic School St Martins Nursery School
Kamfinsa School St Michael and Noah
Kamitondo Primary School Nursery School
Kapemba Basic School St. Francis College
Katana Trust School St. Johns Convent School
Kawama Primary School St. Michaels Nursery School
Kitwe Boys Secondary Tom & Jo Nursery & Primary
School School
Kitwe Convent Twashuka Primary School
Page 134 of 190
Twashuku Primary School Twatemwa School
Valley View Primary School
Wusakile Primary School Mufulira District:
Wusakili Basic School Butondo Secondary School
Buyantanshi Primary School
Luanshya District: Chankwa School
4Th Street School Chibolya Primary School
Buteko Basic Primary Dominican Convent Primary
School Eagle School
Central Primary School Eastlea Primary School
Chaisa School Fibusa Primary School
Dominican Convent School Ipusukilo Basic School
Gandhi Primary School Kakoyo Primary School
GB Pre-School Kalanga School
Happy Days Nursery School Kamuchanga Basic School
Harrison Primary School Kansuswa Basic School
Kafubu Block Primary Kantanshi Seconadry School
School Kasumba Primary School
Kalulu Nursery Makole Primary School
Kansumbi Primary School Mano Primary School
Luanshya Boys Secondary Mufulira Central Basic
School School
Luanshya Girls Secondary Mufulira High School
School Mufulira Mine Primary
Luanshya High School School
Luanshya Trust School Mufulira Primary School
Makoma Primary School Mufulira Secondary School
Mikomfwa Primary School Mufulira Trust School
Mikomfwa West School Muleya Winter School
Mipundu Primary School Mupambe Primary School
Mpatamatu Primaryschool Mutamba School
Mpatamatu Secondary Mutundu Primary School
School Pamodzi Primary School
Mpelembe Primary School Pax Hall Nursery School
Mpongwe Secondary School Tangata Primary School
Muchinshi Primary School Taung-Up Junior Secondary
Mwaiseni School School
Nkambo Primary School Twampane Primary School
Nkulumashiba Primary Twashuka Primary School
School
Rivercross School Ndola District:
Roan Antelope Secondary Baby Bunty School
School Chawama Primary School
Roan Primary School Chifubu Secondary School
Twashuka Secondary School Chifubu ‘A’ Primary School.
Page 135 of 190
Chilengwa Primary School Nkwazi Middle Basic School
Chiwala Secondary School Northrise Primary School
Dambo Primary School Nsansa Primary School
Dola Hill Primary School Nsansa School
Dominican Convent Pamodzi Primary School
Dominican Convent Primary Perseverance Primary
School School
Fatima Girls Convent Sathya Sai School
Fibobe Primary School Simba Primary School
Fransiscan School St. Adrews Nursery School
International Tutorial School St. Andrews High School
Intulo Primary School St. Bonaventure School
Itawa Primary School Suburbs Primary School
Kaloko Primary School Temweni Primary School
Kamba School Twapia Primary School
Kaniki Primary School Zikomo Primary School
Kanini Primary School
Kansenji Primary School Other Copperbelt
Kansenshi Secondary School Institutions:
Kashitu Primary School Accountancy Training
Katondo Primary School College
Kayele Primary School Baptist Bible College of
Llewellen High School Zambia
Lubuto Primary School Chambishi High School
Lubuto Secondary School Chambishi Primary School
Lyuni Primary School Chingola School of
Mabungo Primary School Accountancy
Malasha Primary School Copperbelt Teachers’
Masala Primary School Training
Masala Secondary School College
Mawilo Primary School Copperbelt University
Mickey Mouse Nursery Faith L.I.F.E. Ministries Bible
School School
Milemu Primary School Foundation For Cross
Mupapa Adventist Cultural
Secondary School Education
Muzi School Glo Zambia
Mwenge Primary School Ibenga Girls Secondary
Nambeya Primary School School
Ndeke Primary School Instrumentation Training
Ndola Modern High School School
Ndola Modern Primary Kabwata School
School Kafulafuta Primary School
Ndola Primary School Kanyenda Basic School
Ndola Trust School Miyengwe Primary School
Page 136 of 190
Mupapa School St. Johns Evangelist
Kaniki Bible College Anglican
Kitwe School of Nursing Seminary
Kitwe Teachers’ College Technical and Vocational
Luanshya School for Adult Teachers
and Training College
Continuing Education Theological College of
Luanshya Trades Training Central Africa
Institute Trans-Africa Theological
Montessory Teachers College
Training Twalubuka Primary School
College University of Zambia, Adult
Mufulira School of Midwifery Education
Mufulira School of Nursing Victory Institute of Biblical
Mufulira Teachers’ College Studies
Mufulira Trades Training Vision School of
Institute Accountancy
Nchanga School of Yengwe Primary School
Midwifery Zambia Forest College
Nchanga Trades School Zambia Institute of Business
Ndola School of Biomedical and
Sciences Industrial Practices
Ndola School of Midwifery Zambia Institute of
Ndola School of Nursing Management
NIEC School of Business ZCCM Trades Training
Northern Technical College Institute
Northrise University Zambia Insurance Business
Norzam International College
Pan-African Media Centre Zambian Catholic University
Roan Antelope School of Zamim—Chingola Campus
Nursing Zampost Training College
Simba School Zamtel College
Spur School Zesco Training Centre

PART 9:
EASTERN PROVINCE
[1.3 million residents, 2001 CSO Census.]

9.1 Public Health and Sanitation

We shall provide for free life-saving healthcare for all


Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health
centers throughout Eastern Province, as well as build new
Page 137 of 190
ones. Moreover, we shall improve conditions of service for
healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and
ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have
adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and
equipment regardless of whether they are operated by
missionaries or the government.

Our efforts in these endeavors shall also apply to major


healthcare facilities in the province—that is, the Mwami
Mission, Lundazi District, Kamoto Mission, Nyimba, Minga
Mission, Njanje, Petauke, Chipata General, and St. Francis
hospitals.

Further, we shall improve the availability of safe and clean


water for both rural and urban areas through boreholes, dams,
water pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for
modern sewage facilities and both public and private
conveniences.

9.2 Education and Skills Training

We are going to build more primary and secondary schools in


Eastern Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to
make it possible for each and every child in the Province to
have access to education near their homes in all the districts;
that is, in Chadiza, Chama, Chipata, Katete, Lundazi, Mambwe,
Nyimba, and Petauke districts.

Besides, we want to ensure that higher education and


vocational training in Eastern Province are enhanced by
rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional
institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to
offer training programs that will be consistent with the needs
of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, we shall
provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the
Province.

Further, we want to address the problems facing educational


and training institutions, including the lack of teachers,
instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment,
inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all
the educational and training institutions in Eastern Province.

We shall also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely


disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil
Page 138 of 190
servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up
their money only to be told that their dues are not yet
available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’


physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and
productive citizens, we shall promote sport throughout Eastern
Province. In this endeavour, we shall provide sports facilities at
all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing,
basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

9.3 Culture and Local Traditions

We consider culture and both family and traditional values as


essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society.
Therefore, we shall make an earnest effort to promote cultural
and traditional events in Eastern Province, including the
following:

(a) The N’cwala ceremony of the Ngoni people in Paramount


Chief Mpezeni’s area in Chipata district held in February;

(b) The Kulamba ceremony of the Chewa people in Paramount


Chief Gawa Undi’s area in Katete district held in August;

(c) The Tuwimba ceremony of the Nsenga people in Senior


Chief Kalindawalo’s area in Petauke district held in October;

(d) The Malaila ceremony of the Kunda people in Senior Chief


Nsefu’s area in Mambwe district held in October; and

(e) The Kwenje ceremony of the Tumbuka people in Senior


Chief Kambombo’s area in Chama district held in October.

9.4 Other Projects and Programs

There are a lot of important projects and programs that we are


going to work on in Eastern Province designed to improve the
socio-economic well-being of residents. These projects and
programs include the following:

(a) Maintenance of the Chipata-Mchinji rail project which was


initiated in 1982 as a joint venture involving Zambia, Malawi
and Mozambique during the UNIP administration; and
facilitation of the creation of the planned Shire-Zambezi
Page 139 of 190
Waterway designed to open up a cheap transport route for
imports and exports by connecting Zambia to the Indian Ocean
port of Chinde in Mozambique through the inland port of Njase
on Shire River in Malawi.

(b) Construction of an international airport in Chipata district


similar to the Chileka Airport in Blantyre in neigboring Malawi.

(c) Upgrading of both Chadiza and Nyimba clinics into district


hospitals, and enhanced control of mosquito breeding
throughout the province.

(d) Provide for the construction and rehabilitation of irrigation


dams, canals, bridges, and trunk roads.

(e) Promotion of the small-scale mining industry through low-


interest loans, and processing industries to process cotton,
tobacco, sunflower, groundnuts, and other products within the
province.

(f) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water for


both rural and urban areas through boreholes, dams, water
pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for
modern sewage facilities and both public and private
conveniences.

(g) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by


providing financial and material resources for constructing
and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams
and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics,
basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services
and facilities. Such schemes include the Chipangali-
Madziatuba, Chipangali-Rukuzye, and Petauke schemes.

9.5 Existing Healthcare Facilities

Chadiza District: Mkumbudzi RHC


Bwanunkha RHC Nsadzu Settlement RHC
Chadiza Stage II RHC Nsadzu RHC
Chadiza HAHC RHC Sinde-Misale RHC
Chanida RHC Tafelansoni RHC
Chikoma RHC Zemba RHC
Mazaeyela RHC
Mchenjeza RHC Chama District:
Miti RHC Chama RHC
Page 140 of 190
Chibale RHC Magwero Clinic RHC
Chifunda RHC Mkanda RHC
Chikwa RHC M'noro RHC
Chilubanama RHC Msekera RHC
Fulaza RHC Mshawa RHC
Kambombo RHC Muzeyi RHC
Kanyelele RHC Mwami RHC
Chigoma RHC Namuseche Prison RHC
Lundu RHC Rukuzye RHC
Mapamba RHC Samuel RHC
Nthonkho RHC Tamanda RHC
Mulilo RHC Vizenge RHC
Pondo RHC
Katete District:
Chama District: St. Francis General Hospital
Sitwe RHC (Mission)
Tembwe RHC Chimtende RHC
Kapichilansenga RHC Kafumbwe RHC
Kagoro RHC
Chipata District: Chimunsi RHC
Chipata General Hospital Katete RHC
Mwami Mission Hospital Mindola RHC
Champhande RHC Mpangwe RHC
Chikando RHC Mutandaza RHC
Chinunda RHC Muthunya RHC
Chipangali RHC Vulamukoko RHC
Chiparamba RHC Nyembe RHC
Chipungu RHC Mungomba RHC
Chiwoko Z.N.S. RHC Kamiza RHC
Chizenge (Pwata) RHC Mtetezi RHC
Gonda Barracks RHC Undi RHC
Jerusalem RHC Chindwale RHC
Kalichero RHC
Kamulaza RHC (Mission) Lundazi District:
Kapara RHC Lundazi District Hospital
Kapata Clinic UHC Chasefu RHC
Kasenengwa RHC Chokomeni RHC
Kapata Stage II UHC Chitungulu RHC
Katandala RHC Kanyanga RHC (Mission)
Katondo Health Post Kapangula RHC
Kayeka Health Post Kapichila RHC
Kwenje (Kazimule) RHC Kazembe RHC
Lunkhwakwa Clinic RHC Lumezi Mission RHC
Madzimawe RHC Lunzi RHC
Madzimoyo RHC Lusuntha RHC
Page 141 of 190
Malandula RHC Mtilizi RHC
Mthwalo RHC Mwape RHC
Mwanya RHC Nyalugwe RHC
Mwase Mphangwe RHC Nyimba Z.N.S. RHC
Mwase-Lundazi RHC
Ng’onga RHC Petauke District:
Nkhanga RHC Minga Mission Hospital
Nyangwe RHC Nyanje Mission Hospital
Phikamalaza RHC Petauke District Hospital
Zumwanda RHC Chataika RHC
Zasp RHC Chikowa RHC
Munyukwa RHC Chikuse RHC
Chipungu RHC
Mambwe District: Chisenjere RHC
Kamoto Mission District Kakwiya RHC
Hospital Kalindawalo RHC
Chikowa RHC Luamphande RHC
Kakumbi RHC Manyane RHC
Kasamanda RHC Matambazi RHC
Masumba RHC Mawanda RHC
Mfuwe Airport Health Post Merwe RHC
(Private) Msanzala RHC
Nsefu RHC Mumbi RHC
St. Luke Msoro RHC Mwanjabanthu RHC
(Mission) Nyamphande RHC
Nyamphondolo RHC
Nyimba District: Petauke Township Clinic
Nyimba District Hospital RHC
Chalubilo RHC Sandwe RHC
Chinsimbwe RHC Satellite 30 RHC
Chipembe RHC (Mission) Sinda RHC
Hofmeyer RHC Ukwimi Satellite RHC
Kacholola RHC Ukwimi Refugee Health Post
Lwembe Z.F.D.S RHC Mwanika RHC
M’kopeka RHC

9.6 A Selection of Existing Schools

Chadiza District: Nunda Lower Primary


Chadiza Primary School School
Chadiza Secondary School Taferansoni Upper Primary
Katantha Upper Primary School
School Vubwi Basic School
Mwala Primary School Zemba School
Nsadzu School
Page 142 of 190
Chama District: Ngulube Basic School
Chama Primary School Nyakutwa Primary School
Chama High School Nyauzi High School
Chingozi Primary School St. Annes Primary School
Dungulungu Primary School St. Mary’s Junior Seminary
Katangalika Primary School St. Mary’s Seminary
Mundalanga Primary School St. Monica’s Girl’s
Secondary School
Chipata District: St. Monicas Secondary
Anoya Zulu School School
Chamanda Primary School St.Monica’s Secondary
Chiparamba Primary School School
Chewa Upper School Vizenge High School
Chipata Day Secondary
School Katete District:
Chipata Primary School Chimbundire Primary School
Chitilila School Katete Basic School
Chizongwe Secondary Katete Secondary School
School Omela Mumba Primary
Chongololo School School
Eden Institute Willows
Academy Lundazi District:
Gondar Day School Boyole School
Hillside Primary School Chambuzi Middle School
Hillside Secondary School Chasefu Primary School
Kanjala School Chijemu Primary School
Kanjala Primary Islamic Welfare Center
Kanjala Primary School Kanyunya Primary School
Kanyanja Primary School Kapekesa Primary School
Kapata Primary Khulamayembe Primary
Kapoko Primary School School
Katopola Basic School Khuyu Primary School
Kazwanya Primary School Lumezi Day Secondary
Lunkhwakwa Primary School
Lutembwe Basic School Lundazi Secondary School
Madzimoyo Primary School Lundazi Township School
Makungwa Primary School Lusuntha Primary School
Matula Primary School Mphamba Primary School
Mkanile School Mwase Mphangwe Primary
Mpezeni Primary School School
Msoro Upper Primary School Mwase Primary School
Musekela Primary School
Mushaba Primary School Mambwe District:
Mwami Basic School Chikowa Primary School
Mwami Primary School Jumbe Secondary School
Page 143 of 190
Mambwe High School Nyamphondolo Primary
School
Nyimba District: Ongolwe Basic Scool
Mombe Primary School Petauke School
Nyimba Basic School Petauke Secondary School
Nyimba Secondary School Petauke Upper Primary
Utotwe Primary School School
Tiritonse Primary School
Petauke District:
Kaulu Basic School Other E/Province
Lusinde Primary School Institutions:
Lutwazi Primary School Chassa Boys Secondary
Minga School School
Mngoza School Chipata Teachers’ College
Monde Day Secondary Kasusu Basic School
Mulilo Primary School M’ngona Primary School
Mumbi Basic School Ukwimi Trades Training
Mwanza Primary School Institute

PART 10:
LUAPULA PROVINCE
[0.79 million residents, 2001 CSO Census]

10.1 Public Health and Sanitation

We shall provide for free life-saving healthcare for all


Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health
centres throughout Luapula Province, as well as build new
ones. Moreover, we shall improve conditions of service for
healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and
ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have
adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and
equipment regardless of whether they are operated by
missionaries or the government.

Our efforts in these endeavors shall also apply to major


healthcare facilities in the province—examples of which include
the Kawambwa, Mbereshi Mission, Mambilima, Kashikishi, St.
Pauls, Lubwe Mission, St. Margaret / Kasaba, and Mansa
hospitals.

10.2 Education and Skills Training

Page 144 of 190


We are going to build more primary and secondary schools in
Luapula Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to
make it possible for each and every child in the Province to
have access to education near their homes in all the districts;
that is, in Chiengi, Kawambwa, Mansa, Milenge, Mwense,
Nchelenge, and Samfya districts.

Besides, we want to ensure that higher education and


vocational training in Luapula Province are enhanced by
rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional
institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to
offer training programs that will be consistent with the needs
of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, we shall
provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the
Province.

Further, we want to address the problems facing educational


and training institutions, including the lack of teachers,
instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment,
inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all
the educational and training institutions in Luapula Province.

We shall also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely


disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil
servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up
their money only to be told that their dues are not yet
available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’


physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and
productive citizens, we shall promote sport throughout Luapula
Province. In this endeavour, we shall provide sports facilities at
all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing,
basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

10.3 Culture and Local Traditions

We consider culture and both family and traditional values as


essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society.
Therefore, we shall make an earnest effort to promote cultural
and traditional events in Luapula Province, including the
following:

(a) The Kwanga ceremony of the Ng’umbo people in Senior


Chief Mwewa’s area in Samfya district held in October;
Page 145 of 190
(b) The Mabila ceremony of the Shila people in Senior Chief
Mununga’s area in Chiengi district held in October;

(c) The Mutomboko ceremony of the Lunda people in Senior


Chief Mwata Kazembe’s area in Kawambwa district held in July;

(d) The Bwile ceremony of the Bwile people in Senior Chief


Puta’s area in Chiengi district held in September;

(e) The Chishinga Malaila ceremony of the Chishinga people in


Senior Chief Mushota’s area in Kawambwa district held in
October;

(f) The Chabuka ceremony of the Ushi people in Chief


Matanda’s area in Mansa district held in September or October;
and

(g) The Makumba ceremony of the Ushi people in Chief


Mabumba’s area in Mansa district held in August.

10.4 Other Projects and Programs

There are a lot of important projects and programs that we are


going to work on in Luapula Province designed to improve the
socio-economic well-being of residents. These projects and
programs include the following:

(a) Completion of the bridge on Mukubwe River at Kaungu in


order to make it easy for our fellow citizens in Senior Chief
Nsama and Chief Mukupa Katandula’s areas to cross the river.
The Mukubwe Bridge is important as it connects Luapula
Province and Northern Province on a short-cut road from
Mununga in Chiengi district to Senior Chief Nsama in Kaputa
district.

(b) Ensuring that traveling between the Copperbelt and


Luapula provinces is made easier and safer by financing the
maintenance of the Levy Mwanawasa Bridge at Chembe border
post. We trust that the contractor that has constructed the
Bridge—that is, China Henan International Corporation (CHICO)
—has done a good job in ensuring that it (the bridge) will have
the expected life-span of at least 300 years.

(c) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water in


Page 146 of 190
the province through boreholes, dams, piped water, and
protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern sewage
facilities and both public and private conveniences.

(d) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by


providing financial and material resources for constructing
and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams
and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics,
basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services
and facilities. Such schemes include the Mansa, Mwense,
Mukanga, and Kapako schemes.

(e) Ensuring that the tourism potential in the Northern-Luapula


Circuit is fully exploited through: (i) improved airport
infrastructure; (ii) well-maintained roads leading to wildlife
sanctuaries, water falls, lakes, beaches along Lake Bangweulu
in Samfya, and other heritage sites; and (iii) inducement of
private investments in tourism camps, lodges and hotels.

10.5 Existing Healthcare Facilities

Chiengi District: (Private)


Chipungu Rural Health Kazembe Stage II RHC
Centre Lufubu RHC
Kabole Stage II RHC Mbereshi Clinic RHC
Lambwe Chomba RHC Mufwaya RHC
Mukunta RHC Munkanta RHC
Puta Stage II RHC Mushota RHC
Sambula RHC Musungu RHC
Muyembe RHC
Kawanbwa District: Salanga RHC
Kawambwa District Hospital
Mbereshi Mission District Mansa District:
Hospital Mansa General Hospital
Chama RHC Bahati Health Post
Chibote RHC Buntungwa Clinic UHC
Chimpempe RHC Central UHC
Chimpili RHC Chembe Stage II RHC
Chipunka RHC Chipete RHC
Chitondo RHC Chisembe RHC
Kabanda RHC Chisunka RHC
Kanengo RHC Fimpulu RHC
Kawambwa Central RHC Kabunda RHC
Kawambwa Tea Company Kalaba RHC
RHC Kalyongo RHC
Page 147 of 190
Kasoma-Lwela RHC Mwense Prison RHC
Katangwe RHC Mwense Stage II RHC
Kundamfumu RHC Kapamba RHC
Mabumba RHC Mupeta RHC
Mano RHC Musangu RHC
Mantubusa RHC
Matanda RHC Nchelenge District:
Mibenge RHC Kashikishi / St. Pauls District
Moloshi RHC Hospital
Mutiti RHC Chabilikila RHC
Muwang'uni RHC Chisenga Island RHC
Ndoba RHC Kabalenge RHC
Nsonga RHC Kabuta RHC
Paul Mambilima RHC Kambwali RHC
Senama Stage II RHC Kanyembo RHC
Z.N.S. Luamfumu RHC Kilwa Island RHC
Nchelenge UHC
Milenge District: Kafutuma RHC
Kapalala RHC Kashikishi UHC
Lungomukuta RHC Samfya District:
Lwela Mission Stage II RHC Lubwe Mission District
Milenge East RHC Hospital
Mulumbi RHC St. Margaret / Kasaba
Sokontwe RHC District
Hospital
Mwense District: Lubwe HAHC RHC (Mission)
Mambilima Stage II RHC Kasoba HAHC RHC (Mission)
(Mission) Bwalya Mponda RHC
Chibondo RHC Chibuye RHC
Chipili RHC (Mission) Chishi Island RHC
Chisheta RHC Fwaka (ZFDS E8) RHC
Kalundu RHC Kabongo RHC
Kashiba RHC Kalasa Mukoso RHC
Katuta RHC Kalima Nkonde RHC
Kawama RHC Kapata (ZFDS E1) RHC
Lubunda RHC Kapata RHC
Lukwesa RHC Kasanka RHC
Luminu RHC Kasoma Lunga RHC
Lupososhi RHC Katanshya RHC
Mubende RHC Mabo-Kunda RHC
Mukonshi RHC Mbabala Island RHC
Mununshi RHC Miponda RHC
Musonda Falls RHC (Private) Mpeshi /Mushili RHC
Mutipula RHC Njipi RHC
Mwenda RHC Nsalushi RHC
Page 148 of 190
Samfya Stage II RHC Nimbale RHC
Shikamushile RHC Ninge RHC
Mungulube RHC

10.6 A Selection of Existing Schools

Kawambwa District:
Chisheta Primary School Mwense District:
Kalamba Primary School Kabundafyela Primary
Kawambwa Primary School Kankomba Primary School
Kawambwa Technical Kapena Primary School
Secondary Kawama School
School Lubunda Primary School
Mabel Show Memorial Mulundu Primary School
Secondary Mwense Boys’ Secondary
School School
Mpota Primary School Nsakaluba School
Munkanta Primary School
Ngona Basic School Nchelenge District:
St. Mary’s Secondary School Chisenga Primary School
Kabuta Basic School
Mansa District: Kashikishi Basic School
Chakopo Primary School Nchelenge Primary
Chayuwa Primary School Nchelenge Secondary
Chipete Primary School School
Chipili Primary School Shanyemba Primary School
Fimpulu Basic School
Kabunda Primary School Samfya District:
Kaole Primary School Chibolya School
Kombaniya Primary School Chifunabuli Primary School
Mabumba Basic School Kalasa Mukoso Basic School
Mansa Primary School Kasanka Primary School
Mansa School for Continuing Kasoma Bangweulu Primary
Education School
Mansa Secondary School Kasuba Primary School
Mbaso School Lubwe Secondary School
Moloshi Primary School Lubwe Primary School
Muchinka Primary School Mibenge School
Mutende Primary School Samfya Secondary School
Namwandwe Primary School Twingi Secondary School
Ntoposhi Primary School
St. Charles Lwanga Other LUA/Province
Seminary Institutions:
St. Clements Secondary Chinyanta Primary School
School Kaputa Primary School
Page 149 of 190
Kasongole Primary School Milenge Primary School
Kabumbu School Nsama Primary School
Kazembe Primary School Ponde Basic School
Mabel Shaw School St Paul’s Zen School of
Mansa Teachers’ Training Nursing
College

PART 11:
LUSAKA PROVINCE
[1.4 million residents, 2001 CSO Census]

11.1 Public Health and Sanitation

We shall provide for free life-saving healthcare for all


Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health
centres throughout Lusaka Province, as well as build new ones.
Moreover, we shall improve conditions of service for healthcare
personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and ensure that
healthcare facilities throughout the province have adequate
stocks of medicines and medical supplies and equipment
regardless of whether they are operated by missionaries,
mining companies or the government.

Our efforts in these endeavors shall also apply to major


healthcare facilities in the province—such as the Mpanshya /
St. Luke, Katondwe Sacred Heart, Hill Top, Lusaka Mine, Maina
Soko, and Monica Chiumya hospitals. Besides, we shall embark
on an ambitious program designed to improve the
infrastructure of health institutions throughout the province,
including mortuaries, laboratories, voluntary testing centres for
HIV/AIDS (VTCs), and other essential facilities.

11.2 Education and Skills Training

We are going to build more primary and secondary schools in


Lusaka Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to
make it possible for each and every child in the Province to
have access to education near their homes in all the districts;
that is, in Chongwe, Kafue, Luangwa, and Lusaka districts.

Besides, we want to ensure that higher education and


vocational training in Lusaka Province are enhanced by
rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional
Page 150 of 190
institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to
offer training programs that will be consistent with the needs
of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, we shall
provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the
Province.

Further, we want to address the problems facing educational


and training institutions, including the lack of teachers,
instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment,
inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all
the educational and training institutions in Lusaka Province.

We shall also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely


disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil
servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up
their money only to be told that their dues are not yet
available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’


physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and
productive citizens, we shall promote sport throughout Lusaka
Province. In this endeavour, we shall provide sports facilities at
all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer, boxing,
basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

11.3 Culture and Local Traditions

We consider culture and both family and traditional values as


essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society.
Therefore, we shall make an earnest effort to promote cultural
and traditional events in Lusaka Province, including the
following:

(a) The Mbambala ceremony of the Nsenga-Luzi people in


Senior Chief Mburuma’s area in Luangwa district held in
November;

(b) The Chibwela Kumushi ceremony of the Soli people in Chief


Bunda Bunda’s area in Chinyunyu held in November; and

(c) The Kailala ceremony of the Goba people in Chieftainess


Chiawa’s area in Kafue district held in September.

11.4 Other Projects and Programs

Page 151 of 190


There are a lot of important projects and programs that we are
going to work on in Lusaka Province designed to improve the
socio-economic well-being of residents. These projects and
programs include the following:

(a) Ensuring that garbage collection and disposal are


undertaken on a more regular basis, and providing adequate
resources to facilitate the effective control of mosquitoes to
reduce the incidence of malaria.

(b) Extension of credit facilities to enterprising men and


women who want to get involved in the informal sector of the
economy and, in the process, attracting them away from the
tedious stone crushing business and other less-rewarding
activities.

(c) Ensuring that the relocation of shanty townships is


conducted only after low-cost public housing units are provided
by the government, and re-settlement areas are furnished with
running water, electricity, public transportation routes and por-
tals, and other essential public services and facilities.

(d) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water for


both rural and urban areas through boreholes, dams, water
pipes, and protected shallow wells, and also provide for
modern sewage facilities and both public and private
conveniences.

(e) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by


providing financial and material resources for constructing
and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams
and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics,
basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services
and facilities. Such schemes include the Kanakantapa scheme
in Chongwe district, and the Kasenga, Rufunsa, and Yapite
schemes.

11.5 Existing Healthcare Facilities

Chongwe District: Chikumbi Health Post


Mpanshya / St. Luke District Health Post
Hospital Chinyunyu RHC
(Mission) Chongwe RHC (Mission)
Chainda RHC Chulo Medical Centre RHC
Chalimbana RHC (Private)
Page 152 of 190
Kampekete RHC Zambia Helpers RHC
Kanakantapa RHC (Private)
Kasisi RHC Z.N.S Kafue RHC
Katoba RHC Z.N.S Safaris RHC
Lukwipa RHC Z.N.S Sopelo RHC
Lwiimba RHC Zubeda Surgery UHC
Mikango Barracks RHC (Private)
Mphango RHC Zambia Railways UHC
Ngwerere Health Post (Private)
Health Post Z.N.S NBB Camp (Lusaka
Ngwerere RHC West) RHC
Nyangwenya RHC ZAF Mt Eugenia RHC
Old Kasenga Health Post (Private)
Health Post Zambia Army Apollo RHC
Palabana RHC (Private)
Rufunsa RHC
Shikabeta RHC Luangwa District:
ZAF1 RHC Katondwe District Hospital
ZAF Base Clinic RHC (Mission)
Zambia Helpers RHC Chitope RHC
(Mission) Kavalamanja RHC
ZASTI RHC Kasinsa RHC
Z.N.S Chongwe RHC Luangwa Boma RHC
Luangwa Sec. School RHC
Kafue District: Mandombe RHC
Chanyanya RHC Mphuka RHC
Chiawa RHC Sinyawagora RHC
Chikupi RHC
Chilanga Cement UHC Lusaka District:
(Private) Chainama Hills Specialised
Chilanga UHC Hospital
Chipapa RHC Hill Top Hospital (Private)
Chisankhane RHC Lusaka Mine Hospital
K.T.Z. Clinic UHC (Private) (Private)
Kafue Estates UHC Maina Soko Hospital
Kafue Mission RHC Monica Chiumya (Private)
Kazimva RHC University Teaching Central
Kambale RHC Hospital
Lulat Clinic UHC (Private) Airport Clinic UHC
Mt. Makulu UHC Governemnt
Mwembeshi RHC Arrakan Barracks UHC
N.C.Z. Family Clinic UHC Balm Medical Centre UHC
(Private) (Private)
Nangongwe UHC Bauleni UHC
Railways UHC Chainama UHC
Page 153 of 190
Chainda UHC Makeni UHC
Chawama UHC Mandevu UHC
Chelstone UHC Matero Main UHC
Chilenje UHC Matero Ref. Centre UHC
Chipata UHC Min. of Health HQs UHC
Civic Centre UHC Mtendere UHC
Evelyn Hone College UHC Ngombe UHC
Force Headquarters UHC NIPA Main Campus UHC
Chazanga UHC Northmead Medical Centre
George UHC UHC
Kabwata UHC (Private)
Kalingalinga UHC PTC Clinic UHC (Private)
Kamwala UHC Railway Clinic UHC
Kanyama UHC State Lodge Clinic UHC
Kaunda Square UHC Teba Medical Centre UHC
Lilayi Police UHC (Private)
Lusaka Central Prison UHC University Clinic UHC

11.6 A Selection of Existing Schools

Chongwe District: Lusaka District:


Chimusanya Primary School Alliance Francaise de
Chongwe High School Lusaka
Chongwe Pre-School American Embassy School
Chongwe Primary School of Lusaka
Ellensdale School Arakan Secondary School
Mikango Barracks Primary Arthur Wina Basic School
School Auntie Emma’s Primary
Mukamambo II Girls School
Palabana School Baba’s Day Nursery School
Baobab School
Kafue District: Barlastone Park School
Agape Trust School Bauleni Middle Basic School
Kafue Boys Secondary Bayuni Primary School
School Birdsfield Primary School
Kafue High School Burma Rd Primary School
Kafue Primary School Chadliegh House School
Lishiko Primary School Chakunkula Primary School
Malundu School Chalimbana Secondary
Muchito Primary School School
Naboye Secondary School Chalo Secondary School
Nagongwe Primary School Chamba Valley Primary
Nangongwe Primary School School
Shikoswe Primary School Chaminade Catholic School
for Boys
Page 154 of 190
Chawama Primary School Lusaka
Chelstone Basic School International Tuition Centre
Chibelo Primary School Italian School of Lusaka
Chibolya Primary School Jacaranda Basic School
Chilanga Primary School Jessie Mbanga Pre &
Chilenje B School Primary
Chilenje South Primary Jollywood Accademic School
School Justine Kabwe Promary
Chimwemwe School School
Chingwere Primary School Kabulonga Basic School
Chinika Primary School Kabulonga Boys Secondary
Chipata Primary School School
Chisengalumbwe Kabulonga Girls High School
Chitanda Primary School Kabwata Primary School
Chitukuko Primary School Kamulanga Primary School
Chongwe Secondary School Kamwala School
Choonga Primary School Kamwala Secondary School
Chudliegh House School Kapwelyomba P School
Chunga Primary School Kasamba Primary School
City Christian Leaning Kasis Boys Boarding
Centre Primary School
David Kaunda Technical Kasisi Girls Secondary
Secondary School
School Kasta Child Early Learning
Desai Primary School Centre
Dominican Convent Lusaka Kaunda Square Primary
Don Gordon School School
Emmasdale Primary School Kings Highway Sda School
Firstrate International Kwacha Secondary School
Tuition Center Lake Road School
Itc1 Laser Technology
George Central Primary Leopards Hill Secondary
School School
Gilbert Rennie Libala Secondary School
Gospel Outreach Christian Licef School
Academy Lilanda Primary School
Great North Road Tuition Lilayi Primary School
Academy Little Big Horn School
Harry Mwaanga Nkumbula Longford Nursery School
Primary Lotus Primary School
Hillside Primary School Luangwa Secondary School
Ibex Hill School Lugambwa Nursery School
Ict Resource Foundation Lumuno Nursery and Primay
Impact Systems School
International School of Lusaka Boys Primary School
Page 155 of 190
Lusaka East Day and Administaration
Boarding School Ndeke School
Lusaka Girls School Ngwerere School
Lusaka High School Nkwazi Primary School
Lusaka Infants Primary Northmead Primary School
School Novitiate School
Lusaka International Olympia Basic School
Community Parklands High School
School Peter Pan School
Lusaka Learnng Centre Pinewood Preperratory
Lusaka School of Midwifery Regiment Primary School
Lusaka South End School Rephidim Institute
Lusakasa Primary School Rhodes Park School
Mahat Ma Ghandhi School Roma Girls Secondary
Makeni Ecumenical Centre School
Makeni Islamic School Roma Nursery School
Makeni Primary School Sacred Heart Primary
Mambilima School School
Management Services Sarafina International
Board Tuition Centre
Mary Queen of Peace Sarafina Secondary School
Matero Boys Primary Sharma Pre and Primary
Matero Boys Secondary School
School Silver Rest Primary School
Matero East Basic School Simon M. Kapwepwe Basic
Matero Girls Secondary School
School Sonshine School
Metropolitan Secondary SOS Hermman Gmeiner
School Southend Primary School
Metropolitan Secondary Springfields Coaching
School Centre
Mkandawire Primary School St Mary’s Primary School
Modern Primary School St. Patricks Girls School
Mount Makulu Primary St. Bridget'S High School
School St. Francis of Assisi Primary
Muleya Primary School School
Mumuni Primary School St. Joseph Nursery School
Munali Secondary School St. Mary’s Dominican
Musamba Basic School Convent
Mutambe Primary School St. Mary’s Primary School
Mutendere Basic School St. Mary’s Secondary School
Muyooma Primary School St. Monica Girls Basic
Namando Primary School St Patricks Girls School
Namununga Primary School Thornhill Boarding and Day
National Institute of Public Thornpark Primary School
Page 156 of 190
Tick Secondary School Institute
Timothy Mwanakatwe Trust
Tina Trust School Industrial Training Center
Tom Thumb Nusery School Trust
Tree Tops Primary School Institute of United Nations
Tubalange Primary School Studies
Tunduya Basic School International Tutorial School
Tunduya Primary School Kara Counselling Training
Twatasha Primary School and
University of Zambia – Cisco Counselling Resource
Academy Centre
Waddington Community Kays Technologies
Nursary KBM Computer Training
School Center
Wisdom Secondary School Law Pracrtice Institute
Woodbridge Primary School Local Training Institute
Woodlanda A Primary Luangwa Boys Secondary
Woodlands A Primary School
School Luangwa Primary School
Woodlands B Primary Lusaka Trades School
School Lusaka School of Nursing
Yotam Muleya School Lusaka School of Operating
Theatre
Other LUS/Province Makeni Islamic TTC
Institutions: Mansfield Institute of
Cavendish University Technology
(Zambia) Massi Computing College
Chainama College of Health Mpima Major Seminary
Sciences Mukuyu Primary School
Chingwere School Nalab Computer
City College of Management Consultancy
Studies National In-Service
Cooperative College Teachers’ College
Cyber Academy National Institute for Public
Dental Training School Administration
Destiny School (Mission) Natural Resources
Destiny School (Mission) Development
Evelyn Hone College College
Excessloer Academy Norma-Jean College of
Golden Gates Training Broadcasting and
Institute Communication
Greenwood Institute NRDC/ZEGA Training Trust
Hightech Computer Taining Nzelu Tertiary Institute
Institute Premier Accountancy
Hotel & Tourism Training Business
Page 157 of 190
College Zambia Dental Training
Ram House Computers School
College Zambia Institute of
St. Bonaventure College Advanced
St. Dominics Major Legal Education
Seminary Zambia Institute of Bankers
University of Zambia Zambia Insititute of
University Teaching Hospital Chartered
Counselling Training Unit Accountants
Unza School of Medicine Zambia Institute of
Valley View Business and Management
Secretarial Zambia Institute of
College Management
Vocational Training Centre (ZAMIM)
for Zambia Institute of Mass
Commerce Communication
ZABMAC Zambia Institute of Special
ZAMAC Education
Zambia Air Services Zambia Insurance Business
Training College
Institute Zambia Police College Lilayi
Zambia Bussiness Zambian Open University
Management and (ZAOU)
Accountancy Training Zambia Revenue Authority
Centre Training
Zambia Centre for Centre
Accountancy Zamtel Staff Training
Studies College

PART 12:
NORTHERN PROVINCE
[1.4 million residents, 2001 CSO Census.]

12.1 Public Health and Sanitation

We shall provide for free life-saving healthcare for all


Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health
centres throughout Northern Province, as well as build new
ones. Moreover, we shall improve conditions of service for
healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and
ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have
adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and
equipment regardless of whether they are operated by
missionaries or the government.
Page 158 of 190
Our efforts in these endeavors shall also apply to major
healthcare facilities in the province—that is, Chinsali, Isoka,
Luwingu District, Mpika, Mporokoso, Kasama General, Mbala
General, and Chilonga Mission hospitals.

12.2 Education and Skills Training

We are going to build more primary and secondary schools in


Northern Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to
make it possible for each and every child in the Province to
have access to education near their homes in all the districts;
that is, in Chilubi, Chinsali, Isoka, Kaputa, Kasama, Luwingu,
Mbala, Mpika, Mporokoso, Mpulungu, Mungwi, and Nakonde
districts.

Besides, we want to ensure that higher education and


vocational training in Northern Province are enhanced by
rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional
institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to
offer training programs that will be consistent with the needs
of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, we shall
provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the
Province.

Further, we want to address the problems facing educational


and training institutions, including the lack of teachers,
instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment,
inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all
the educational and training institutions in Northern Province.

We shall also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely


disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil
servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up
their money only to be told that their dues are not yet
available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’


physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and
productive citizens, we shall promote sport throughout
Northern Province. In this endeavour, we shall provide sports
facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer,
boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

12.3 Culture and Local Traditions


Page 159 of 190
We consider culture and both family and traditional values as
essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society.
Therefore, we shall make an earnest effort to promote cultural
and traditional events in Northern Province, including the
following:

(a) The Ukusefya Pa Ng’wena ceremony of the Bemba people


in Paramount Chief Chitimukulu’s area in Mungwi district held
in August;

(b) The Chinamanongo ceremony of the Bisa people in Senior


Chief Kopa’s area in Mpika district held in September;

(c) The Mukulu Pembe ceremony of the Bemba people in


Senior Chief Chunga’s area in Luwingu district held in August;

(d) The Vikamkanimba ceremony of the Tumbuka people in


Senior Chief Muyombe’s area in Isoka district held in
September;

(e) The Ng’ondo ceremony of the Namwanga people in Senior


Chief Kafwimbi’s area in Isoka district held in November;

(f) The Mfungwe and Chambo Chalutanga ceremony in Chief


Mwenechifungwe’s area in Isoka district held in September;

(g) The Mulasa ceremony of the Namwanga people in


Chieftainess Nawaitwika’s area in Nakonde district held in
September;

(h) The Chisaka Chalubombo ceremony of the Bisa people in


Chief Chiwanangala’s area in Chilubi district held in
September;

(i) The Bisa Malaila ceremony of the Bisa people in Chief


Nabwalya’s area in Mpika district held in September; and

(j) The Mutomolo ceremony of the Mambwe people in Mambwe


and Lungu Chiefs’ areas in Mbala district held in June.

12.4 Other Projects and Programs

There are a lot of important projects and programs that we are


going to work on in Northern Province. Among other things, we
Page 160 of 190
shall:

(a) Provide material and financial support to facilitate the


construction and maintenance of irrigation canals, dams,
furrows, and boreholes throughout the Northern Province.
Successful irrigation schemes are an important element in
efforts aimed at reducing poverty nationwide, as demonstrated
by the Ngulula Village scheme situated 25 km from Kasama—
which was initiated in 1955 and has continued to sustain local
households through the growing and selling of beans,
cabbages, carrots, fruits, groundnuts, maize, potatoes, sugar
cane, tomatoes, and other crops.

Eventually, we expect the agricultural schemes at Phillip


Village in Chinsali District, the Kabila Village in Kasama District,
the Bulunda Village in Chief Mukonge’s area along the Luwingu
road, and other similar sites and communities in the Province
to be as productive as the Ngulula Village scheme.

(b) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by


providing financial and material resources for constructing
and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams
and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics,
basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services
and facilities. Such resettlement schemes include the Lufubu
Resettlement Scheme near Luwingu; the Lukulu South
Resettlement Scheme in Kasama district, the Kanchibiya and
Mufubushi schemes in Mpika district, and the new scheme
based in Chief Katyetye’s area in Isoka district.

(c) Improve the transportation infrastructure in the Province to


facilitate and expedite the ferrying of agricultural produce,
inputs and machinery and equipment by providing for an inter-
modal network of all-season feeder roads, trunk roads, and
bridges—including the Mbesuma Bridge in Chinsali district on
the Chambeshi River that has already been earmarked for
construction.

(d) Introduce widely accessible credit schemes, and also


provide incentives for the establishment of privately owned
facilities in the Province for processing, packaging and canning
agricultural produce—including beans, carrots, cabbages and
other kinds of vegetables, cassava, coffee, fish, fruits,
groundnuts, maize, millet, potatoes, pumpkins, sorghum, sugar
cane, and tomatoes.
Page 161 of 190
(e) Provide for seed and fertilizer subsidies at 50% in order to
facilitate the growing of crops that are currently being grown
through the citemene system mainly due to the high cost of
agricultural inputs. And

(f) Provision for the construction of a magistrate’s court on


Chilubi Island so that the police will not have to transport
suspected law breakers to Samfya for court sessions.

We shall also ensure that the tourism potential in the Northern-


Luapula Circuit is fully exploited through:

(a) Improved airport infrastructure at the Kasama Airport, the


Kasaba Bay Airport, the Samora Machel Airport, and other
airfields in the northern region, and the opening up of the
Samora Machel Airport to civilian aircrafts;

(b) A network of well-maintained roads leading to water falls,


lakes, beaches, wildlife sanctuaries in national parks, and other
heritage sites—including the Chishimba Falls National
Monument in Kasama, Kalambo Falls and the Moto Moto
Museum in Mbala, the Ntumbachushi Falls in Kawambwa, the
Lumangwe Falls in Mporokoso, the Nachikufu Cave in Mpika,
and the Mwela Rock Art site in Kasama; and

(c) Inducement of private investments in the establishment


and maintenance of tourism camps, lodges and hotels mainly
through the Tourism Development Credit Facility (TDCF).

12.5 Existing Healthcare Facilities

Chilubi District: Chunga RHC


Chaba RHC Ilondola RHC (Mission)
Chilubi (ZFDS) RHC Kabanda RHC
E10 Fube (ZFDS) RHC Konja RHC
Matipa (ZFDS) RHC Lubwa RHC
E12 Mayuka (ZFDS) RHC Lukaka RHC (Mission)
Mofu E2 (ZFDS) RHC Matumbo RHC
E9 Nsumbu (ZFDS) RHC Mulanga RHC (Mission)
Santa Maria RHC (Mission) Mulilansolo RHC (Mission)
Mundu RHC
Chinsali District: Mwika RHC
Chinsali District Hospital Shiwa-Ngandu RHC
Chilanga RHC (Mission) Kaloswe RHC (Private)
Page 162 of 190
Mwasha Health Post
Isoka District:
Isoka District Hospital Luwingu District:
Isoka Opd RHC Luwingu District Hospital
Kafwimbi RHC Chungu RHC
Kalungu RHC Ipusukilo RHC
Kampumbu RHC Katuta RHC
Mulekatembo RHC Lwena RHC
Muyombe RHC Namukolo RHC
Nachisitu RHC Ndoki RHC
Thendere RHC Nsombo RHC
Shimumbi RHC
Kaputa District: Tungati RHC
Chishela RHC
Kampinda RHC Mbala District:
Kaputa RHC Mbala General General
Kasongole RHC Hospital
Mukupa Katandula RHC Chisanza RHC
Mwewe RHC Isofu RHC (Mission)
Nsama RHC Kaka RHC
Nsumbu RHC Kawimbe RHC
Mambwe Mission RHC
Kasama District: Mpande RHC
Kasama General Hospital Mwamba RHC
Chilongoshi RHC Nondo RHC
Chilubula RHC (Mission) Nsokolo RHC
Chiombo RHC Senga Hill RHC
Chishimba Z.N.S RHC Senka RHC
Kasakula RHC Tulemane RHC
Kasama Location Clinic RHC Urban Clinic RHC
Kasama Urban RHC ZAF RHC
Kateshi RHC Z.N.S RHC
Lubushi RHC (Mission) Chozi UHC (Private)
Lukashya RHC
Lukupa RHC Mpika District:
Milima RHC Chilonga Mission General
Misamfu RHC Hospital
Misengo RHC Mpika District Hospital
Munkonge RHC Chabalesa RHC (Mission)
Mulanshi RHC Chiunda Ponde RHC
Mulobola RHC (Mission) Kabinga RHC
Musa Farm RHC Kalonje Pipeline Clinic RHC
Mwamba RHC (Private)
Nkole Mfumu RHC Kopa RHC
Tazara RHC Lukulu RHC
Page 163 of 190
Lwitikila RHC
Mbati RHC Mpulungu District:
Mpepo RHC Chinakila RHC
Mpika RHC Chitimbwa RHC
Mpumba RHC Isoko RHC
Mukungule RHC Iyendwe RHC
Mununga RHC (Private) Kopeka RHC
Muwele RHC Mpulungu RHC
Nabwalya RHC Vyamba RHC
Tazara R esidential Clinic
RHC Mungwi District:
(Private) Chimba RHC
Tazara Training RHC Chitimulu RHC
(Private) Kapolyo RHC
Tazara Workshop RHC Kayambi RHC (Mission)
(Private) Makasa RHC
Z.C.A. Clinic RHC Malole RHC
Z.N.S RHC Mumba RHC
Kalonje Pipe Clinic RHC Mungwi RHC
(Private) Ndasa RHC
Ngoli RHC
Mporokoso District: Nseluka RHC
Mporokoso District Hospital Peleti RHC
Chishamwamba RHC Rosa RHC
Chitoshi RHC
Chiwala RHC Nakonde District:
Kalabwe RHC Chozi RHC
Kapatu RHC (Mission) Mwenechaka RHC
Mukolwe RHC Mwenzo RHC
Mukupa Kaoma RHC Nakonde RHC
Shibwalya Kapila RHC Nawaitwika RHC
Sunkutu RHC Ntantumbila RHC
Township Clinic RHC Shemu RHC
Mwange Refugee Camp RHC Chilolwa RHC
(Private)

12.6 A Selection of Existing Schools

Chinsali District: Ilondola Basic School


Chibesakunda Primary Kenneth Kaunda Secondary
School School
Chinsali Day Secondary Lubwa Primary School
School Mukwikile Primary School
Chinsali Girls Secondary Mulakupikwa Basic School
School Mulanga School
Page 164 of 190
Mundu Basic School St. Francis High School
Musanya School St. John’s Primary School
Mwaba Basic School St. Theresa Girls Secondary
Mwika Primary School School

Isoka District: Luwingu District:


Chilunda Primary School Ipusukilo (Mission) School
Isoka Boyz Secondary Katopola Primary School
School Luwingu Secondary School
Kapililonga Primary School Mwando Primary School
Malale School Saili Primary School
Mpemba Primary School Tungati Primary School
Muyombe High School
Muyombe Primary School Mbala District:
Mwenya Primary School Chila Primary School
Chilundumusi Primary
Kasama District: School
Chiba Primary School Chipoka Primary School
Chifwani Basic School Chitimbwa Primary School
Chifwani Primary School Kawimbe Primary School
Chilubula Primary School Lucheche Primary School
Chitwe Primary School Mbala Primary School
Ituna Basic School Mbala Secondary School
Ituna Primary School Mbulu Primary School
Kapongolo Basic School Mulungushi Primary School
Kasama Boys Secondary St. Paul’s Primary School
School
Kasama Girls Secondary Mpika District:
School Chikakala School
Kasama International School Chikwanda Primary School
Kasenda Primary School Chilufya Basic School
Kateshi Primary School Kabale High School
Katilungu Primary School Lwitikila Girls’ Secondary
Lubushi Minor Seminary School
Lubushi Seminary School Mpepo Primary School
Lwitikila Girls Secondary Mpika Boys Secondary
Makasa Primary School School
Malama Primary School Mpika Primary School
Misamfu Basic School Musakanya Basic School
Misamfu Primary School Samata Primary School
Misolo Primary School St. Charles Lwanga School
Mubanga Chipoya Primary
School Mporokoso District:
Ngoli Primary School Kambobe Primary School
Santa Maria Basic School Kanyimbo Basic School
Page 165 of 190
Kashinda Primary School Nakonde District:
Mole Basic School Musesengoma School
Mporokoso Primary School Mwenzo Girls Secondary
Mporokoso Secondary School
School Nachipeta Primary School
Mukanga Primary School Nakonde Primary School
Sambala Primary Schoo Ntindi Primary School
Shibwalya Kapila Basic Tenga School
School
Vincent Bulaya Basic School Other N/Province
Institutions:
Mungwi District: Kasama School of Nursing
Kapolyo Basic School Kasama Teachers’ Training
Kapolyo Primary School College
Luwingu Secondary School Lukashya Trades Training
Mungwi Technical School Institute
Mutemba Primary School Tazara Training College

PART 13:
NORTH-WESTERN PROVINCE
[0.61 million residents, 2001 CSO census.]

13.1 Public Health and Sanitation

We shall provide for free life-saving healthcare for all


Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health
centres throughout the North-Western Province, as well as
build new ones. Moreover, we shall improve conditions of
service for healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare
personnel, and ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the
province have adequate stocks of medicines and medical
supplies and equipment regardless of whether they are
operated by missionaries, mining companies or the
government.

Our efforts in these endeavors shall also apply to major


healthcare facilities in the province, especially the Chavuma,
Kabompo, Loloma, Kalene Mission, Mwinilunga, Chitokoloki
Mission, Zambezi, Mukinge, and Solwezi hospitals. Besides, we
are going to construct a nursing school in Mwinilunga, and
upgrade the Solwezi School of Nursing so that it can offer
Registered Nursing services.

Page 166 of 190


13.2 Education and Skills Training

We are going to build more primary and secondary schools in


the North-Western Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in
order to make it possible for each and every child in the
Province to have access to education near their homes in all
the districts; that is, in Chavuma, Kabompo, Kasempa,
Mufumbwe, Mwinilunga, Solwezi, and Zambezi districts.

Besides, we want to ensure that higher education and


vocational training in the North-Western Province are
enhanced by rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building
additional institutions of higher learning, and require such
institutions to offer training programs that will be consistent
with the needs of commerce and industry in the Province,
including the processing of minerals, mangoes, pineapples,
Kaimbwe salt, honey, leather, timber, cassava, coffee,
bananas, beans, and sweet potatoes.

Further, we want to address the problems facing educational


and training institutions, including the lack of teachers,
instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment,
inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all
the educational and training institutions in North-Western
Province.

We shall also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely


disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil
servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up
their money only to be told that their dues are not yet
available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’


physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and
productive citizens, we shall promote sport throughout North-
Western Province. In this endeavour, we shall provide sports
facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer,
boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

13.3 Culture and Local Traditions

We consider culture and both family and traditional values as


essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society.
Therefore, we shall make an earnest effort to promote cultural
and traditional events in North-Western Province, including the
Page 167 of 190
following:

(a) The Chisemwa Cha Lunda ceremony of the Lunda people in


Senior Chief Kanongesha’s area in Mwinilunga district held in
August;

(b) The Nsomo ceremony of the Kaonde people in Senior Chief


Kasempa’s area in Kasempa district held in June;

(c) The Kupupa ceremony of the Kaonde people in Senior Chief


Kalilele’s area in Solwezi district held in July;

(d) The Lunda Lubanza ceremony of the Lunda people in Senior


Chief Ishindi’s area in Zambezi district held in August;

(e) The Lukwakwa ceremony of the Mbunda people in Senior


Chief Sikufele’s area in Kabompo district held in October;

(f) The Makundu ceremony of the Kaonde people in Senior


Chief Mushima’s area in Mufumbwe district held in August;

(g) The Chivweka ceremony of the Luchazi people in Chief


Kalunga’s area in Kabompo district held in June;

(h) The Mbunda Liyoyelo ceremony of the Mbunda people in


Chief Chiyengele’s area in Kabompo district held in October;

(i) The Kunyanta Ntanda ceremony of the Kaonde people in


Chief Kapijimpanga’s area in Solwezi district held in July;

(j) The Ntongo ceremony of the Kaonde people in Chief


Chizera’s area in Mufumbwe district held in September;

(k) The Kuvuluka Kishakulu ceremony of the Lamba people in


Chief Matebo’s area in Solwezi district held in September;

(l) The Kufukwila ceremony of the Kaonde people in Chief


Mukumbi’s area in Solwezi district held in May;

(m) The Likumbi Lya Mize ceremony of the Luvale people in


Senior Chief Ndungu’s area in Zambezi district held in August;
and

(n) The Lubinda Ntongo ceremony of the Kaonde people in


Senior Chief Mumena’s area in Solwezi district held in August.
Page 168 of 190
(o) The Nyawunda ceremony of the Lunda people in Senior
Chief Sailunga’s area in Mwinilunga district held in July.

13.4 Other Projects and Programs

There are a lot of important projects and programs that we are


going to work on in the North-Western Province designed to
improve the socio-economic well-being of residents. These
projects and programs include the following:

(a) Construction of a bridge on the Zambezi river to connect


the east bank to the west bank where discoveries of oil and
gas deposits have been made in Chavuma and Zambezi
districts in order to facilitate the exploitation of, and further
exploration for, oil and gas and other minerals.

(b) Completion of the tarring and maintenance of major roads


in the entire province, including the Mutanda-Chavuma (M8)
road, Solwezi-Lumwana road, and the Solwezi-Kipushi road.

(c) Tarring and maintenance of local streets throughout the


province; in Solwezi district, for example, we shall upgrade
Kimasala, Kyafukuma, Mbonge, Messengers, Kyalalankuba, and
Kansanshi Mine streets in collaboration with the Kansanshi
Foundation.

(d) Construction of the planned railway line from Chingola to


Benguela in Angola through Solwezi and Mwinilunga districts,
maintenance of the Mwinilunga-Jimbe road which links Zambia
to Angola, and active participation in the construction of a dual
carriage way from Chingola to the Lumwana Mine being
developed by Australian Equinox Minerals.

(e) Improvement of infrastructure at Solwezi airport,


rehabilitation of all airstrips in the province, and expansion of
Kifubwa, Solwezi, Mutanda, Mundanya, and other major
bridges in the province.

(f) Development and maintenance of roads leading to tourist


centres; that is: the Kifubwa National Monument, Mutanda Falls
in Solwezi, Nyambwezu National Monument, Zambezi Source
National Monument, Zambezi Rapids in Mwinilunga East and
West, Lunga National Parks in Mufumbwe and Kasempa,
Chinyingi Foot Bridge, Chavuma Rapids, and the Zambezi
Page 169 of 190
beach.

(g) Improve accommodation standards in tourist centres by


providing incentives for the construction of motels and 5-star
hotels (similar to the new Royal Solwezi Hotel and Villas in
Solwezi) throughout the province.

(h) Speed up the connection of areas of districts in the


province that do not have electrical power to the national
electricity grid, and provide incentives for private investment
in revamping the Mwinilunga Cannery factory.

(i) Construct barracks in Chavuma, Mwinilunga and Solwezi for


army officers at border towns, revive the Kafunfula Zambia
National Service (ZNS) camp in Kasempa district, as well as
construct houses for ZNS, police, military, and immigration
officers in the province. An additional immigration border post
will also be built in the province at Ndunga in Kabompo district
on Zambia’s border with Angola to control illegal traffic and
trade across the border.

(j) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water


throughout the province through boreholes, dams, water pipes,
and protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern
sewage facilities and both public and private rest rooms.

(k) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by


providing financial and material resources for constructing
and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams
and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics,
basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services
and facilities. Such schemes include the Kazhiba scheme in
Solwezi district, and the Litoya and Luwe scheme schemes in
Kabompo district. The planned Chikenge scheme in Chief
Kalunga’s area, the Kayombo scheme in Chief Chiyengele’s
area and Mumbeji scheme in Senior Chief Sikufele’s area will
also be provided for in terms of essential public services and
facilities.

In all, there are a lot of investment opportunities in the North-


Western Province in mining, agriculture and tourism. We want
residents in the Province and citizens from other provinces to
take full advantage of the high-wage and skill-intensive jobs
that are being generated by new investments in the Province.
This is one of the major reasons why we want to permanently
Page 170 of 190
abolish Grades 7 and 9 elimination examinations, abolish
examination fees, provide free education through Grade 12,
and also provide merit-based scholarships and low-interest
loans for higher education and vocational training.

13.5 Existing Healthcare Facilities

Chavuma District: Nselauke RHC


Chavuma Mission Hospital Ntemwa RHC
Chingi Health Post Nyoka (ZFDS W3) RHC
Chivombo Rural Health
Centre Mufumbwe District:
Lukolwe RHC (Mission) Boma RHC
Makinjila Health Post Jivundu RHC
Nyatanda Health Post Kabanda RHC (Private)
Chiyeke RHC Kabipupu RHC
Kalengwa RHC
Kabompo District: Kaminzekenzeke RHC
Kabompo District Hospital Kashima RHC
Loloma Mission Hospital Matushi RHC
Chikonkwelo RHC Mufumbwe RHC
Kabulamema RHC Munyambala RHC
Kalunga RHC Mushima RHC
Kasamba RHC
Kashinakaji RHC (Mission) Mwinilunga District:
Kayombo RHC Kalene Mission Hospital
Luansongwa RHC Mwinilunga District Hospital
Mumbeji RHC Chibwika RHC
Ndungo RHC Chiwoma RHC
Nkulwashi RHC Ikelenge RHC
St. Kalemba RHC (Mission) Jimbe RHC
Kafweku RHC
Kasempa District: Kakoma RHC
Mukinge General Hospital Kamapanda RHC
(Mission) Kanyihampa RHC
Dengwe RHC Kapundu RHC
Kamakechi RHC Katuyola RHC
Kanjibinji RHC Kazozu RHC
Kankolonkolo RHC Lumwana West RHC
Kasempa RHC Lwawu RHC (Mission)
Kelongwa RHC Msangila RHC
Lunga RHC Sailunga RHC
Mpungu RHC Kawota RHC
Mukunanshi RHC Mukangala RHC
Njenga RHC Ntambu RHC
Page 171 of 190
Nyangombe RHC Matebo RHC
Sachibondu RHC (Mission) Mitukutuku RHC
Salujinga RHC Mujimanzovu RHC
Tom Ilunga RHC Mukumbi RHC
Kayipaka RHC Mumbezhi Holy Family RHC
Kanyama RHC (Mission)
Mumbezhi Z.N.S RHC
Solwezi District: Mumena RHC
Solwezi General Hospital Mushindamo RHC
Chisasa RHC Mutanda Research RHC
Chitungu RHC Mutanda RHC
Chovwe RHC New Kyafukuma RHC
Jagaimo RHC Muyashi RHC
Jiwundu RHC Shilenda RHC
Kalengelenge (ZFDS W5) Solwezi T.T.C. UHC
RHC Solwezi Urban UHC
Kamitonte RHC St. Dorothy RHC
Kankonzhi RHC St. Francis RHC (Mission)
Kanuma RHC Wamafwaha RHC
Kapijimpanga RHC
Katandano RHC Zambezi District:
Kimasala UHC Chitokoloki Mission Hospital
Kyanyika (ZFDS W8) RHC Zambezi District Hospital
Luamala RHC Chilenga RHC
Luamfula RHC Chinyamalitapi RHC
Lukendo RHC Chinyingi RHC (Mission)
Lumwana East RHC Dipalata RHC (Mission)
Maheba A RHC Kucheka RHC
Maheba B RHC Mize RHC
Maheba D RHC Mpidi RHC
Maheba F RHC Mukandakunda RHC
Mangala (ZFDS W9) RHC Nyakulenga RHC
Mapunga RHC

13.6 A Selection of Existing Schools

Kabompo District: Kasempa Boys Secondary


Chiweza School School
Kabompo Primary School Kasempa Day High School
Kabompo Boys’ Secondary Kasempa Junior Secondary
School School
Loloma Primary School Kasempa Primary School
Mukinge Basic School
Kasempa District: Mukinge Girls Secondary
Kanongo Basic School School
Page 172 of 190
Kyafukuma Basic School
Mufumbwe District: Maheba High School
Chizera Primary School Mapunga Primary School
Kalengwa School Meheba Secondary School
Kyamwina Basic School Mukinge Primary School
Solwezi Boys’ Technical
Mwinilunga District: School
Chiwoma Primary School Solwezi Day Secondary
Kabanda Basic School School
Kalene Primary School Solwezi Modern School
Kamapanda Primary School Solwezi Primary School
Kanyihampa Basic School
Katuyola Primary School Zambezi District:
Lumwana Primary School Chilenga Primary School
Mwinilunga Secondary Chitokoloki Primary School
School Makondu Primary School
Nswanakudya Primary Zambezi Primary School
School Zambezi Secondary School
Ntambu Primary School
Sakeji School Other NW/Province
Samuteba Primary School Institutions:
Mukinge School of Nursing
Solwezi District: Nazareth Homecraft College
Jiundu Basic School Solwezi Girls Technical High
Kikombe Primary School School (planned)
Kikombe Primary School Solwezi Teachers’ Training
Kimiteto Primary School College

PART 14:
SOUTHERN PROVINCE
[1.3 million residents, 2001 CSO census]

14.1 Public Health and Sanitation

We shall provide for free life-saving healthcare for all


Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health
centres throughout Southern Province, as well as build new
ones. Moreover, we shall improve conditions of service for
healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and
ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have
adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and
equipment regardless of whether they are operated by
missionaries or the government.

Page 173 of 190


Our efforts in these endeavors shall also apply to major
healthcare facilities in the province—including the Gwembe,
Kalomo, Zimba Mission, Kafue Gorge, Mazabuka, Chikombola,
Research Station Clinic, Riverside Farm Clinic, Chikuni Mission,
Stage II, Namwala, Itezhi Tezhi, Mtendere, Siavonga, Maamba,
Choma General, Macha Mission, Livingstone, Chikankata, and
Monze Mission medical centers.

14.2 Education and Skills Training

We are going to build more primary and secondary schools in


Southern Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to
make it possible for each and every child in the Province to
have access to education near their homes in all the districts;
that is, in Choma, Gwembe, Itezhi-Tezhi, Kalomo, Kazungula,
Livingstone, Mazabuka, Monze, Namwala, Siavonga, and
Sinazongwe districts.

Besides, we want to ensure that higher education and


vocational training in Southern Province are enhanced by
rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional
institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to
offer training programs that will be consistent with the needs
of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, we shall
provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the
Province.

Further, we want to address the problems facing educational


and training institutions, including the lack of teachers,
instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment,
inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all
the educational and training institutions in Southern Province.

We shall also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely


disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil
servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up
their money only to be told that their dues are not yet
available.

And because we believe in the importance of students’


physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and
productive citizens, we shall promote sport throughout
Southern Province. In this endeavour, we shall provide sports
facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer,
boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.
Page 174 of 190
14.3 Culture and Local Traditions

We consider culture and both family and traditional values as


essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society.
Therefore, we shall make an earnest effort to promote cultural
and traditional events in Southern Province, including the
following:

(a) The Lwiindi ceremony of the Toka Leya people in Chief


Mukuni’s area in Livingstone district held in January;

(b) The Lwiindi Gonde ceremony of the Tonga people in Chief


Monze’s area in Monze district held in July;

(c) The Chungu ceremony of the Tonga people in Chief


Chikanta’s area in Kalomo district held in October;

(d) The Lukuni Luzwa Buuka ceremony of the Toka Leya people
in Chief Musokotwane’s area in Kazungula district held in
August;

(e) The Maanzi Aabila Lwiindi ceremony of the Tonga people in


Chiefs Mutondo and Siachitema’s areas in Kalomo district held
in October; and

(f) The Shimunenga ceremony of the Ila people of Namwala


district held between September and October at Maala on the
Kafue Flats, celebrated by Ila people from Chiefs Chilyabufu,
Mukobela, Shezongo, Nalubamba, Mungaila, and Shimbihi.

14.4 Other Projects and Programs

There are a lot of important projects and programs that we are


going to work on in Southern Province designed to improve the
socio-economic well-being of residents. These projects and
programs include the following:

(a) Planning adequately for both the prevention and the


containment of diseases like the Contagious Bovine Pleuro-
Pneumonia (CBPP) disease (which recently hit the border area
between Kazungula district in Southern Province and Sesheke
district in Western Province) and effective control of the tse-tse
fly in order to reduce the incidence of sleeping sickness.

Page 175 of 190


(b) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water
throughout the province through boreholes, dams, water pipes,
and protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern
sewage facilities and both public and private conveniences.

(c) Completion of the construction of irrigation schemes at


Simupande, Nzenga and Sinazongwe, including the
electrification of the three irrigation schemes. Moreover, we
shall ensure that the dam at Buleya Malima irrigation scheme
in Sinazongwe district will be rehabilitated and maintained on a
regular basis.

(d) Provide incentives for the exploration of gas and oil


deposits at Kanesiya stream near Sianeja in Senior Chief
Mweemba’s kingdom in Sinazongwe district.

(e) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by


providing financial and material resources for constructing
and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams
and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics,
basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services
and facilities. Such schemes include the Masasabi scheme in
Itezhi Tezhi district, the Kasiya scheme in Livingstone district,
the Harmony scheme, and the Siamambo scheme in Choma
district.

14.5 Existing Healthcare Facilities

Choma District: Mangunza RHC


Choma General General Mapanza RHC
Hospital Masuku Mission RHC
Macha Mission General Masuku Terminal RHC
Hospital Mbabala RHC
Batoka RHC Mochipapa RHC
Choma Hahc RHC Moyo RHC
Choma Prison RHC Muzoka RHC
Choma Railway Surgery Nakempa RHC
UHC Nalube RHC
Jembo RHC (Mission) Njase RHC (Mission)
Kamwanu RHC Pemba Main RHC
Kanchomba RHC Pemba Sub HC RHC
Kasikili RHC Popota RHC
Kasiya RHC Shapande Urban Clinic
Kazimaulu RHC Siamaubi RHC
Macha RHC Sikalongo RHC (Mission)
Page 176 of 190
Simakutu RHC Luyaba RHC
Zambia National Service Mapatizya RHC
RHC Masempela RHC
Zambia Railways UHC Mayomba RHC
(Private) Mubanga RHC
Mukwela RHC
Gwembe District: Naluja RHC
Gwembe District Hospital Nameeto RHC
Bbondo RHC Namwianga RHC (Mission)
Chaamwe / Nyanga RHC Siabunkululu RHC
Chabbobboma RHC Siachitema RHC (Mission)
(Mission) Siamufumba RHC
Chipepo RHC (Mission) Simalundu RHC
Gwembe RHC Simwatachela RHC
Lukonde RHC Sipatunyana RHC
Luumbo RHC Zimba RHC (Mission)
Munyumbwe RHC
Sinafala RHC Kazungula District:
Kabuyu RHC
Itezhi-Tezhi District: Katapazi RHC
Itezhi-Tezhi District Hospital Katombola RHC
Banamwaze RHC Kazungula RHC
Basanga RHC Makunka RHC
Itezhi-Tezhi RHC Mambova RHC
Kaanzwa RHC Maoomba RHC
Lubanda RHC Mukuni RHC
Luubwe RHC Ngwezi RHC
Mbila RHC Nyawa RHC
Muunga RHC Sekute RHC
Nansenga RHC Siakasipa RHC
Nanzhila RHC Simango RHC
Ngoma Health Post Sinde RHC

Kalomo District: Livingstone District:


Kalomo District Hospital Livingstone General
Zimba Mission District Hospital
Hospital Airport Clinic UHC
Chifusa RHC Boma Clinic UHC
Chilala RHC (Mission) Dlttc UHC (Private)
Choonga RHC Libuyu UHC
Dimbwe RHC Linda UHC
Habulile RHC Ltti UHC
Kalomo RHC Mahatima Ghandi UHC0
Kalonda RHC Maramba UHC
Kanchele RHC Mch Clinic UHC
Page 177 of 190
Police UHC Chikankata RHC
Prisons UHC Moobe RHC
Victoria Falls Clinic UHC Nanduba Health Post
Musuma Health Post
Mazabuka District: Nakaila Health Post
Chikankanta General
Hospital
(Mission) Monze District:
Kafue Gorge District Monze General Hospital
Hospital (Mission)
Mazabuka District Hospital Chikuni Mission RHC Stage
Cheeba RHC II
Chikankata RHC (Mission) Banakaila RHC
Chikombola RHC Bweengwa RHC
Chikonkomene RHC Charles Lwanga Clinic RHC
Ching'ang'auka RHC Chisekesi RHC
Chivuna RHC (Mission) Hakunkula RHC
Hanjalika RHC Hamangaba RHC
Hanzala RHC Hamapande RHC
Itebe RHC Hinjali Health Post Health
Kalama RHC Post
Kaleya UHC Kaumba Health Post Health
Kaleya Small Holders RHC Post
(Private) Kanundwa RHC
Kaonga UHC Katimba RHC
Konkola RHC Keemba Hill RHC
Lubombo RHC Luyaba RHC
Mazabuka RHC Manungu RHC
Mbaya Musuma RHC Monze Urban Clinic RHC
Mugoto RHC Moomba RHC
Mukuyu RHC Moonzwe RHC
Munenga RHC Nampeyo RHC
Munjile RHC Njola-Mwanza RHC
Nakambala Sugar Estate Nteme Health Post
RHC Rusangu RHC (Mission)
(Private) Siatontola RHC
Nakambala Urban UHC St. Mary’s Health Post
Naluama RHC Zambia College of
Nameembo RHC Agriculture RHC
Nanga RHC
Nega Nega RHC
Research Station Clinic RHC Namwala District:
Riverside Farm Clinic RHC Namwala District Hospital
Nadezwe RHC Baambwe RHC
Mazabuka RHC Chitongo RHC
Page 178 of 190
Ichila RHC Manchavwa RHC
Kabulamwanda RHC Matuwa RHC
Kantengwa RHC Mtendere RHC (Mission)
Kasenga RHC Munyama RHC
Maala RHC Sianyolo RHC
Maseele RHC Siavonga Hahc RHC
Mobola RHC
Muchila RHC Sinazongwe District:
Nakamboma RHC Maamba District Hospital
Namwala RHC Buleyamalima RHC
Chiyabi RHC
Siavonga District: G.V.D.C. Clinic RHC
Mtendere Mission Hospital Kafwambila RHC
Siavonga District Hospital Maamba Hahc RHC
Chaanga RHC Sinankumbi Health Post
Chikanzaya RHC Siameja RHC
Chipepo RHC Siansowa RHC
Ibbwemunyama RHC Siatwinda RHC
Jamba RHC Sikaneka RHC
Kapululila RHC Sinamalima RHC
Kariba RHC Sinazeze RHC
Lusitu RHC Sinazongwe RHC

14.6 A Selection of Existing Schools

Choma District: Siachidinta School


Adastra Primary School Popota Primary School
Beit School Sichikali Primary School
Chibwe Primary School St. Patrick’s Primary School
Chilalantambo Basic School Sikalongo Secondary School
Choma Basic School
Choma Secondary School Gwembe District:
Frances Davidson High Chipepo Secondary School
School Gwembe Basic School
Hamoonde Primary School
Macha Secondary School Kalomo District:
Mang’unza Primary School GBCC
Masuku Secondary School Kabanga Christian
Muchenje Primary School Secondary School
Mukasa Minor Seminary Kalomo High School
Muyanda Basic School Kalomo Primary School
Nahumba Primary School Kalomo Secondary School
Nakeempa Primary School Namwianga Christian
Njase Girls Secondary Secondary
School School
Page 179 of 190
Namwianga Primary School Zambezi Primary School
Siachitema Primary School
George Benson College Mazabuka District:
Chikankata High School
Livingstone District: Chikankata Primary School
Blue Gum Lane School Itebe Primary School
Christ The King Primary Kabanje Primary School
School Kaonga School
Dambwa North Primary Kawama School
Dambwa Primary School Malala Primary School
Franciscan House of Studies Mazabuka Day Secondary
Hillcrest Secondary Mazabuka Girls High School
Technical School Mazabuka Primary School
Holy Cross Basic School Mbiya Basic School
Holy Cross Convent Mibenge Primary School
Holy Cross Primary School Musikili School
Holycross Secondary School Nadezwe School
Kabuyu Primary School Nakambala Basic School
Kabuyu Primary Shool Nakambala (Private) School
Kachabula Primary School Namulonga Primary School
Kings School Nanga Basic School
Linda Secondary School Ngangula Primary School
Livingstone Convent Nkonkola Basic School
Livingstone Kindergarden Sianzala Primary School
Livingstone Primary School St. Columbus Primary
Messiah Secondary School School
Mosi-O-Tunya Secondary St. Edmunds Secondary
School School
Mujala Demostration School
Mukamusaba Primary Monze District:
School Banakaila Primary School
Mulwani Primary School Charles Lwanga Primary
Nalituwe Primary School School
Namatama Primary School Chikuni Girls Secondary
Nansanzu School School
Parins Primary School Choongo Primary School
Shungu Namutitima Basic Hamapande School
School Kaloba Primary School
Shungu Primary Kasaka Primary School
Simango Primary School Kaumba Basic School
Sinde Primary School Keemba Primary School
St. Mary's Secondary School Lwengu School
St. Raphaels Secondary Miyoba Primary School
School Monze Basic School
Syanalumba Primary School Monze East Primary School
Page 180 of 190
Monze Secondary School College
Moomba Primary School Jembo Primary School
Nabukuyu Primary School Jembo Secondary School
Namateba Basic School Kasiya Business &
Ntambo Middle Basic School Secretarial College
Rusangu Secondary School Kasiya Secretarial College
St Canisius Secondary Livingstone School of
School Nursing
St. Josephs (Chivuna) Livingstone Trades Training
St. Mary’s Primary School Institute
(Chivuna) Maamba G.R.Z School
Tagore Basic School Maamba Mine Basic School
Maamba School (Private)
Siavonga District: Maamba Secondary School
Chilindi Primary School Magoye Basic School
Kariba Primary School Mukuyu Primary School
Siavonga School Munenga Basic School
Sikoongo Primary School Nakambala Training Centre
Syakalyabanyama Primary Namwala Secondary School
School NECOR
Ndondi Basic School
Other S/Province Nakowa Primary School
Institutions: Nyawa Primary School
Canisius Secondary School Pemba Basic School
Charles Lwanga Teachers’ Pemba Secondary School
Training Sibalumbi Primary School
College St. Charles Lwanga College
Chikankata School of University of Zambia, Adult
Nursing Education
Chikuni Primary School Victoria Falls University of
Chiwoko Primary School Technology
Chiyobola Primary School Zimba Secondary School
Choma Trades Training Zambia College of
Institute Agariculture
David Livingstone Teachers’

PART 15:
WESTERN PROVINCE
[0.78 million residents, 2001 CSO census.]

15.1 Public Health and Sanitation

Page 181 of 190


We shall provide for free life-saving healthcare for all
Zambians, and rehabilitate existing urban and rural health
centres throughout Western Province, as well as build new
ones. Moreover, we shall improve conditions of service for
healthcare personnel, employ more healthcare personnel, and
ensure that healthcare facilities throughout the province have
adequate stocks of medicines and medical supplies and
equipment regardless of whether they are operated by
missionaries or the government.

Our efforts in these endeavors shall also apply to major


healthcare facilities in the province—that is, the Kalabo, Yuka
Mission, Kaoma District, Luampa, Mangango, Lukulu, Senanga
District, Yeta District, Mwandi Mission, Sichili Mission, and
Lewanika hospitals.

15.2 Education and Skills Training

We are going to build more primary and secondary schools in


Western Province, and also rehabilitate old ones, in order to
make it possible for each and every child in the Province to
have access to education near their homes in all the districts;
that is, in Kalabo, Kaoma, Lukulu, Mongu, Senanga, Sesheke,
and Shang’ombo districts.

Besides, we want to ensure that higher education and


vocational training in Western Province are enhanced by
rehabilitating existing facilities, and by building additional
institutions of higher learning, and require such institutions to
offer training programs that will be consistent with the needs
of commerce and industry in the Province. Moreover, we shall
provide for more boarding facilities in high schools in the
Province.

Further, we want to address the problems facing educational


and training institutions, including the lack of teachers,
instructors, housing, educational supplies and equipment,
inadequate salaries and allowances, and entertainment at all
the educational and training institutions in Western Province.

We shall also ensure that salaries and allowances are timely


disbursed to all the provinces so that teachers and other civil
servants will not have to trek to designated locations to pick up
their money only to be told that their dues are not yet
available.
Page 182 of 190
And because we believe in the importance of students’
physical and intellectual development in nurturing active and
productive citizens, we shall promote sport throughout
Western Province. In this endeavour, we shall provide sports
facilities at all schools and colleges for athletics, soccer,
boxing, basketball, badminton, netball, and so forth.

15.3 Culture and Local Traditions

We consider culture and both family and traditional values as


essential and indispensable elements of Zambian society.
Therefore, we shall make an earnest effort to promote cultural
and traditional events in Western Province, including the
following:

(a) The Kuomboka Nalolo ceremony of the Lozi people in


Litunga Lamboela’s area in Senanga district held in May;

(b) The Kuomboka Libonda ceremony of the Lozi people in


Chieftainess Mboanjikana’s area in Kalabo district held in May;
and

(c) The Kazanga (Kathanga) ceremony of the Nkoya people in


Chiefs Kahare and Mutondo Muchaila’s areas in Kaoma district
held in July.

15.4 Other Projects and Programs

There are a lot of important projects and programs that we are


going to work on in Western Province designed to improve the
socio-economic well-being of residents. These projects and
programs include the following:

(a) Improvement of the availability of safe and clean water in


the province through boreholes, dams, water pipes, and
protected shallow wells, and also provide for modern sewage
facilities and both public and private conveniences.

(b) Completion of the 50 km road from Uwee to Mongu through


Nangula, and upgrading and maintenance of the Limulunga-
Ushaa-Lukulu Road.

(c) Construction of Kalongola Bridge on the Zambezi River and


Liyoyelo Bridge on the Mongu-Kalabo Road, and maintenance
Page 183 of 190
of all other bridges throughout the province—including foot
bridges.

(d) Allocation of adequate resources for upgrading and


expansion of the Lewanika School of Nursing, and construction
of a new District Hospital in Mongu district.

(e) Provision of incentives for the establishment of processing


industries for cotton, timber, leather, mangoes, fish, tobacco,
paprika, rice, cassava, and cashew nuts.

(f) Planning adequately for both the prevention and the


containment of diseases like the Contagious Bovine Pleuro-
Pneumonia (CBPP) disease (which recently hit the border area
between Kazungula district in Southern Province and Sesheke
district in Western Province) and effective control of the tse-tse
fly in order to reduce the incidence of sleeping sickness—
particularly in Kaoma and Shang’ombo districts.

(g) Improvement of the road infrastructure in the province


through the construction and/or rehabilitation of the Mongu-
Lusaka Road, Mongu-Senanga Road, Senanga-Sesheke Road,
Katunda-Lukulu Road, Mongu-Lukulu Road, Senanga-Kalabo
Road, Kalabo-Sikongo Road, and the Luampa-Machile Road. It
is also important to provide for the rehabilitation of the
Mulobezi railway line.

(h) Exploitation of waterfalls like the Sioma for hydro-electric


power, and the sandy soils found in much of the Province for
glass manufacturing. There is also a need to provide for the re-
opening of Mulobezi Sawmills in order to boost economic
activity and the creation of employment opportunities in the
Province.

(i) Upgrading of resettlement schemes in the province by


providing financial and material resources for constructing
and/or rehabilitating boreholes, water wells, irrigation dams
and canals, feeder roads, culverts, low-cost houses, clinics,
basic schools, police posts, and other essential public services
and facilities. Such schemes include the Kalumwange scheme.

(j) Elevation of the Namushakende and Nkeyeme sub-districts


to full district status.

15.5 Existing Healthcare Facilities


Page 184 of 190
Kalabo District: Nyambi I RHC
Kalabo District Hospital Nyambi II RHC
Yuka Mission Hospital Winda RHC
Kaluwe Mutala RHC
Kuuli RHC Lukulu District:
Libonda RHC Lukulu District Hospital
Liumba RHC (Mission) (Mission)
Liyolelo HAHC Dongwe RHC
Lueti RHC Kamilende RHC
Lukena RHC Lishuwa RHC
Lukona RHC Lubosi RHC
Mambolomoka RHC Luvuzi RHC
Mapungu RHC Mayankwa RHC
Namatindi RHC Mbanga RHC
Nyengo RHC Mitete RHC
Sihole RHC Ngimbu RHC (Mission)
Sikongo RHC Sikunduko RHC
Tapo RHC Simakumba RHC
Watopa RHC
Kaoma District:
Kaoma District Hospital Mongu District:
Luampa Mission Hospital Lewanika General Hospital
Mangango Mission Hospital Lewanika UHC
Aha (Mayukwayukwa) RHC Ikwichi RHC
(Private) Iloke RHC
Chitwa RHC Kalundwana RHC
Kaaba RHC Kama RHC
Kahare RHC Lealui RHC
Kasabi RHC Lewanika RHC
Kasimba RHC Limulunga Stage II RHC
Luena Barracks RHC Litawa RHC
Lui RHC Liyoyelo UHC
Mulamba RHC Luandui RHC
Mangango RHC (Mission) Lukalanya RHC
Luampa RHC (Mission) Lukweta RHC
Mangango Z.N.S RHC Mabumbu RHC
Mayukwayukwa RHC Mawawa RHC
Mbanyutu RHC Mulambwe UHC
Mulamba RHC Mwanawina RHC
Mwanambuyu RHC Nalikwanda Stage II RHC
Namilangi RHC Nalwei RHC
Njonjolo RHC Namitome RHC
Nkenga RHC Namushakende RHC
Nkeyema RHC Nangula RHC
Page 185 of 190
Ndanda RHC Senaga UHC
Ndau RHC Sinungu RHC
Prisons Clinic UHC
Sefula Stage II RHC Sesheke District:
(Mission) Yeta District District
Simulumbe RHC Hospital
Sitoya RHC Mwandi Mission Hospital
Ushaa RHC Sichili Mission Hospital
Bwina RHC
Senanga District: Imusho RHC
Senanga District District Kalobolelwa RHC
Hospital Katima Mulilo RHC
Itufa RHC Kaywala RHC
Kataba RHC Masese RHC
Kaunga Lueti RHC Mukusi RHC
Liliachi RHC Mulimambango RHC
Litambya RHC Mulobezi RHC
Litoya RHC Mushukula RHC
Lui River RHC Nawinda RHC
Mata RHC Yeta HAHC UHC
Muoyo RHC Sichili HAHC RHC
Nalolo RHC Mwandi HAHC RHC
Nasilimwe RHC Silumbu RHC
Sibukali RHC Zambezi RHC

9.6 A Selection of Existing Schools

Kalabo District: Liunga Primary School


Kalabo High School Limulunga Day Secondary
Kalabo Secondary School School
Libonda Primary School Lukona Secondary School
Nalionwa Basic School Malengwa Middle School
Mongu Primary School
Kaoma District: Mukoko Primary School
Kaoma Secondary School Mulambwa Primary School
Mahilo Primary School Mupatu Basic School
Shishamba Primary School Mutwiwambwa School
Nangula School
Mongu District: Sefula Primary School
Holy Cross Girls School Sefula Secondary School
Imwiko School St. John’s Secondary School
Kambule High School Suburbs School
Kanyonyo Primary School Tungi Primary School
Katongo School
Lealui Basic School Senanga District:
Page 186 of 190
Likuma Basic School Sanembo Primary School
Litambya Primary School Sesheke High School
Litoya Primary School Sesheke Secondary School
Lukanda Primary School
Muoyo Upper Basic School Other W/Province
Namalangu Primary School Institutions:
Senanga Primary School Lukulu Day Secondary
Senanga Secondary School School
Mongu Teachers’ Training
Sesheke District: College
Bwina Basic School

Zambia: A Nation Is Born!

The history of our country can be traced from at least 3 million


years ago as having been part of the northern African Rift
Valley. Archaeologists have found stone implements, similar to
those found in modern Kenya, along the Zambezi River.
A number of early Stone Age sites have been unearthed in
many parts of our beloved country, the most significant being
at the Kalambo Falls in the Northern and the Victoria Falls in
the Southern portions of the country. At Kalambo Falls,
archaeologists have found evidence that our ancestors began
using fire over 60,000 years ago. At Victoria Falls, on the other
hand, they have found a housing complex showing that the
people who lived there had developed important architectural,
organizational, human relations, and survival skills.

The 12th Century:


Much of the readily available information about Zambia’s
past, though, starts from the 12th Century when the Shona
people arrived in the area from the south and established the
Mwene Mutapa Empire, which included today’s southern
Zambia.

The 16th Century:


During the 16th Century, the region witnessed the arrival of
people from the Luba and Lunda empires of the former Zaire to
set up small kingdoms. They were joined later during the 19th
Century by the Ngoni people from the south. During the latter
part of the 19th Century, the country’s 73 tribal groups had
already established themselves in the areas they currently
occupy.
Page 187 of 190
The Late 1800s:
British imperialist, John Cecil Rhodes, obtained a concession
for mineral rights from local chiefs in 1899, and eventually
took control over the territory and administered it through his
British South Africa Company (BSAC) as North-Eastern
Rhodesia (with Fort Jameson – now Chipata – as its capital) and
North-Western Rhodesia (with Kalomo as its capital).
In 1911, the territory became Northern Rhodesia with
Livingstone as its capital. In 1924, the BSAC ceased to be the
political power and the territory became a British Protectorate.
In 1935, the seat of government was eventually moved from
Livingstone to Lusaka.

August 1953:
The Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland was created in
August 1953, consisting of Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia),
Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Nyasaland (now
Malawi). In opposition to the Federation, the late Harry
Mwaanga Nkumbula and his followers (including Kenneth David
Kaunda) formed the Northern Rhodesia African National
Congress (ANC), which was later banned (in 1959) and its
leaders imprisoned by British authorities.

The Year 1960:


Kenneth David Kaunda, upon his release from prison,
founded the United National Independence Party (UNIP) to
campaign for independence and the dissolution of the
Federation dominated by white-ruled Southern Rhodesia. On
December 31, 1963, the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland
was finally and permanently dissolved.

October 24, 1964:


Northern Rhodesia gained independence on October 24,
1964, with Kenneth David Kaunda of the United National
Independence Party (UNIP) as the first President of Zambia.

Origin of the Name “Zambia”:


According to the Zambia Daily Mail (1999), the name
“Zambia” was coined in October 1958 during the launching of
the Zambia African National Congress (ZANC) at Broken Hill
(now Kabwe) by some of the former leaders of the liberation
movement to replace the Northern Rhodesia African National
Congress (ANC).
Initially, the name “Zambezia African National Congress”
Page 188 of 190
was proposed, but someone (believed to be the late Simon
Mwansa Kapwepwe) suggested that the “Zambezia” part of the
nascent political party’s name should be shortened to
“Zambia.”
Our country, therefore, derives its name from the “Zambezi
River.” But then, what is the origin of the name “Zambezi”?
As early as the 16th Century, maps drawn by Arabs in search
of trade in goods and slaves began to show a river named
“Zembere.” In the 17th Century, the De Lisle maps similarly
depicted the name of the river as “Zambeze,” “Empondo” or
“Cuama.” Later, cartographers sometimes used the name
“Zambeze,” sometimes “Cuoama” (or “Cuama”) or both. But
from the time of De Lisle (1675-1725), “Zambeze” became
established on the maps.
Portuguese historian De Barros, whose writings were
published between 1552 and 1613, mentioned “Zambeze” as
one of the great rivers in the territory. Reference to the
meaning of the name can be traced to the writings of Joao dos
Santos, a Dominican Father, who wrote in 1609 that the local
people called the river “Zambesi” – implying a river
surrounded by riches and abounding in animals and provisions.
According to David Livingstone, in his Missionary Travels
first published in 1858, the people living around today’s
Western Province of Zambia referred to the river as “Liambai”
or “Leeambye” – which meant “the large river.” He also noted
that the names “Luambeji,” “Ambezi,” “Ojimbezi,” and
“Zambesi” were applied to the river depending on the
languages or dialects spoken by natives.
The name “Zambezia” was sometimes used to describe
parts of today’s Zambezi valley by E. P. Mathers in his book
entitled Zambezia published around 1900. He also used the
same name to describe the whole of Matabeleland and
Mashonaland. And R. C. F. Maughan, in a book published in
1910 with a similar title to that of E. P. Mathers’ book,
presented a map with the name “Zambesia,” which covered a
large portion of today’s lower Zambezi in Mozambique.

SELECTED SOURCES OF INFORMATION

“About Lusaka City,” http://www.lcc.gov.zm/, January 25, 2004.

“Background Note: Zambia,” Bureau of African Affairs,


http://polisource.com/, April 2002 and September 2004.
Page 189 of 190
BBC News, Timeline: Zambia – A Chronology of Key Events,
http://news.bbc.co.uk/, February 17, 2004.

Central Board of Health (CBoH), “Health Institutions in Zambia


– 2002,”
http://www.cboh.gov.zm/documents/HMIS.pdf.

Civil Society for Poverty Reduction (CSPR), “Fifth National


Development Plan for Zambia, 2006-2011: A Civil Society
Perspective,” November 2005.

Graduates.com, “Reuniting School Friends around the World,”


http://www.graduates.com/.

“History: The History of African Country Names,” Click Afrique:


http://www.clickafrique.com/, December 5, 2001.

Holmes, Tim, “The History of Zambia,”


http://www.africainstitutes.com/, November 8, 2001.

International Monetary Fund, “Zambia: Poverty Reduction


Strategy Paper Progress Report – June 2004,” IMF Country
Report No. 04/181.

Promised Land Ministries, “Tribes of Zambia,”


http://wwwpromisedlandministries.homestead.com/.

Seshamani, V., White, H., Chisupa, N., and Leavy, J., “Northern
Province Field Report,” Lusaka and Falmer, April 2002.

Sichizya, Kelvin, “Exploring Northern Region’s Tourism


Potential,” parts 1and 2, Zambia Daily Mail, January 2007.

Wikipedia, “List of Schools in Zambia,”


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_schools_in_Zambia.

Zambia National Tourist Board (ZNTB), “Table of Traditional


Ceremonies,”
http://www.zambiatourism.com/.

“Zambia Traces Its Roots to Arabs,” Zambia Daily Mail:


http://www.zamnet.zm/, November 7, 1999.

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