Sie sind auf Seite 1von 40

The Snell Fishing Knot

The Snell Knot provides a strong connection when fishing with bait and using a separate length of leader.
You can only use a Snell Knot with a leader.

SNELL KNOT
1. Insert one end of the leader
through the hook's eye, extending
1 to 2 inches past the eye.

Insert the other end of the leader


through the eye in the opposite
direction pointing toward the barb
of the hook.

Hold the hook and leader ends


between your thumb and
forefinger of left hand. Leader will
hang below the hook in a large
loop.

2. Take the part of the large lower


loop that is closest to the eye and
wrap it over the hook shank and
both ends of the leader toward the
hook's barb.

3. Continue to wrap for 7 or 8


turns and hold wraps with left
hand. Grip the end of the leader
that is through the eyelet with
your right hand and pull it slowly
and steadily. Hold the turns with
your left hand or the knot will
unravel.

When knot is almost tight, slide it


up against the eye of the hook.
Grip the short end lying along the
shank of the hook with a pair of
pliers. Pull this end and the
standing line at the same time to
completely tighten the knot.

The Clinch Knot

1. Bring the free end of the line


up through the eye of the hook.
Give yourself about a foot of free
line on top to work with.
2. Take the free end back, behind and
then under the straight line.

3. Bring the free end back over the top


to form a full loop. Keep loops
fairly loose at this point.

4. Continue looping the free end


around the straight line in the same
direction. Form about four loops.

5. With the free end coming from the


bottom of a turn, pass it
between the eye and the first loop.

6. Slowly pull out all slack. Then


pull tightly and trim off the end.

Knot Tying - The Improved Clinch Knot


1. An old standby for
fishermen. Pass the
line through the eye of
hook, swivel or lure.
Double back and make
5 turns around the
standing line.

Hold the coils in place;


thread end of line
through the first loop
above the eye, then
through the big loop as
shown.
2. Hold the tag end and
standing line while
coils are pulled up.
Take care that coils are
in spiral, not lapping
over each other. Slide
tight against the eye.
Clip tag end.
The PALOMAR KNOT - For Joining Line To A Fish Hook
The Palomar Knot is easy to
tie correctly, and consistently
the strongest knot known to
hold terminal tackle.

1. Double about 4" of line and


pass the loop through the eye
of fishing hook.

2. Let the fishing hook hang


loose, and tie an overhand
knot in the doubled line.

Avoid twisting the lines and do


NOT tighten the knot.

3. Pull the loop end of the line


far enough to pass it over the
hook, swivel or lure.

Make sure the loop passes


completely over the
attachment.

4. Pull both the tag end and


the standing line until the knot
is tightened. Clip off the tag
end of the fishing line.

Jansik Knot - A Popular Knot For Muskie Fishing


A strong knot. The Jansik Special Knot is
a popular knot with muskie fisherman.

1. Run about five inches of line through


the eye of fish hook or fishing lure.

Bring it around in a circle and run it


through again.
2. Make a second circle, parallel with the
first and pass the end of the line through
the fishing hook eye a third time.

3. Bend the standing part of the line


around the two circles.

Bring tag end around in a third circle and


wrap it three times around the three
parallel lines.

4. Hold the fish hook, swivel or fishing


lure with pliers.

Hold the standing line with other hand


and hold the tag end in teeth. Pull all three
to tighten. (Arrows identify standing line.)

The Trilene Fishing Knot


The Trilene Knot is a strong reliable connection that resists slippage and premature failures.

The Trilene Knot is an all-purpose connection to be used in joining monofilament to swivels, snaps, hooks
and artificial lures. The knot's unique design and ease of tying yield consistently strong, dependable
connections while retaining 85-90% of the original line strength. The double wrap of mono through the
eyelet provides a protective cushion for added safety.

Trilene Knot --- Joining Monofilament to Tackle)


1. Run the
end of line
through eye
of hook or
lure and
double back
through the
eye a
second time.

2. Loop
around the
standing
part of line 5
or 6 times.
3. Thread
the tag end
back
between the
eye and the
coils as
shown.

4. Pull up
tight and
trim the tag
end.

Offshore Swivel Knot --- (Attaching swivel or snap to double-line leader)

1. Slip the loop end of double-line leader through the eye of swivel.
Rotate the loop end a half-turn to put a single twist between loop and swivel eye.

2. Pass the loop with the twist over the swivel.


Hold the endof the loop, plus both legs of the double-line leader with one hand.
Let the swivel slide to other end of double loops now formed.

3. Still holding the loop and lines with one hand, use your other hand to rotate the swivel through
center of both loops, at least six times.

4. Continue holding both legs of the double-line leader tightly, but release the end of loop.
Pull on the swivel and the loops will begin to gather.

5. To draw the knot tight, grip the swivel with pliers and push loops toward the eye with fingers,
while still keeping standing lines of the leader pulled tight.

IMPROVED BLOOD KNOT


The Improved Blood Knot is
used for tying two pieces of
monofilament together of
relatively equal diameters.

1. Overlap the ends of your


two strands that are to be
joined.

Twist them together about 10


turns.

2. Separate one of the center


twists and thrust the two ends
through the space as shown.

3. Pull the knot together and


trim off the short ends.

The Uni-Knot System


One basic fishing knot which can be varied to meet virtually every knot tying need in either freshwater or
saltwater fishing. That was the objective of Vic Dunaway, author of numerous books on fishing and editor
of "Florida Sportsman" magazine. The Uni-Knot system resulted. Knot illustrations and directions thanks
to Ande Monofilament.

Uni-Knot --- Tying Fishing Line To Terminal Tackle

1. Run the line through the eye of


hook, swivel or lure at least 6" and
fold to make 2 parallel lines.

Bring the end of line back in a


circle toward the hook or lure.
2. Make 6 turns with tag end
around the double line.

Pass tag end through the circle.

Hold the double line at a point


where it passes through the eye
and pull the tag end to snug up the
turns.

3. Now pull the standing line to


slide the knot up against the eye.

4. Continue pulling until the knot


is tight. Trim tag end flush with
closest coil of knot. The uni-knot
will not slip.

The Uni-Knot System -- Leader to Line


One basic fishing knot which can be varied to meet virtually every knot tying need in either
fresh or salt water fishing. That was the objective of Vic Dunaway, author of numerous
books on fishing and editor of "Florida Sportsman" magazine. The Uni-Knot system
resulted. Knot illustrations and directions thanks to Ande Monofilament.

Uni-Knot --- Joining Leader to Fishing Line


Tie on leader
of no more
than four
times the
pound /test of
the line.

1. Double the
end of the line
and overlap it
with the
leader for
about 6".
Make a Uni-
circle with the
doubled line.

2. Tie the
basic Uni-
Knot, making
three turns
with the line
loop around
the two lines
and the leader
line.

Pull it snug
up.
3. Now tie
another Uni-
Knot to the
left side with
the leader
around the
double line.
Again, use
only three
turns.

4. Pull the
knots
together as
tightly as
possible.

Trim ends and


loop.
The Uni-Knot System
One basic fishing knot which can be varied to meet virtually every knot tying need in either fresh or salt water
fishing. That was the objective of Vic Dunaway, author of numerous books on fishing and editor of "Florida
Sportsman" magazine. The Uni-Knot system resulted. Knot illustrations and directions thanks to Ande
Monofilament.

SHOCK LEADER TO LINE


DOUBLE LINE SHOCK LEADER
Uni-Knot --- Joining Shock Leader to Line

1. When the leader is 5 times or more the pound/test of the line, double ends of both the leader and line
back about 6". Slip the loop of the line through loop of leader far enough to permit tying a Uni-Knot
around both strands of leader.

2. With doubled line, tie Uni-Knot around the two strands of leader. Use only four turns.

3. Put finger through loop of line and grasph both tag end and standing line to pull knot snug around loop
of leader.
4. With one hand, pull the standing leader (not both strands). With other hand pull both strands of line
(see arrows). Pull slowly until the knot slides to end of leader loop and all slippage is gone.

Uni-Knot --- Double Line Shock Leader

1. As a replacement for the Bimini Twist or Spider Hitch, first clip off an amount of line needed for
length of loop desired.
Tie the two ends together with an Overhand Knot.

2. Double end of the standing line and overlap 6" with knotted end of loop piece.
Tie Uni-Knot with tied loop around doubled standing line, making 4 turns.

3. Now tie Uni-Knot with doubled standing line around loop piece. Again, make 4 turns.

4. Hold both strands of doubled line in one hand, both strands of loop in other hand. Pull knots
together until they barely touch.
5. Tighten by pulling both strands of loop piece, but only the main strand of standing line.
Trim off both loop tag ends, which eliminates the Overhand knot.

Setting The Drag On Your Fishing Rod and Reel

Set the strike drag with the rod securely in a holder. The scale should read between 25 and 33
percent of the unknotted line strength when the drag starts to slip. 30-lb test line (shown above)
should have a strike drag setting of between 7.5 and 10 pounds.

If you set the drag on a light-tackle outfit (12-pound test is illustrated above) with the rod tip pointed at
the scale (top image), the reading should be about 15 percent of the unknotted line strength. When th
rod is in the fighting position (bottom) friction will increase the drag.
Tying The Bowline For Your Boat
---- Memorize this sentence and tying your bowline is easy.....
Protecting Your Fishing Line
Considering the expectations of monofilament fishing line, and the abuse it's subject to, it is amazing
what this "thin" material will do. But, to get the most out of any monofilament, we must protect it from
certain negative elements. Listed below are a few "mono checks" that, when followed properly, will put
more fish on the table. We will start with the reel and work towards the hook.
Putting Monofilament Line On Your Fishing Reel
Most tackle stores are happy to spool up your reel, particularly those who have a line winding machine
If you have the time, and they have the quality line you want, let them do it.

When you're spooling up a bait casting reel, or any conventional reel, put a rod, or even a pencil,
through the center of the line spool. Tie the line to the reel with a (Uni-knot or Arbor knot) clipping off th
tag end. Snug the knot to the reel spool. One person should reel while another holds both ends of the
rod, applying pressure as the line is reeled onto the spool. Fill to about an 1/8 inch from the spool's
outer rim. Keep the line away from anything that could cause abrasion.

Use the same procedure with a spinning reel, but reel line so that it comes off the end of the spool.
After 15 or 20 turns, if a twist occurs, turn the spool over and continue to fill the reel.

Monofilament will twist. If it happens while fishing from a boat, play the line out with nothing on the end
trolling behind the boat for about five minutes. It is also important to always use a ball-bearing swivel,
which will reduce or eliminate line twist. Certain lures or bait tied directly to the line will invite twist. To
compensate for this, try lighter line. Just for your own education and enjoyment, go down in line test.
You will be surprised that you can catch big fish on line much lighter than you are presently using. It
may take more patience and even a little more skill, but you will enjoy it. If fish stop biting, go to a light
test. The thinner line may get them eating again. The thinner the line, the less likely a fish sees it.
Care Of Fishing Rod Guides
The guides on your rods must be checked and kept free of any abrasive areas. Pull a strip of pantyhos
through the rod guides to check for snags, or a cotton tipped swab. Saltwater will wreak havoc with
roller guides. Inspect them before and after each trip. When trolling, make sure the line is not wrappe
around a guide.
Care Of Fishing Line
Always check the line for nicks or frazzles or areas of abrasion that will cause a weakness. After every
fishing trip, or after playing out a nice fish, cut off approximately ten feet of line and retie, if you have
reason to believe it may have been frayed. This is very important.

When fighting a decent fish, in fresh or saltwater, three things can happen: (1) the fish goes deep,
pulling the line across rocks, logs or other hard objects, (2) the fish is big and the line will rub across its
body or tail, and (3) other things, such as the boat, a jetty, surface objects or dock, or even other fish
inthe area, may bump into your line. All three factors will cause abrasion, eventually prompting the line
to break. The easiest solution is to cut off the weak line and retie.

Quality monofilament that has not come in contact with the above items does not need to be totally
replaced. (We have had saltwater charter boat captains catch over 20 Blue Marlin without respooling
new Ande monofilament.) So, if you check your reel's drag system, your rod guides and cut away line
that may be damaged, we guarantee you will catch more fish. Take the time...it is worth it.
Other Fishing Tackle Tips
Tip: Monofilament can be damaged by excess exposure to direct sunlight. Keep your equipment in
a dry, shaded area. Fishing on a hot summer day is fine. Keeping your rods in a hot car trunk, or
exposed to direct sunlight in the back seat, is not recommended.

Tip: Always use a well balanced outfit. This means the rod, reel, line and lure should be made for
each other. Do not load a light outfit with a heavy line. Conversely, do not throw a huge lure with a ligh
outfit.

Tip: More rods are broken in car doors, house doors or through poor storage. Do not let rod tips ban
all over your boat.

Tip: Always rinse rods with freshwater. Periodically remove reels and lubricate reel seats with CRC-6
56.

Tip: Remember, proper maintenance, balance, storage and handling are imperative in taking care o
the equipment that takes care of you.

Tip: Store all bulk line in a cool, dark place. Direct sunlight will damage monofilament over a period
of time.

There is one small hitch encountered by many first time knot-tiers. Their expert instructors seem to assume that their fellow fishermen are familiar with the Surgeon's
Knot, the Bimini Twist and the like. But long before I moved into the field of knot-tying, I was content to join a line-to-swivel, swivel-to-trace and trace-to-hook via a
Simple Loop Knot, where the loop is made only perhaps 25mm long - just long enough to pass over the hook and swivel.

The Loop Knot can be tied readily in the dark, and equally readily attached to swivel and hook. If fishing for flathead, you may have more confidence in your gear if the
loop to the hook is made about 12.5cm long, thus taking the fish on a doubled trace.

As experience is gained, you may wish to move on from the Loop Knot to knots that lie closer to hook and swivel.

One of these is the Half Blood Knot, which is more correctly half of the Barrel Knot. THIS KNOT WILL SLIP. It has cost me more fish than I want to remember.

If you must use it, then you have two choices:

a) Stop the end of the line with a simple Overhand Knot, and draw it against the turns of the knot.
b) or make the Half Blood Knot into a Clinch Knot.

The following illustrations are fairly well all-purpose, but for tropical waters we strongly suggest
that a 35-45lb mono leader be used prior to attaching a lure. If you are going after fish like
mackerel, it is also a good idea to use black wire and swivels.

Clinch Knot

• Pass the line through the eye of the hook, or swivel.

• Double back. make five turns around the line.

• Pass the end of the line through the first loop, above the eye, and then through the large
loop. Draw the knot into shape.

• Slide the coils down tight against the eye.

Jansik Special

Another beautifully simple knotthat can be tied in the dark, The Jansik Special is a high strength knot tied as
follows:

• Put 15cm of line through the eye of the hook.

• Bring it around in a circle and put the end through again.

• Making a second circle, pass then end through a third time.

• Holding the three circles of line against each other, wrap the end three times around the circles.

• Either hold the hook steady with pliers, or make it fast to boat's rigging or safety lines.

• Holding strain on the hook, pull on both ends of the line to tighten.

Palomar Knot

The Palomar Knot is another very simple knot for terminal tackle. It is regarded by the International Game Fish Association consistently as the strongest knot known.
It's great virtue is that it can safely be tied at night with a minimum of practice.

• Double about 12.5cm of line, and pass through the eye.

• Tie a simple Overhand Knot in the doubled line, letting the hook hang loose. Avoide twisting the lines.

• Pull the end of loop down, passing it completely over the hook.

• Pull both ends of the line to draw up the knot.

Hangman's Knot

There are at least 6 variations of the Hangman's Knot, - all of them excellent for terminal tackle, swivels and hooks. The "standard" Hangman's Knot holds only five
turns when tied in monofilament nylon. If tied in rope, and used for its stated purpose, it takes eight turns.

• Pass a 15cm loop of line through the eye.

• Bring the end back on itself, passing it under the doubled part.

• Make five loops over the doubled part.

• The formed knot is worked into shape.

• The knot is sent down the line, against the eye of the hook or swivel.

Scaffold Knot

This is a much simpler variant. In all likelihood, this Grant's Uni-Knot. I have used it for more than fifty
years and it has never failed me, whether tied in 1kg or 50kg monofilament. It was taught to me by the
late Wally Kerr, a top flathead fisherman.
• Pass a 15cm loop of line through the eye.

• Lock the upper part between thumb and forefinger, making a loop.

• Make two more loops over the double part, holding them too, between thumb and forefinger.

• Pass the end through the two loops just made, plus the first loop made in step2.

• The formed knot can now be drawn into shape, and worked down against the eye of the hook or swivel.

Snelling A Hook

One small problem is the variety of names that may be applied to the one knot, for example, a Granny is a False Knot, a Clove Hitch is a Waterman's Knot, an
Overhand Knot is a Thumb Knot. But when we come to snelling a hook, the length of nylon attached to the hook may be a snell or a snood.

I now find that the actual job of tying the snood may be called snoozing, while snelling is often jealously thought of as an art restricted to the fly fisherman. I have
fished with bottom-fisherman on the Great Barrier Reef who routinely snell their hooks.

Restricted to lines of breaking strength less than about 20kg, the process is a simple one.

• Pass the end of the line, trace or tippet through the eye twice, leaving a loop hanging below the hook.

• Hold both lines along the shank of the hook.

• Use the loop to wind tight coils around the shank and both lines, from the eye upwards. Use from 5 to 10 turns.

• Use the fingers to hold these tight coils in place. Pull the line (extending from the eye) until the whole loop has passed under these tight coils.

• With coils drawn up, use pliers to pull up the end of the line.

Joining Line To Line

There are two top grade knots used to join one line to another, where these are approximately of the same thickness. These are the Blood Knot and the Hangman's
Knot - also called the Uni Knot by the International Game Fish Association.

Where there diameters are very dissimilar, either the Surgeon's Knot should be used, or the thinner line should be doubled where the knot is formed.

Blood Knot

• Lie the ends of the two lines against each other, overlapping about 15cm.

• Take 5 turns around one line with the end of the other, and bring the end back where it's held between the two lines.

• Repeat by taking 5 turns around the other line, bringing the end back between the two lines. These two ends should then project in opposite directions.

• Work the knot up into loops, taking care that the two ends do not slip out of position.

• Draw the knot up tightly.

Uni-Knot Version Of The Hangman's Knot

A better join can be made using one of the Hangman's Knots, known to the International Game Fish Association fisherman as the Uni-Knot.

This is a knot used for attaching the line to the spool of the reel.
• Overlap the two lines for about 15cm.

• Using one end, form a circle that overlies both lines.

• Pass the end six times around the two lines.

• Pull the end tight to draw the knot up into shape.

• Repeat the process using the end of the other line.

• Pull both lines to slide the two knots together.

Surgeon's Knot

Earlier mention was made that if the two lines to be joined vary greatly in their diameters, the lesser line may be
doubled at the knot, or the Surgeon's Knot may be used. In the latter case, it will probably be necessary to have one of
the lines rolled on a spool, or perhaps wrapped on a temporary card, so that it may be passed through the loop.

• Lay the two lines against each other, overlapping about 22.5 cm.

• Working the two lines as one, tie an Overhand Knot. It will be necessary to pull one line (say the leader)
completely through this loop.

• Pull the leader through this loop again.

• Pass the other end through the loop.

• The formed knot can now be worked into shape.

Spider Hitch

The offshore fisherman often have a need to tie a double line - a long loop of line that is obviously stronger, and easier to handle, than the line itself. In accordance
with International Game Fish Association Rules, the double line may be up to 4.5m long in lines up to 10kg, and as much as 9m in heavier lines.

The double may be tied by means of the simple Spider Hitch with lines to 15kg. The big game boys use the Bimini Twist, a double that is normally formed by two
people who make the intitial twenty twists. The Bimini is obviously beyond the scope of this little book. It's smaller brother, the Spider Hitch, is a much faster and
easier knot for the light tackle fisherman.

• Form a loop of the desired length, say 1.25m.

• Twist a section into a small loop.

• This is the only tricky part - hold this loop with thumb and forefinger, the thumb extending above the finger, and with the loop standing up beyond the tip
of the thumb.

• Wind the doubled line around the thumb and the loop 5 times.

• Send the rest of the long loop through the small loop, and pull gently to unwind the turns off the thumb.

• The knot is now formed and worked into tight coils.

Offshore Swivel Knot

This is a special knot used for attaching a swivel to a double line.

• Put the end of the double line through the eye of the swivel.

• Rotate the end half a turn, putting a single twist between the end of the loop and the swivel eye.

• Pass the loop with the twist over the swivel. Hold the end of the loop, together with the double, with one hand,
and allow the swivel to slide to the end of the double loops that have formed.

• Continue holding the loop and the lines with the right hand. Use the left hand to rotate the swivel through both loops 6 times or more.

• Keep pressure on both parts of the double line. Release the loop. Pull on the swivel and loops of line will start to form.

• Holding the swivel with pliers, or (better still) attaching it with a short length of line to the rigging, push the loop down towards the eye while keeping
pressure on the double line.

Surgeons End Loop

Loops are made for the purpose of attaching leaders, traces or other terminal tackle. They have the advantage that they can be tied quickly and in the dark.

The Surgeon's End Loop is an easy way to go.

• Take the end of the line and double it to form a loop of the required size.
• Tie an Overhand Knot at the desired point, leaving the loop open.

• Bring the doubled line through the loop again.

• Hold the line and the end part together, and pull the loop to form a knot.

Blood Bight Knot

Another end loop can be tied quickly and easily using the Blood Bight Knot.

• Double the line back to make a loop of the size desired.

• Bring the end of the loop twice over the doubled part.

• Now pass the end of the loop through the first loop formed in the doubled part.

• Draw the knot up into shape, keeping pressure on both lines.

The Blood Bight Knot is often used for attaching a dropper when fishing deep water with several hooks.

Some anglers attached the hook directly to the end of the loop, which should be at least 30cm from the end of the line.

This is not a good practice, especially when the fish are shy. Far better to attach a single strand of nylon to a short Blood Bight
Knot, using another Blood Bight Knot, or a Surgeon's Knot.

Dropper Loop

A better method of forming a loop, or loops, in the line above the sinker is to use the old Dropper Loop. This draws into a knot
that stands out at right angles to the line.

If desired, the loops can be made long enough to have a hook set on them. And once again, this is not a good practice unless
the fish are biting-mad, which they rarely are.

• Form a loop in the line.

• Take hold of one side of the loop, and make 6 or more turns around the line itself.

• This is the tricky part - keep open the point where the turns, or twists, are being made.

• Take hold of the other side of the loop, and pull it through the centre opening. use a finger in this loop so that it is not lost.

• Hold this loop between the teeth. Pull gently on both ends of the line, making the turns gather and pack down on either side of the loop.

• Draw up the knot by pulling the lines as tightly as possible. The turns will make the loop stand at right angles to the line.

Tucked Sheet Bend

Usually employed by the fly fisherman, the Tucked Sheet Bend is commonly used for joining the backing line to the tapered line. It is not an especially compact knot,
but has a very strong attachment which cannot be said for the more aesthetically pleasing Perfection Loop.

• Make a Blood Bight (see above) at the end of the backing line.

• Take the end of the tapered line. Pass it through the Blood Bightand make a simple Sheet Bend.

• Now pass the end of the tapered line back through the closed loop of the Sheet Bend.

• Hold both ends of the tapered line to tighten and draw into shape.

Float Stop

The float fisherman uses a running float for casting and general handiness, and stops the float from running up the line by
using the Float Stop. It has the advantage that the stops moves readily over the rod guides, but grips the monofilament nylon
so tightly that it will not slide over the line.

It should be made with about 12.5cm of nylon, usually the same diameter as the line itself.
• Take 2 turns (3 if necessary) around the main line at the chosen point.

• Bring both ends around to form a Surgeon's Knot (see above).

• Tighten into shape bringing the coils close together.

Turle Knot

I have included the still-used Turle Knot for old times sake. Also known as the Turtle Knot, and Major Turle's Knot, it is
simplicity itself to tie, but is one of the weakest knots.

It should never be used for light lines, and there are better knots for use with heavy ones.

• Pass the line through the eye of the hook.

• Make a simple loop.

• Carry the end of the line on to make a Simple Overhand Knot upon the loop.

• Pass the loop over the hook.

• Draw up into shape.

Double Turle Knot

Tied in monofilament nylon, the Turle Knot may slip unless another Simple Overhand Knot is made at the end of the line where it leaves the Turle Knot.

It is improved substantially by using the Double Turle Knot.

• Pass the line through the eye of the hook or swivel.

• Make two simple loops, and carry the line on to make a Simple Overhand Knot around both loops.

• Pass both of these loops over the hook or swivel.

• Pull on both parts of the line to draw the knot up into shape against the eye of the hook or swivel.

Tackle, Rigs & Bait › Rigs

The following illustrations are fairly well all-purpose, but for tropical
waters we strongly suggest that a 35-45lb mono leader be used
prior to attaching a lure. If you are going after fish like mackerel, it
is also a good idea to use black wire and swivels.

Barramundi

For lure fishing simply attach the lure to the end of the line, but don't use a
swivel.

When bait fishing it is far more productive to use a float that breaks loose
when hit.

In both cases use 6-7.5kg (12-15lb) line and 3/0 to 5/0 hooks for bait fishing.
The styrene float is attached to the line using a Float Stop so that it breaks
loose on a strike. Don't half-hitch the line around the float, as the line will
snap if a twist develops.

Bream

Lines are 3kg (6lb) and hooks are No 2, No 1, or 1/0. The trace should be as
long as is manageable in order to tempt timid fish to bite. 1.3m is a good
length.

Cod

Depending on the size of fish targetted, the line can be 10-40kg (20-80lb)
and hooks from 5/0 to 8/0.

Coral Trout

For trolling simply attach the fly, lure or spoon to the line without using a
swivel.

For bottom fishing the line should be 10-30kg (20-60lb) depending on the
size of the fish being targetted and the roughness of the bottom coral. Hooks
need to be 5/0 to 8/0 and attached with a Surgeon's End Loop.

Dart

4-5kg (8-10lb) line and No 2 or No 1 hook.


Flathead

3-5 kg (6-10lb) line in all cases, however the hook size varies from 1/0 to 4/0
depending on the size of fish targetted. A wire trace shouldn't be used but
you can strengthen the nylon trace by doubling it using a Simple Loop Knot.

Hairtail

Lines are 7.5-15kg (15-30lb) using 5/0 to 8/0 hooks. This is one of the few
fish that require a wire trace.

Jewfish

For school jewfish in estuaries, use 7.5-10kg (15-20lb) line and 4/0 to 6/0
hooks. For big jewfish off beaches and rock walls, strengthen up to 15-25kg
(30-50lb) line and 6/0 to 8/0 hooks, and extend the trace 20-40cm.

Mangrove Jack

Use 7.5-20kg (15-40lb) line to stop the fish from diving into snags, and use
4/0 to 6/0 hooks. Never use a wire trace and go to heavier nylon if additional
trace strength is required.

For lure fishing simply attach the lure to the end of the line without a swivel.

Queenfish

For trolling simply attach the lure to the end of the line without a swivel.
For bait fishing the lines are 6-10kg (12-20lb) and 2/0 to 5/0 hooks.

Red Emperor

Deep waters are best fished with a handlines. Use 20-40kg (40-80lb) line and
5/0 to 8/0 hooks.

Snapper

There are 2 good options here, both using 6-15kg (12-30lb) line and 1/0 to
8/0 hooks. (Dropper Loops)

Spanish Mackerel

For lure fishing attach the lure to the end of 12.5-25kg (20-50lb) line without
a swivel. For drift fishing use 12.5-25kg (20-50lb) line and 5/0 to 8/0 ganged
hooks. For both rigs, rather than a wire trace, thread 15 cm of clear plastic
tubing above the lure to avoid making the fish wary.

Sweetlip

Use 7.5-20kg (15-40lb) and 1/0 to 6/0 hooks.

Trevally
For lure fishing attach the lure to the end of 5-15kg (10-30lb) line without a
swivel. For still water fishing use 1/0 to 5/0 hooks.

Tackle, Rigs & Bait › Lures

A lot has been written about the best lure or fly for the job and it is obviously
a very personal thing. It has also been said that lures catch fisherman and
not necessarily fish.

To work properly, an angler must be confident in using


a particular lure, and the best lure for the tropics is a
gold one, and particulalry the spectacularly successful
Gold Bomber.

Having said that, the true skill in lure fishing is to know


exactly:

• Where to place your lure

• How to work it attractively to entice a strike

• What type of bait fish your quarry is likely to feed on

• The working depth and speed required to entice a strike

I have seen too many anglers come to Tropical North Poppers & Leads: Mackerel lure,
Queensland and think that by just chucking any old Kingfisher popper (queenfish, trevally),
Kingfisher popper - river & estuary (barra,

thing out in the water they are going to catch that jacks, trevally, queenfish), Rebel popper -
river & estuary (sooty grunter, tarpon, jungle
perch, trevally)
prized barra, a 'big bastard' marauding Spaniard, or
the bill fish of a lifetime.

It's not that simple, but if you use common sense then it's not that hard
either. Sure there are times when fish will almost jump into the boat, but that
is not the norm and the thinking angler will always come out on top due to
one important fact - our tidal estuary and river fish are basically lazy.

Look at their shape. Big fat fish, broad thick tail, designed for a powerful
burst from cover to ambush their prey. They are not designed to be out in
the middle of nowhere just cruising around waiting for you to show up with
your little bit of plastic.

The lure must be placed within a foot of their ambush


point, or swum past their holding "structure" to be
successful.

Rule 1: For our waters hone up on your casting


skills.

Lure Selection

It is obvious that a 30cm jungle perch is not going to attack an 8 inch Rapala
mackerel lure. They will however smash a 2 inch XYZ lure if it lands close
enough. Most fish are opportunistic feeders and will not pass up an easy
picking.
The size of the lure depends on the target species. Big lures for big
mouthed fish like barra and coral trout. Smaller lures for dainty fish
like jungle perch and sooty grunter.

Next, the natural traveling or tracking depth of a lure should be


considered. Up in the shallow weed beds chasing barra during the wet, a
shallow lure will enable you to work over the cover and entice more strikes.
Down in the mangrove, salt water regions however it may be necessary to
get your lure down a few feet to the structure and a deep diving model
required.

Most anglers also forget what the lure is trying to achieve, and that is to
catch fish by imitating a wounded or dying bait fish. In the wilds anything
that appears to be sick or injured gets eaten. A straight retrieve by just
cranking the reel handle is often just not enough.

Sure the lure swims but that extra critical action must
be imparted to the lure, to make it look like an injured
fish, by deft movement of the rod tip. This is the most
often overlooked and most critical aspect of lure
fishing in tidal estuaries and tropical river
environments.

Out On The Reef

Out on the Reef, poppers and fizzers cranked hard and fast over and near
the coral can entice all manner of strikes from various fish like GT's, coral
trout and even tricky snappers. Shallow running
minnow lures are the same.

You may be chasing feeding tuna around a tightly


knit bait school where matching the live bait size with
a chrome slice or metal lure is smart choice. Whether
you're casting poppers around bommies and coral for Giant black marlin skirted
GT's, or trolling big deep divers or plastic skirted trolling lure
lures for billfish or marlin, each situation and location
has its own preferred rig.

Thankfully, when fishing outside the skipper and crew are experts and know
what works and how to use it. Most visiting anglers will not have the
necessary tools and equipment for offshore work and this task should be left
to the pro's.

What Lures Do We Use Up Here?

Although many anglers will have personal favorites and specific lures that
work well for them a list of the most popular and productive lures for our
region is as follows:

Leads Lures: river & estuary - barra, jacks,


GT's, cod
Bumpa Bars: Locally made stainless steel
blue water & estuary lures
Blue Water: Rapala Magnum, Leads Bibles,
Halco Laser Pro & Reidy's Bib Boss

Gold Bomber: don't let any fish near this


photo!!
C Lures: Barra Pro, Headmaster - ideal river Manns Lures: Stretch, Boof bait - barra,
& estuary lure - barras, jacks, GT's, queenfish jacks, trevally, queenfish, cod
Rapala Range: Husky Jerk - river &
estuary (barra, jacks, trevally), Shad Rapp -
estuary (barra, jacks, GT's), Count Down - river &
estuary (barra, jacks, trevally, tarpon, sooty
grunter)

Fresh Water (Colours: gold, brown, green, pink)


• Rapala Countdown 7cm • Halco Laser Pro 8cm
• Northern Jerk Bait 7cm • 'C' Lures Headmaster 8cm
• Leads Lures Shallow and Deep 8cm • Tilsan Lures 8cm
• Nils Master Spearheads 9cm • Manns Deep and Shallow 8cm
• Reidy's Aqua Rats 9cm

River And Estuary (Colours: gold, brown, blue, green, pink)


• Bomber Gold Long A 13cm • Halco Laser Pro 13cm
• 'C' Lures Barra Pro 11cm Deep • Reidy's Shallow and Deep 12cm
• Leads Lures Deep Diver 10cm • Yo-Zuri Minnow 12cm
• Rapala Husky Jerk 12cm • Manns Stretch 5+ 10+
• Rapala Shad Raps 10cm

Blue Water (Colours: mackerel, red/white, blue, green, silver, pink)


• Rapala CD 18 Minnow • Killalure Evolver
• Halco Laser Pro • Reidy's Big Boss
• Halco Laser Scorpion • "C" Lures Big Eye
• Halco Laser Trembler • Bumpa Bar Chrome Metal
• Killalure MacMagic

Trolling For Barramundi

We have an excellent article by Keith Graham from Bransfords about Trolling


For Barramundi in Cape York explaining how lures can work a treat in the
tropical fisheries of North Queensland.

Glow In The Dark Lures

Here's an interesting one that came across my desk and I couldn't help
sharing it with you. Although I haven't checked out yet whether they work in
our tropical waters, Michigan Stinger Glow in the Dark Lures claim to have
better performance in low light conditions, while still retaining all of the
benefits and features on standard painted and pigmented lures. They might
be just the thing for the deeper, darker reaches of our mangrove-lined
estuaries!

Refer to our Fishing Styles section for more information on specific


habitats.
Tackle, Rigs & Bait › Flies

A lot has been written about the best lure or fly for the job and it is obviously
a very personal thing. It has also been said that lures catch fisherman and
not necessarily fish.

To work properly, an angler must be confident in using


a particular fly, but the true skill in fly fishing is to
know exactly:

• Where to place your fly

• How to work it attractively to entice a strike

• What your quarry is likely to feed on

• The action and speed required to entice a strike

I have seen too many anglers come to Tropical North Queensland and think
that by just chucking any old thing out in the water they are going to catch
that trophy fish of a lifetime.
It's not that simple, but if you use common sense
then it's not that hard either. Sure there are times
when fish will almost jump into the boat, but that is
not the norm and the thinking angler will always
come out on top due to one important fact - our tidal
estuary and river fish are basically lazy.
River & Estuary Flies: Clouser
Look at their shape. Big fat fish, broad thick tail, minnows, streamer flies, pink thing & crab
pattern (barra, jacks, GT's, trevally, cod,
barracuda, flathead)
designed for a powerful burst from cover to ambush
their prey. They are not designed to be out in the middle of nowhere just
cruising around waiting for you to show up with your little bit of plastic.

The fly must be placed within a foot of their ambush point, or swum past
their holding "structure" to be successful.

The first thing that becomes obvious when targeting tropical fish on the long
wand is that our species do not target insects, but instead hunt baitfish,
shrimps, and prawns.

Obviously the fly then must imitate their preferred


food and be presented in a manner that the target
fish will find irresistible. Accuracy with casting is still
of the utmost importance, twitching the fly second
and choosing the right fly for the job possibly third.
Many "experts" will spend hours tying that perfect fly Pink Thing: The proven barra taker
and one of the most popular tropical flies
when in some conditions a piece of tinsel on a small
hook will do even a better job.

This is not meant to lessen the art of fly tying, but to open up the anglers
eyes to the potential of catching fish on fly using very basic techniques:

• Casting the fly to structure, allowing it to settle or drift downwards

• Twitch the fly forward with a deadly stick action

• Hold on!

It's a great thrill to actually see a prime silver barra


materialize from the gloom, suspend beneath that
"Pink Thing" for a fraction of a second before BOOF!!
In an instant it has charged off and the line is burning
your fingers.
Fresh Water: Poppers, dahlberg
divers
Never heard of a Pink Thing? Click here to find
out why it's the best for not just barra, but many other species as
well.

Selecting The Right Fly

Any fish that can be taken on lure can be taken on fly. Upstream in the fresh
water our quarry consists of smaller jungle perch, jacks, sooty grunter and
juvenile barra. A small streamer type fly, dahlberg or clouser is ideal and the
Pink Thing mentioned before is a proven barra taker.

Weight forward sinking lines are preferred, 7/8 weight upstream while an 8/9
outfit is better suited to the salt water environment where slightly larger flies
to 8 cm is preferable. Colors include pink, gold, brown, black, green, blue.

Dinky light tippets are also a no-no as tropical fish hit hard and a minimum
20lb leader tied straight from fly line to fly is OK. Fish to 20lb+ are commonly
encountered, and when they are this size barramundi, GT's, and queenfish
will sure give you a workout. Jacks, cod, flathead and tarpon will also readily
inhale a well presented fly.

Popper flies also work very well, from sooty up in the fresh, to GT's in the salt
or out on the reef. There is no better sight than a fired up fish repeatedly
crashing a surface popper. Once hooked however it's a whole new ball game.
Hang on and do your best to not get scalded fingers.

Plenty of backing is also required in the salt, you just don't know what you
might encounter. Don't say we didn't warn you.

More information on fly fishing opportunities in North Queensland can be


found in our Fishing Styles section.

An easy to tie method of securing the end of the line to the arbor of the fishing reel.
This knot can be found in Practical Fishing Knots by Mark Sosin and Lefty Kreh - in our opinion
the best book written on fishing knots. We have it in our Book Section at the lowest price on the
internet!

Get the ten best fishing knots printed on waterproof plastic cards!
The Fisherman's Ultimate Knot Guide features the ten best fishing
knots and folds out to a 12" ruler! It is the best selling fishing knot
guide in the country and one of our most popular items.
EGG LOOP

The Egg Loop was one of our most requested knots - so here it is. Steelheaders and salmon fishermen rely on this knot to attach a
cluster of eggs or yarn to a hook. It works best with hooks that have turned-up or turned-down eyes.

This knot can be found in Practical Fishing Knots by Mark Sosin and Lefty Kreh - in our opinion the best book written on fishing
knots. We have it in our Book Section at the lowest price on the internet!
NON SLIP MONO LOOP

The Non-Slip Mono Loop doesn’t slip and often tests close to 100 percent of the unknotted line strength. For lines testing
from 8X to six pounds, use seven turns, five turns for lines in the eight to twelve pound class; four turns for fifteen to forty-
pound line; three turns for fifty or sixty pound and two turns for lines heavier than that.

This knot is from Practical Fishing Knots by Mark Sosin and Lefty Kreh - in our opinion the best book written on fishing
knots. We have it in our Book Section at the lowest price on the internet!
SNELL KNOT

Considered by many pros to be the best method of attaching a hook to the end of a line or leader when fishing with bait.
TRILENE KNOT

The Trilene Knot is a strong reliable connection that resists slippage and premature failures.

The Trilene Knot is an all-purpose connection to be used in joining monofilament to swivels, snaps, hooks and artificial lures.
The knot's unique design and ease of tying yield consistently strong, dependable connections while retaining 85-90% of the
original line strength. The double wrap of mono through the eyelet provides a protective cushion for added safety.
EMERGENCY HOOK REMOVAL

The first diagram is for hooks imbedded in loose skin. The hook can be backed out with a loop of
strong monofilament pulling on the bend of the hook while simutaneously pushing down on the
eye of the hook. The second diagram is for hooks embedded in tight skin such as a finger.
Following the natural bend of the hook, feed the hook into the wound until the barb is clear of the
skin. (The worst is over now.) Then clip off the hook barb with pliers or side cutters and feed the
barbless hook back through the wound.
The Baja Knot or Mexican Speed Knot is actually
the Perfection Loop tied with terminal tackle in
the loop. It allows for a strong and easy to tie knot
to be tied in very heavy monofilament fishing line.

After tying the knot it is necessary to secure the


hook in the side of the boat or with pliers and pull
the standing line very firmly to set the knot in
heavy mono. Note that the hook actually hangs
from a non slip loop. This is a benefit when using
live bait as the free swinging hook allows for a
more natural bait behavior.