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GRIPS BULLETIN

2010–2011
Contents

1. Academic Calendar for 2010-2011 ....................................................................................................................... 4

2. Academic Regulations
Course Registration ....................................................................................................................................... 6
GRIPS Assessment Policy ............................................................................................................................. 7
Cheating and Plagiarism ................................................................................................................................ 9
Disciplinary Policy in the Event of Student Misconduct ............................................................................... 10

3. Useful Information for Academic Life


Classification of Course Codes ...................................................................................................................... 11
How to Read Course Codes and Numbers ..................................................................................................... 12
Tips for Successful Studies at GRIPS ............................................................................................................ 13
Where to Buy Textbooks ............................................................................................................................... 14

4. Degree Programs for Master’s Students


Evaluation Criteria & Assessment Structure for Master’s Degree Theses and Papers .................................. 16
Graduation Requirements .............................................................................................................................. 17
Master’s Programs ......................................................................................................................................... 19
Summary Table of Master’s Programs ........................................................................................................... 25
Graduation Requirement Tables .................................................................................................................... 26
List of Courses and Instructors ...................................................................................................................... 37
Course Description ........................................................................................................................................ 42
Timetables ..................................................................................................................................................... 68

5. Degree Programs for Doctoral Students


Overview of the Doctoral Program ................................................................................................................ 74
Requirements for Doctoral Students .............................................................................................................. 75
List of Programs Offered Under the Doctoral Program ................................................................................. 77
Program Requirements .................................................................................................................................. 78
Doctoral Programs ......................................................................................................................................... 79
Summary Table of Doctoral Programs .......................................................................................................... 82
Curriculums ................................................................................................................................................... 83
Timetables ..................................................................................................................................................... 92
Schedule for Evaluation of Doctoral Theses ................................................................................................. 96
Financial Aid for Doctoral Students .............................................................................................................. 97
Information about Policy Analysis Program
Model Schedule ............................................................................................................................... 101
Policy Analysis Program (Economics) Recommended Elective Courses ........................................ 102
Qualifying Exams for the Policy Analysis Program ........................................................................ 103
GRIPS Fellowship Policy ................................................................................................................ 104
GRIPS Fellowship and JICA Scholarship For GRIPS Current Master’s Program Students
An Avenue to Reach Ph.D ................................................................................................... 105
To Receive GRIPS Fellowship or JICA Scholarship ....................................................................... 106
Self Finance Pattern ......................................................................................................................... 107

6. Centers for Language Learning and Academic Literacy


Academic Writing Center (AWC) .................................................................................................................. 108
Center for Japanese Language Learning (CJLL) ........................................................................................... 110

7. Campus, Support, and Services


GRIPS Library ............................................................................................................................................... 112
How to Use the Online Catalog (OPAC) ......................................................................................... 114
My Library: What you can do with “My Library” ........................................................................... 117
IT Support Center .......................................................................................................................................... 120
Logging in to Your PC ..................................................................................................................... 122
GRIPS Webmail ............................................................................................................................... 123
STU-File Server ............................................................................................................................... 125
GRIPS Portal ................................................................................................................................... 126
Campus Plan .................................................................................................................................... 128
Shared PC ........................................................................................................................................ 138
Printer .............................................................................................................................................. 139
Scanner ............................................................................................................................................ 141
GRIPS Network FAQ ...................................................................................................................... 145
Academic and Student Affairs Division ........................................................................................................ 147
Signing the Register ....................................................................................................................................... 149
Temporary Leave ........................................................................................................................................... 150
Leave of Absence .......................................................................................................................................... 151
Expenses and Financial Aid ........................................................................................................................... 152
Scholarship Payment Regulations ................................................................................................................. 153
Accident Property Insurance .......................................................................................................................... 154
Facilities ........................................................................................................................................................ 156
Health Services Center .................................................................................................................................. 158
Alumni Association ....................................................................................................................................... 159

8. Directories
Faculty Directory
By Fields .......................................................................................................................................... 161
Executive Staff ................................................................................................................................. 165
All Faculty ....................................................................................................................................... 166
Floor Map .................................................................................................................................................... 168
Access to GRIPS ......................................................................................................................................... 171
Academic Calendar for 2010-2011
(October 2010 ~ September 2011)
Term Month Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Note Event
26 27 28 29 30 1 2 Oct.4 Entrance Ceremony and Orientation

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Oct. 4 - 5 Initial registration for Fall Term and Fall (Session I) Welcome Party

October 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Oct. 6 Classes for Fall Term and Fall (Session I) commence Medical Check-up

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Oct. 6 - 14 Add/drop for Fall Term & Fall (Session I) Student Council Elections

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Oct. 15 - 28 Withdrawal for Fall Term & Fall (Session I) Fitness Center Training Sessions

31 1 2 3 4 5 6 Tokyo Half-day Tour

7 8 9 10 11 12 13
November
14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Nov. 24 - 25 Initial registration for Fall (Session II)


Fall 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 Dec. 2 Classes for Fall (Session II) commence

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Dec. 2 - 9 Add/drop for Fall (Session II)


December 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Dec. 10 - 16 Withdrawal for Fall (Session II)

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Year-end Party

26 27 28 29 30 31 1 Dec. 29 - Jan. 3 New Year holidays

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15
January
16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 New Year Party

30 31 1 *2 *3 *4 5 Jan. 31 - Feb. 1 Initial registration for Winter Term [*Interterm Period: Feb. 2 - 4]

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Feb. 7 Classes for Winter Term commence Feb. 5 - 6 Field Trip


February
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Feb. 7 - 17 Add/drop Period for Winter Term

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Feb. 18 - 24 Withdrawal for Winter Term Field Trip

27 28 1 2 3 4 5 Farewell Party
Winter
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Mar. 8 Grade release (Fall)
March 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30 31 *1 *2 [*Interterm Period: April 1 - 5]


3 *4 *5 6 7 8 9 Apr. 4 - 5 Initial registration for Spring Term & Spring (Session I)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Apr. 6 Classes for Spring Term & Spring (Session I) commence Welcome Party
April
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Apr. 6 - 21 Add/drop for Spring Term & Spring (Session I) Fitness Center Training Sessions

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Apr. 22 - 28 Withdrawal for Spring Term & Spring (Session I)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 May 11 Grade release (Winter)


May
15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 May 25 - 26 Initial registration for Spring (Session II)


Spring 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 Jun. 1 Classes for Spring (Session II) commence

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Jun. 1 - 9 Add/drop for Spring (Session II)

June 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Jun. 10 - 16 Withdrawal for Spring (Session II)

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Field Trip

26 27 28 29 30 1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16
July
17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 25 26 *27 *28 *29 30 Jul. 25 - 26 Initial registration for Summer Term [*Interterm Period: Jul. 27 - 29]

31 1 2 3 4 5 6 Aug. 1 Classes for Summer Term commence, Aug. 1 - 4 Add/drop Period for Summer Term

7 8 9 10 11 12 13

August 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Summer Party

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Summer 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 Aug. 30 Grade release (Spring and Summer)

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Farewell Party

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Sep. 16 Graduation Ceremony


September
18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30

Course Registration (Please note that schedules are subject to change.)

: Initial registration

: Add/drop

: Withdrawal

: No class (Sundays, National Holidays, and New Year Holidays)


2. Academic Regulations

Course Registration

• Course registration consists of three parts: *No withdrawal period is set for the Summer
initial registration, add/drop, and Term, since most summer courses take the
withdrawal periods. For the registration short-term, intensive approach. Students must
schedule, please check the “Academic drop a course during the add/drop period, or
Calendar for 2010-2011.” successfully complete all course requirements
1. The period for Initial registration is prior to avoid failing any course.
to the commencement of each term’s classes. • In order to select courses effectively, students
You must register in this initial registration are strongly advised to read the course syllabus
period to earn your right to add/drop courses on our website carefully:
later, as well as to attend classes that you wish http://gsys.grips.ac.jp/syllabus/2010/
to take. No credits can be earned for courses
completed without registration.
2. The add/drop period is scheduled for the How to Register
second week of each term (with the exception
of the Spring Term). Students may add/drop • Master’s students (including Policy Analysis
course(s) during this period. Program students for some courses) must
3. The withdrawal period provides the only register online using the Campus Plan.
option to leave a course following the end of • Doctoral students must submit the “Course
the add/drop period. The deadline to withdraw Registration Form.” (No email/fax submissions
is in the fourth week of each term (with the accepted.)
exception of the Winter Term). A student must *For online registration details, please refer to
submit a “Withdrawal from Course the “Campus Plan” page.
Registration” form (available at the Academic
and Student Affairs Division). Email or fax
submissions are not accepted. The transcript
will indicate a ‘W’ grade. Students cannot
withdraw after the withdrawal deadline.
GRIPS Assessment Policy
Assessment Information extent of the collaboration and the identity of co-workers
Provided on Syllabus should be specified in all joint assignments.

All information about assessment for individual courses (4) Requests for extensions
will be provided in the detailed syllabus available at the A student who cannot meet the deadline for an
beginning of the course. This will include: assignment should discuss the situation with the
instructor. Penalties for late work (where there is no
• the assessment plan, including the
good reason) will be set out in the course outline.
marking/grading system to be used, and the
weights allocated to each significant grading
component (5) Special consideration
• examination/submission dates (a) Students who have suffered serious illness or
misadventure beyond their control, which they believe
• penalties for late submission
has affected their assessment work, should submit a
• other requirements if any
“Request for Special Consideration” form, available at
Once a course has started, instructors may change the
the Academic Support Team counter, as soon as possible.
requirements only after obtaining the agreement of all
The completed documents, including any medical
students concerned and informing the Academic Support
certificates or other certified official documents that are
Team.
specific about the duration and severity of the problem,
should be returned to the Academic Support Team, who
will forward them to the instructor.
Procedure before Final Grades
(b) Students should note that work, family, sporting
(1) Assessment during the course and social commitments are not normally seen as
All items of assessment completed during the term will being beyond a student’s control and so would not
be returned promptly to students by the faculty member normally be accepted as grounds for special
with a mark or grade and, where appropriate, comments. consideration.
Instructors should also provide information on the grade
distribution for the class for each item of progressive (c) If the student is not satisfied with the initial response
assessment during the term, so that students can gauge to their “Request for Special Consideration”, then the
their own performance against that of other class student may submit a request for further consideration to
members. Students are required to keep the original the Program Director through the Academic Support
assignment in case they appeal the final grade. Team.

(2) Meeting all assessment requirements (d) Contact the Academic Support Team for further
Courses include different forms of assessment, such as information regarding applications for special
class exercises, assignments, quizzes, tests or consideration.
examinations. Students need to ensure they have
completed all the required forms of assessment at the (6) Withdrawal procedure for a course
designated time. Failure to attend a class where After the registration period, a student can withdraw
instructions or work was given is not a valid excuse. from a course without penalty during the add/drop
period. After the add/drop period ends, students can still
(3) Students’ own work withdraw from the course before the final withdrawal
All work submitted for assessment should be the deadline. In this case, a grade of W will be shown on
student’s own work, and should not be the result of their transcript. Students cannot withdraw after the
collaboration with others, unless it is clearly indicated in withdrawal deadline. The Academic calendar shows
the assessment details that the submitted assessment may these specific dates for each term and course type.
be a joint work or collaborative effort. The nature and
Final Grades (3) Release of course results
Course results are submitted to the Academic Support
(1) Final Grades Team by the third week after the end of the term. All
The following grading scale will apply: students will be issued an official result notice providing
the details of courses completed and grades awarded
A 90-100 Outstanding performance after each term, within ten working days of the final
B 80-89 Superior performance submission date.
C 70-79 Satisfactory performance
D 60-69 Acceptable minimum performance
E 0-59 Unsatisfactory Appeal

P Pass (in courses designated Pass/Fail) (a) If students have concerns regarding their grade in a
F Fail (in courses designated Pass/Fail) course, they should first approach the course instructor to
discuss their performance.
W Withdraw
(b) A student who, after speaking with the course
(2) Grade distribution guidelines: instructor, still wishes to appeal the grade, must submit a
For courses with letter grades, the grade distribution request in writing to the Program Director through the
should satisfy both the Mean GPA criterion and the Academic Support Team within three weeks of the
reasonable distribution criterion. release of results. If appropriate, the Program Director
will seek the advice of the course instructor and the Dean,
(a) Mean Grade Point Average Criterion: and arrange for the work to be reassessed. The Program
The course should have a mean GPA in the range of Director will decline to take action if there are
3.1 – 3.5, where A, B, C, D, E, carry grade points of 4, 3, insufficient reasons given to justify reassessment. In
2, 1, 0, respectively. particular, a deviation from the grade guidelines is not
sufficient grounds for a review. If the course instructor
(b) Reasonable Distribution Criterion: is the Program Director, then the request will go directly
The distribution of grades should be within the to the Dean.
following range:
(c) When the piece of assessment in contention is a
A 20-50% of class group assignment, the formal request for review must be
B 30-70% of class signed by all members of the group and submitted as
C < 25% of class above.
D < 10% of class
E < 10% of class (d) As noted previously, all marked work returned to a
student must be kept by the student in case it is required
If the grade distribution guidelines are not met, the for reassessment purposes. Reassessment will not be
instructor should provide the reasons. approved in cases where the student cannot provide the
original marked piece of work.
Cheating and Plagiarism

GRIPS View of Cheating and Plagiarism • Helping others to cheat in these ways is also a form
of cheating;
Cheating and plagiarism is viewed as a serious offense by • Falsifying data. This means manipulating research
the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies materials or processes, or changing or omitting data
(GRIPS). It directly affects the morale of your fellow or results, such that the research is not accurately
students and lowers the reputation of the School. Cheating represented in the research record. While there is
and plagiarism, therefore, will not be tolerated and may considerable leeway in interpreting data, the data
result in serious penalties, including suspension or itself must not be manipulated or distorted.
expulsion from the School. All staff and students have a
responsibility to prevent, discourage, and report cheating. Definition of Plagiarism
For more information about penalties, see the Plagiarism is the copying of ideas, wording, or anything
“Disciplinary Policy in the Event of Student Misconduct.” else from another source without appropriate reference or
acknowledgement so that it appears to be one’s own work.
Definition of Cheating This includes published and unpublished work, the
Cheating is behaving in a fraudulent way in university Internet, and the work of other students and staff.
coursework and examinations. Cheating includes
passing off work done by someone else as your own Examples of Plagiarism
work, or otherwise trying to gain an unfair advantage. Examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to:

Examples of Cheating • The submission of a work, either in part or in whole,


Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to: completed by another;
• Failure to give credit for ideas, statements, facts, or
• Impersonating someone else in a test or examination, conclusions which rightfully belong to another;
or arranging such impersonation; • Paraphrasing the ideas, interpretation, or expressions
• Copying from another student during a test or of another without giving credit;
examination; • In written work, failure to use quotation marks when
• Referring to notebooks, papers, or any other quoting directly from another, whether it be a
materials during a closed-book exam; paragraph, a sentence, or even a part thereof;
• Submitting work for which credit has already been • Using another writer’s whole paper (or a substantial
received in another course without the express part), even with a citation.
consent of the instructor;
Disciplinary Policy in the Event of
Student Misconduct
[1] Misconduct in Academic Activities [4] Disciplinary Procedures
1. Misconduct during an examination refers to any Disciplinary action for students suspected of
behavior considered improper for a graduate student misconduct shall be determined and executed as follows:
under instruction, such as using non-permitted materials 1. In the case of misconduct relating to academic
in a test site, including “cheat notes” constructed by the activities, the faculty member in charge of the applicable
student, non-permitted devices, or another person’s course shall report the details of the conduct to the Dean
answer sheets. of the Graduate School. In the case of misconduct in
2. Misconduct in the context of a research paper refers non-academic activities, the faculty member with
to the unattributed use of a source of information that is knowledge of the details of the offense shall report the
not considered common knowledge (plagiarism), details to the Dean of the Graduate School.
intentional falsification of analytical results and/or 2. The Dean of the Graduate School shall report the
research data, and other such unsuitable behaviors. details of the incident to the University President and
shall convene an investigative committee composed of
[2] Misconduct in Non-Academic Activities the Dean of the Graduate School (committee chair), the
Misconduct in Non-Academic Activities refers to Vice-President for Academic Affairs, the Program
any conduct that would disrupt the good order of the Director, the instructor of the relevant course, and others
university, or any unsuitable behavior for a student under as deemed necessary.
instruction. 3. The investigative committee shall consider the facts
relevant to the case, develop a proposal for the penalty,
[3] Penalties and submit the proposal to the University President.
1. In accordance with Article 56 of the School 4. The University President shall receive the
Regulations, disciplinary action taken with regard to aforementioned proposal from the investigative
students found guilty of misconduct may include a committee, develop a proposal for final disposition, and
reprimand, suspension, or expulsion from the university. present it for deliberation at the Council for Research and
Suspension may be of two types, either for a period of Education, upon which the results shall be finalized.
between one week and three months, or for a period of 5. The University President shall notify the relevant
six months. The date on which the disciplinary action student regarding the contents of the disciplinary action.
goes into effect shall in principle be the same date on 6. In the event that the student files an objection about
which the notice of said action is issued. the decision, the University President shall have the
2. Treatment of misconduct in academic activities investigative committee engage in further consideration
(1) In the event of a reprimand, the student’s of the matter. The investigative committee shall take into
enrollment in the relevant course shall be annulled. consideration the contents of the student’s objection, and
(2) In the event of a suspension, the student’s report its results to the University President.
enrollment in the relevant course shall be annulled. 7. In the event that a change occurs in the contents of
Further, depending on the severity of the case, the the proposal for penalty, the revised proposal shall once
student’s enrollment in all courses for the relevant again be placed before the Council for Research and
term (the term in which the misconduct occurred) Education, and upon deliberation, the proposal shall be
or the relevant school year may also be annulled. finalized.
(3) During the period of suspension, the student 8. Disciplinary action in response to student
shall not be allowed to register for courses, attend misconduct, including details regarding the misconduct
classes, or take exams. and penalty, shall be publicized within the university.
3. Treatment of misconduct in non-academic activities The publication of information will omit the student’s
This shall be decided on a case-by-case basis. name and school identification number.
3. Useful Information for Academic Life

Classification of Course Codes

By Alphabetical Order By Types and Disciplines


University Wide Courses
CUL Cultural Policy
• Economics
DEV Development ECO
DMP Disaster Management Policy Program IDS: Many economics courses are offered
under this code.
ECO Economics
EDU Educational Policy • Political Science, International Relations and
EPP Economics, Planning and Public Policy Public Administration
Program (Indonesia Linkage) GOV
GEN General LAW
PAD
GOV Government (Political Science, International
Relations)
• Multi Disciplinary Policy Studies
IDS International Development Studies Program DEV
IPR Intellectual Property Right Program EDU
(Japanese) GEN
JLC Graduate Program in Japanese Language and MOR
Culture TEC
LAN Japanese (Language), English (Language)
• Language
LAW Law
LAN
MOR Mathematics and Operations Research
PAD Public Administration Program Specific Courses
PFP Public Finance Program CUL
EDU
PPP Public Policy Program EPP
REG Regional Policy IDS
TEC Science and Technology Policy IPR
PFP
TEP Asian Economic Policy Program
PPP
UPP Urban Policy Program (Japanese) REG
YLP Young Leaders Program TEP
UPP
YLP

Independent Program Courses


DMP
JLC
How to Read Course Codes and Numbers

First Digit of the Three Digit Number • DMP Courses


Shows the Level of the Course 2nd digit Subjects
0-1 Disaster Management Policy (Common
subjects including thesis)
1st digit Level
2-3 Seismology
1 Introductory courses 4-5 Earthquake Engineering
2 2nd level courses 6-7 Tsunami Disaster
3 3rd level courses 8-9 Water-related Disaster Management
4 Thesis writing and related courses
5 Other special courses
6-9 Reserved for higher level courses
First Alphabet after the Three Digit Number
Shows the Language of Instruction
Second Digit of the Three Digit Number
Shows Subjects under the Specific Code E English
J Japanese

• ECO Courses
2nd digit Subjects
Second Alphabet after the Three Digit
0 Economic Theory
(Microeconomics, Macroeconomics) Number Shows the Section
1 Public Finance, Social Security,
Labor Economics A Section A
2 Regulatory Economics, B Section B
Law and Economics
3 Urban Economics,
Transportation Economics
4 International Economics Example
5 Environmental Economics
6 Finance, Macroeconomic Policy, Economics
Monetary Policy Introductory
7 Econometrics, Cost Benefit Analysis ECO102EA
Theory (Micro) English
8 Development Economics Section A
9 Others

• GOV Courses
2nd digit Subjects
1 Domestic Politics
2 International Politics
3 Comparative Politics
4 Regional Study
5 Public Administration
6 Topics in Policy Studies
7 Political Philosophy, Political Ideas
8 Unfixed
9 Others
Tips for Successful Studies at GRIPS

Preparing for Lectures During Examinations

• You should be sure to read a lecture’s assigned • Make sure to allocate your time appropriately: you
readings before the lecture in order to gain the most do not want to get stuck spending too much time on
from the class and be able to ask good questions. a question not worth many points while neglecting
• Review your lecture notes after each class to make to answer other questions which may provide many
sure you understand everything. more points.
• Follow the exam directions carefully and also make
sure you answered each part of the question.
Preparing for Examinations • Try to write legibly.
• If you have time, review your answers before
• It’s okay to ask what course material is most submitting them.
important for the exam, as well as to ask about the
format of the exam and whether any practice exams
are available. Allocating Your Time during Term
• Try predicting what exam questions could be using
your lecture notes, problem sets, and readings. Then • The end of the term is usually a very busy time,
develop answers for these questions. with many examinations and papers due in a short
• Try explaining difficult topics to your friends. It period. You shouldn’t procrastinate. Begin writing
will help to test your understanding. your papers as soon as you can, and study the
• If you still have questions about a topic as you course materials throughout the term so that the end
prepare for the exam, ask the professor about it of the term is not so hectic.
during office hours or a review session.
• Be sure to get enough sleep and eat healthy foods
while you are studying.
Where to Buy Textbooks

Maruzen (Marunouchi)

Location: Two-minute walk from JR Tokyo Station, Marunouchi North Exit


Opening Hours: 9:00-21:00
Tel: 03-5288-8881
Foreign Books: 4th Floor

Marunouchi OAZO

Marunouchi
Maruzen
North Exit

JR Tokyo Station

Kinokuniya (Shinjuku South Store)

Location: Six-minute walk from JR Shinjuku Station, South Exit


or three-minute walk from JR Yoyogi Station, East Exit
Opening Hours: 10:00-20:00 from Monday to Friday, Sunday, 10:00-20:30 on Saturday
Tel: 03-5361-3316
Foreign Books: 6th Floor
URL: http://www.kinokuniya.co.jp/english/index.html

Meiji Dori

Koushukaido
Kinokuniya
Police (Shinjuku South Store)
Box

Shinjuku
Takshimaya
Department Store

East
Exit
JR Shinjuku JR Yoyogi
Station Station

South
Exit
Yaesu Book Center (Main Store)

Location: Five-minute walk from JR Tokyo Station, Yaesu South Exit


or Tokyo Metro Ginza Line, Kyobashi Station, Exit 7
Opening Hours: 10:00-21:00 from Monday to Friday, 10:00-20:00 on Saturday, Sunday national holiday,
Tel: 03-3281-1811
Foreign Books: 8th Floor

Sotobori-Dori

Yaesu Chuo Exit

JR Tokyo
Yaesu Dori
Station

Yaesu South Exit

Chuo-Dori

Exit 7
Yaesu Book Center
Ginza Line (Tokyo Metro),
Kyobashi Station

Ordering Books at Amazon

Visit www.amazon.co.jp and click “IN ENGLISH” in the upper right corner.
4. Degree Programs for Master’s Students

Evaluation Criteria & Assessment Structure


for Master’s Degree Theses and Papers

Evaluation Criteria Assessment Structure

Most of the students at GRIPS are mid-career Each program should organize viva voce presentations
bureaucrats sent from governmental organizations and, that include question and answer sessions, with the
thus, master’s theses are aimed at improving assessment status decided by judges composed of
policymaking ability. Specific policy issues that are of academic supervisors and program committee
interest to each individual student are selected, with members. Based on assessment results, final passing
analyses of policy effectiveness carried out based on status will be determined by the Board of Research
disciplines in various inter-disciplinary academic and Education, following an assessment by the
fields (economics, politics, public administration, Master's Programs Committee.
engineering, etc.) along with analyses such as policy
evaluation. When evaluating a master’s thesis or
research paper on a specific topic, criteria for
assessment shall be determined by the degree of
objective and rational analyses, based on various
scholarly methodologies in accordance with the topic’s
distinguishing features, as evaluated independently by
each respective program.

Each program must thoroughly disseminate the


evaluation criteria during the orientation process at the
start of each course.
Graduation Requirements
For international students, the minimum residential requirement to obtain a Master’s degree is one year, and most students can satisfy all requirements for the degree within that time.

Program Credit Requirement Thesis Requirement Degree


Young Leaders (School of Government) (School of Government) Master of Public Administration
Program Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 16 of which Students must produce a mandatory paper on Master of Public Policy
must come from Category I, at least 6 of which must come from their area of Independent Study. They must then
Category II, and the rest from Categories III and IV in Table III give a presentation on the paper and submit it in
Master's Programs 9-1 (Young Leaders Program). accordance with the assigned format. The
Program Director will provide guidance for this.

(School of Local Governance) (School of Local Governance)


Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 18 of which Students will produce a Research Paper. The
must come from Category I, 4 of which from Category II, and the Program Director will provide guidance for this.
rest from Categories II, III and Ⅳ in Table III Master's Programs
9-2 (Young Leaders Program).

One-year Master’s Students must complete a minimum of 36 credits, 10 of which A policy paper is mandatory. Master of Public Policy
Program of Public must come from Category I in table III Master's Programs 10 The paper must be submitted in line with the Master of Public Administration
Policy (MP1) (One-year Master’s Program of Public Policy). assigned format. The Program Director will
provide guidance for this.

Two-year Master’s Students must complete a minimum of 48 credits, including 20 Students are expected to find and develop their Master of Arts in Public Policy
Program of Public units of required core courses (Category I) and 6 to 8 units of thesis topic, over the first year’s coursework.
Policy (MP2) disciplinary required courses (Category II). In the second year, students devote a substantial
amount of time to writing their thesis on the
topic of their choice.

Asian Economic Students must complete a minimum of 38 credits, 16 of which A policy proposal paper is mandatory. The Master of Public Policy
Policy Program must come from Category I, 6 from Category II, and 8 from Program Director will provide details.
Category III in Table III Master's Programs 11 (Transition
Economy Program). The remaining 6 credits may be taken from
Categories II, III, or IV in Table III Master's Programs 11
(Transition Economy Program).
Program Credit Requirement Thesis Requirement Degree
Public Finance Students must complete a minimum of 36 credits and meet the A thesis paper is required. All scholars in the Master of Public Finance
Program following requirements: (a) Tax students must take the following Public Finance program must complete two
courses: PFP252E, PFP501E, ECO100EB, ECO310E, ECO312E, required courses of 2 credits each, namely,
ECO410E, and ECO411E from Category I in Table III Master's Workshop in Public Finance I and II. Students
Courses 12 (Public Finance Program). (b) Customs students must will produce their thesis papers under the
take the following courses: PFP250E, PFP502E, PFP503E, guidance of a supervisor.
PFP504E, ECO100EB, ECO310E, , ECO410E, and ECO411E
from Category I in Table III Master's Programs 12 (Public Finance
Program).

International Students must complete a minimum of 40 credits, 18 of which An ADR (Applied Development Research) Master of International
Development must come from Category I and another 16 from Categories II and paper, which is the MA thesis substitute, is Development Studies
Studies Program III including a minimum of 6 from Category II in Table III required.
Master's Programs 13 (International Development Studies
Program).

Graduate Program in Students must complete a minimum of 33 credits, 8 of which must A research paper on a specific subject is one of Master of Japanese Language and
Japanese Language come from Category I, 12 from Category II, 6 from Category III the requirements for the MA degree. The Culture
and Culture and 7 from Category IV. (Graduate Program in Japanese Language Program Committee will provide guidance for Master of Japanese Language
and Culture) this. Education
Disaster (Earthquake Disaster Mitigation & Tsunami Disaster Mitigation) A research paper on a specific subject is one of Master of Disaster Management
Management Policy Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 6 of which must the requirements for the MA degree. The
Program come from Category II in Table III Master's Programs 15-1 subject and instructor for individual study are
(Disaster Management Policy Program). decided on through discussion with the teaching
staff.
(Water-related Disaster Management)
Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 16 of which
must come from Category II in Table III Master's Programs 15-2
(Disaster Management Policy Program).

Economics, Planning Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 4 of which must A research paper on a specific subject is one of Master of Public Policy
and Public Policy come from Category I and 16 from Category II in Table III the requirements for the MA degree. The
Program (Indonesia Master's Programs 14 (Economics, Planning and Public Policy subject and instructor for independent study are
Linkage Program) Program). decided on through discussions with the
program committee.
Master’s Programs

Master’s Programs policy-making, as well as opportunities for


(International Programs) intensive discussions with politicians, high-level
government officials, corporate directors,
journalists, and other Japanese leaders. The
Master’s programs for international students
Program also includes Field Trip/Workshop I-II
commence in October. All courses are conducted in
and a final paper based on the Independent
English (except the ones for Graduate Program in
Study/Research Paper.
Japanese Language and Culture).

One-year Master’s Program of Public Policy


Young Leaders Program
(MP1)
(School of Government/School of Local
This program is designed for early- and mid- career
Governance)
professionals and staff members in local or national
The YLP-GRIPS School of Government was
governments, as well as international organizations, in
launched in 2001, and is supported by the Young
fundamental skills for analyzing and implementing
Leaders Program (YLP) scholarship from the
public policy.
Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports,
The curriculum features rigorous academic
Science and Technology. In addition, GRIPS
training in economics, political science, and
launched the School of Local Governance in 2009,
international relations, within which students
which is also supported by the YLP scholarship
choose their own fields of concentration.
program. The program is designed to further cultivate
It also offers practical courses taught by former
future national leaders.
and current Japanese government officials who are
involved in real-life policy formulation. This blend
Its objectives are to:
of academic and practical knowledge gives students
1. Cultivate future national leaders
a solid foundation for analyzing public policy, and
2. Create comprehensive human networks between
prepares them to make valuable contributions to
the leaders
policy development in their home countries.
3. Establish friendly relations between countries
Young officials of government organizations and
4. Improve the quality of policy planning in
talented scholars interested in the field of public
participating countries
policy are welcome to apply. Asian Development
The program is designed to expand students’
Bank (ADB) scholarship may be awarded to young
comparative as well as historical knowledge of
government officials from Asian countries;
global and regional politics and economics, while
Japanese government scholarship may be awarded
cultivating an in-depth understanding of Japanese
to other government officials and researchers. The
politics and economy.
Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East
This program is open to exceptionally promising
Asia (ERIA) scholarship is available to government
young people with work experiences in the area of
officials and senior students from ASEAN
public administration. In principle, a minimum of
countries that are planning on government careers.
three years field-relevant work experience in the
applicant’s home country is a prerequisite for
Two-year Master’s Program of Public Policy
admission to the program. Students will be
admitted based on an appraisal of their potential to (MP2)
become future leaders in public service; fulfill This program is designed for pre- and early- career
important roles in their country’s development; and professionals and staff members in local or national
maintain lasting friendship and trust between Japan governments, international organizations, and private
and other countries. companies, and aims to equip them with the
The curriculum covers a wide range of topics fundamental skills for analyzing and implementing
pertaining to public administration and public policy.
Public Finance Program
The first year curriculum focuses on rigorous This program is for fiscal professionals in the area of
study of fundamental public policy theories. In the taxation and customs.
second year, students focus on one of three The major objective of the Public Finance
disciplines, namely Public Economics, Political Program is to provide students with the conceptual
Science, and Social Engineering, and shape their understanding and technical competence to become
master’s degree. leaders in taxation and customs. The curriculum is
designed for government officials from developing
Asian Economic Policy Program countries worldwide who are currently working in
The Asian Economic Policy Program aims to tax or customs administration or equivalent
educate government officials of Asian countries in departments. In accordance with their background,
market-oriented economic management. students in this Program specialize in either tax or
Many Asian countries face enormous challenges customs policy and administration. The Program
in maintaining economic stability and achieving provides rigorous academic training aimed at
sustainable economic growth- both fundamental developing an understanding of the theoretical,
objectives of macroeconomic policies. Achieving empirical, and institutional aspects of tax and
sustainable growth and development requires customs administration. Administrative aspects and
guidance and leadership from educated, qualified reforms in the field of taxation and customs are
policymakers who are equipped with the required studied and linked to developing countries’
macroeconomic knowledge and analytical skills. economic and social development. A practicum at
The Asian Economic Policy Program is designed the National Tax Administration or the Customs
to cultivate macroeconomic policymakers from Training Institute provides an opportunity for
these countries. Its curriculum covers fundamental students to enhance their learning with hands-on
macroeconomic principles and methodologies for experience in a tax/customs-related work
economic policy analysis. The courses deal with environment and to integrate this experience with
macroeconomic and structural aspects, including their formal education. Scholarships are provided
policies aimed at establishing sound by the joint Japan/World Bank Graduate
macroeconomic fundamentals, trade liberalization, Scholarship Program and the World Customs
a robust financial system, and a vast private sector; Organization.
but ample attention is also given to a broader range
of developmental issues such as the role of International Development Studies Program
government, institution-building, the environment, The GRIPS-FASID (Foundation for Advanced
and sustainable development. Studies on International Development) Joint
Scholarships for this program are provided by the Program in cooperation with the Ministry of
Japanese government and administered by the Foreign Affairs and the Japan International
International Monetary Fund (IMF). They are Cooperation Agency (JICA) offers graduate
offered to promising young officials from the training in the field of development studies as of
following Asian countries: Bangladesh, Bhutan, 2009. The Program is designed for professionals in
Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, development assistance and program planning, and
Kyrgyz, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, explores effective development policies within the
Myanmar, Nepal, Pacific Island countries, Papua context of the development process, and the
New Guinea, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, curriculum covers a broad range of critical issues
Thailand, Timor-Leste, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, with a special focus on emerging global and
and Vietnam. The program is primarily aimed at regional concerns.
officials of various ministries of finance, economy, Through systematic and intensive training in this
and planning, as well as central banks. However, area, the Program equips students with high-level
suitable candidates from other parts of government abilities in theoretical thinking and practical
are also admitted. applications. The core courses provide students
with an understanding of the basic framework of
international development studies and problems by
utilizing standard economic theories and should be promoted in multi-disciplinary ways. To
quantitative methods. Elective courses provide meet this need, disaster management experts must
students with a deep understanding of such issues be cultivated through professional education and
as poverty reduction, the role of governance in the training, so that they may develop, then apply
development process, and technology and the suitable disaster management policies and
environment. techniques in line with local conditions.
Scholarships for this Program are provided by In order to enhance the capacity of professionals
the Japanese government through JICA, and are in developing countries to cope with natural
available to students from Bangladesh, Cambodia, disasters, the National Graduate Institute for Policy
China, Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Studies (GRIPS) offers a master’s degree program
Indonesia, Kenya, Laos, Madagascar, Malaysia, in Disaster Management Policy. This Program is
Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, offered jointly with the International Institute of
Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Sri Seismology and Earthquake Engineering (IISEE) of
Lanka, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Vietnam, the Building Research Institute (BRI); the
Zambia, and Zimbabwe. International Centre for Water Hazard and Risk
Management (ICHARM) of the Public Works
Graduate Program in Japanese Language Research Institute (PWRI); and the Japan
and Culture (conducted in Japanese) International Cooperation Agency (JICA). This
The Graduate Program in Japanese Language and program is administered as a JICA training program
Culture is designed for foreign teachers of the under Official Development Assistance from the
Japanese language who teach overseas. The Government of Japan.
Program’s goal is to prepare graduates who will The program is designed for disaster risk
become leaders in the academic world of Japanese management professionals in developing countries to
language education in their own countries. acquire knowledge in seismology, earthquake
The first of its kind in Japan, this Program offers engineering, tsunami disaster mitigation, and
an entirely new and interdisciplinary approach to water-related disasters, as well as basic knowledge
Japanese language education and Japanese Studies necessary for disaster risk management; learn
by helping students gain a thorough understanding theories on which disaster management policies are
of Japanese culture and society. GRIPS offers the based, while studying Japanese policies and
Program in conjunction with the Japan Foundation systems; and cultivate the capability to develop
Japanese-Language Institute (JFJLI), Urawa. JFJLI concrete technologies and policies in line with local
is a leading educational institution in Japan with a conditions, by utilizing an approach that
long tradition of excellence in Japanese language emphasizes problem-solving.
education and in teaching Japanese to foreign
educators. Economics, Planning, and Public Policy
Courses are divided into three fields: Japanese Program
language; language education; and society, culture, This program is designed for government officials to
and region studies. Students have the opportunity to contribute to good governance and economic
return to their home country to conduct research, as development in Indonesia.
well as take part in an internship to improve their Indonesia is undergoing enormous
teaching methods. transformation. The “two D’s”-robust
democratization and radical decentralization-are
Disaster Management Policy Program fundamentally reshaping the country's political,
Natural disasters result in crippling economic economic and social landscape. To help Indonesia
losses and human tragedy, hampering development, meet the challenges arising from this
particularly in developing countries, where many transformation, the GRIPS-Indonesia Linkage
people reside in buildings and areas that are Master's Program (LMP) was designed to develop
vulnerable to natural disasters. In order to reduce highly capable central and local government
the effects of natural disasters, and human losses in officials who will contribute to Indonesia's capacity
particular, proactive disaster risk management to continue on the road to good governance and
economic prosperity. pre-doctoral curriculum. Both paths focus on
This collaborative academic program is offered cultivating abilities in problem analysis and policy
by GRIPS and Indonesia's premier national planning. Graduates of the Program will be able to
universities (Universitas Indonesia, Institut offer valuable contributions in the field of public
Teknologi Bandung, Universitas Gadja Mada, and policy.
Universitas Brawijaya). During the two-year
Program, with the first year in Indonesia and the Development Policy Program
second one at GRIPS, the students enjoy excellent This program is designed for professionals in the
opportunities to combine theory with practical field of development projects, and its objective is
skills and research with action. Special emphasis is similar to that of the Public Policy Program.
placed on developing core skills in areas that will However, the particular focus of this Program is the
be valuable to them: economics, political science, implementation of development projects. This
public policy, and public management. The Program seeks to attract not only junior and
Program’s approach is multidisciplinary and covers mid-career officials of the national government, but
a wide range of topics, allowing the fellows to also staff of public and quasi-public corporations as
select the courses that suit their individual needs. well as private companies involved in
GRIPS offers a distinctive learning environment implementing development projects in cooperation
in which the LMP students have abundant with the public sector. While candidates for the
opportunities to interact with and learn from a Public Policy Program typically have
diverse international group of faculty members and undergraduate training in law, economics, political
their own peers-mid-career government officials science, or public administration, the Development
from all over the world. In addition, the faculty's Policy Program is geared toward people with an
vast network of contacts, along with the campus's engineering background.
ideal location in the heart of metropolitan Tokyo, In addition to addressing policy questions, the
provides the students with uniquely easy access to Program is concerned with critically evaluating the
the Japanese policymaking community. impact of policy at strategic and practical levels.
The Program aims to give a firm grounding in
economics and management and familiarize
Master’s Programs students with basic policymaking tools needed for
(Domestic Programs) the socio-economic development of a country.
Other main subjects include economics of the
Domestic programs at the master’s level commence public sector, private finance initiatives, project
in April. All courses are conducted in Japanese. feasibility and evaluation methods, project cycle
management, project implementation, and global
issues for sustainability.
Public Policy Program
The Public Policy Program targets individuals from
a wide variety of backgrounds relevant to policy Regional Policy Program
research. Students include administrative officials The dilemmas, problems, and opportunities facing
who are candidates to become officers in central today’s regional areas are manifold, and only
government ministries and agencies, as well as through rigorous analysis and planning can decision
aspiring policy analysts. The Program is designed makers arrive at policies that encourage the growth
for government officials with extensive knowledge of and development of a particular region. The
policy analysis, and cultivate professional leaders Regional Policy Program is designed to prepare
and innovative policy analysts who possess not local government officials/professionals to examine
only highly technical knowledge but also awareness and analyze regional problems, devise effective
of the social responsibilities attendant upon their strategies for solving those problems, and guide the
positions. implementation of those plans. It teaches public
This Program acts as GRIPS’ core program and policy knowledge and techniques with an emphasis
aims to meet diverse needs. Students can choose on regional issues to a target group of junior and
either a terminal master’s degree or an intensive mid-career local government officials who will be
taking policy initiatives and devising new strategies intellectual property law and introductory
as the local government executives of the future. economics, as well as interdisciplinary subjects,
The Program’s core courses provide a firm basis such as law and economics and science and
for logical thinking and analysis, develop technology, which are crucial for evaluating
sensitivity to policy problems, and enhance intellectual property strategy and policies. Guest
students' planning abilities. The curriculum also lectures by policy makers, lawyers, attorneys, and
includes a policy research seminar and several businesspeople in charge of intellectual property
other courses in which students are exposed to a strategy demonstrate practical knowledge in
broad array of issues, information, and methods. In addition to specialized knowledge. Policy courses
the seminar, students develop relevant solutions to require students to participate in discussions about
real-world policy issues facing local governments. ideal intellectual property strategy for governments
Students prepare a proposal paper in which they and corporations, applying the methodology of law
present their own policy issue responses. and economics as well as science and technology.
We expect the results of these discussions to be
Cultural Policy Program reflected in government and corporate intellectual
This program is designed for leaders in cultural property strategy planning and design, as well as in
policy; its purpose is to cultivate professionals and each student’s career. The Program offers a wide
specialists in the field of cultural policy. Graduates variety of applied courses and accepts transfer
are expected to play leading roles in cultural policy credits from relevant courses in Local Autonomy
research and/or the design and implementation of College, Takasaki City University of Economics
future cultural policy, cultural administration, and and Seikei University Law School. This system
cultural diplomacy in Japan. The Program is geared enables students to acquire more advanced
toward Japanese junior and mid-career government knowledge in science, technology, and law, in
officials, as well as others with a serious interest in accordance with their needs.
cultural policy issues. The Program’s faculty The Program brings a diverse group of
conducts cutting-edge research that applies individuals engaged in intellectual property issues
quantitative analytical techniques to data from field —including lawyers, attorneys, businesspeople, and
studies in order to provide a sound basis for staff of non-profit organizations— together with
government decisions regarding cultural policy. civil servants and staff of international
organizations who supervise policy planning.
Intellectual Property Program Friendly competition among students from such
In recent years, national and local governments and varied backgrounds enhances the education process
private corporations have shown growing interest in is surely an invaluable asset to their careers.
intellectual property issues as the Japanese
government endeavors to make the nation Urban Policy Program
intellectual property-oriented. This Program aims Japanese cities have been faced with social change
to cultivate leaders who are capable of planning and due to the aging of the population and a
designing intellectual property policies and diminishing number of children. However,
strategies in central government, local government, policymakers have not carefully analyzed how to
and corporations. Applicants seeking a professional deal with new problems in a logical manner;
career in the field of intellectual property and instead, lacking a theoretical basis, they tend to
policy are welcomed regardless of academic adhere to a conventional framework. In addition,
background. The Program focuses on enabling the emergence of new urban policy planners, such
students to be practically competent in overall as non-profit organizations (NPOs), makes it
policy analysis, evaluation, and planning, with a difficult to satisfactorily implement urban policy.
strong focus on law and economics. The Urban Policy Program targets individuals
The curriculum is composed of core, policy, and from the wide variety of backgrounds now engaged
applied courses. The core courses provide students in urban policy, equipping them with an array of
with basic academic knowledge related to analytical tools for designing and assessing urban
intellectual property and methodology, including policies to address current problems. The
curriculum provides students with a foundation in This Program has been designed to develop
“law and economics,” as well as insights from leaders that Japan needs for educational policy
sociology, regional policy, local community studies, planning and implementation in local governments.
urban planning, and urban structure studies to In concrete terms, the target abilities fall into the
cultivate future leaders in urban policy and town following three categories: 1) the ability to plan
management. original education policies with insight into new
Partnerships with other universities and issues and needs; 2) the ability to implement
institutions are being explored to help students education policies effectively and efficiently; and
absorb both theoretical and practical knowledge 3) the ability to assess and evaluate policy impacts
about the urban environment, welfare, engagement with appropriate academic policy analysis tools.
with local residents, and other urban policy issues. In addition to these post-graduate educational
activities, the Program engages in research, such as
Education Policy Program policy research projects and seminars/symposia, as
Recent and rapid progress in the decentralization of well as information activities through the Internet.
policy making as well as the emergence of new All the Program’s activities are planned and carried
education policy issues in Japan has left a number out with a view to creating an academically
of prefectures and municipalities facing the urgent stimulating and intriguing environment for students,
need for their own education policies. This and to this end, positive partnership and
challenge calls for the development of human cooperation have been maintained with such
resources within each of the prefectural/municipal relevant entities as the Ministry of Education,
authorities so that officials with relevant and Culture, Sports, Science & Technology, the
sufficient abilities may plan and implement original National Institute for Educational Policy Research,
education policies to serve specific local needs, and a number of overseas and domestic universities
while maintaining effective cooperation with local and research institutes.
education-related bodies.
Summary Table of Master’s Programs

Program Summary

Commence in October Young Leaders Program Designed for future national leaders in countries in Asia and other regions
conducted in English (School of Government/School of Local
Governance)
One-year Master’s Program of Public Policy (MP1) Designed for early- and mid- career professionals and staff members in local or national
governments, and international organizations in the fundamental skills to analyze and implement
public policy
Two-year Master’s Program of Public Policy (MP2) Designed for pre- and early- career professionals and staff members in local or national
governments, international organizations, and private companies, and aims to equip them with
the fundamental skills for analyzing and implementing public policy
Asian Economic Policy Program Designed for government officials of Asian countries for market-oriented economic management

Public Finance Program Designed for fiscal leaders in taxation and customs

International Development Studies Program Designed for leaders in development assistance and program planning

Graduate Program in Japanese Language and Designed for leaders in the field of Japanese language education
Culture
(conducted in Japanese)
Disaster Management Policy Program Designed for disaster risk management experts in developing countries

Economics, Planning and Public Policy Program Designed for government officials to contribute to good governance and economic development
(Indonesia Linkage Program) in Indonesia
Commence in April Public Policy Program Designed for government officials with extensive knowledge of policy analysis
conducted in Japanese
Development Policy Program Designed for professionals in the field of development projects

Regional Policy Program Designed for local government officials to analyze and solve regional problems

Cultural Policy Program Designed for leaders in cultural policy

Intellectual Property Program Designed for leaders in intellectual property policy

Urban Policy Program Designed for leaders in urban policy and town management

Education Policy Program Designed for leaders in education policy in local governments
Graduation Requirement Tables
Table III Master's Programs 9-1 Young Leaders Program (School of Government)
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit
PAD258E Global Governance: Leadership and Negotiation Komatsu Winter 2

YLP500E Introduction to Japan Okita, Horie Fall (Session I) 2


I
YLP501E Colloquium Horie Fall & Spring 2 14
Required Courses
Fall through
YLP502E Independent Study Masuyama, et al 6
Summer
YLP503E Field Trip Horie Fall & Spring 2

ECO101E Introductory Microeconomics* Kurosawa Fall (Session I) 2


2
ECO100EA Microeconomics I* Yoshida Fall (Session I) 2

ECO360E Contemporary Japanese Economy** Kojima Fall 2

ECO361E Japanese Economy** Okita Spring 2 2

ECO381E Economic Development of Japan** Ohno Kenichi Spring 2


II
Core Elective GOV210E Government and Politics in Japan*** Masuyama Fall 2
Courses 2
GOV220E Introduction to International Relations*** Iwama Fall 2

GOV221E Introduction to International Political Economy**** Tsunekawa Spring 2


4
GOV224E International Security Studies**** Michishita Spring 2

GOV231E Comparative Politics**** Takenaka Fall 2

GOV258E Structure and Process of Government**** Horie Spring 2


30
ECO106EC Macroeconomics I Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session I) 2

ECO202EB Government and Market Kidokoro Winter 2

ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2

ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2

ECO363E Japanese Financial System Rhodes Winter 2

ECO384EB Development Economics Dermendzhieva Winter 2

ECO386E Asian Economic Development and Integration Kawai, et al Spring 2


III
Recommended GOV264E National Security Policy Tokuchi Spring 2
Courses
IDS280E Japan's ODA: Its policies and reform agenda Tomimoto Fall 2

IDS285E Japanese Development Cooperation Akiyama Winter 2

PAD101E Social Science Questions and Methodologies TBA Winter 2

REG201E Local Government System Nakamura Fall 2

REG202E Local Government Finance Hatakeyama Spring 2

REG301E Local Governance in the Changing World Ikawa, et al Spring 2

TEC254E Innovation, Sustainability and Uncertainty Woolger, Hope Spring 2

Selected Topics in Policy Studies I -IV***** 2


IV
Elective Courses
Courses unlisted in this table

LAN001J Japanese Language I****** Kondoh, et al. Fall 2

LAN002J Japanese Language II****** Kondoh, et al. Winter 1

LAN003J Japanese Language III****** Kondoh, et al. Spring 2

LAN001E Understanding Academic Readings****** Thomson Fall (Session II) 1

LAN002E Academic Presentation Skills****** Thomson Fall (Session I) 1

LAN003E Writing for the Social Sciences****** TBA TBA 1

Notes:
1. This table applies to students in the Young Leaders Program (School of Government).
2. Graduation Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 14 of which must come from Category I ,
at least 8 of which must come from Category II, and the rest from Categories III and IV.
3. Courses offered in the program are subject to change.
4. Students cannot take courses conducted in Japanese without the director's approval.
If a student takes the same course in both English and Japanese, only one (2 credits) will count toward the degree.
5. * If a student takes both Introductory Microeconomics and Microeconomics I, only one (2credits) will count toward the degree.
6. ** Students must complete a minimum of 2 credits from the following: Contemporary Japanese Economy, Japanese Economy,
and Economic Development of Japan.
7. *** Students must complete a minimum of 2 credits (one course) from either Government and Politics in Japan or Introduction to International Relations.

8. **** If a student takes only one course from Government and Politics in Japan or Introduction to International Relations,
he/she must take at least one course from the following: Introduction to International Political Economy, International Security

9. ***** Course numbers, instructors, and terms will be announced following official determination of course offerings.
10. ****** Credits earned in these courses will not count toward the degree.
Table III Master's Programs 9-2 Young Leaders Program (School of Local Governance)
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit
REG201E Local Government System Nakamura Fall 2

REG202E Local Government Finance Hatakeyama Spring 2

REG301E Local Governance in the Changing World Ikawa, et al. Spring 2

YLP500E Introduction to Japan Horie&Okita Fall (Session I) 2


I
18
Required Courses
YLP501E Colloquium Horie Fall & Spring 2
Fall through
YLP551E Research Paper Yokomichi, et al. 4
Summer
YLP552E WorkshopⅠ Yokomichi Fall 2

YLP553E WorkshopⅡ Fujiwara Spring 2

GOV210E Government and Politics in Japan Masuyama Fall 2

GOV220E Introduction to International Relations Iwama Fall 2

GOV258E Structure and Process of Government Horie Spring 2


II
Core Elective PAD258E Global Governance, Leadership & Negotiation Komatsu Winter 2 4
Courses
ECO100EA Microeconomics I* Yoshida Fall (Session I) 2

ECO101E Introductory Microeconomics* Kurosawa Fall (Session I) 2 30

ECO381E Economic Development of Japan Ohno Spring 2

ECO106EC Macroeconomics I Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session I) 2

ECO202EB Government and Market Kidokoro Winter 2

ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2

ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2

ECO363E Japanese Financial System Rhodes Winter 2


III
Recommended ECO384EB Development Economics Dermendzhieva Winter 2
Courses
ECO386E Asian Economic Development and Integration Kawai, et al Spring 2

IDS280E Japan's ODA: Its policies and reform agenda Tomimoto Fall 2

IDS285E Japanese Development Cooperation Akiyama Winter 2

PAD101E Social Science Questions and Methodologies TBA Winter 2

TEC254E Innovation, Sustainability and Uncertainty Woolger, Hope Spring 2

Selected Topics in Policy Studies I -IV** 2


IV
Elective Courses
Courses unlisted in this table

LAN001J Japanese Language I*** Kondoh, et al. Fall 2

LAN002J Japanese Language II*** Kondoh, et al. Winter 1

LAN003J Japanese Language III*** Kondoh, et al. Spring 2

LAN001E Understanding Academic Readings*** Thomson Fall (Session II) 1

LAN002E Academic Presentation Skills*** Thomson Fall (Session I) 1

LAN003E Writing for the Social Sciences*** TBA TBA 1

Notes:
1. This table applies to students in the Young Leaders Program (School of Local Governance) .
2. Graduation Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 18 of which must come from Category I,
4 of which from Category II, and the rest from Categories II, III and IV.
3. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.
4. Students can not take courses conducted in Japanese without Director's approval.
If a student takes the same course in both English and Japanese, only one course (2 credits) will count toward the degree.

5. *If a student takes both Microeconomics I and Introductory Microeconomics, only one course(2credits) will count toward the degree.

6. ** Course Number, Instructor, and Term for these courses will be announced when the course is offered.
7. *** Credits earned in these courses cannot count toward the degree.
Table III Master's Programs 10-1 One-year Master's Program of Public Policy (MP1)
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit
I ECO100EA Microeconomics I Yoshida Fall (Session I) 2
Core Courses ECO106EA Macroeconomics I Deguchi Fall (Session I) 2
ECO200EA Microeconomics II Yoshida Fall (Session II) 2
ECO202EA Government and Market Munro Winter 2
ECO206EA Macroeconomics II Deguchi Fall (Session II) 2 10
ECO272EA Introduction to Applied Econometrics Leon-Gonzalez Fall 2
GOV210E Government and Politics in Japan Masuyama Fall 2
GOV220E Introduction to International Relations* Iwama Fall 2

GOV221E Introduction to International Political Economy Tsunekawa Spring 2

GOV258E Structure and Process of Government Horie Spring 2


II CUL101E Managing Cultural Diversity Aikawa Fall (Session II) 2
Elective Courses CUL102E Development and Culture Aikawa Spring (Session II) 2
DEV250E National Development and Institution for Transportation Infrastructure Morichi Spring 2
ECO160E Monetary Economics (Money and Banking) Pfau Fall 2
ECO290E Game Theory Yasuda Winter 2
ECO300E Mathematics for Economic Analysis Yoshida Fall (Session II), Winter 2
ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2
ECO315E Local Public Finance Kook Spring 2
ECO316E Economic and Fiscal Reform in Japan Ota Spring 2
ECO317E Labor Economics Kurosawa Fall (Session II) 2
ECO320E Economics of Law Hatanaka Spring 2
ECO321E Competition and Regulatory Economics Tanaka Makoto Spring 2
ECO330E Urban Economics Okamoto Ryosuke Spring 2
ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2
ECO345E International Finance Hsu Spring 2
ECO347E Empirics of Macroeconomic Policies and International Finance TBA TBA 2
ECO351E Environmental Economics Munro Spring 2
ECO353E Resource and Energy Economics Tanaka Makoto Winter 2
ECO361E Japanese Economy Okita Spring 2
ECO363E Japanese Financial System Rhodes Winter 2
ECO364E Financial Economics Kubota Spring (Session I) 2
ECO371E Time Series Analysis Ikeda Spring 2
ECO374E Economic Modeling for Policy Simulations Hosoe Spring 2
ECO381E Economic Development of Japan Ohno Kenichi Spring 2
ECO384EA Development Economics Cooray Winter 2
IDS290E Project Cycle Management and International Development Koga Winter 2
IDS280E Japan's ODA: Its policies and reform agenda Tomimoto Fall 2
MOR102E Introductory Statistics Tsuchiya,Morohosi,Yoshida Fall (Session I) 2
ECO600E Advanced Microeconomics I Yasuda Spring (Session I) 2 36
For qualified students ECO601E Advanced Microeconomics II Yasuda Spring (Session II) 2
only (See note 7 below) ECO670E Advanced Econometrics I Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session I) 2
ECO671E Advanced Econometrics II Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session II) 2
EDU200E Education Policy Okamoto Kaoru Winter 2
GOV223E Foreign Policy TBA Spring 2
GOV231E Comparative Politics Takenaka Fall 2
GOV264E National Security Policy Tokuchi Spring 2
IDS272E Development Project Analysis Kalirajan Winter 2
IDS286E Poverty Alleviation Suzuki Aya Spring 2
IDS288E Trade and Industrial Development Sonobe Spring 2
LAW201E International Economic Law (Globalization and Regionalism) Yamane Fall 2
MOR100E Introduction to Quantitative Methods Morohosi Fall (Session I) 2
MOR101E Statistics Miyata Fall 2
MOR250E Quantitative Social Systems Analysis Oyama, Tsuchiya Spring 2
PAD101E Social Science Questions and Methodologies TBA Winter 2
PAD254E Development Assistance by International Organizations Hirono Fall 2
PAD255E Foreign Direct Investment Yoshitake Summer 2
PAD256E Human Resources Management Yamazaki Spring 2
PAD257E Seminar in Industry and Trade Policy Tanaka Masami Spring 2
PAD260E Labor Policy (Human Resources Development) TBA TBA 2
PAD261E Fiscal and Monetary Policies in Japan Kobayashi,Yasui Fall 2
PAD263E Public Investment TBA Spring 2
PAD267E Public Expenditure Management Tanaka Hideaki Fall 2
PAD281E National Land Policy Surya Raj Acharya Fall (Session I) 2
PAD282E Transport Policy Ono Spring 2
Ohno Kenchi, Ohno Izumi &
PAD302E Policy Design and Implementation in Developing Countries Spring 2
Shimamura
PPP501E Independent Study Spring 2
REG202E Local Government Finance Hatakeyama Spring 2
TEC251E Science and Technology Policy TBA TBA 2
TEC252E Small and Medium Enterprise and Technology Hashimoto Fall 2
TEC253E Communications Policy TBA Fall 2
GEN500E GRIPS Forum Fall &Spring 2
Selected Topics in Policy Studies I - IV* 2
Courses unlisted in this table
LAN001J Japanese Language I** Kondoh, et al. Fall 2
LAN002J Japanese Language II** Kondoh, et al. Winter 1
LAN003J Japanese Language III** Kondoh, et al. Spring 2
LAN001E Understanding Academic Readings** Thomson Fall (Session II) 1
LAN002E Academic Presentation Skills** Thomson Fall (Session I) 1
LAN003E Writing for the Social Sciences** TBA TBA 1
Notes:

1. This table applies to students in the One-year Master's Program of Public Policy (MP1) .
2. Graduation Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 36 credits, 10 of which must come from Category I.
3. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.
4. Students can not take courses conducted in Japanese without Director's approval. If a student takes the same course in both English and Japanese, only one course (2 credits) will count toward the degree.
5 * Course Number, Instructor, and Term for these courses will be announced when the course is offered.
6. ** Credits earned in these courses cannot count toward the degree.
7. Qualified students are those who have successfully completed the six courses (ECO100E, ECO106E, ECO200E, ECO206E, ECO272E, ECO300E or equivalent courses offered by IDS program) with GPA
higher than 3.7 over the six courses.
Table III Master's Programs 10-2 Two-year Master's Program of Public Policy (MP2)
Public Economics (PE) Political Science (PS) Social Engineering (SE)
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit
Concentration Concentration Concentration
Required Category I : ECO100EA Microeconomics I Yoshida Fall (Session I) 2
Courses Core Required ECO106EA Macroeconomics I Deguchi Fall (Session I) 2
Courses ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2
12 12 12
GOV210E Government and Politics in Japan Masuyama Fall 2
GOV220E Introduction to International Relations Iwama Fall 2
MOR102E Introductory Statistics Tsuchiya, Morohosi,Yoshida Fall (Session I) 2
PPP502E Thesis Writing I Yoshida Spring (Session II), Summer 2
PPP503E Thesis Writing II Fall (Session I) [Second year] 2
8 8 8
PPP504E Thesis Writing III Fall (Session II) [Second year] 2
PPP505E Thesis Writing IV Winter [Second year] 2
Category II : ECO200EA Microeconomics II Yoshida Fall (Session II) 2
Disciplinary ECO206EA Macroeconomics II Deguchi Fall (Session II) 2
PE 8
Required ECO202EA Government and Market Munro Winter 2
Courses ECO272EA Introduction to Applied Econometrics Leon-Gonzalez Fall 2
GOV221E Introduction to International Political Economy Tsunekawa Spring 2
PS GOV224E International Security Studies Michishita Spring 2 6
GOV258E Structure and Process of Government Horie Spring 2
MOR250E Quantitative Social Systems Analysis Oyama, Tsuchiya Spring 2
MOR101E Statistics Miyata Fall 2
SE 6
GOV258E Structure and Process of Government Horie Spring 2
ECO202EA Government and Market Munro Winter 2
Category III CUL101E Managing Cultural Diversity Aikawa Fall (Session II) 2
Elective Courses CUL102E Development and Culture Aikawa Spring (Session II) 2
DEV250E National Development and Institution for Transportation Infrastructure Morichi Spring 2
ECO160E Monetary Economics (Money and Banking) Pfau Fall 2
ECO290E Game Theory Yasuda Winter 2
ECO300E Mathematics for Economic Analysis Yoshida Fall (Session II), Winter 2
ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2
ECO315E Local Public Finance Kook Spring 2
ECO316E Economic and Fiscal Reform in Japan Ota Spring 2
ECO317E Labor Economics Kurosawa Fall (Session II) 2
ECO321E Competition and Regulatory Economics Tanaka Makoto Spring 2
ECO330E Urban Economics Okamoto Ryosuke Spring 2
ECO345E International Finance Hsu Spring 2
ECO347E Empirics of Macroeconomic Policies and International Finance TBA TBA 2
ECO351E Environmental Economics Munro Spring 2
ECO353E Resource and Energy Economics Tanaka Makoto Winter 2
ECO361E Japanese Economy Okita Spring 2
ECO363E Japanese Financial System Rhodes Winter 2
ECO364E Financial Economics Kubota Spring (Session I) 2
ECO371E Time Series Analysis Ikeda Spring 2
ECO374E Economic Modeling for Policy Simulations Hosoe Spring 2
ECO381E Economic Development of Japan Ohno Kenichi Spring 2
ECO384EA Development Economics Cooray Winter 2 48 48 48
ECO386E Asian Economic Development and Integration Kawai, et al Spring 2
ECO600E Advanced Microeconomics I Yasuda Spring (Session I) 2
ECO601E Advanced Microeconomics II Yasuda Spring (Session II) 2
ECO670E Advanced Econometrics I Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session I) 2
ECO671E Advanced Econometrics II Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session II) 2
For qualified students only ECO602E Advanced Microeconomics III Sonobe Fall (Session I) [Second year] 2
(See note 7 below) ECO603E Advanced Microeconomics IV Sonobe Fall (Session II) [Second year] 2
ECO605E Advanced Macroeconomics I Hsu Fall (Session I) [Second year] 2
ECO606E Advanced Macroeconomics II Hsu Fall (Session II) [Second year] 2
ECO672E Advanced Econometrics III Yamano, Matsumoto Fall (Session I) [Second year] 2
ECO673E Advanced Econometrics IV Yamano, Matsumoto Fall (Session II) [Second year] 2
IDS290E Project Cycle Management and International Development Koga Winter 2
IDS280E Japan's ODA: Its policies and reform agenda Tomimoto Fall 2
EDU200E Education Policy Okamoto Kaoru Winter 2
GOV223E Foreign Policy TBA Spring 2
GOV264E National Security Policy Tokuchi Spring 2
IDS272E Development Project Analysis Kalirajan Winter 2
IDS286E Poverty Alleviation Suzuki Aya Spring 2
IDS288E Trade and Industrial Development Sonobe Spring 2
LAW201E International Economic Law (Globalization and Regionalism) Yamane Fall 2
PAD101E Social Science Questions and Methodologies TBA Winter 2
PAD254E Development Assistance by International Organizations Hirono Fall 2
PAD255E Foreign Direct Investment Yoshitake Summer 2
PAD256E Human Resources Management Yamazaki Spring 2
PAD257E Seminar in Industry and Trade Policy Tanaka Masami Spring 2
PAD260E Labor Policy (Human Resources Development) TBA TBA 2
PAD261E Fiscal and Monetary Policies in Japan Kobayashi, Yasui Fall 2
PAD263E Public Investment TBA TBA 2
PAD267E Public Expenditure Management Tanaka Hideaki Fall 2
PAD281E National Land Policy Surya Raj Acharya Fall (Session I) 2
PAD282E Transport Policy Ono Spring 2
Ohno Kenchi, Ohno Izumi,
PAD302E Policy Design and Implementation in Developing Countries Spring 2
Shimamura
REG201E Local Government System Nakamura Fall 2
REG202E Local Government Finance Hatakeyama Spring 2
REG301E Local Governance in the Changing World Ikawa, et al. Spring 2
TEC251E Science and Technology Policy TBA TBA 2
TEC252E Small and Medium Enterprise and Technology Hashimoto Fall 2
TEC253E Communications Policy TBA Fall 2
GEN500E GRIPS Forum TBA Fall and Spring 2
Selected Topics in Policy Studies I - IV* 2
Courses unlisted in this table
LAN001J Japanese Language I** Kondoh, et al. Fall 2
LAN002J Japanese Language II** Kondoh, et al. Winter 1
LAN003J Japanese Language III** Kondoh, et al. Spring 2
LAN001E Understanding Academic Readings** Thomson Fall (Session II) 1
LAN002E Academic Presentation Skills** Thomson Fall (Session I) 1
LAN003E Writing for the Social Sciences TBA TBA 1
Notes:
1. This table applies to students in the Two-year Master's Program of Public Policy (MP2).
2. As part of graduation requirements, student must complete a minimum of 48 credits, 20 of which must come from Category I.
In addition, Public Economics students must complete 8 credits from Category II-EC, Political Science students must complete 6 credits from Category II-PS,
and Social Engineering students must complete 6 credits from Category II-SE.
3. Category-II courses in another concentration are considered to be Elective.
4. Selection or change of concentration, as well as course registration in each term require Director's approval.
5. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.
6. If a student takes the same course in both English and Japanese, only one course (2 credits) will count toward the degree.
7. * Course Number, Instructor, and Term for these courses will be announced when the course is offered.
8. ** Credits earned in these courses cannot count toward the degree.
9. Qualified students are those who have successfully completed the six courses (ECO100E, ECO106E, ECO200E, ECO206E, ECO272E, ECO300E or equivalent courses offered by IDS program) with GPA higher than 3.7 over the six courses.
Table III Master's Programs 11 Asian Economic Policy Program
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit
ECO100EB Microeconomics I Xing Fall (Session I) 2
ECO106EC Macroeconomics I Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session I) 2
ECO200EB Microeconomics II Xing Fall (Session II) 2

I ECO206EC Macroeconomics II Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session II) 2 16


Required Courses ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2
ECO384EB Development Economics Dermendzhieva Winter 2
PAD261E Fiscal and Monetary Policies in Japan Kobayashi, Yasui Fall 2
TEP501E Independent Study (Policy Proposal Paper) 2
ECO272EB Introduction to Applied Econometrics Pfau Fall 2
ECO300E Mathematics for Economic Analysis Yoshida Fall (Session II), Winter 2
II ECO371E Time Series Analysis Ikeda Spring 2
Recommended 1
ECO374E Economic Modeling for Policy Simulations Hosoe Spring 2 6
Quantitative Courses
(minimum 3 courses) MOR100E Introduction to Quantitative Methods Morohosi Fall (Session I) 2
MOR101E Statistics Miyata Fall 2
MOR250E Quantitative Social Systems Analysis Oyama, Tsuchiya Spring 2
ECO160E Monetary Economics (Money and Banking) Pfau Fall 2
ECO202EB Government and Market Kidokoro Winter 2
ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2
ECO345E International Finance Hsu Spring 2
ECO347E Empirics of Macroeconomic Policies and International Finance TBA TBA 2
III
Recommended 2 ECO381E Economic Development of Japan Ohno Kenichi Spring 2 8
(minimum 4 courses) GOV258E Structure and Process of Government Horie Spring 2
PAD251E Accounting and Financial Management I Lee Fall 2
PAD252E Accounting and Financial Management II Lee Spring 2
PAD265E Modernization of Financial Sector Yoshikuni Spring 2
Ohno Kenchi, Ohno
PAD302E Policy Design and Implementation in Developing Countries Spring 2
Izumi, Shimamura
ECO290E Game Theory Yasuda Winter 2 38
ECO315E Local Public Finance Kook Spring 2
ECO316E Economic and Fiscal Reform in Japan Ota Spring 2
ECO317E Labor Economics Kurosawa Fall (Session II) 2
ECO320E Economics of Law Hatanaka Spring 2
ECO351E Environmental Economics Munro Spring 2
ECO353E Resource and Energy Economics Tanaka Makoto Winter 2
ECO363E Japanese Financial System Rhodes Winter 2
ECO386E Asian Economic Development and Integration Kawai, et al. Spring 2
IDS290E Project Cycle Management and International Development Koga Winter 2
IDS260E Finance and Economic Growth Jeong Spring (Session II) 2
IDS272E Development Project Analysis Kalirajan Winter 2
IDS283E Environment and Sustainable Development Otsuka Spring 2
IDS285E Japanese Development Cooperation Akiyama Winter 2
LAW201E International Economic Law (Globalization and Regionalism) Yamane Fall 2
PAD101E Social Science Questions and Methodologies TBA Winter 2
IV
PAD254E Development Assistance by International Organizations Hirono Fall 2
Elective Courses
PAD255E Foreign Direct Investment Yoshitake Summer 2
PAD257E Seminar in Industry and Trade Policy Tanaka Masami Spring 2
PAD264E Structural Reform and Privatization Tanaka Hideo Spring 2
PAD267E Public Expenditure Management Tanaka Hideaki Fall 2
PAD281E National Land Policy Surya Raj Acharya Fall (Session I) 2
TEC251E Science and Technology Policy TBA TBA 2
TEC252E Small and Medium Enterprise and Technology Hashimoto Fall 2
GEN500E GRIPS Forum Fall &Spring 2
Selected Topics in Policy Studies I - IV* 2
Courses unlisted in this table
LAN001J Japanese Language I** Kondoh, et al. Fall 2
LAN002J Japanese Language II** Kondoh, et al. Winter 1
LAN003J Japanese Language III** Kondoh, et al. Spring 2
LAN001E Understanding Academic Readings** Thomson Fall (Session II) 1
LAN002E Academic Presentation Skills** Thomson Fall (Session I) 1
LAN003E Writing for the Social Sciences** TBA TBA 1
Notes:
1. This table applies to students in the Asian Economic Policy Program.
2. Graduation Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 38 credits,
16 of which must come from Category I, 6 from Category II, and 8 from Category III. The remaining 6 credits may be taken from Categories II, III, or IV.
3. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.
4. Students can not take courses conducted in Japanese without Director's approval.
If a student takes the same course in both English and Japanese, only one course (2 credits) will count toward the degree.
5. * Course Number, Instructor, and Term for these courses will be announced when the course is offered.
6. ** Credits earned in these courses cannot count toward the degree.
Table III Master's Programs 12 Public Finance Program
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit Tax Customs
PFP252E International Taxation of Japan Komamiya Fall 2
PFP501E Practicum at the National Tax Agency Fall through Spring 8 10

PFP250E Customs Law Nagase Fall 2


PFP502E Practicum in Customs Administration I Nagase Winter & Spring 4 12
PFP503E Practicum in Customs Administration II Aoyama, Yamashita Spring 4
I
Required PFP504E Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement at Border Mizutani, Hamaguchi Spring (Session I) 2
Courses
ECO100EC Microeconomics I Wie Fall (Session I) 2
ECO310E Theory of Public Finance Fukushima Fall (Session II) 2
ECO410E Workshop in Public Finance I Fukushima, Kurosawa Spring 2 8

ECO411E Workshop in Public Finance II Fukushima, Kurosawa Summer 2 10

ECO312E Public Finance and Fiscal Policy Matsuda Fall 2


ECO106EB Macroeconomics I Rhodes Fall (Session I) 2
ECO200EC Microeconomics II Wie Fall (Session II) 2
ECO202EC Government and Market Hatanaka Winter 2

II ECO206EB Macroeconomics II Rhodes Fall (Session II) 2


Highly ECO272EC Introduction to Applied Econometrics Wie Fall 2
Recommended
Elective ECO315E Local Public Finance Kook Spring 2
Courses ECO316E Economic and Fiscal Reform in Japan Ota Spring 2
ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2
ECO384EA Development Economics Cooray Winter 2
PAD256E Human Resources Management Yamazaki Spring 2
ECO160E Monetary Economics (Money and Banking) Pfau Fall 2
ECO290E Game Theory Yasuda Winter 2
ECO300E Mathematics for Economic Analysis Yoshida Fall (Session II), Winter 2
ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2
ECO317E Labor Economics Kurosawa Fall (Session II) 2
ECO320E Economics of Law Hatanaka Spring 2
ECO330E Urban Economics Okamoto Ryosuke Spring 2
ECO331E Transportation Economics Murakami Spring 2
ECO345E International Finance Hsu Spring 2
III
Other Elective ECO347E Empirics of Macroeconomic Policies and International Finance TBA TBA 2
Courses
ECO351E Environmental Economics Munro Spring 2
ECO353E Resource and Energy Economics Tanaka Makoto Winter 2
ECO361E Japanese Economy Okita Spring 2 36 36
ECO363E Japanese Financial System Rhodes Winter 2
ECO370E Econometrics/ Quantitative Methods Arai Winter 2
ECO371E Time Series Analysis Ikeda Spring 2
ECO374E Economic Modeling for Policy Simulations Hosoe Spring 2
ECO381E Economic Development of Japan Ohno Kenichi Spring 2
ECO386E Asian Economic Development and Integration Kawai, et al Spring 2
ECO600E Advanced Microeconomics I Yasuda Spring (Session I) 2
For qualified
MA students ECO601E Advanced Microeconomics II Yasuda Spring (Session II) 2
only (See note ECO670E Advanced Econometrics I Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session I) 2
7 below)
ECO671E Advanced Econometrics II Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session II) 2
IDS260E Finance and Economic Growth Jeong Spring (Session II) 2
IDS272E Development Project Analysis Kalirajan Winter 2
IDS286E Poverty Alleviation Suzuki Aya Spring 2
IDS288E Trade and Industrial Development Sonobe Spring 2
MOR100E Introduction to Quantitative Methods Morohosi Fall (Session I) 2
MOR250E Quantitative Social Systems Analysis Oyama, Tsuchiya Spring 2
PAD101E Social Science Questions and Methodologies TBA Winter 2
PAD251E Accounting and Financial ManagementⅠ Lee Fall 2
PAD254E Development Assistance by International Organizations Hirono Fall 2
PAD255E Foreign Direct Investment Yoshitake Summer 2
PAD257E Seminar in Industry and Trade Policy Tanaka Masami Spring 2
PAD258E Global Governance: Leadership and Negotiation Komatsu Winter 2
PAD261E Fiscal and Monetary Policies in Japan Kobayashi, Yasui Fall 2
PAD263E Public Investment TBA Spring 2
PAD267E Public Expenditure Management Tanaka Hideaki Fall 2
Ohno Kenchi, Ohno Izumi,
PAD302E Policy Design and Implementation in Developing Countries Spring 2
Shimamura
REG201E Local Government System Nakamura Fall 2
REG202E Local Government Finance Hatakeyama Spring 2
Selected Topics in Policy Studies I - IV* 2
Courses unlisted in this table
LAN001J Japanese Language I** Kondoh, et al. Fall 2
LAN002J Japanese Language II** Kondoh, et al. Winter 1
LAN003J Japanese Language III** Kondoh, et al. Spring 2
LAN001E Understanding Academic Readings** Thomson Fall (Session II) 1
LAN002E Academic Presentation Skills** Thomson Fall (Session I) 1
LAN004EA English for Academic Purposes** Nakatsugawa Fall 2
LAN004EB English for Academic Purposes** Nakatsugawa Spring 2
LAN005EA Listening and Speaking** Thomson Fall 2
LAN005EB Listening and Speaking** Thomson Winter 1
LAN005EC Listening and Speaking** Thomson Spring 2
Notes:
1. This table applies to students in the Public Finance Program.
2. Graduation Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 36 credits and meet the following requirements:
(a) Tax students must take the following courses: PFP252E, PFP501E, ECO100EC, ECO310E, ECO312E, ECO410E, and ECO411E from Category I.
(b) Customs students must take the following courses: PFP250E, PFP502E, PFP503E, PEP504E, ECO100EC, ECO310E, ECO410E, and ECO411E from Category I.
3. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.
4. Students can not take courses conducted in Japanese without Director's approval. If a student takes the same course in both English and Japanese, only one course (2 credits) will count toward the degree.
5. * Course Number, Instructor, and Term for these courses will be announced later when the course is offered.
6 ** Credits earned in these courses cannot count toward the degree.
7. Qualified MA students are those who have successfully completed the six courses (ECO100E, ECO106E, ECO200E, ECO206E, ECO272E, ECO300E or equivalent courses offered by IDS program) with GPA higher than 3.7 over
the six courses.
Table III Master's Programs 13 International Development Studies Program

Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit

IDS101E Microeconomics I Mano, Suzuki Aya Fall (Session I) 2

IDS103E Microeconomics II Mano, Suzuki Aya Fall (Session II) 2

IDS270E Quantitative Methods I Kajisa Fall (Session I) 2

I IDS273E Quantitative Methods II Kajisa Fall (Session II) 2


18
Required Courses
IDS287E Strategies and Conditions for Development I Otsuka Fall (Session I) 2

IDS289E Strategies and Conditions for Development II Otsuka Fall (Session II) 2
Estudillo, Jeong,
IDS380E Applied Development Research I, II, III Yamano, Yamauchi, Fall, Winter, & Spring 6
Rundle
ECO106ED Macroeconomics Okita Winter 2

IDS202E Government and Market Kalirajan Winter 2


II
6
Core Courses
IDS272E Development Project Analysis Kalirajan Winter 2

IDS282E Development Project Management Minato Spring 2

DEV253E Gender and Development Estudillo Spring (Session I) 2

IDS100E Introductory Mathematics and Economics Mano, Goto Fall (September) 2

IDS274E Applied Econometrics Yamano Winter 2


16
IDS283E Environment and Sustainable Development Otsuka Spring 2

IDS285E Japanese Development Cooperation Akiyama Winter 2


III
Recommended Elective IDS286E Poverty Alleviation Suzuki Aya Spring 2
Courses
IDS288E Trade and Industrial Development Sonobe Spring 2

IDS260E Finance and Economic Growth Jeong Spring (Session II) 2

IDS381E Selected Topics in International Development I TBA Summer 2

IDS382E Selected Topics in International Development II TBA Summer 2 40

IDS580E Internship * Fall & Winter 2010/11 2

ECO600E Advanced Microeconomics I Yasuda Spring (Session I) 2

ECO601E Advanced Microeconomics II Yasuda Spring (Session II) 2


For qualified students only
(See note 5 below)
ECO670E Advanced Econometrics I Gonzalez Spring (Session I) 2

ECO671E Advanced Econometrics II Gonzalez Spring (Session II) 2

CUL102E Development and Culture Aikawa Spring (Session II) 2

ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2

ECO320E Economics of Law Hatanaka Spring 2

ECO374E Economic Modeling for Policy Simulations Hosoe Spring 2

MOR250E Quantitative Social Systems Analysis Oyama, Tsuchiya Spring 2

PAD255E Foreign Direct Investment Yoshitake Summer 2

PAD257E Seminar in Industry and Trade Policy Tanaka Masami Spring 2


IV
PAD263E Public Investment TBA Spring 2
Elective Courses
Ohno Kenchi, Ohno
PAD302E Policy Design and Implementation in Developing Countries Spring 2
Izumi, Shimamura
IDS290E Project Cycle Management and International Development Koga Winter 2

IDS280E Japan's ODA: Its policies and reform agenda Tomimoto Fall 2

Courses unlisted in this table but taught in English

LAN001J Japanese Language I * Kondoh, et al. Fall 2

LAN002J Japanese Language II * Kondoh, et al. Winter 1

LAN003J Japanese Language III * Kondoh, et al. Spring 2

Notes:

1. This table applies to students in the International Development Studies Program.


2. Graduation Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 40 credits, 18 of which must come from Category I and another 16 from Categories II and III including a minimum of 6 from Category II.
3. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.
4.  * Credits earned in these courses cannot count toward the degree.
5. Qualified students are those who have successfully completed the six courses (IDS101E, IDS103E, IDS270E, IDS273E, IDS287E, IDS289E) with GPA higher than 3.7 over the six courses.
Table III Master's Programs 15
Economics, Planning and Public Policy Program

Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit


I
EPP501E Independent Study (Policy Paper) Fall, Winter, Spring 4 4
Required Course
ECO160E Monetary Economics (Money and Banking) Pfau Fall 2
ECO200EC Microeconomics II Wie Fall (Session II) 2
ECO202EC Government and Market Hatanaka Winter 2
ECO206EB Macroeconomics II Rhodes Fall (Session II) 2
ECO272EC Introduction to Applied Econometrics Wie Fall 2
ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2
ECO315E Local Public Finance Kook Spring 2
ECO316E Economic and Fiscal Reform in Japan Ota Spring 2
ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2 16
ECO341E Trade Policy and International Economy TBA TBA 2
ECO353E Resource and Energy Economics Tanaka Makoto Winter 2
ECO361E Japanese Economy Okita Spring 2
ECO386E Asian Economic Development and Integration Kawai, et al Spring 2
ECO384EA Development Economics Cooray Winter 2
IDS290E Project Cycle Management and International DevelopmentKoga Winter 2
IDS280E Japan's ODA: Its policies and reform agenda Tomimoto Fall 2
EPP201E Agricultural Economics Hara Spring 2
GOV246E Government and Politics in Southeast Asia Abinales TBA 2
International Economic Law
LAW201E Yamane Fall 2
(Globalization and Regionalism)
II PAD263E Public Investment TBA Spring 2
Recommended
Courses PAD254E Development Assistance by International Organizations Hirono Fall 2
PAD282E Transport Policy Ono Spring 2
PFP252E International Taxation of Japan Komamiya Fall 2
TEC252E Small and Medium Enterprise and Technology Hashimoto Fall 2
National Development and Institutions for Transportation
DEV250E Morichi Spring 2
Infrastructure 30
IDS102E Economic Growth Mano Spring (Session I) 2
IDS260E Finance and Economic Growth Jeong Spring (Session II) 2
IDS272E Development Project Analysis Kalirajan Winter 2
IDS282E Development Project Management Minato Spring 2
IDS283E Environment and Sustainable Development Otsuka Spring (Session II) 2
IDS285E Japanese Development Cooperation Akiyama Winter 2
IDS286E Poverty Alleviation Suzuki Aya Spring 2
IDS288E Trade and Industrial Development Sonobe Spring 2
PAD255E Foreign Direct Investment Yoshitake Summer 2
PAD256E Human Resources Management Yamazaki Spring 2
PAD267E Public Expenditure Management Tanaka Hideaki Fall 2
REG201E Local Government System Nakamura Fall 2
REG202E Local Government Finance Hatakeyama Spring 2
REG301E Local Governance in the Changing World Ikawa, et al. Spring 2
Selected Topics in Policy Studies I - IV* 2

III Courses unlisted in this table


Elective Courses LAN001J Japanese Language I** Kondoh, et al. Fall 2
LAN002J Japanese Language II** Kondoh, et al. Winter 1
LAN003J Japanese Language III** Kondoh, et al. Spring 2
LAN001E Understanding Academic Readings** Thomson Fall (Session II) 1
LAN002E Academic Presentation Skills** Thomson Fall (Session I) 1
LAN003E Writing for the Social Sciences** TBA TBA 1
LAN004EA English for Academic Purposes** Nakatsugawa Fall 2
LAN004EB English for Academic Purposes** Nakatsugawa Spring 2
LAN005EA Listening and Speaking** Thomson Fall 2
LAN005EB Listening and Speaking** Thomson Winter 1
LAN005EC Listening and Speaking** Thomson Spring 2
Notes:
1. This table applies to students in the Economics, Planning and Public Policy Program.
2. Graduation Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 4 of which must come from Category I and 16 from Category II.
3. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.
4. Students can not take courses conducted in Japanese without Director's approval.
If a student takes the same course in both English and Japanese, only one course (2 credits) will count toward the degree.
5. * Course Number, Instructor, and Term for these courses will be announced when the courses are offered.
6. ** Credits earned in these courses cannot count toward the degree.
Table III Master's Programs 14-1
Disaster Management Policy Program (Earthquake Disaster Mitigation & Tsunami Disaster Mitigation)
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit

I
DMP400E Individual Study Fall through Summer 10
Required Courses

DMP200E Disaster Mitigation Policy Morichi Winter 2

DMP201E Disaster Risk Management Okazaki Winter 2

DMP300E Earthquake Hazard Assessment Saito Fall through Spring 2


II
Recommended DMP301E Earthquake Risk Assessment Kashima Fall through Spring 2 6
Courses
Spring through
DMP302E Disaster Mitigation and Development Assistance Ando 2
Summer

DMP303E Tsunami Hazard Assessment Shibazaki Spring 2

DMP304E Tsunami Countermeasures Fujii Spring 2

DMP320E Earthquake Phenomenology Hurukawa Fall through Spring 3

DMP321E Characteristics of Earthquake Disasters Yokoi Fall through Spring 3

DMP322E Earthquake Circumstance Shibazaki Fall through Spring 3


30
Information Technology Related with Earthquakes and
DMP323E Hara Fall 3
Disasters

DMP340E Structural Analysis Saito Fall 3

DMP341E Structural Dynamics Okawa Fall 3

DMP342E Seismic Design Mukai Fall through Spring 3

DMP343E Seismic Evaluation and Retrofitting Fukuyama Spring 3

III
DMP360E Theory of Tsunami Fujii Winter through Spring 3
Elective Courses

Case Study (Practice for Earthquake Disaster


DMP531E Saito Fall through Summer 1
Mitigation Policy I)

Case Study (Practice for Earthquake Disaster


DMP532E Koyama Fall through Spring 1
Mitigation Policy II)

Case Study (Practice for Earthquake Disaster


DMP533E Kashima Fall 1
Mitigation Policy III)

Case Study (Practice for Tsunami Disaster Mitigation


DMP534E Hara Fall through Spring 1
Policy)

Selected Topics in Policy Studies I -IV*

Notes:

1. This table applies to students in the Disaster Management Policy Program (Earthquake Disaster Mitigation & Tsunami Disaster Mitigation) .

2. Graduation Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 6 of which must come from Category II.

3. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.

4. *Course Number, Instructor, and Term for the course will be announced later when the course is offered.
Table III Master's Programs 14-2
Disaster Management Policy Program (Water-related Disaster Management)

Category Course No. Course Title Instructor Term Credit

I Winter through
DMP480E Individual Study 10
Required Courses Summer

DMP200E Disaster Mitigation Policy Morichi Winter 2

DMP201E Disaster Risk Management Okazaki Winter 2

DMP280E Basic Hydrology Jayawardena Fall through Winter 2

DMP281E Hydraulics Ishikawa Fall through Winter 2

Basic Concepts of Integrated Flood Risk Management


DMP282E Takeuchi Fall through Winter 2
(IFRM)

II DMP283E Local Disaster Management and Hazard Mapping Tanaka Fall through Spring 2 16
Recommended
Courses DMP284E Urban Flood Management Kudo Fall through Winter 2

DMP380E Advanced Hydrology Jayawardena Fall through Winter 2

DMP381E Flood Hydraulics and Sediment Transport Fukuoka Fall through Winter 2

Mechanics of Sediment Transportation and Channel


DMP382E Egashira Fall through Winter 2 30
Changes

DMP383E Sustainable Reservoir Development & Management Matsumoto Fall through Winter 2

DMP384E Control Measures for Landslide & Debris Flow Ikeya Fall through Winter 2

DMP180E Computer Programming Sayama Fall through Winter 1

DMP285E Practice on Hydraulics Ishikawa Fall through Spring 1

DMP286E Practice on Local Disaster Management Plan Tanaka Fall through Spring 1

III
DMP385E Practice on Advanced Hydrology Jayawardena Fall through Spring 1
Elective Courses

Practice on Flood Hazard Modeling & Flood


DMP386E Fukami Fall through Spring 1
Forecasting

Practice on Sustainable Reservoir Development &


DMP387E Matsumoto Fall through Spring 1
Management

Practice on Control Measures for Landslide & Debris


DMP388E Ikeya Fall through Spring 1
Flow

Selected Topics in Policy Studies I -IV*

Notes:

1. This table applies to students in the Disaster Management Policy Program (Water-related Disaster Management).

2. Graduation Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 16 of which must come from Category II.

3. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.

4. *Course Number, Instructor, and Term for the course will be announced later when the course is offered.
Table III Master's Programs 15
Economics, Planning and Public Policy Program

Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit


I
EPP501E Independent Study (Policy Paper) Fall, Winter, Spring 4 4
Required Course
ECO160E Monetary Economics (Money and Banking) Pfau Fall 2
ECO200EC Microeconomics II Wie Fall (Session II) 2
ECO202EC Government and Market Hatanaka Winter 2
ECO206EB Macroeconomics II Rhodes Fall (Session II) 2
ECO272EC Introduction to Applied Econometrics Wie Fall 2
ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2
ECO315E Local Public Finance Kook Spring 2
ECO316E Economic and Fiscal Reform in Japan Ota Spring 2
ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2 16
ECO341E Trade Policy and International Economy TBA TBA 2
ECO353E Resource and Energy Economics Tanaka Makoto Winter 2
ECO361E Japanese Economy Okita Spring 2
ECO386E Asian Economic Development and Integration Kawai, et al Spring 2
ECO384EA Development Economics Cooray Winter 2
IDS290E Project Cycle Management and International Development Koga Winter 2
IDS280E Japan's ODA: Its policies and reform agenda Tomimoto Fall 2
EPP201E Agricultural Economics Hara Spring 2
GOV246E Government and Politics in Southeast Asia Abinales TBA 2
International Economic Law
LAW201E Yamane Fall 2
(Globalization and Regionalism)
PAD263E Public Investment TBA Spring 2
II
Recommended PAD254E Development Assistance by International Organizations Hirono Fall 2
Courses
PAD282E Transport Policy Ono Spring 2
PFP252E International Taxation of Japan Komamiya Fall 2
TEC252E Small and Medium Enterprise and Technology Hashimoto Fall 2
National Development and Institutions for Transportation
DEV250E Morichi Spring 2
Infrastructure 30
IDS102E Economic Growth Mano Spring (Session I) 2
IDS260E Finance and Economic Growth Jeong Spring (Session II) 2
IDS272E Development Project Analysis Kalirajan Winter 2
IDS281E Contemporary Issues in Developing Countries Yamano Spring 2
IDS282E Development Project Management Minato Spring 2
IDS283E Environment and Sustainable Development Otsuka Spring (Session II) 2
IDS285E Japanese Development Cooperation Akiyama Winter 2
IDS286E Poverty Alleviation Suzuki Aya Spring 2
IDS288E Trade and Industrial Development Sonobe Spring 2
PAD255E Foreign Direct Investment Yoshitake Summer 2
PAD256E Human Resources Management Yamazaki Spring 2
PAD267E Public Expenditure Management Tanaka Hideaki Fall 2
REG201E Local Government System Nakamura Fall 2
REG202E Local Government Finance Hatakeyama Spring 2
REG301E Local Governance in the Changing World Ikawa, et al. Spring 2
Selected Topics in Policy Studies I - IV* 2

III Courses unlisted in this table


Elective Courses LAN001J Japanese Language I** Kondoh, et al. Fall 2
LAN002J Japanese Language II** Kondoh, et al. Winter 1
LAN003J Japanese Language III** Kondoh, et al. Spring 2
LAN001E Understanding Academic Readings** Thomson Fall (Session II) 1
LAN002E Academic Presentation Skills** Thomson Fall (Session I) 1
LAN003E Writing for the Social Sciences** TBA TBA 1
LAN004EA English for Academic Purposes** Nakatsugawa Fall 2
LAN004EB English for Academic Purposes** Nakatsugawa Spring 2
LAN005EA Listening and Speaking** Thomson Fall 2
LAN005EB Listening and Speaking** Thomson Winter 1
LAN005EC Listening and Speaking** Thomson Spring 2
Notes:
1. This table applies to students in the Economics, Planning and Public Policy Program.
2. Graduation Requirements: Students must complete a minimum of 30 credits, 4 of which must come from Category I and 16 from Category II.
3. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.
4. Students can not take courses conducted in Japanese without Director's approval.
If a student takes the same course in both English and Japanese, only one course (2 credits) will count toward the degree.
5. * Course Number, Instructor, and Term for these courses will be announced when the courses are offered.
6. ** Credits earned in these courses cannot count toward the degree.
List of Courses and Instructors (except JLC and DMP)  ◎=Required Course
 ○=Recommended or Elective Course
Economics  ▲=Closed Course: Students in the program are NOT allowed to take the course.
ECO
Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit YLP MP1 MP2 AE PF IDS EPP Remarks
ECO100EA Microeconomics I Yoshida Fall (Session I) 2 ○ ○ ◎* ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ *For YLP, MP1 and MP2 students only. Required for MP2 students.
ECO100EB Microeconomics I Xing Fall (Session I) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for AE students only.
ECO100EC Microeconomics I Wie Fall (Session I) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ○ For PF and EPP students only. Required for PF students.
ECO101E Introductory Microeconomics Kurosawa Fall (Session I) 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO106EA Macroeconomics I Deguchi Fall (Session I) 2 ▲ ○ ◎* ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ *For MP1 and MP2 students only. Required for MP2 students.
ECO106EB Macroeconomics I Rhodes Fall (Session I) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ○ ▲ ○ For PF and EPP students only.
ECO106EC Macroeconomics I Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session I) 2 ○ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ For YLP and AE students only. Required for AE students.
ECO106ED Macroeconomics Okita Winter 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◯ ▲ For IDS students only.
ECO160E Monetary Economics (Money and Banking) Pfau Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ◯ ○
*For YLP, MP1 and MP2 students only. Required for MP2-PE
ECO200EA Microeconomics II Yoshida Fall (Session II) 2 ○ ○ ◎* ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲
students.
ECO200EB Microeconomics II Xing Fall (Session II) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for AE students only.
ECO200EC Microeconomics II Wie Fall (Session II) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ○ For PF and EPP students. Required for PF students.
*For MP1 and MP2 students only. Required for MP2-PE and MP2-SE
ECO202EA Government and Market Munro Winter 2 ▲ ○ ◎* ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲
students.
ECO202EB Government and Market Kidokoro Winter 2 ○ ▲ ▲ ○ ▲ ▲ ▲ For YLP and AE students only.
ECO202EC Government and Market Hatanaka Winter 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ○ ▲ ○ For PF and EPP students only.
ECO206EA Macroeconomics II Deguchi Fall (Session II) 2 ▲ ○ ◎* ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ *For MP1 & MP2 students only. Required for MP2-PE students.
ECO206EB Macroeconomics II Rhodes Fall (Session II) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ○ ▲ ○ For PF and EPP students only.
ECO206EC Macroeconomics II Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session II) 2 ○ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ For YLP and AE students only. Required for AE students.
ECO272EA Introduction to Applied Econometrics Leon-Gonzalez Fall 2 ▲ ○ ◎* ▲ ▲ ○ ▲ *For MP1,MP2 and IDS students only. Required for MP2-PE students.
ECO272EB Introduction to Applied Econometrics Pfau Fall 2 ○ ▲ ▲ ○ ▲ ▲ ▲ For YLP and AE students only.
ECO272EC Introduction to Applied Econometrics Wie Fall 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ○ ▲ ○ For PF and EPP students only.
ECO290E Game Theory Yasuda Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO300E Mathematics for Economic Analysis Yoshida Fall (Session II), Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO310E Theory of Public Finance Fukushima Fall (Session II) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ Required for PF students only.
ECO312E Public Finance and Fiscal Policy Matsuda Fall 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ Required for PF-Tax students only.
ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO315E Local Public Finance Kook Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO316E Economic and Fiscal Reform in Japan Ota Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO317E Labor Economics Kurosawa Fall (Session II) 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO318E Health Economics TBA Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO320E Economics of Law Hatanaka Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO321E Competition and Regulatory Economics Tanaka Makoto Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO330E Urban Economics Okamoto Ryosuke Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO331E Transportation Economics Murakami Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2 ○ ○ ◎ ◎ ○ ○ ○ Required for MP2 and AE students.
ECO345E International Finance Hsu Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Global Economy, Financial Markets,and Monetary
ECO346E Nunami Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Policy
Empirics of Macroeconomic Policies and
ECO347E TBA TBA 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Not offered this year.
International Finance
ECO351E Environmental Economics Munro Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO352E Economics of Climate Change TBA Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO353E Resource and Energy Economics Tanaka Makoto Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO360E Contemporary Japanese Economy Kojima Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO361E Japanese Economy Okita Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO363E Japanese Financial System Rhodes Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO364E Financial Economics Kubota Spring (Session I) 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO370E Econometrics/ Quantitative Methods Arai Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO371E Time Series Analysis Ikeda Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO372E Cost Benefit Analysis I Kidokoro Fall (Session I) 2 * * * * * * *
*For 2nd year MA students and doctoral students.
ECO373E Cost Benefit Analysis II TBA TBA 2 * * * * * * *
ECO374E Economic Modeling for Policy Simulations Hosoe Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO381E Economic Development of Japan Ohno Kenichi Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO383E Issues of Policy Advisers to Developing Countries TBA Summer 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO384EA Development Economics Cooray Winter 2 ▲ ○ ○ ▲ ○ ▲ ○ For MP1, MP2, PF and EPP students only.
ECO384EB Development Economics Dermendzhieva Winter 2 ○ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ○ ▲ For YLP, AE and IDS students only. Required for AE students.
ECO385E Conflict, Aid and Development Cooray Spring (Session I) 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO386E Asian Economic Development and Integration Kawai, et al Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
ECO391E Experimental Economics Munro Fall 2 * * * * * * * *For 2nd year MA students and doctoral students.
ECO410E Workshop in Public Finance I Fukushima, Kurosawa Spring 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ Required for PF students only.
ECO411E Workshop in Public Finance II Fukushima, Kurosawa Summer 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ Required for PF students only.
ECO600E Advanced Microeconomics I Yasuda Spring (Session I) 2 * * * * * * *
ECO601E Advanced Microeconomics II Yasuda Spring (Session II) 2 * * * * * * *
ECO602E Advanced Microeconomics III Sonobe Fall (Session I) 2 * * * * * * *
ECO603E Advanced Microeconomics IV Sonobe Fall (Session II) 2 * * * * * * *
ECO605E Advanced Macroeconomics I Hsu Fall (Session I) 2 * * * * * * *
ECO606E Advanced Macroeconomics II Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session II) 2 * * * * * * *
* For qualified MA students and doctoral students.
ECO607E Advanced Macroeconomics III Hsu Spring (Session I) 2 * * * * * * *
ECO608E Advanced Macroeconomics IV Ikeda Spring (Session II) 2 * * * * * * *
ECO670E Advanced Econometrics I Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session I) 2 * * * * * * *
ECO671E Advanced Econometrics II Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session II) 2 * * * * * * *
ECO672E Advanced Econometrics III Yamano Fall (Session I) 2 * * * * * * *
ECO673E Advanced Econometrics IV Ikeda Fall (Session II) 2 * * * * * * *

Political Science, International Relations and Public Administration


GOV, LAW, PAD
Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit YLP MP1 MP2 AE PF IDS EPP Remarks
GOV210E Government and Politics in Japan Masuyama Fall 2 ○ ○ ◎ ○ ○ ○ ○ Required for MP2 students.
GOV220E Introduction to International Relations Iwama Fall 2 ○ ○ ◎ ○ ○ ○ ○ Required for MP2 students.
GOV221E Intoroduction to International Political Economy Tsunekawa Spring 2 ○ ○ ◎* ○ ○ ○ ○ *Required for MP2-PS students.
GOV223E Foreign Policy TBA Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
GOV224E International Security Studies Michishita Spring 2 ○ ○ ◎* ○ ○ ○ ○ *Required for MP2-PS students.
GOV225E Chinese Foreign Policy Yu Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
GOV231E Comparative Politics Takenaka Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
GOV246E Government and Politics in Southeast Asia Abinales Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Not offered this year.
GOV258E Structure and Process of Government Horie Spring 2 ○ ○ ◎* ○ ○ ○ ○ *Required for MP2-PS and MP2-SE students.
GOV264E National Security Policy Tokuchi Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
GOV320E World Trade and Diplomacy Ohshima Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
GOV321E Japan's Strategic Environment: historical perspective TBA Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Not offered this year.
GOV625E Transnational Organized Crime and Security Fukumi Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
GOV641E European International Relations Iwama Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
International Economic Law(Globalization and
LAW201E Yamane Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Regionalism)
PAD101E Social Science Questions and Methodologies TBA Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Not offered this year.
PAD250E Armed Conflict and Development Takahashi Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
PAD251E Accounting and Financial ManagementⅠ Lee Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
PAD252E Accounting and Financial Management II Lee Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Development Assistance by International
PAD254E Hirono Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Organizations
PAD255E Foreign Direct Investment Yoshitake Summer 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
PAD256E Human Resources Management Yamazaki Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
PAD257E Seminar in Industry and Trade Policy Tanaka Masami Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
PAD258E Global Governance:Leadership and Negotiation Komatsu Winter 2 ◎ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Required for YLP-School of Government students.
PAD260E Labor Policy (Human Resources Development) TBA TBA 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
PAD261E Fiscal and Monetary Policies in Japan Kobayashi, Yasui Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ◎ ○ ○ ○ Required for AE students.
PAD263E Public Investment TBA TBA 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Not offered this year.
PAD264E Structural Reform and Privatization Tanaka Hideo Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
PAD265E Modernization of Financial Sector Yoshikuni Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
PAD267E Public Expenditure Management Tanaka Hideaki Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
PAD281E National Land Policy Surya Raj Acharya Fall (Session I) 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
PAD282E Transport Policy Ono Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Policy Design and Implementation in Developing Ohno Kenichi, Ohno Izumi,
PAD302E Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Countries Shimamura

Multi Disciplinary Policy Studies


CUL, DEV, EDU, GEN, MOR, TEC
Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit YLP MP1 MP2 AE PF IDS EPP Remarks
CUL101E Managing Cultural Diversity Aikawa Fall (Session II) 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
CUL102E Development and Culture Aikawa Spring (Session II) 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
National Development and Institution for
DEV250E Morichi Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Transportation Infrastructure
DEV253E Gender and Development Estudillo Spring (Session I) 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
EDU200E Education Policy Okamoto Kaoru Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
GEN500E GRIPS Forum Fall & Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
MOR100E Introduction to Quantitative Methods Morohosi Fall (Session I) 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
MOR101E Statistics Miyata Fall 2 ○ ○ ◎* ○ ○ ○ ○ *Required for MP2-SE students.
Tsuchiya, Morohosi,
MOR102E Introductory Statistics Fall (Session I) 2 ○ ○ ◎ ○ ○ ○ ○ Required for MP2 students.
Yoshida
MOR250E Quantitative Social Systems Analysis Oyama, Tsuchiya Spring 2 ○ ○ ◎* ○ ○ ○ ○ *Required for MP2-SE students.
TEC251E Science and Technology Policy TBA TBA 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
TEC252E Small and Medium Enterprise and Technology Hashimoto Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
TEC253E Communications Policy TBA Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
TEC254E Innovation, Sustainability and Uncertainty Woolger, Hope Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

Language
LAN
Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit YLP MP1 MP2 AE PF IDS EPP Remarks
LAN001J Japanese Language I Kondoh, et al. Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

Credits earned in these courses cannot be applied toward the degree.


LAN002J Japanese Language II Kondoh, et al. Winter 1 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
LAN003J Japanese Language III Kondoh, et al. Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Credits earned in these courses cannot be applied toward the degree.
LAN001E Understanding Academic Readings Thomson Fall (Session II) 1 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ▲ ○
LAN002E Academic Presentation Skills Thomson Fall (Session I) 1 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ▲ ○
LAN003E Writing for the Social Sciences TBA TBA 1 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ▲ ○ Not offered this year.
LAN004EA English for Academic Purposes Nakatsugawa Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ▲ ○ For YLP, MP1, MP2, AE, PF and EPP students only.
LAN004EB English for Academic Purposes Nakatsugawa Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ▲ ○ For YLP, MP1, MP2, AE, PF and EPP students only.
LAN005EA Listening and Speaking Thomson Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ▲ ○ For YLP, MP1, MP2, AE, PF and EPP students only.
LAN005EB Listening and Speaking Thomson Winter 1 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ▲ ○ For YLP, MP1, MP2, AE, PF and EPP students only.
LAN005EC Listening and Speaking Thomson Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ▲ ○ For YLP, MP1, MP2, AE, PF and EPP students only.

Program Specific Courses


EPP, IDS, PFP, PPP, REG, TEP, YLP
Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit YLP MP1 MP2 AE PF IDS EPP Remarks
EPP201E Agricultural Economics Hara Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
EPP501E Independent Study (Policy Paper) Fall, Winter, Spring 4 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ Required for EPP students only.
IDS100E Introductory Mathematics and Economics Mano, Goto Fall (September) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ○ ▲ For IDS students only.
IDS101E Microeconomics I Mano, Suzuki Aya Fall (Session I) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ Required for IDS students only.
IDS103E Microeconomics II Mano, Suzuki Aya Fall (Session II) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ Required for IDS students only.
IDS202E Government and Market Kalirajan Winter 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ○ ▲ For IDS students only.
IDS260E Finance and Economic Growth Jeong Spring (Session II) 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
IDS270E Quantitative Methods I Kajisa Fall (Session I) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ Required for IDS students only.
IDS272E Development Project Analysis Kalirajan Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
IDS273E Quantitative Methods II Kajisa Fall (Session II) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ Required for IDS students only.
IDS274E Applied Econometrics Yamano Winter 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ○ ▲ For IDS students only.
IDS280E Japan's ODA: Its Policies and Reform Agenda Tomimoto Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
IDS282E Development Project Management Minato Spring 2 ○* ○* ○* ○* ○* ○ ○* * Non-IDS students need instructor's permission.
IDS283E Environment and Sustainable Development Otsuka Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
IDS285E Japanese Development Cooperation Akiyama Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
IDS286E Poverty Alleviation Suzuki Aya Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
IDS287E Strategies and Conditions for Development I Otsuka Fall (Session I) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ Required for IDS students only.
IDS288E Trade and Industrial Development Sonobe Spring 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
IDS289E Strategies and Conditions for Development II Otsuka Fall (Session II) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ Required for IDS students only.
Project Cycle Management and International
IDS290E Koga Winter 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Development Evaluation
Estudillo, Jeong, Yamano,
IDS380E Applied Development Research I, II, III Fall, Winter, & Spring 6 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ Required for IDS students only.
Yamauchi, Rundle
IDS381E Selected Topics in International Development I TBA Summer 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
IDS382E Selected Topics in International Development II TBA Summer 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
For IDS students only.
IDS580E Internship Fall & Winter 2010/11 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ○ ▲
* Credits earned in this course cannot be applied toward the degree.
PFP250E Customs Law Nagase Fall 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ Required for PF-Customs students only.
PFP252E International Taxation of Japan Komamiya Fall 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ◎ ○ ○ Required for PF Tax Students.
PFP501E Practicum at the National Tax Agency Fall through Spring 8 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ Required for PF-Tax students only.
PFP502E Practicum in Customs Administration I Nagase Winter & Spring 4 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ Required for PF-Customs students only.
PFP503E Practicum in Customs Administration II Aoyama, Yamashita Spring 4 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ Required for PF-Customs students only.
PFP504E Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement at Border Mizutani, Hamaguchi Spring (Session I) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ Required for PF-Customs students only.
PPP501E Independent Study Spring 2 ▲ ○ ○ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ For MP1 and MP2 students only.
PPP502E Thesis Writing I Yoshida Spring (Session II), Summer 2 ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for MP2 students only.
PPP503E Thesis Writing II Fall (Session I) [2nd year] 2 ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for MP2 students only.
PPP504E Thesis Writing III Fall (Session II) [2nd year] 2 ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for MP2 students only.
PPP505E Thesis Writing IV Winter [2nd year] 2 ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for MP2 students only.
REG201E Local Government System Nakamura Fall 2 ◎ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Required for YLP-School of Local Governance students.
REG202E Local Government Finance Hatakeyama Spring 2 ◎ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Required for YLP-School of Local Governance students.
REG301E Local Governance in the Changing World Ikawa, et al. Spring 2 ◎ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ Required for YLP-School of Local Governance students.
TEP501E Independent Study (Policy Proposal Paper) 2 ▲ ▲ ▲ ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for MP2 students only.
YLP500E Introduction to Japan Horie, Okita Fall (Session I) 2 ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for YLP students only.
YLP501E Colloquium Horie Fall & Spring 2 ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for YLP students only.
YLP502E Independent Study Masuyama, et al Fall through Summer 6 ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for YLP-School of Government Students only.
YLP503E Field Trip Horie Fall & Spring 2 ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for YLP-School of Government Students only.
YLP551E Research Paper Yokomichi, et al. Fall through Summer 4 ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for YLP-School of Government Students only.
YLP552E Workshop I Yokomichi Fall 2 ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for YLP-School of Government Students only.
YLP553E Workshop II Fujiwara Spring 2 ◎ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ Required for YLP-School of Government Students only.
Selected Topics in Policy Studies I TBA TBA 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Selected Topics in Policy Studies II TBA TBA 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Selected Topics in Policy Studies III TBA TBA 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Selected Topics in Policy Studies IV TBA TBA 2 ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○
Course Description

Course No., Course Name, Instructor, Term, Course Description

CUL101E, Managing Cultural Diversity, Aikawa, Fall ones. This course has four objectives: (1) explore the
(Session II) aspects of gender inequalities within the households and
This course will study the concept of Cultural in the broader economy at large; (2) assess the impacts of
Diversity from a broader perspective taking the such disparities in the welfare of individuals and
Universal Declaration and the World Report as reference households and aggregate economic growth; (3) explain
documents and try to seek for appropriate policies to be why gender inequalities persist despite its harmful
applied to challenge the issue: how to manage Cultural effects; and (4) identify appropriate policies that can
Diversity. promote gender equality.

CUL102E, Development and Culture, Aikawa, Spring *DMP (Disaster Management Program) courses will
(Session II) appear in the end of the list.
This course will study the evolution of the concept of
development, notably “development’s cultural turn” ECO100EA, Microeconomics I, Yoshida, Fall (Session
which is the paradigm shift occurred in 1990s following I)
the failure of many solely economic oriented This course presents a concise, consistent
development projects. Also we will study the concept methodology for understanding and predicting the
of the cultural approach to development on the basis of economic behavior of people and firms in a variety of
the Report: ‘Our Creative Diversity’ (1995) as well as its markets. We will study the fundamental determinants of
practical application through the ‘Recognizing Culture: market outcomes in enough depth to apply these
A series of briefing papers on Culture and Development’ concepts to the problems faced by family, business, and
(2001). public policy decision-makers. The tools developed in
this course will prepare you for upper-level courses, as
DEV250E, National Development and Institution for well as for intelligent discussion of issues under public
Transportation Infrastructure, Morichi, Spring debate.
The purpose of this lecture is to study the policies for
national development and for transportation ECO100EB, Microeconomics I, Xing, Fall (Session I)
infrastructure. This is an introduction of microeconomics. It covers
Firstly, Japanese national development policies, basic economic assumptions and concepts used to define
which had brought the economical growth and the behaviors of consumers and firms in markets. The course
decrease of regional disparity simultaneously, and which consists of three parts: consumer theory, firm theory and
have been revised to meet the social requirements, are the equilibrium in a competitive market. In the consumer
reviewed. theory, preference, utility, budget constraints, utility
Secondly, the institutions for transportation maximization and demand curves will be introduced. In
infrastructures including railway, road, port and airport the firm theory, production and cost functions, profit
and related policies in Japan, US and European countries maximization, and supply curves will be discussed.
are discussed to understand the future directions in Japan Finally, the concept and the determination of the
and developing countries. equilibrium will be analyzed.

DEV253E, Gender and Development, Estudillo, ECO100EC, Microeconomics I, Wie, Fall (Session I)
Spring (Session I)
Gender and Development explores the linkage ECO101E, Introductory Microeconomics, Kurosawa,
between gender inequalities and economic development. Fall (Session I)
Gender inequalities in rights, resources, and voice exist How do markets work? How do markets set prices,
in rich countries but can be severe among the poor determine what will be produced, how they will be
produced, and decide who will get the goods? What calculus. Knowledge of undergraduate level economics
should governments do in a market economy? This is an is desirable.)
introductory microeconomics course which tries to obtain
answers to these questions. We also consider important ECO160E, Monetary Economics (Money and
economic issues including free trade, taxation, regulation, Banking), Pfau, Fall
environmental preservation, and poverty. This course is intended to provide an overview of the
role that central banks are able to play in the economy.
ECO106EA, Macroeconomics I, TBA, Fall (Session I) The course will begin with a discussion of money and
This course aims to provide an overview of standard interest rates. Then we consider the structure of the
macroeconomic theories. Economists simplify our banking industry and how it allows for the creation of
complex real world into “models” and examine how they money. Next is a discussion of how central banks are
work (or not). The way of modeling depends on the able to adjust the money supply and what the goals of
purpose of the analysis: What determines the overall central bankers should be. Then we will examine some
level of people’s economic welfare? Why does inflation important topics in the theory of monetary policy, such
happen? How can we reduce unemployment? We will as aggregate supply and aggregate demand analysis, and
see the strengths and limitations of macroeconomic the relationship between money and inflation. We will
theories for each economic issue. conclude by considering monetary policy in the context
A background in macroeconomics is not required. of the international financial system. The objective is
However, a basic knowledge of elementary economics is to understand how monetary policy is conducted in the
needed. real world in order to help control cyclical fluctuations in
the economy. The course consists mainly of lectures.
ECO106EB, Macroeconomics I, Rhodes, Fall (Session Student questions and comments are encouraged.
I)
This course is an introduction to modern ECO200EA, Microeconomics II, Yoshida, Fall
macroeconomic theory from a policy perspective. The (Session II)
course uses economic models as a way of formalizing In this course, we incorporate information, time and
ideas about macroeconomic issues and problems. Our uncertainty into the decision processes of economic
primary focus is the aggregate behavior of a competitive agents. In particular, we will analyze how economic
market economy in the classical “long run.” The course agents make optimal decisions when they face
offers insights into the behavior of such important uncertainty, asymmetric information, and choices of
phenomenon as inflation, interest rates, exchange rates, consumption over time. The course will introduce the
unemployment, and long-term economic growth. basics of game theory, analyzing the interaction of
economic agents. Also, the course will discuss the
ECO106EC, Macroeconomics I, Esteban-Pretel, Fall concept of the general equilibrium in a pure exchange
(Session I) economy.
This course will cover basic models used to study
macroeconomic phenomena. We will learn models that ECO200EB, Microeconomics II, Xing, Fall (Session
will help us understand the economic behavior of agents II)
in the short and medium-run. We will focus on the
equilibrium in the goods and financial and labor markets. ECO200EC, Microeconomics II, Wie, Fall (Session II)

ECO106ED, Macroeconomics, Okita, Winter ECO202EA, Government and Market, Munro,


This course discusses mainly macroeconomic Winter
policies for stability of output level, employment, and The aim of this course is to build understanding of
price level. The level is introductory, but some the role of government in a modern, market-based
discussions of graduate level topics are taken up too. The society. We seek to understand what governments do best
use of mathematical models will be limited to some and what should be left to the market and to private
essential subjects, but diagrammatic expositions will be individuals. By the end of the course you should have an
extensively used. improved understanding of government policies and their
(This course uses elementary algebra and elementary consequences. You should also have developed basic
familiarity with economic theories of government ECO206EC, Macroeconomics II, Esteban-Pretel, Fall
behavior and with particular examples of government (Session II)
policies. The sessions will involve a mixture of lectures This course is the continuation of Macroeconomics I
and class discussion. and will cover basic models used to study
macroeconomic phenomena. We will learn models that
ECO202EB, Government and Market, Kidokoro, will help us understand the economic behavior of agents
Winter
in the long-run, and under uncertainty. We will focus on
The purpose of this lecture is to understand the
the consequences of savings and capital accumulation in
economic role of the government in current democratic
the long-run growth of modern economies, the role of
countries. In addition, you will know the basics of
expectations in economic decisions and we will see a
economic thinking, which are very important in applied
brief introduction to open economy models.
work, and how to apply economic theories to actual
phenomena.
ECO272EA, Introduction to Applied Econometrics,
Leon-Gonzales, Fall
ECO202EC, Government and Market, Hatanaka,
The module aims to develop econometric and
Winter
computational skills and their application in modern
The objective of this course is to obtain skills to
economic analysis. The module provides students with
think of various kinds of policies in democratic countries,
basic knowledge of statistical concepts and then
using economic logic or theory. First we will review
progresses towards regression analysis, cross-section and
market failure briefly and treat the various kinds of
time series models. Emphasis is always on the correct
policies to maximize the social welfare and to relieve
application of these methods to economic data. Examples
inequality, such as environmental policy, public
of applications are given in lectures and computer
enterprise, social insurance, anti-trust policy and so on.
sessions. Students are required to write a short
econometric project as part of the final assessment.
ECO206EA, Macroeconomics II, TBA, Fall (Session
II)
ECO272EB, Introduction to Applied Econometrics,
This course is designed to extend the lecture of
Pfau, Fall
Macroeconomics I, so that students can master policy
The course seeks to provide an understanding of
issues, microeconomic foundations and advances in
basic econometrics. The goal at the end of the course is
business cycle theory which are left in Macroeconomics
for students to be able to formulate and conduct basic
I. Economic growth theory will be also covered here
econometrics research using computer statistical
including not only Solow model treated in Mankiw’s
programs (both Stata and EViews). Students are
textbook, but also Ramsey-Cass-Koopmans Model and
expected to gain a good intuition about econometrics and
Overlapping Generations Model to let students acquire
know how to extend their studies into more advanced
basic ideas of representative macroeconomic models that
topics that they may need for their own research. Note
are prerequisite knowledge for the further study of the
that this course will not include important topics such as
macroeconomics.
multicollinearity, autocorrelation, and
heteroskedasticity. Instead, the second half of the course
ECO206EB, Macroeconomics II, Rhodes, Fall
will be spent to introduce time series econometrics,
(Session II)
which is essential for doing empirical research about the
This course is an introduction to business cycle
macroeconomy.
theory from a policy perspective. Using a variety of
economic models, we study the nature and sources of
ECO272EC, Introduction to Applied Econometrics,
macroeconomic fluctuations and potential policy
Wie, Fall
responses. The primary analytical tool is general
Econometrics is the useful methodology of
equilibrium (GE) analysis (IS-LM framework) applied to
economics and other social studies. This course aims to
both closed and open economies. We examine the
introduce students to multiple regression and related
response of macroeconomic variables to various market
methods to analyze data and connect data from the real
“shocks” and to monetary, fiscal, and trade policies.
world to economic models. We start by learning linear
regression model which is widely used tool for
economists. Additionally, we will study methods for and asymmetric information, and examine different types
panel data analysis, regression with binary variables, of government intervention and its financing. Upon
instrumental variables regression, and regression with completion of the course, the students should be familiar
time series data. with the main theoretical concepts and models, which
This course focuses on developing practical will allow them to analyze and discuss issues related to
methodology and applying them to real data using government intervention, taxation, and public
STATA. The mathematics of econometrics will be expenditure.
introduced only as needed and will not be a central focus.
ECO315E, Local Public Finance, Kook, Spring
ECO290E, Game Theory, Yasuda, Winter The course aims to mainly understand the practices
This is an introductory course in game theory, which of local public finance in Japan as well as theoretical
will provide you with mathematical tools for analyzing aspects on fiscal activities of local governments. We
strategically interdependent situations, i.e., the situations introduce basic functions of central and local
in which your optimal decision depends on what other governments. In theoretical aspects, local public finance
people will do. In particular, we will study central deals with the decentralization theorem and its limitation,
solution concepts in game theory such as Nash the optimal size of local authorities, the gains from fiscal
equilibrium, subgame perfect equilibrium, and Bayesian decision-making at a local level, the topics of local tax
equilibrium. To illustrate the analytical value of these revenue and user charges, and intergovernmental fiscal
tools, we will cover a variety of applications, e.g., relations. The course also introduces both viewpoints
international relations, business competition, auctions, from public finance theory and public choice approach.
marriage market, and so forth. There is no prerequisite
for this course, although some background on ECO316E, Economic and Fiscal Reform in Japan,
microeconomics and familiarity of probabilistic thinking Ota, Spring
would be helpful. In this course, we will share and discuss issues and
problems in making economic policy and reforming
ECO300E, Mathematics for Economic Analysis, public finance in Japan.
Yoshida, Fall (Session II) & Winter In the first segment, we will discuss the current
This course provides fundamental and advanced
situation and the major weaknesses in Japan’s economy,
mathematical tools that are useful in conducting an
and consider adequate policies to overcome them. In the
independent research with full utilization of sophisticated
second segment, we will discuss the characteristics of
economic models.
Japan’s fiscal situation and the fiscal policy reforms that
have been implemented recently, and consider the issues
ECO310E, Theory of Public Finance, Fukushima,
that lie ahead. Especially, the structural reform of social
Fall (Session II)
welfare, the local public finance, and taxation system are
In “Theory of Public Finance”, you will learn both
expenditure side and revenue side analysis of public important issues in public finance.
finance theory. This prepares you to “Workshop in Learning about these Japanese experiences may be of
Public Finance 1 and 2”, in which you are expected to value to your country. Students will be encouraged to
write a policy paper in the field of Public Finance. discuss and analyze issues and problems in their own
countries.
ECO314E, Public Economics, Dermendzhieva, Spring
The course examines the role of the government in ECO317E, Labor Economics, Kurosawa, Fall
the economy and combines analysis of government (Session II)
spending and taxation with economic theory. The This is an introductory one semester course in labor
objective of the course is to present the main analytical economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomics
tools used by economists to study key policy questions. and empirical analysis. Topics to be covered include:
We will present the foundations of welfare economics labor supply and demand, human capital, income
and use the cases of market failure as an economic distribution, immigration, discrimination, incentives,
rationale for the existence of government. We will cover unemployment. Throughout the course, we will discuss
in detail the topics of public good provision, externalities, applications of economic theory to important public
policy issues such as minimum wage laws, welfare
reform, and affirmative action. countries will be analyzed along with the experiences of
developing countries as well as transitional economies.
ECO318E, Health Economics, TBA, Spring Finally, the evolution of regional free trade agreements
and the new world trading system under the WTO will be
ECO320E, Economics of Law, Hatanaka, Spring reviewed. The course will cover not only fundamental
This course aims at examining laws by using applied trade theory and policy, but also empirical analysis on
microeconomic theory and provides you with the main the issues.
logic of economic theory to understand the roles of laws.
The objective of this course is (1) to evaluate systems or ECO345E, International Finance, Hsu, Spring
laws in the sense of social welfare (2) to legislate in This course will introduce basic concepts, tools and
order to maximize the social welfare. So each provision facts needed to understand international financial
of laws is not treated in this course. Since we will use markets. We will use the analysis framework to
simple models of applied microeconomics, understand a number of questions that are of current
comprehension of Microeconomics is necessary. interest. Since the financial crises in Asia and Latin
America are the most dramatic recent events in financial
ECO321E, Competition and Regulatory Economics, economics, it is natural that we will focus in particular on
Tanaka Makoto, Spring questions pertaining to that.

ECO330E, Urban Economics, Okamoto Ryosuke, ECO346E, Global Economy, Financial Markets, and
Spring Monetary Policy, Nunami, Spring
This course is intended for second-year Ph.D. The financial crisis which broke out in summer 2007
students or over (not for master’s students). This course has greatly damaged global economy, financial markets,
introduces major theoretical and empirical analyses and financial system, and we are not fully through it yet.
selected in the field of urban economics. In this course, we will discuss lessons to be learned
from the financial crisis by looking through what
ECO331E, Transportation Economics, Murakami, happened and why it happened. Japanese experiences of
Spring asset babbles and their burst in the 80s and the 90s will
This course is divided into two major parts. In the also be discussed. And then, we will discuss challenges
former part, we study the basic theory of transportation major central banks currently face and have to deal with,
economics which is closely related to microeconomics in terms of monetary policy and financial stability policy
as well. Some of current policy issues which will be
and industrial organization. In addition, we study the
discussed in the course are asset price bubbles and
theory of “regulation” and “deregulation”, both of which
monetary policy, quantitative easing and credit easing,
many transportation sectors have experienced. In the
deflation and monetary policy, and inflation targeting.
second part we focus on the cases of regulation and
deregulation of airline and maritime industries, and
ECO347E, Empirics of Macroeconomic Policies and
compare the market behavior and performance
International Finance, Koeda, Winter
before/after the deregulation.
This course introduces practical economic tools used
in central banks and international organizations. This
ECO340E, International Trade, Xing, Spring (Session
includes econometrics models, such as vector
I)
autoregression models, that can be used in analyzing
This course is an introduction to international trade
macroeconomic and international finance problems—in
and commercial policy. It begins with the comparative
particular, the effectiveness of fiscal, monetary and
advantage theory, which explains international trade with
exchange rate policies and macroeconomic diagnosis of
labor productivity as well as resource endowments.
developed and developing countries. These models will
Then, the focus shifts to the income distribution and the
be solved using existing software (Eviews). The class
roles of economies of scale and imperfect competition in
will be taught in English and take place in a computer
the context of trade. The discussion on trade policy
lab.
consists of three parts: tariff and non-tariff instruments,
trade policy in developing countries, and strategic trade
ECO351E, Environmental Economics, Munro, Spring
policy. In particular, trade policy in developing
Environmental issues, such as climate change or for firms, valuing derivative assets, financial planning for
pollution are key problems faced by many nations. The firms, and assessing the effects of taxation upon
aim of this course is to create a basic understanding of corporation financial decision making, along with one or
how economics can be used to value environmental two related Harvard Business School discussion cases.
services and to design environmental policies. The
course mixes theory with international examples and a ECO370E, Econometrics/Quantitative Methods, Arai,
discussion of policy. The sessions will involve lectures Winter
and class discussion. The objective of this course is to enhance
understanding of intermediate econometrics. This course
ECO352E, Economic of Climate Change, TBA, covers the leading econometric methods as well as their
Spring empirical examples.

ECO353E, Resource and Energy Economics, Tanaka ECO371E, Time Series Analysis, Ikeda, Spring
Makoto, Winter This is an introductory course in time series
econometrics for MA students. The examples of
ECO360E, Contemporary Japanese Economy, economic time series data include GDP, Inflation,
Kojima, Fall Aggregate Consumption, Unemployment Rate,
Exchange Rates, Interest Rates, Stock Prices, Volatility
ECO361E, Japanese Economy, Okita, Spring Index, etc. Working knowledge of time series
This course offers some discussions on the post-war econometrics is indispensable for those who are
and contemporary issues of the Japanese economy, such interested in macroeconomics, monetary economics,
as the causes of rapid growth in the 1950s and 60s, the international finance or finance. Data sets will be
Japanese model of corporate governance, corporate distributed for your interests and maybe for homework
finance, and employment system, and the reasons for the assignments. For the analysis of these datasets, students
stagnant development of the economy in the 1990s. are supposed to learn how to use statistical software such
Some discussions on the role of government in the as EVIEWS or MATLAB. I assume students have basic
post-war economic development in Japan will be also knowledge about statistics.
provided.
ECO372E, Cost Benefit Analysis I, Kidokoro, Fall,
ECO363E, Japanese Financial System, Rhodes, (Session I)
Winter The purpose of this lecture is to understand the basic
This course examines the postwar evolution of the theory of cost-benefit analysis and to apply the method to
Japanese financial system (JFS) from the perspectives of actual policy analyses.
economic history, modern political economy, and
comparative economic systems. The focus is the ECO373E, Cost Benefit Analysis II, TBA, TBA
Japanese system of macroeconomic and financial
regulation. The fundamental question addressed is ECO374E, Economic Modeling for Policy
why the JFS worked so (apparently) well in the Simulations, Hosoe, Spring
highly-regulated early periods but floundered in the This course exposes students to macro-economic
post-liberalization era. models which are useful to analyze various policy issues
for developing countries as well as developed ones by
ECO364E, Financial Economics, Kubota, Spring simulating counter-factual situations. The aim of this
(Session I) course is to have students acquire practical modeling
To help students familiarize and understand the basic skills on PCs for empirical policy analysis and/or for
principles of Financial Economics doctrine, in particular, academic research works. Thus, this course is designed
in Corporate Finance area. These understandings will so that students can learn both of theoretical frameworks
help students control the use of various financial of the economic models (as exemplified below),
instruments in a prudent way. programming with numerical computation software, and
The lecture topics include valuing various financial their empirical implementation for policy simulation
assets, optimal real investment decisions, raising capital purposes through developing simple and then
sophisticated models by themselves. taking this course will learn to analyse and engage in
ongoing policy debate. An attempt is also made
ECO381E, Economic Development of Japan, Ohno throughout the course to bring the subject alive and
Kenichi, Spring providing students with insight into the economy. No
This course reviews the path of Japan’s prior knowledge in economics is required for this course
modernization and industrialization as a latecomer but strong desire and genuine effort to learn are
country from the Edo period (17-19c), which prepared prerequisites.
pre-conditions for development, through Meiji
Restoration and pre- and post-WW2 industrialization up ECO384EB, Development Economics,
to present. Classes proceed chronologically, studying key Dermendzhieva, Winter
problems and policy response in each period. Numerical The objective of the course is to develop the students’
data, research findings, and remaining debates will be ability to understand the economic problems of the
presented. In addition to economic issues, social and developing countries, to prepare them to propose
political aspects of economic development are also possible solutions and evaluate alternative policies and
discussed. The reason for Japan’s early industrial measures to combat these problems. The course includes
catch-up, interaction of external forces and domestic a critical review of the classic and contemporary theories
capability, and the roles of government policy and of economic growth, development and
private dynamism are featured. A textbook, web underdevelopment. A number of case studies will be used
materials, and classroom handouts will be used. to provide empirical evidence on the theories presented
and to illustrate the progress made and the challenges to
ECO383E, Issues of Policy Advisers to Developing reducing poverty and inequality in the developing world.
Countries, TBA, Summer We will discuss the role of education, health, agriculture,
As part of economic assistance programs, a great international trade, globalization, institutions, social
number of policy advisers are sent to developing capital, foreign investment and aid, as well as pressing
countries by developed countries. Many issues, such as environmental issues, in the context of economic
their objectives and qualifications, have been discussed development.
vigorously in both sending and receiving countries.
This course focuses on an analysis of these issues, ECO385E, Conflict, Aid and Development, Cooray,
not only by reviewing the contemporary advisers but also Spring (Session I)
by comparing those with foreign advisers (oyatoi- The course examines the complex nature among
gaikokujin) received by the pre-modern Japan around conflict, aid and development taking broader
1870. An attempt is also made to analyze these policy perspectives into consideration and ways to achieve
advisers in the contract theory framework such as development in a sustainable manner. We also critically
common agency. examine the role of aid in peace building and
Through the course, we will try to think of how to development. The course is design to produce the
improve the “effectiveness” of those policy advisers. following outcomes for course participants. At the end of
the course, they will be able:
ECO384EA, Development Economics, Cooray, (a) To recognize the root courses for conflict and
Winter violence;
Nothing matters more to the long-term living (b) To understand the consequences of conflict and
condition of a country than its growth and development. violence;
The economic development of developing countries is (c) To identify strategies to overcome the conflict-the
almost universally desired by their people and precondition for peace;
governments. And policy makers in those countries have (d) To comprehend the causes of uneven development;
attempted to improve living conditions through various (e) To critically evaluate the role of foreign aid in
economic policies. In this context, this course aims at achieving target goals of developing economies;
fostering the knowledge and skills of students to and
understand real problems faced by developing countries. (f) To synthesize social, geo-political, economical and
This course introduces economic models within the environmental needs and revisit existing
context of countries and issues so that students who are development management practices of their own
countries in the context of international instructed by the policy paper adviser of your choice. A
cooperation. list of possible advisers will be provided in due course.
The following is a description of the typical avenue
ECO386E, Asian Economic Development and that you are to follow in writing your policy paper. First,
Integration, Kawai et al., Spring you are expected to choose a topic in the field of public
This course will provide an overview of the key finance (or in the closely related area). Then you are
factors influencing the rapid growth and development of expected to present your research at least three times in a
Asian economies since the 1950s, with a focus on semester: 1) Your topic and initial outline, 2) Progress
developments since the Asian financial crisis (1997/98). report, 3) Final presentation. The following schedule is
It will examine a range of policy challenges that the a rough one and more detailed one may be provided by
region has faced and the response of various economies. your policy paper adviser.
The course will draw on diverse country, regional, and
sub-regional experience to identify policies that seem to ECO600E, Advanced Microeconomics I, Yasuda,
have contributed most significantly to growth and Spring (Session I)
development, examine why they “worked,” and how they This is an advanced course in microeconomics,
might be applied in other developing economies. It will emphasizing the applications of mathematical tools and
consider current policy debates on a host of “hot” topics models to the study of individual economic decisions and
including monetary policy, regional economic integration, their aggregate consequences. We begin with a
social safety nets, and financial market development and parsimonious set of hypotheses about human behavior
supervision. At the end of the course, students should and the ways in which individual choices interact, and
understand the key drivers of Asian growth and then examine the implications for markets. This entails
development in the past 60 years and be familiar with a treatments and applications of consumer theory and
range of ongoing policy discussions likely to influence theory of the firm, under the ideal conditions implied by
growth in the region moving forward. Students are our hypotheses.
expected to attend all lectures and participate actively in
class. ECO601E, Advanced Microeconomics II, Yasuda,
Spring (Session II)
ECO391E, Experimental Economics, Munro, Fall This is an advanced course in microeconomics,
Experiments have become one of the main methods succeeding to Advanced Microeconomics I (ECO601E)
economists use to test theories and policy proposals. in which we study individual economic decisions and
They are widely used in areas such as regulation, public their aggregate consequences under ideal situations. In
economics, environmental economics, development and this course, we extend our previous analyses to
industrial organisation. The approach of experimental incorporate imperfectly competitive market structures,
economists has changed economic theory and strongly dynamic market competitions, and incomplete
influenced developments in econometric methods. The information. To this end, we study game theory, a
aim of this course to create a basic understanding of collection of mathematical tools for analyzing
experimental methods and results, suited to PhD students strategically interdependent situations. Most of the topics
who may be considering writing a thesis in an exciting covered in this course parallels to those of Game Theory
and rapidly expanding area. (ECO290E), but are explained in much more rigorous
way.
ECO410E, Workshop in Public Finance I, Fukushima
& Kurosawa, Spring ECO602E, Advanced Microeconomics III, Sonobe,
Fall (Session I)
ECO411E, Workshop in Public Finance II, This course is a continuation of Advanced
Fukushima & Kurosawa, Summer Microeconomics II. It reviews the consumer theory and
You must register with these courses in order to write the producer theory. It is problem-centered: almost all
and submit your Policy Paper for Public Finance the class hours will be devoted to the discussion of the
Program.
exercise questions which are provided at the end of each
In addition to registering with the course, you must
chapter of the textbook. Students are expected to have
find your policy paper adviser. Your actual work will be
read the text of the textbook and have solved at least the
first eight questions in the chapter which is covered in health care systems. To study these issues, we need to
that week before coming to class. During class, they introduce an overlapping generations (OLG) model.
will be assigned to show their answers to other students Effects of demographic changes (e.g. aging population,
and answer the questions asked by fellow students. fertility, etc) will also be discussed.

ECO603E , Advanced Microeconomics IV, Sonobe, ECO608E, Advanced Macroeconomics IV, Ikeda,
Fall (Session II) Spring (Session II)
This course follows Advanced Microeconomics III. This is a graduate course of macro-finance. Students
It will cover the partial and general equilibrium are required to buy and read John Cochrane’s “Asset
competitive models, factor markets, and market failures. Pricing”. The topics include testing efficient market
Like Advanced Microeconomics III, it s hypothesis, aggregate return predictability, consumption
problem-centered: almost all the class hours will be CAPM and equity premium puzzle. I will cover a few
devoted to the discussion of the exercise questions which chapters and students are supposed to report selected
are provided at the end of each chapter of the textbook. topics.
Students are expected to have read the text of the
textbook and have solved at least the first eight questions ECO670E, Advanced Econometrics I, Leon-Gonzales,
in the chapter which is covered in that week before Spring (Session I)
coming to class. During class, they will be assigned to The module focuses on a selection of
show their answers to other students and answer the microeconometric techniques, with an emphasis on their
questions asked by fellow students. application in modern economic analysis. The module
outlines the basic principles of linear regression,
ECO605E, Advanced Macroeconomics I, Hsu, Fall Maximum Likelihood, Quasi Maximum-Likelihood,
(Session I) Generalized Method of Moments and Bayesian
This course is the first of the advanced estimation with applications to the dynamic panel data
macroeconomics sequence that will introduce you to the model and repeated cross sections models. Examples of
methods, and some of the issues, of modern applications are given in lectures and computer classes.
macroeconomics. Since this is a fundamental PhD level Students are required to write a short econometric project
course, we will focus more on “tools” (rather than topics) as part of the final assessment.
so that you can have the ability to read macroeconomic
literature and to analyze related economic issues ECO671E, Advanced Econometrics II,
independently. In this term, we will begin with Leon-Gonzales, Spring (Session II)
deterministic neoclassical growth theory. Dynamic The module aims to develop understanding of time
programming and recursive equilibrium are the tools we series econometrics techniques and their application in
will develop to study these models. Simple modern economic analysis. Examples of applications are
computational methods for analyzing these models will given in lectures and computer classes. Students are
also be discussed. The theory will be applied to some required to write a short econometric project as part of
related questions. the final assessment.

ECO606E, Advanced Macroeconomics II, ECO672E, Advanced Econometrics III, Yamano, Fall
Esteban-Pretel, Fall (Session II) (Session I)
This course will study general equilibrium models This course focuses on causal inference in analyses
with the intention of analyzing business cycle of the cross-sectional and longitudinal data and aims at
fluctuations. It will build from simple Real Business acquiring practical skills necessary to carry out their own
Cycle models to more elaborate models with frictions, in empirical analyses. Through weekly homework,
the style of the New Keynesian theory. students will learn how to conduct econometric analyses
with STATA. Whenever possible, this course
ECO607E, Advanced Macroeconomics III, Hsu, introduces published empirical studies in the field of
Spring (Session I) development economics to students.
This course will focus on analyses of social
institutions, in particular social security (pension) and ECO673E, Advanced Econometrics IV, Ikeda, Fall
(Session II) Masuyama, Fall
This is a graduate course on financial econometrics. This course covers an overview of Japanese politics,
Students are strongly recommended to review Advanced and themes and writings of interest to political scientists.
Econometrics II by Professor Leon-Gonzalez on Time In particular, this course explores how Japanese politics
Series Econometrics. The topics include the information works from three perspectives: (1) voters, (2) politicians,
set, conditional expectation, ARMA models, (G)ARCH
and (3) political organizations, with a special emphasis
and stochastic volatility models, market microstructure
placed on insights from rational choice models of
and analysis of intra-daily high frequency data. Students
political behavior.
are required to write one term paper using my or your
dataset and technique covered in this course. GOV220E, Introduction to International Relations,
Iwama, Fall
EDU200E, Education Policy, Okamoto Kaoru, Winter This course is intended to provide introduction into
This course is to provide students with the following the study of international relations as well as some
opportunities. understanding of the more recent happenings in global
(1) To acquire basic information on education politics. After several introductory sessions, we will
policies and practices in Japan examine some of the major past historical junctures to
(including (a) historical developments, (b) better understand the nature of the change world system
cultural backgrounds and (c) current is now facing. Thereafter we will examine different
challenges/obstacles) aspects of the challenge we are facing and compare
(2) To learn a new method of policy analysis: different perspectives.
“Ph.P Method”
(3) To practice policy analysis and presentation GOV221E, Introduction to International Political
(4) To exchange information and have discussions Economy, Tsunekawa, Spring
among students on education issues in their This course is designed to provide introduction to
countries International Political Economy (IPE) which focuses on
economic aspects of international relations. The role of
EPP201E, Agricultural Economics, Hara, Spring the state in rapidly globalizing economy is the main
This course provides an overview of agricultural theme in the discipline. In the first half of the course,
economics, through focusing on the historical experience students are expected to become familiarized with basic
of agricultural development in Modern Japan. It will give concepts and theoretical frameworks which are used to
you the theoretical frameworks and the empirical interpret or understand IPE phenomena. In the second
evidences for analyzing the agricultural policies in the half of the course, students will study how various IPE
developing countries as well as the developed countries. frameworks are applied to the analysis of particular
issues such as financial/monetary relations, international
EPP501E, Independent Study (Policy Paper), Fall, trade relations, regional integration, and development in
Winter, Spring the South. In this course, students are required to read
“classical” works in the field in addition to textbook-type
GEN500E, GRIPS Forum, GRIPS Forum Committee, materials.
Fall & Spring
GRIPS Forum makes use of the university’s vast GOV223E, Foreign Policy, TBA, Spring
network to invite leaders from a wide range of fields to
present lectures with simultaneous translation between GOV224E, International Security Studies, Michishita,
Japanese and English. The aim of the course is to Spring
broaden students’ perspective on policy issues beyond This course is designed to give students an
the focus of their day-to-day academic activities. understanding of security issues both in theory and
Another important objective of the course is to provide practice. Major subjects of this course include:
students with opportunities to be acquainted, through international relations theories; civil-military relations;
interaction, with their Japanese and non-Japanese peers,
force and diplomacy; intelligence; nuclear issues; and
instructors and administrative staff of other programs.
assessment of military balance. In investigating these
subjects, historical and current security issues concerning
GOV210E, Government and Politics in Japan,
Japan and Korea will be extensively discussed. In this Government, Horie, Spring
sense, this course can be characterized as a combined This course is intended to study the systems and
course on strategic studies and Asian studies. operations of structures and processes of government
from comparative viewpoints and to contribute to the
GOV225E, Chinese Foreign Policy, Yu, Winter reform of government and public administration. Major
This course has two main goals. The first is to issues of administrative reform will be discussed from
provide the students with a history of Chinese foreign theoretical as well as practical viewpoints.
policy since 1949, which has been divided into six Relying basically on the framework of comparative
periods. This includes basic developments in China’s analysis worked out by C. Pollitt and G. Bouckert, key
bilateral relations with other states (particularly with the features of government and public administration which
U.S., the Soviet Union/Russia, and Japan), in China’s have much to do with the process and content of
relations with other actors in international politics from administrative reform will be discussed in the course.
revolutionary movements to international institutions, While the cases in Japan will be dealt with in detail,
and in Chinese positions on global issues such as arms based on academic works and practical experiences of
control, trade and environment. The second goal is to the instructor, students are also expected to make a
apply analytical tools from international relations theory contribution to the discussion by infusing their first-hand
and comparative foreign policy analysis to the Chinese information and analysis on the topics of discussion.
case. These include structural/systemic theories,
Neo-liberal institutional theories, cultural and ideological GOV264E, National Security Policy, Tokuchi, Spring
explanations, domestic political factors, and This course provides an overview of Japan’s national
psychological approaches among others. The purpose is security policy with primary focus on the roles of the
to familiarize the students with some of the basic Japan’s Defense Forces and on the Japan-US alliance
theoretical approaches to the study of state behavior with relationship. What will the future course of Japan’s
a view to gauging their value for understanding Chinese national security look like? How will it be intertwined
foreign policy while seeing how China’s foreign policy is with the Japan-US security relationship? Through
different from others. discussions on the basic defense policy of Japan and on
some current topics, we will analyze domestic and
GOV231E, Comparative Politics, Takenaka, Fall regional factors behind the policy, in order to have an
This is a graduate course on comparative politics for insight for the future of the security of Japan and the
the YLP as well as Security Program. The course aims to region.
expose students to some major issues in comparative
politics with particular focus on development of GOV320E, World Trade and Diplomacy, Ohshima,
democracy and role of political institutions under Spring
democracy. The course puts weights on discussions
based on the readings. GOV321E, Japan's Strategic Environment: historical
perspective, TBA, Winter
GOV246E, Government and Politics in Southeast
Asia, Abinales, Fall GOV620E, International Relations, Iwama, Fall
This course focuses on state formation, economic
development and state-and-civil society relations in GOV625E, Transnational Organized Crime and
Southeast Asia from the late colonial period to the Security, Fukumi, Fall
present. It examines the colonial legacies that shaped This course intends to explore transnational
these states, and the economic, social and politics organized crime regarded as the major non-traditional
tensions they underwent in the post-colonial period. It security threat. Since the end of the Cold War, new
looks at why certain states were able to develop while threats came to recognize in the sphere of Security
others failed. The lectures will be theme-based, but Studies. To what extent non-traditional security threats
students are expected to study closely the political differ from the traditional threats? This course will cover
histories of two countries for their research reports. issues related to transnational organized crime with the
particular emphasis on drug trafficking (for example, the
GOV258E, Structure and Processes of the nature of non-traditional security threats, the threats
posed by them and counter-measures), and theories to fail to deliver efficient allocation of resources due to
analyze the phenomena. various factors. Market failures are common and
potentially serious in developing economies as they
GOV641E, European International Relations, Iwama, could trap these economies in low stages of development.
Spring We will discuss topics including monopoly, uncertainty,
game theory, asymmetric information, externalities, and
IDS100E, Introductory Mathematics & Economics, public goods.
Mano & Goto, Fall (September) We expect you to work hard to understand the basic
The course aims to provide the core principles of concepts and the philosophy of economics. The best way
mathematics and economics to students who have either to do so is to use theories to solve problems. For this
not taken introductory economics or taken it some time purpose, homework will be provided and answers are
ago and thus would benefit from refreshing their discussed in weekly drill sessions.
knowledge. By the end of the term, the students are
expected to be ready to take intermediate courses in IDS202E, Government and Market, Kalirajan,
economics and quantitative methods that will be offered Winter
in the regular semesters as core requirements. This course explores what will be the most
appropriate economic system to promote development.
IDS101E, Microeconomics I, Mano & Suzuki Aya, An economic system is defined as an institutional
Fall (Session I) framework by which competition among people on the
Microeconomics provides the foundation for modern use of scarce resources are coordinated. Traditionally, the
economic theory and its applications, including choice of economic system has been discussed in terms
development economics. This course is designed to help of relationship between market and state, centering on
the students familiarize themselves with the basic ways what economic activities should be controlled by the
of thinking in economics and set the stage for a serious command of the government and what activities should
study of critical issues in economic development. be left to the dictate of voluntary transactions in the
This course will primarily study fundamental theories market. While following this tradition, this course
on consumer choice, producer’s behavior, and incorporates community as the third major component of
competitive equilibrium while it also explores some economic system. The market is viewed as the
introductory topics of imperfect competition. The organization that is efficient in producing private goods
materials will illustrate the twin pillars in the economic through free competition, whereas the state is the
science, namely rational choice by individual agents and organization necessary to supply public goods by means
equilibrium formed by mutually compatible individual coercion. In contrast, the community defined as the small
choices. group of people characterized by intensive social
We expect you to work hard to understand the basic interactions is considered efficient in the supply of local
concepts and the philosophy of economics. The best way public goods through cooperation. The optimum system
to do so is to use theories to solve problems. For this for economic development may be designed in the
purpose, homework will be provided and answers are appropriate combination of these three organizations.
discussed in weekly drill sessions. However, what combinations may be appropriate for
different cultural and institutional heritages as well as for
IDS103E, Microeconomics II, Mano & Suzuki Aya, different development stages are the major agenda of this
Fall (Session II) course.
Microeconomics provides the foundation for modern
economic theory and its applications, including IDS260E, Finance and Economic Growth, Jeong,
development economics. This course is designed to help Spring (Session II)
the students familiarize themselves with the basic ways The goal of the course is to understand the process of
of thinking in economics and set the stage for a serious economic growth and development in relation to
study of critical issues in economic development. financial system. This course defines the financial
This course is the continuation of the system in a broad and open sense so that financial
Microeconomics I (IDS101E). In this part of the course, aspects may include credit, insurance and money. Both
we focus on cases where markets fail, i.e., when markets theory and empirics are emphasized, which eventually
are to be translated into policy discussions for economic students who need to use econometrics in their research.
growth. To conduct econometric analysis properly, students need
We first review the basic constructs of growth to have solid understanding on the subject. Through
theories and the stylized facts about them. Then, we weekly homework, students will deepen their knowledge
study various models where finance matters for on the subject and learn how to conduct econometric
economic growth, and review their empirical relevance. analyses with STATA, which is a popular econometrics
For this part of lectures, we may review some empirical software.
methods if necessary.
The class will also discuss the policy and institutional IDS280E, Japan’s ODA: Its Policies and Reform
implications of financial system on economic growth. Agenda, Tomimoto, Fall

IDS270E, Quantitative Methods I, Kajisa, Fall IDS282E, Development Project Management, Minato,
(Session I) Spring
The first objective of this course is to provide Development Project Management Course is
students with a solid understanding of statistics that are designed to provide students with a practical knowledge
frequently used in development studies such as poverty of the management method, skill and tool for
indexes, Gini coefficient, Purchasing Power Parity (PPP). development projects including ODA projects and
The second objective is to provide basic knowledge on NGO’s projects. We will start with the concept of
probability theory and methods of statistical analysis. development project and project management. We will
The course consists of lectures and laboratory sections. focus on Project Cycle Management that is one of
The laboratory sections will be used for exercises and management methods widely used at the participatory
computational works. planning, implementing and monitoring, and evaluating
stages of development projects. The course introduces
IDS272E, Development Project Analysis, Kalirajan, some relevant cases and lectures’ experience, which
Winter enables students to understand how projects are planned,
This course is intended to provide a clear monitored and evaluated in the local context. Some
understanding and guidance in the use of benefit-cost important concepts for project formulation such as
analysis while evaluating development projects that bear participatory development, ownership by stakeholders,
major resource implications. This course requires a basic institutional development, gender issue, environmental
knowledge of microeconomics. Wherever possible, aspects, and appropriate technology will be discussed.
examples are used to aid the exposition. Certainly, this is The relationship between Project and Program/Policy
not a course on welfare economics exclusively. Welfare formulation, MDGs, Aid coordination, harmonization,
concepts that are relevant in benefit-cost analysis will be and Cooperation between the public and private sector
discussed. Particular attention will be given to practical will be covered.
analysis with emphasis on the use of shadow prices, the
use of consumers’ surplus and the problems of valuing IDS283E, Environment and Sustainable Development,
goods that do not have market prices. Students are Otsuka, Spring
encouraged to participate effectively in class discussions. By now it is clear that climate change is a major
threat to the welfare of the mankind in the 21st century.
IDS273E, Quantitative Methods II, Kajisa, Fall This course reviews the prospect of climate change,
(Session II) examines the widely debated and hot issue of whether
This course follows IDS270E and provides basics of environment deteriorates with economic development,
econometrics. This course emphasizes application rather and considers the desirable “solution” to mitigate climate
than theory itself, so that students can integrate change. More specifically, we deal with the issues of
econometrics with economic theories for the analysis of (1) natural resource management, such as forests, (2)
development issues. Examples use data on economic sustainable development of agriculture, particular in
growth and development. sub-Saharan Africa, (3) emission of greenhouse gasses
(GHGs) and other pollutants in the course of economic
IDS274E, Applied Econometrics, Yamano, Winter development, and (4) the significance of international
This course aims at providing econometrics tools for agreement to reduce the emission of GHGs), such as the
Kyoto Protocol. In each topic, theoretical discussions also examine methods to evaluate the effects of aid
will be made first, followed by the review of empirical programs on poverty. Throughout the course, we
evidence. Final purpose of this course is to consider emphasize on applying the basic theories of
desirable solutions to prevent disastrous impacts of microeconomics and econometric techniques to deepen
climate change. This course uses basic tools of our understandings on these issues.
microeconomics and econometrics extensively. Students are required to make group presentations on
Therefore, students must have successfully completed assigned papers and actively participate in classroom
the courses of Microeconomics and Quantitative discussions. Through these exercises, students are
Methods offered in the fall term. expected to develop analytical skills to read papers
critically as well as communication skills to make logical
IDS285E, Japanese Development Cooperation, argument to support their own ideas.
Akiyama, Winter
International development assistance has been IDS287E, Strategies and Conditions for Development
undergoing significant changes over the last several I, Otsuka, Fall (Session I)
years. Among the entire development communities there This course explores conditions under which
have been an increased emphasis on policies, institutions, developing economies can be set on the track of
and issues of poverty reduction, governance, and sustained development for the immediate goal of
coordination among donors and NGOs. Also since 9/11 reducing poverty and the long-term goal of catching up
international security issues have attracted attentions in to the wealth of developed economies. A comprehensive
the context of development assistance. Japan’s ODA has review of development literature as well as a quantitative
also changed. The amount of ODA spending has been overview of the developing world is advanced. Further,
reduced and, its position as world top leader in ODA in the patterns of institutional evolution in response to
the 1990s has moved to fifth place. In October 2008, new changes in resource endowments and technology under
JICA was created which now handles loans and grants in different social and cultural traditions are compared
addition to technical assistance. Some changes have been across space and time to derive lessons for the design of
in conjunction with the global trend, and also there is development strategies.
another change designed to meet the challenges for
improvement required under stringent financial situation IDS288E, Trade and Industrial Development, Sonobe,
at home and called for by the public. The course will Spring
examine the changes, trends and issues in the thinking, The main objective of this course is to explore the
approaches and provision of Japanese ODA-both strategy of industrial development in low-income
globally and domestically with dynamic world countries. The first six sessions provide an introduction
development assistance evolution. In addition, through to international trade theory, which will help students
discussions, the class will explore ways to improve understand the basic mechanism of international trade
Japanese and global ODA. About one half of the lectures and the major causes of large international income gaps.
will be given by outside experts. The rest of the course is devoted to the issues of
industrial development in developing countries. We
IDS286E, Poverty Alleviation, Suzuki Aya, Spring will review theoretical studies, cases studies and
Eradication of extreme poverty and hunger is at the experimental studies conducted in Asia and Africa, and
core of the development study and is the first agenda of discuss their policy implications.
the Millennium Development Goals. Poverty, however,
is a compound phenomenon and achieving the goal IDS289E, Strategies and Conditions for Development
requires academic efforts in addition to practical II, Otsuka, Fall (Session II)
endeavors. Among many, this course explores selective This course explores conditions under which
topics that contribute to poverty alleviation. In developing economies can be set on the track of
particular, we examine how agricultural households sustained development for the immediate goal of
make choices given exogenous conditions and study reducing poverty and the long-term goal of catching up
empirical findings on how factors such as non-farm to the wealth of developed economies. A comprehensive
income, education, infrastructure, trade, and review of development literature as well as a quantitative
microfinance contribute to the welfare of the poor. We overview of the developing world is advanced. Special
focus will be placed on the role of capital accumulation
and technological change, income distribution and LAN001J, Japanese Language I, Kondoh, et al., Fall
poverty, and climate change. J Japanese Language I is aimed at learning useful
Japanese for your life here. It consists of four levels such
IDS290E, Project Cycle Management and as J1, J2, J3 and J4.
International Development Evaluation, Koga, Winter y J1 (Japanese1) introduces survival Japanese to
beginners who have no Japanese learning
IDS380E, Applied Development Research I, II, III, experience. J1 has 3 classes (J1A, J1B, and J1C)
Estudillo, Jeong, Yamano, Yamauchi & Rundle, Fall, covering the same material.
Winter, & Spring y J2 offers practical and useful Japanese for your life.
The purposes of this course are to strengthen the It is appropriate for students with basic learning
analytical skills of students and to develop their ability to experience.
prepare and present an academic paper. This course y J3 is designed for intermediate students who have
expands over three terms -- Fall, Winter, and Spring. already mastered basic skills.
In the Fall Term (Applied Development Research I), y J4 is designed to give advanced students the
students will be introduced to the structure and contents opportunity to engage in intellectual and academic
of an academic paper and will be requested to choose a conversation in class.
topic for their research. At the end of the Fall Term,
students are expected to have selected a research topic LAN002J, Japanese Language II, Kondoh, et al.,
followed by the submission of a research prospectus of Winter
about 1-2 pages long containing a brief description of the Japanese Language II is aimed at learning useful
research topic and a statement of the objective of the Japanese for your life here. It consists of five levels.
paper. y J1 (Japanese1) introduces survival Japanese to
In the Winter Term (Applied Development Research beginners who have no Japanese learning
II), students will be divided into three groups based on experience. J1 has 3 classes (J1A, J1B, and J1C)
research topics, which will be supervised by Prof. covering the same material.
Estudillo, Prof. Jeong, Prof.Yamano and Prof. Yamauchi. y J2 offers practical and useful Japanese for your life.
Under supervision, students will expand upon the topics It is appropriate for students with basic learning
outlined in the Fall Term. Students will be introduced experience.
to scientific research methodology and statistical y J3 is designed for intermediate students who have
software to enable them to choose an appropriate already mastered basic skills.
methodology in data analysis. At the end of the Winter y J4 is designed to give advanced students the
Term, students submit a six- to eight-page draft proposal opportunity to engage in intellectual and academic
containing objectives, literature review, data description, conversation in class.
methodology, and expected outcome of their respective y J5 offers more advanced Japanese with Japanese
research projects. TV programs, newspapers, and so on. Classes will
In the Spring Term (Applied Development Research be designed according to students’ needs.
III), each student orally presents to the class and submits
two papers: a more detailed research proposal in Spring I, LAN003J, Japanese Language III, Kondoh, et al.,
and the final paper in Spring II. In this way, all the Spring
classes in the Spring Term will be allocated for student Japanese Language III is aimed at learning useful
presentations. Japanese for your life here. It consists of five levels.
y J1 (Japanese1) introduces survival Japanese to
IDS381E, Selected Topics in International beginners who have no Japanese learning
Development I, TBA, Summer experience. J1 has 3 classes (J1A, J1B, and J1C)
covering the same material.
IDS382E, Selected Topics in International y J2 offers practical and useful Japanese for your life.
Development II, TBA, Summer It is appropriate for students with basic learning
experience.
IDS580E, Internship, Fall & Winter (2010/11) y J3 is designed for intermediate students who have
already mastered basic skills. Winter
y J4 is designed to give advanced students the
opportunity to engage in intellectual and academic LAN005EC, Listening and Speaking, Thomson,
conversation in class. Spring
y J5 offers more advanced Japanese with Japanese
TV programs, newspapers, and so on. Classes will LAW201E, International Economic Law
be designed according to students’ needs. (Globalization and Regionalism), Yamane, Fall
This course will attempt to clarify the rules that
LAN001E, Understanding Academic Readings, govern international trade, investment and competition
Thomson, Fall (Session II) and examine how they relate to innovation and
This course teaches students to understand research development. The first part of the course will
studies in the human and social sciences. We will concentrate on the rules and dispute settlement within the
examine such fundamental concepts of academic WTO. The second part will focus on international rules
research as theoretical framework, research methodology, relating to intellectual property, with a view to exploring
and study design, and will look at the role of theory in their impact on innovation and socio-economic welfare.
research, the basic logic that underlies scientific research,
and the main criteria for assessing the appropriateness of MOR100E, Introduction to Quantitative Methods,
a particular research method to investigating a particular Morohosi, Fall (Session I)
research problem. Students will learn how to evaluate the This course introduces students to fundamental
strength of a research design, the validity of knowledge mathematics necessary for learning economics, political
claims, and the credibility of academic arguments. science, operations research, and other social sciences.
Students will read research articles from a variety of Students will know some basic ideas in mathematics and
social science disciplines and will critique them with a be able to apply mathematical methods to various
focus on research design, structure of main arguments, problems.
and limitations.
MOR101E, Statistics, Miyata, Fall
LAN002E, Academic Presentation Skills, Thomson, This course is designed for students from a wide
Fall (Session I) variety of backgrounds. The course emphasizes statistical
The course will focus on four aspects of a good thinking rather than mathematical details and is intended
academic presentation: organization, language, delivery, to get students familiar with organizing and describing
and visual aids. Students will learn how to prepare and data, as well as with basic statistical reasoning and
organize an academic presentation that does not bore the models for data analysis including regression and
audience and how to prepare slides that help, rather than ANOVA (Analysis of Variance). Students will be
hurt, the presentation. Students will also learn how to supposed to use a computer intensively but no previous
deliver a presentation clearly and persuasively and will knowledge of a computer is required. (1) Course web site
receive guidance on effective use of verbal and will be prepared and lecture notes, homework
non-verbal skills. Students will practice making assignments and other information will be posted. (2) R,
presentations in groups and in front of the whole class. free software, for statistical analysis will be intensively
used in this course.
LAN003E, Writing for Social Sciences, TBA, TBA
MOR102E, Introductory Statistics, Oyama, Tsuchiya
LAN004EA, English for Academic Purposes, & Morohosi, Fall (Session I)
Nakatsugawa, Fall This course is an introduction to statistical modeling
and data analyses intended to provide fundamental
LAN004EB, English for Academic Purposes, methodology and make students get familiar to statistical
Nakatsugawa, Spring software. After surveying basic statistical notions such as
probability distribution, statistical inference, hypothesis
LAN005EA, Listening and Speaking, Thomson, Fall testing, and regression analysis, course proceeds with
practical data analyses on actual social data by using
LAN005EB, Listening and Speaking, Thomson, computer software, for example, EXCEL, R, MATLAB,
and others. business analysis. There is no prerequisite for this
course.
MOR250E, Quantitative Social Systems Analysis,
Oyama & Tsuchiya, Spring PAD252E, Accounting and Financial Management II,
Operations research is a scientific approach used for Lee, Spring
analyzing the structure of the system, solving various This course exposes participants to techniques to
problems occurring in the system, then for making analyze various financial problems. The example
reasonable and desirable decisions. Main objective of includes a project evaluation, risk assessment or a
this course is to explain operations research theory, financing decision. Since much of materials are based on
model building techniques and solution methods. Topics accounting concepts, this course requires a solid
will be selected from various areas given below understanding of financial accounting. Also a certain
depending upon students' needs, preferences and degree of spread-sheet skill will be desirable for anyone
academic backgrounds. Lecture will be given with many who wishes to practice application examples.
examples, not only theory itself, so that the students can
understand even though they do not have enough PAD254E, Development Assistance by International
mathematical backgrounds, then adding recitation if Organizations, Hirono, Fall
necessary. This course will examine among others the nature
of major changes in terms of policies and practices as
PAD101E, Social Science Questions and initiated and responded during the last few decades by
Methodologies, TBA, Winter international organizations, particularly by the United
This course teaches students how to engage Nations organizations and multilateral development
qualitative academic writing critically and productively. banks, and the factors that have contributed to these
Compared to deductive quantitative analysis (applying changes. The focus of the course will be on major issues
general principle to specific cases), qualitative analysis facing the United Nations Development Programme
tends to be inductive (inferring general principle from (UNDP), the World Bank (WB), the Asian Development
specific cases), its data more varied and subjective, and Bank (AsDB) and the World Trade Organization (WTO)
its writing more complex. This course uses readings on a in the light of changing international economic, social
topic important to policy makers – states and their and environmental scenes. References will be made,
relations with society – to deepen students’ when considered essential, to the development assistance
understanding of qualitative approaches such as experiences of various United Nations specialized
comparison, comparative historical analysis, ethnography, agencies and other regional development banks.
case study, and interdisciplinary analysis. There is
particular focus on the formal structure of the readings to PAD255E, Foreign Direct Investment, Yoshitake,
illustrate how research is contextualized and arguments Summer
are made. There are many reasons why foreign direct investment
This course is appropriate for students who plan to (FDI) has become a much-discussed topic. One is the
write non-statistical independent study, research, or dramatic increase in the global flow. In tern, the sales
policy papers; students in quantitative programs who of foreign affiliates of multinational corporations
wish to broaden their content/methodological exposure; (MNCs) are now nearly twice as high as the value of
and students interested in political science, sociology, or world trade in goods and services. The keen interest in
history. FDI is also part of a broader interest in the forces
propelling the ongoing globalization process.
PAD250E, Armed Conflict and Development, This course offers a comprehensive introduction to
Takahashi, Fall many FDI-related issues on both a theoretical and
empirical level.
PAD251E, Accounting and Financial Management I,
Lee, Fall PAD256E, Human Resources Management, Yamazaki,
This course aims to develop the participants’ ability Spring
to produce and analyze corporate financial reports. The The purpose of this course is to assist you in
course will lay foundation for financial management and acquiring knowledge and developing skills necessary to
effectively manage human resources in organizations. financial sector and thereby promote a basic
You will be introduced to conceptual frameworks and understanding of macro and micro prudential policies. In
diagnostic tools that can be used to understand and this connection, the course will cover broad topics of
analyze the various inter-related activities and functions central banking, exchange rate and reserve management
that are the foundation of an effective human resource policies, and the international policy co-operation in the
management system. While you are required to deal with context of the so-called Basel Process. In particular,
individual assignments about a human resource topic in students are encouraged to gain insight into the
this course, you will be expected to actively participate implications of the recent global financial crisis and its
in team-based learning and discussions. Through several impact on financial institutions. Also, the recent Japanese
case studies, you will deeply understand human resource experience since the late 1980s will be reviewed with
management practices and its related theories and models special emphasis on the lessons learnt from the
by highlighting concrete situations in organizations. quantitative easing and the crisis management in the
financial sector. Following the good tradition of active
PAD257E, Seminar in Industry and Trade Policy, student participation, group/individual presentations and
Tanaka Masami, Spring discussions will be scheduled. Special sessions could be
This course attempts to offer knowledge on organized, e.g., field visits to and special speakers from
government industrial policies, in particular on concrete financial institutions and regulatory authorities including
cases by shedding light from the economic theories. It the Bank of Japan, depending upon the specific interests
also aims at understanding of the characteristics of each of students. Various papers and articles will be used as a
industrial sector and of their histories, in particular the guide for individual classes. The BIS and IMF Annual
Japanese industry. The course will consist mainly of Reports and Frederic S. Mishkin’s Ecnomics of Money,
lectures and class discussions. Banking and Financial Markets are used as general
reference textbooks.
PAD258E, Global Governance: Leadership and
Negotiation, Komatsu, Winter PAD267E, Public Expenditure Management, Tanaka
Hideaki, Fall
PAD260E, Labor Policy (Human Resources This course is intended to provide a framework for
Development), TBA, TBA thinking about how governments can attain sound budget
performance and to give guidance on the key elements of
PAD261E, Fiscal and Monetary Policies in Japan, a well-performing public expenditure management
TBA, Fall (PEM). The course presents the theoretical and practical
setting for the management of financial resources in the
PAD263E, Public Investment, TBA, TBA government sector. Students can learn best practices on
PEM in the world.
PAD264E, Structural Reform and Privatization, It is so called,. The course will also examine the idea
Tanaka Hideo, Spring of "New Public Management" critically, and discuss the
Structural Reform is a process whereby policies and transformation of public sector and public governance in
institutions are reshaped to be more market-oriented. It the wider sense. The course will focus on not only
is aimed at establishing macroeconomic stability and experiences in developed countries including Japan but
creating the conditions for sustained economic growth. also those in developing countries. Students will be
The main objective of the course is to review key issues encouraged to discuss and analyze issues and problems
of structural reform and privatization in developing and in their own countries.
transitional countries. The course will also highlight the This course is aimed at officials in the public sector
evaluation of past structural reform/adjustment programs and those who are interested in managing government
supported by international financial institutions. finances.

PAD265E, Modernization of Financial Sector, PAD281E, National Land Policy, Surya Raj Acharya,
Yoshikuni, Spring Fall (Session I)
This course aims to provide participants with basic Economic activities are distributed unevenly over the
knowledge and expertise regarding the functioning of the national land area. As a country develops, economic
activities show a tendency of growing concentration in Customs related laws, including those of Japan, by
some areas, which may have important implications for focusing on various aspects of Customs procedures and
both efficiency and equity. This course intends to enable formalities. The course is also intended to provide a
students in understanding underlying mechanisms for basic idea about international conventions which
diverse patterns of spatial development at the national constitute an integral part of Customs related laws, such
and regional level, and in answering questions on as Revised Kyoto Convention, Harmonized System
associated policy issues. The course first introduces Convention, WTO Valuation Agreement, etc.
relevant theoretical concepts. Next, cases of spatial
development plan and policy (national land development PFP252E, International Taxation of Japan,
policy) in Japan and other countries are reviewed. Finally, Komamiya, Fall
recent directions of spatial development policy are This course focuses on international aspect of
discussed along with possible lessons for developing Japanese income taxation. It includes source rules of
countries. There is no specific prerequisite for this income, foreign tax credit system, transfer pricing, tax
course. haven measurements, thin capitalization, and taxation on
derivative transactions. This course aims at training
PAD282E, Transport Policy, Ono, Spring students to an expert of international taxation.
This course will study transport industries,
government involvement, and the interrelationship PFP501E, Practicum at the National Tax Agency, Fall
between the industries and the government. And it will through Spring
study about the role of development of transport This course aims to provide overseas tax officials
infrastructure for the Japanese economic growth. with knowledge on Japanese tax systems and
Students are expected to understand major transport administration, and to contribute to the improvement of
policies of the Japanese government, and understand each country’s tax administration.
basic theories which explain behavior of the government NTA officials as well as the NTC faculty give
and transport firms. lectures on practical aspects of Japanese tax
administration. To broaden the knowledge acquired
PAD302E, Policy Design and Implementation in through the course, participants will have study visits to
Developing Countries, Ohno K., Ohno I. & Regional Taxation Bureau, Tax Office, Tax Counsel
Shimamura, Spring Office, etc.
This interactive course is offered for students who Based on the knowledge acquired from lectures,
have had practical experience in development policy participants are assigned to write a Research Paper with
formulation and/or execution. Weak policy content, lack the assistance and guidance of the faculty of the NTC.
of coordination, implementation failure, and political Through the work of Research Paper, we check their
pressure often plague developing countries, but some understanding of the lectures of the course and train
governments solve these problems more effectively than analytical ability on issues and problems of tax
others. administration.
This course, with a limited size (max. 10 students),
conducts case studies of development policy methods PFP502E, Practicum in Customs Administration I,
and organizations from the perspective of institutional Nagase, Winter & Spring
and international comparison (including Asia and Africa). Today, Customs is deeply integrated into
Leadership, central economic agencies, managing aid, international supply chain whose secure and safe
large infrastructure projects, and industrial policy maintenance is essential. This course aims to provide a
documents are among highlighted topics. Each session wide range of knowledge concerning international
starts with an issue-raising presentation by one of the theories and practice of trade and Customs, including the
instructors followed by discussion by all. Active activities of WTO, WCO and UN/CEFACT, various
participation is required. Some students will be asked to aspects of border control and trade facilitation (SAFE
present cases from their countries. Framework, 24 hour rule, C-TPAT, 10+2, Risk
Management, AEO (Authorized Economic Operators),
PFP250E, Customs Laws, Nagase, Fall EDI, etc.), so that the role and importance of the
This course is intended to provide an overview of Customs in the international supply chain will be made
clear. Japanese public management. Based on these general
analyses, the class will then focus on local system of
PFP503E, Practicum in Customs Administration II, government. It will delineate a number of theoretical
Aoyama & Yamashita, Spring issues, in additional to practical policy problems. The
This course aims at providing students with the class will particularly stress city and urban development
necessary knowledge and practical problem solution as a focal point to help understand the complexity of
skills for future Customs policymakers. center local interface in the country. In the class,
The students are expected to keep their knowledge up comparative analysis is highly valued. Students are
to date on the global standards for Customs therefore encouraged to contribute to the class discussion
administration under WCO. Lectures cover the practices by bringing out the similar examples or cases of the
on organizational management, human resource country they are from. Likewise, the class stresses
development and risk management of Japan Customs, writings on various topics of significance.
Project Cycle Management (PCM), and the WCO
Diagnosis Framework which is a comprehensive analysis REG202E, Local Government Finance, Hatakeyama,
tool for developing the capacity of Customs Spring
administration toward reform and modernization. In This course is intended to introduce the system and the
addition to this course, a field study trip to regional practice of local government finance in Japan.
Customs is organized to observe and study actual Starting in mid-1990s , decentra1ization reform in
Customs operations. Japan has achieved its first stage, where one of the main
By participating in this course, the students are
results is the transfer of tax resources from the central to
requested to identify issues and challenges faced by their
local governments.
own Customs administration, based on knowledge
In this course,after taking a view of the outline of the
obtained not only from this course, but also from the
system and the current situation of local government
Practicum in Customs Administration I which will be
finance,we will focus on several components of local
held during the last Winter/Spring term and/or the
revenue and expenditure in detail. We will also study
Customs Law held during the last Fall term.
some other issues related to the decentralization reform.
PFP504E, Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement
REG301E, Local Governance in the Changing World,
at Border, Mizutani & Hamaguchi, Spring (Session I)
Ikawa, et al., Spring

PPP501E, Independent Study, Spring In accordance with the changes in social and
economic circumstances, enhancement of domestic
PPP502E, Thesis Writing I, Yoshida, Spring (Session governance is sought, and in Japan and in many other
II), Summer countries the challenge has been to promote
decentralization and advancements in local governance.
PPP503E, Thesis Writing II, Fall (Session I) [Second Reflecting such a circumstance, this lecture series will
year] cover the present state and challenges of local
government and the situation of decentralization in a
PPP504E, Thesis Writing III, Fall (Session II) number of countries worldwide (four to five countries),
[Second year] as well as study the challenges of local governance in
Japan. During this lecture series, I am planning to
PPP505E, Thesis Writing IV, Winter [Second year] invite experts (lecturers) from outside GRIPS, and the
lecturer will speak about one theme (country) in two
REG201E, Local Government System, Nakamura, classes, apart from classes by GRIPS faculty.
Fall
One of the major thrusts of this course is to provide a TEC251E, Science and Technology Policy, TBA, TBA
general contour of local government and politics in Japan.
The class will start off with the historical background of TEC252E, Small and Medium Enterprise and
Japanese politics and public administration. This is Technology, Hashimoto, Fall
followed by a brief elaboration on the underpinnings of
In the post-war period, the modernization of Small
and Medium Enterprises (henceforthe “SMEs”) became YLP553E, Workshop II, Fujiwara, Spring
one of the priority areas and a wide range of multifaceted
policies were developed. DMP180E, Computer Programming, Sayama, Fall
This course examines the historical evolution of through Winter
SME policy of Japan (and also some selected countries) This course provides general knowledge on computer
and examines the applicability of policies in relation to programming and its skills for computation solving
each country. water-related problems covered in Course No. DMP280E
Some lectures will be given by governmental “Basic Hydrology”, No. DMP281E “Hydraulics”, No.
officers, presidents of small companies or researchers of DMP380E “Advanced Hydrology” and No.DMP381E
Asian SMEs etc. “Flood Hydraulics and Sediment Transport”.
You can feel the power and dynamism of SME and
understand the roll of policy in developing sound SMEs DMP200E, Disaster Mitigation Policy, Morichi,
in each country. Winter
This course provides the framework of seismic and
TEC253E, Communications Policy, TBA, Fall water related disaster mitigation policies and the basic
idea of each policy. The policies discussed in this class
TEC254E, Innovation, Sustainability and Uncertainty, include the disaster prevention policies for transportation
Woolger & Hope, Spring infrastructure and land-use and also social education for
Technological innovation is increasingly important disasters.
for economic growth, sustainability and quality of life.
This course will introduce key concepts for DMP201E, Disaster Risk Management, Okazaki,
understanding innovation policy, the types of policies Winter
and issues that exist when stimulating and exploiting This course aims to provide a broad understanding of
innovation, as well as introduce current trends and issues disaster risk management, including prevention and
facing innovation policy-makers. The course will preparedness before disasters and
emphasize the uncertainty inherent in innovation policy. recovery/reconstruction after disasters. It emphasizes
application of appropriate and practical technology,
TEP501E, Independent Study (Policy Proposal reflecting social and economic conditions of the country.
Paper) This course attempts to discuss the following issues;
y Activities of national/local governments,
YLP500E, Introduction to Japan, Horie & Okita, Fall international organizations, and communities
(Session I) against disasters
This course is a required course of the Young Leaders y Issues of disaster management and lessons from
Program. The students of the other programs have to get the past disasters
the approval from the instructor to register in this course. y Policies and regulation to secure safety of
This course is planned to give the students the basic housing and buildings
knowledge of Japan's society, history and culture. y Practical disaster risk assessment
y Institutionalization of disaster risk management
YLP501E, Colloquium, Horie, Fall & Spring at various levels

YLP502E, Independent Study, Masuyama, et al, Fall DMP280E, Basic Hydrological, Jayawardena, Fall
through Summer through Winter
The aim of this course is to introduce and expose the
YLP503E, Field Trip, Horie, Fall & Spring students to the basic concepts of hydrology including the
different processes, quantification of hydrological
YLP551E, Research Paper, Yokomichi,et al., Fall variables and their measurement and/or estimation, unit
through Summer hydrograph methods and the application of probability
and statistics in hydrology.
YLP552E, Workshop I, Yokomichi, Fall
DMP281E, Hydraulics, Ishikawa, Fall through DMP285E, Practice on Hydraulics, Ishikawa, Fall
Winter through Spring
Open Channel Hydraulics is a branch of applied fluid This course is review and discussion about Open
mechanics to support river management and Channel Hydraulics, which is a branch of applied fluid
improvement works for flood disaster prevention and mechanics to support river management and
water environment conservation. The first half of the improvement works for flood disaster prevention and
lecture provides the fundamentals; general transport water environment conservation. This helps students
equation being based on the idea of conservation law, understand deeply about topics explained in DMP281E
and basic characteristic of one dimensional open channel “Hydraulics”, as well as Quiz.
flow by using the energy transport equation. The second
half of the lecture provides practical features of open DMP286E, Practice on Local Disaster Management
channel hydraulics; hydraulic jump, composite channel Plan, Tanaka, Fall through Spring
flow, secondary flow, and salt wedge dynamics in This course aims at consolidating the material
estuaries. covered in Course No. DMP283E “Local Disaster
Management and Hazard Mapping”.
DMP282E, Basic Concepts of Integrated Flood Risk Exercises related to each topic will be given to the
management (IFRM), Takeuchi, Fall through Winter students and they will be discussed and explained.
This course provides the basic concepts of
“Integrated Flood Risk Management (IFRM)” as part of DMP300E, Earthquake Hazard Assessment, Saito,
Integrated Water resources Management (IWRM). The Fall though Spring
mechanism of disaster risk development with natural The earthquake hazard differs quite affected by
several conditions. This subject gives fundamental ideas
hazard, societal vulnerability, exposure and coping
on earthquake hazard evaluation for specific locations
capacity will be emphasized. New concepts of IWRM at
when an earthquake and soil environment is given.
basin scale will be introduced and, as concrete examples,
Japanese flood management experiences and global
DMP301E, Earthquake Risk Assessment, Kashima,
activity trends will be introduced emphasizing good
Fall through Spring
practices and key for success. Anticipated future
This class deals with a technology of seismic risk
direction of risk management to cope with societal
management of buildings. Methodologies of ground
changes and global climate changes will also be covered. motion estimation are described by in-site measurement,
empirical and semi-empirical approaches. Conventional
DMP283E, Local Disaster Management and Hazard
and new seismic risk assessment methodologies, which
Mapping, Tanaka, Fall through Spring
integrate the related methodologies, are presented.
This course provides not only general knowledge on
As for practice, you will take part in international
disaster prevention countermeasures in Japan, but also
conferences on seismology, earthquake engineering or
practical knowledge and techniques such as flood hazard
earthquake disaster prevention, which to be held in Japan,
maps which are indispensable for local disaster
to obtain the information of latest technology and
management. In addition, students will also have
research results in the world.
opportunity to interview to local governmental officers,
community leaders and residents to learn/understand
DMP302E, Disaster Mitigation and Development
actual situation of local disaster management.
Assistance, Ando, Spring through Summer
This course is aimed to learn about the dissemination
DMP284E, Urban Flood Management, Kudo, Fall
for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation and also the decision
through Spring
making for disaster management among those who have
This course provides the basic and practical
different background and opinions through the practice
knowledge of urban flood risk management in Japan;
of Project Cycle Management Workshop and also ODA
characteristics of urban flood (including inundation by
policy of Japan.
flooding), countermeasures against urban flood and
administration of urban rivers. Case studies will be
DMP303E, Tsunami Hazard Assessment, Shibazaki,
conducted in the fields.
Spring
To manage tsunami risk and to administrate the Fall through Spring
tsunami disaster prevention, it is essential for us to Understanding earthquake circumstance such as
prepare a tsunami hazard map that identifies the areas crustal deformation associated with earthquake
that are likely to get flooded and sustain damage under generation processes, source process of earthquakes and
different tsunami scenarios. tectonic environments, in each place is necessary for
The objective of this course is to study the preparing proper earthquake disaster prevention
knowledge and the techniques necessary for assessing strategies. In this course, first, you will learn practical
the hazards of a tsunami and the damage, preparing a mathematics for seismology. Then, lectures and practices
tsunami hazard map, administrating tsunami disaster on earthquake focal mechanism, earthquake source
prevention, managing the risk of a tsunami, planning for process, and relationship between plate tectonics and
evacuation, and educating the residents about disaster earthquake are given. Finally, the current situation in
prevention in case of a tsunami. earthquake generation and forecasting research such as
long-term forecasting will be introduced.
DMP304E, Tsunami Countermeasures, Fujii, Spring
The objective of this course is to study the DMP323E, Information Technology Related with
techniques and methods necessary as tsunami Earthquake and Disasters, Hara, Fall
countermeasures. In the first part, tsunami force, various The aim of this course is to learn basics of
tsunami protection facilities, and tsunami refuge information technology related with earthquakes and
buildings are introduced. A field study in which the disasters and acquire the ability to utilize them through a
tsunami protection facilities will be observed is also series of lectures and practices. The course topics include
included in the course. In the second part, the techniques subjects of computing (e.g., programming using Fortran
and methods for tsunami observation, tsunami early language, Generic Mapping Tools, etc), and fundamental
warning systems and warning dissemination will be theories of seismic waves.
introduced.
DMP340E, Structural Analysis, Saito, Fall
DMP320E, Earthquake Phenomenology, Hurukawa, Fundamental concepts and principles for structural
Fall through Spring analysis, such as displacement method and stress method,
Earthquake detection, hypocenter determination, are introduced using matrix formulation. Basic concepts
which are basics to grasp earthquakes phenomenon, will of finite element method are explained focusing on
be learnt through lectures and practices. You will learn solving static linear problems using iso-parametric
how to pick up P- and S-wave arrival times as well as element models. After that, member models and basic
other later phases and how to measure amplitudes from concepts of the direct stiffness method are discussed for
observed seismic wave records. These phase data and non-linear frame analyses of buildings. Then, following
seismographs will be analyzed by different methods to the instruction of using computer programs, earthquake
know hypocenters, magnitudes of earthquakes, etc. Crust responses of buildings are evaluated.
and upper mantle structure, crustal deformation, and
seismicity will be also learnt. DMP341E, Structural Dynamics, Okawa, Fall
The objective of this subject is to study the behavior
DMP321E, Characteristics of Earthquake Disasters, of structures subjected to dynamic loadings. The lecture
Yokoi, Fall through Spring covers the SDOF (single-degree-of-freedom) system to
This course is aimed for grasping knowledge, the MDOF (multi-degree-of-freedom) linear elastic
techniques, methods and ability necessary for system. The deterministic procedure is discussed in
quantitative estimation of physical processes of details with several exercises.
attenuation and amplification, underground shear wave's
velocity structure which gives big influence on seismic DMP342E, Seismic Design, Mukai, Fall through
wave’s propagation and amplification, dynamic behavior Spring
of soft sedimentary layers near the earth's surface and so The seismic design of structures should be based on
on. their elastic-to-plastic behaviors under earthquakes and
the required performance. In the lectures, at first the
DMP322E, Earthquake Circumstance, Shibazaki, mechanical properties of the materials, elastic-to-plastic
behaviors of structural members and joints, seismic Integrated Flood Risk Management (IFRM). The course
behaviors of the entire structures and their failure first describes the river administration and planning for
characteristics are introduced through the seismic application of IFRM. Especially the methodology of
experiences, results of structural experiments and comprehensive river management will be emphasized
theoretical approaches. Then, the various design factors that includes planning of flood hydraulics, flood control,
which dominate the seismic behavior of structures are and sediment movement to river channels and dam
discussed introducing the seismic design methods used in reservoirs. This will be followed by specific technologies
practice. The structural test for RC members will be of channel control and channel improvement.
carried out to understand their actual structural
performance. DMP382E, Mechanics of Sediment Transportation
and Channel Changes, Egashira, Fall through Winter
DMP343E, Seismic Evaluation and Retrofitting, Sediment transportation takes place in various forms
Fukuyama, Spring such as bed-load, suspended load, debris flow etc. and its
Lectures of the “Seismic Evaluation and Retrofitting” spatial imbalance causes river bed degradation and
provide holistic information from conceptual to detail in aggradation, side bank erosion, sand bar formation and
technique on Seismic code, Design earthquake ground channel shifting. Although these channel changes will
motion, Seismic evaluation, Seismic retrofit, be suitable for ecological systems, if they are within an
Post-earthquake countermeasures, and Base isolation. allowable level. However, if these are over some
You can comprehend the specific meanings of these critical level, flood and sediment disasters will happen.
evaluation methods and determinations well through This course provides methods for evaluating sediment
practical study and code comparison. Lectures show you transportation and associated channel changes with
not only conventional techniques but newly developed attention focused on basic principles of sediment
techniques related on the “Seismic Evaluation and mechanics. In addition, methods of sediment
Retrofitting”. management are discussed for disaster mitigation as well
as for a suitable drainage condition.
DMP360E, Theory of Tsunami, Fujii, Winter through
Spring DMP383E, Sustainable Reservoir Development &
The objective of this course is to study basic Management, Matsumoto, Fall through Winter
theories of tsunami and acquire the techniques for This course provides the basic ideas of dam reservoir
tsunami simulation which are essential to forecast design, construction and operation & maintenance. The
tsunami heights or to prepare a tsunami hazard map lecture starts from the purposes of dam reservoirs and
around coastal region. looks into their environmental and societal impacts. The
In the first part, some lectures about tsunami
lecture covers the basic methodologies of project
magnitude, theoretical topics of fluid mechanics for
planning, site selection, design, construction,
tsunami, tsunami source, tsunami generation and
environmental impact assessment, sediment management
propagation will be undertaken. In the second part,
and operation and maintenance of dam reservoirs. The
hands-on practices to estimate tsunami source and
students are expected to experience a preliminary but
calculate the tsunami propagation will be given by using
concrete process of environmental assessment of
Linux WS and Windows PC.
reservoirs and gets insight of the role of reservoirs as one
DMP380E, Advanced Hydrology, Jayawardena, Fall of adaptation measures of climate changes.
through Winter
DMP384E, Control Measures for Landslide & Debris
The objective of this course is to provide knowledge
Flow, Ikeya, Fall through Winter
and skill in advanced techniques of hydrological data
This course provides the necessary knowledge and
analysis, modeling and prediction.
understanding of landslide and debris flow phenomena
and their control measures necessary to exercise the
DMP381E, Flood Hydraulics and Sediment Transport,
IFRM. The lecture will illustrate the devastating
Fukuoka, Fall through Winter
phenomena and the causes of landslides and debris flows
This course provides the basic knowledge necessary
and provide the basic concepts of the measures for
for planning and designing the structural measures for
sediment-related disasters, so-called Sabo Works which
is executed in the hill slopes and the channels. It will
cover the important role of hazard mapping for DMP400E, Individual Study, IISEE staffs, Fall
sediment-related disasters in both structural and through Summer
non-structural measures. The advisors assigned to each of the participants will
guide them individually from the beginning of the course
DMP385E, Practice on Advanced Hydrology, (Oct. 2010) for building up their motivation and for
Jayawardena, Fall through Spring selecting the subjects of Individual Study Report.
The objective of this course is to train the students in About three months at the end of the course (from
various quantitative methods in Hydrology including June to Aug., 2011) are especially assigned for Individual
some exercises on hydrological data analysis, modeling Study, in which each participant makes a research on a
and prediction. specific subject intensively and writes Individual Study
Report under the direction of a supervisor.
DMP386E, Practice on Flood Hazard Modeling & It, however, is recommendable for participants to
Flood Forecasting, Fukami, Fall through Spring starts their study on their own specific subject under the
The objective of this course is to build capacities for guidance of their advisors as early as possible, e.g., from
undertaking hydrological predictions in poorly-gauged Oct., 2010 using the days assigned to Seminars.
basins. The course first introduces the fundamentals of
rainfall-runoff models and flood inundation models. DMP480E, Individual Study, Winter through
Then it describes finite difference methods to solve Summer
simple differential equations for flood hazard modeling.
The basic knowledge with computer programming DMP531E, Case Study (Practice for Earthquake
exercises will lead for understanding the background of Disaster Mitigation Policy I), Saito, Fall through
the “Integrated Flood Analysis System: IFAS,” which is Summer
a software developed by ICHARM for rainfall-runoff You will make presentations at three colloquiums.
analysis. During the second half of the course, the Two of them are assigned this class as “Colloquium I &
participants will learn how to apply IFAS for flood II”. Firstly, you will make a presentation on your country
predictions using IFAS in poorly-gauged basins with report that you had already submitted to us. You will
satellite-based rainfall information. show us the current condition of your country, your
organization activity on earthquake disaster prevention,
DMP387E, Practice on Sustainable Reservoir etc. Then you will have discussions with other
Development & Management, Matsumoto, Fall participants and staff members on them. For second
through Spring colloquium, participants in the Seismology and Tsunami
This course aims at consolidating the material groups (S and T-groups) will review a technical/scientific
covered in Course No. DMP383E “Sustainable Reservoir paper recommended by your advisor in order to prepare
Development & Management”. for your individual study. Participants in the Earthquake
Exercises related to each topic will be given to the Engineering group (E-group) will introduce their present
students. Two technical field trips will be arranged to condition of building construction. Through the
enable students to learn about Japan’s current activities colloquiums, you are requested to obtain the skill to
in multipurpose dams development and upgrading. convey your point to audiences with accuracy, too.
Based on individual interest, participants are
DMP388E, Practice on Control Measures for requested to practice the topic relate to Earthquake
Landslide & Debris Flow, Ikeya, Fall through Spring Disaster Mitigation according to the guidance of the
This course aims at consolidating the material advisor.
covered in Course No. DMP384E “Control Measures for
Landslide & Debris Flow”. DMP532E, Case Study (Practice for Earthquake
Exercises related to each topic will be given to the Disaster Mitigation Policy II), Koyama, Fall through
students and they will be discussed and explained. It also Spring
includes field survey. You will make presentations at three colloquiums.
Student performance at these exercises will be The last one of them is assigned this class as
counted toward their grades. “Colloquium III”. For the third colloquium, you will
introduce a tentative plan of your individual study to us. DMP534E, Case Study (Practice for Tsunami Disaster
Then you will discuss with other participants and staff Mitigation Policy), Hara, Fall through Spring
members on your individual study. In this course, some practices and a field trip on
Based on individual interest, participants are tsunami disaster mitigation will be included. Lectures
requested to practice the topic relate to Earthquake and practices on real-time determination of earthquake
Disaster Mitigation according to the guidance of the parameters and determination of the broadband moment
advisor. magnitude to obtain techniques to detect potentially
tsunamigenic earthquakes will be undertaken. Field trips
DMP533E, Case Study (Practice for Earthquake to observe tsunami protection facilities and tsunami and
Disaster Mitigation Policy III), Kashima, Fall earthquake museums in Shizuoka and Wakayama are
In the course, you will visit Earthquake Memorial also included.
Nojima Earthquake Fault Museum in Awaji-Island and
the earthquake related institutes in Kobe to study the
rehabilitations and reconstructions of 1995 Hyogo-ken
Nanbu earthquake and its fault as illustrations. Then you
will visit some other earthquake disaster related institutes
like Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto
University and E-Defense, a full size three-dimensional
vibration destruction facility, of National Research
Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention. Also
you will visit some building construction sites to study
the latest construction technology and the up-to-date
seismic strengthening technology.
Master's Programs TIMETABLE (Fall Session I: Oct. 6, 2010 - Dec. 1, 2010) As of July 28, 2010
1 (9:00-10:30) 2 (10:40-12:10) 3 (13:20-14:50) 4 (15:00-16:30) 5 (16:40-18:10) 6 (18:20-19:50)
Cour Cour Cour Cour Cour Cour
se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room
No. No. No. No. No. No.

LAN ECO PAD Surya


English for Academic
004 Nakatsugawa E 101 Introductory Microeconomics Kurosawa A 281 National Land Policy Raj D
EA Purpose E E Acharya
IDS IDS Strategies &
Microeconomics I Mano &
101 F 287 Conditions for Otsuka F
E (IDS only) Suzuki Aya E GEN Souk
Development I
MON 500 GRIPS Forum ai-rou
PFP E Hall
501 Practicum at the National Tax Agency NTC C
E

LAN LAN
Japanese Language I Japanese Language I
001 Yatabe E 001 Yatabe E
J J4 J J1A

ECO Introduction to Applied PAD ECO ECO Introduction to Applied Academic Writing PAD Surya
Armed Conflict & Monetary Economics
272 Econometrics Leon-Gonzalez F 250 Takahashi G 160 Pfau L 272 Econometrics Pfau D - Workshops (AE only) petchko AWC 281 National Land Policy Raj D
EA (MP1,MP2 & IDS only) E Development E (Money & Banking) EB (YLP & AE only) (Oct 12, 26, Nov 2, 16) E Acharya
Applied Development Estudillo, Jeong, Academic Writing
ECO GOV Reserch IDS ECO Introduction to Applied
Microeconomics I Yamano, Workshops (EPP only)
100 Wie C 231 Comparative Politics Takenaka Meeting 380 Research I Yamauchi, &
F 272 Econometrics Wie F -
(Oct 19, Nov 9, 30, Dec 7,
petchko E
EC (PF & EPP only) E Room 4F E EC (PF & EPP only)
(IDS only) Rundle 14, 21, Jan 4)
TUE
ECO ECO
Macroeconomics I Microeconomics I
106 Rhodes D 100 Yoshida F
EB (PF & EPP only) EA (YLP, MP1 & MP2 only)

LAN YLP
Japanese Language I Kondoh, Okita &
001 H 500 Introduction to Japan A
J J1B et al E Horie

LAN MOR GOV Introduction to PFP LAW International Economic Academic Writing
Japanese Language I
001 Yagi H 101 Statistics Miyata E 220 International Iwama C 250 Customs Law Nagase A 201 Law (Globalization & Yamane I - Workshops (PF only) petchko E
J J1C E E E E Regionalism) (Oct 27, Nov 17, 24)
Relations
GOV Transnational ECO
Microeconomics I
625 Organization Crime & Fukumi D 100 Xing F
E EB (AE only)
Security
WED
LAN Academic Writing
Japanese Language I Kondoh,
001 H  - Workshops (YLP only) petchko J
J J3 et al (Oct 13, 20, Nov 10, Dec 1)

IDS
270 Quantitative Methods I Kajisa A
E

ECO GOV TEC Small & Medium ECO MOR ECO Public Finance &
Microeconomics I Government & Politics Contemporary Introduction to
100 Wie C 210 Masuyama A 252 Enterprise & Hashimoto D 360 Kojima C 100 Morohosi D 312 Fiscal Policy Matsuda H
EC (PF & EPP only) E in Japan E E Japanese Economy E Quantitative Methods E
Technology (PF only)
LAN IDS Microeconomics I Mano & IDS IDS Japan’s ODA : Its LAN
Japanese Language I Quantitative Methods
THU 001 Yagi H 101 (Drill) Suzuki F 270 Kajisa B 280 policies & reform Tomimoto D 005 Listening & Speaking Thomson E
J J1D E E I (Lab) E EA
(IDS only) Aya agenda
LAN Academic Writing
Japanese Language I
001 Yagi H - Workshops (AE only) Petchko AWC
J J2
(Nov 25)
ECO IDS Strategies & YLP PAD
Macroeconomics I Esteban- Public Expenditure Tanaka
106 D 287 Conditions for Otsuka F 501 Colloquium Horie TBA 267 A
EC (YLP & AE only) Pretel E E E Management Hideaki
Development I
LAN REG MOR PAD Accounting &
Academic Local Government Introduction to
002 Thomson E 201 Nakamura F 100 Morohosi D 251 Financial Management Lee C
E Presentation Skills E System E Quantitative Methods E I
FRI
PFP
252 International Taxation of Japan Komamiya A
E

MOR
Oyama, Tsuchiya
102 Introductory Statistics & Morohosi
C
E

PAD
SAT 254 Development Assistance by International Organization Hirono C
E

*This timetable is subject to change.


   Master's Programs TIMETABLE (Fall Session II: Dec.2, 2010 - Feb.1, 2011)              As of July 28, 2010
1 (9:00-10:30) 2 (10:40-12:10) 3 (13:20-14:50) 4 (15:00-16:30) 5 (16:40-18:10) 6 (18:20-19:50)
Cou Cou Cou Cou Cou Cou
rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room
No. No. No. No. No. No.

LAN ECO IDS Strategies &


English for Academic
004 Nakatsugawa E 317 Labor Economics Kurosawa J 289 Conditions for Otsuka A
EA Purpose E E Development II
IDS Mano &
Microeconomics II
103 Suzuki F Souk
E (IDS only) GEN
Aya ai
MON 500 GRIPS Forum
PFP E -rou
501 Practicum at the National Tax Agency NTC C Hall
E

LAN LAN
Japanese Language I Japanese Language I
001 Yatabe E 001 Yatabe E
J J4 J J1A

ECO Introduction to Applied PAD ECO CUL


Armed Conflict & Monetary Economics
272 Econometrics Leon-Gonzalez F 250 Takahashi G 160 Pfau L 101 Managing Cultural Diversity Aikawa J
EA (MP1,MP2 & IDS only) E Development E (Money & Banking) E

ECO
Microeconomics II GOV Reserch IDS Applied Development Estudillo, Jeong, ECO Introduction to Applied ECO
Microeconomics II
Yamano,
200 Wie C 231 Comparative Politics Takenaka Meeting 380 Research I F 272 Econometrics Pfau D 200 Yoshida F
EC (PF & EPP only) E Room 4F E
Yamauchi, &
EB (YLP & AE only) EA (YLP, MP1 & MP2 only)
(IDS only) Rundle
TUE
Academic Writing
ECO ECO Introduction to Applied
Macroeconomics II Workshops (EPP only)
206 Rhodes D 272 Econometrics Wie F - petchko E
EB (PF & EPP only) EC (PF & EPP only)
(Oct 19, Nov 9, 30, Dec 7,
14, 21, Jan 4)
LAN
Japanese Language I Kondoh,
001 H
J J1B et al
MO Introduction to Academic Writing
LAN GOV PFP LAW International Economic
Japanese Language I R
001 Yagi H Statistics Miyata E 220 International Iwama C 250 Customs Law Nagase A 201 Law (Globalization & Yamane I - Workshops (PF only) Petchko AWC
J J1C 101
E E E Regionalism)
E Relations (Dec 22)
GOV Transnational ECO
Microeconomics II
625 Organization Crime & Fukumi D 200 Xing F
E EB (AE only)
Security
WED
LAN
Japanese Language I Kondoh,
001 H
J J3 et al

IDS
273 Quantitative Methods II Kajisa A
E

ECO GOV TEC Small & Medium ECO ECO Mathematics for ECO Public Finance &
Microeconomics II Government & Masuyam Contemporary
200 Wie C 210 A 252 Enterprise & Hashimoto D 360 Kojima C 300 Economic Analysis Yoshida D 312 Fiscal Policy Matsuda H
EC (PF & EPP only) E Politics in Japan a E E Japanese Economy E E
Technology (Fall II & Winter) (PF only)
LAN IDS Mano & ECO IDS Japan’s ODA : Its LAN
Japanese Language I Microeconomics II
THU 001 Yagi H 103 Suzuki F 317 Labor Economics Kurosawa J 280 policies & reform Tomimoto D 005 Listening & Speaking Thomson E
J J1D E (Drill, IDS only) E E EA
Aya agenda
LAN IDS
Japanese Language I Quantitative Methods
001 Yagi H 273 Kajisa B
J J2 E II (Lab)

ECO IDS Strategies & YLP PAD


Macroeconomics II Esteban- Public Expenditure Tanaka
206 D 289 Conditions for Otsuka A 501 Colloquium Horie TBA 267 A
EC (YLP & AE only) Pretel E E E Management Hideaki
Development II
LAN REG ECO
Underst&ing Local Government Theory of Public Finance
FRI 001 Thomson E 201 Nakamura F 310 Fukushima D
E Academic Reasdings E System E (PF Only)

PFP PAD Accounting &


252 International Taxation of Japan Komamiya A 251 Financial Lee C
E E Management I
PAD
SAT 254 Development Assistance by International Organization Hirono C
E

*This timetable is subject to change.


 Master's Programs TIMETABLE (Winter: Feb. 7, 2011 - Mar. 31, 2011)              As of July 28, 2010  

1 (9:00-10:30) 2 (10:40-12:10) 3 (13:20-14:50) 4 (15:00-16:30) 5 (16:40-18:10) 6 (18:20-19:50)


Cou Cou Cour Cou Cou Cou
rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room
No. No. No. No. No. No.

PAD Global Governance: Academic Writing IDS Japanese


258 Leadership & Komatsu - Workshops (AE only) Petchko 285 Development Akiyama
E Negotiation (Feb 7, 21, 28, Mar 7) E Cooperation
ECO
Macroeconomics
106 Okita
ED (IDS only)
MON

PFP
501 Practicum at the National Tax Agency NTC C
E

Government & Academic Writing


IDS ECO
Government & Market Workshops (MP1 & MP2
202 Market Kalirajan 202 Munro - Petchko
E EA (MP1 & Mp2 only) only)( Feb 8, 15, 22, Mar
(IDS only) 1, 8, 22, 29)
ECO IDS Estudillo, Jeong, PFP Practicum in Customs
Resources & Energy Tanaka Applied Development Research II Yamano,
353 380 502 Administration I Nagase
E Economics Makoto E (IDS only) Yamauchi, &
E (PF Only)
Rundle
TUE
ECO ECO
Government & Market Development Economics Dermendz
202 Kidokoro 384
EB (YLP & AE only) EB (YLP, AE & IDS only) hieva

ECO
Government & Market
202 Hatanaka
EC (PF & EPP only)

IDS Government & IDS Applied IDS Academic Writing


202 Market Kalirajan 274 Econometrics Yamano 272 Development Project Analysis Kalirajan - Workshops (YLP only) Petchko
E (IDS only) E (IDS only) E (Feb 16, Mar 23)
WED
ECO
290 Game Theory Yasuda
E

PAD Global Governance: EDU ECO Mathematics for LAN


Okamoto
258 Leadership & Komatsu 200 Education Policy 300 Economic Analysis Yoshida 005 Listening & Speaking Thomson
E E Kaoru E EB
Negotiation (Fall II & Winter)
ECO IDS Japanese
Macroeconomics
106 Okita 285 Development Akiyama
ED (IDS only) E Cooperation
THU

IDS
290 Project Cycle Management & International Development Evaluation Koga
E

ECO ECO PFP Practicum in Customs


Resources & Energy Tanaka
363 Japanese Financial System Rhodes 353 502 Administration I Nagase
E E Economics Makoto E (PF Only)

ECO IDS Applied


Development Economics
FRI 384 Cooray 274 Econometrics x
EA (MP1, MP2, PF & EPP only) (9:30-12:45) E (IDS only)
ECO
370 Econometrics/ Quantitative Methods Arai
E

Intensive Class: "Chinese Foreign Policy"


Professor Yu
Feb. 10 (Tur) Period 3 & 4, Feb. 12 (Sut) Period 3 & 4, Feb. 14 (Mon) Period 3 & 4, Feb. 15 (Tue) Period 3 & 4,
*This timetable is subject to change.
Feb. 16 (Wed) Period 3 & 4, Feb. 17 (Thu) Period 3 & 4 & 5, Feb. 18 (Fri) Period 3 & 4
                  Master's Programs TIMETABLE (Spring Session I: Apr. 6, 2011 - May 31, 2011)             As of July 28, 2010
1 (9:00-10:30) 2 (10:40-12:10) 3 (13:20-14:50) 4 (15:00-16:30) 5 (16:40-18:10) 6 (18:20-19:50)
Cou Cour Cou Cour Cou Cou
rse Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room
No. No. No. No. No. No.

LAN ECO IDS DEV Academic Writing


English for Academic Trade & Industrial Gender &
004 Nakatsugawa 320 Economics of Law Hatanaka 288 Sonobe 253 Estudillo - Workshops (AE only) Petchko
EB Purpose E E Development E Development (Apr 11, May 23, Jun 6)

ECO Competition & ECO


Tanaka
321 Regulatory 371 Time Series Analysis Ikeda Souka
E Makoto E GEN
Economics i
MON 500 GRIPS Forum -rou
PFP GOV European E
Hall
503 Practicum in Customs Administration II CTI 641 International Iwama
E E Relations
PFP
501 Practicum at the National Tax Agency NTC C
E

Advanced National Development &


ECO ECO Economic Modeling DEV ECO
Leon- Institution for
670 Econometrics 374 for Policy Hosoe 250 Morichi 364 Financial Economics Kubota
E Gonzalez E E
Transportation
E
I Simulations Infrastructure
GOV IDS Applied Development Estudillo, Jeong, ECO PFP Practicum in
International Security Yamano, Economic & Fiscal
224 Michishita 380 Research III 316 Ota 502 Customs Nagase
E Studies E (IDS only)
Yamauchi, &
E Reform in Japan E
Rundle Administration I
TUE
IDS Environment & ECO REG
Dermendz
283 Sustainable Otsuka 314 Public Economics 301 Local Governance in the Changing World Ikawa
E E hieva E
Development
Academic Writing
Workshops (PF only)

(Apr 12, 26, May 17, 31,
Petchko
Jun 7)
Academic Writing
REG IDS IDS ECO
Local Government Hatakeyam Suzuki Development Project Workshops (YLP only)
202 286 Poverty Alleviation 282 Minato 361 Japanese Economy Okita - Petchko
E Finance a
E Aya E Management E
(Apr 27, May 18, 25, Jun
15)
WED
ECO ECO GOV Introduction to
600 Advanced Microeconomics I Yasuda 340 International Trade Xing 221 International Political Tsunekawa
E E E Economy
ECO Advanced ECO ECO Global Economy, GOV ECO LAN
Leon- Structure & Process Okamoto
670 Econometrics 345 International Finance Hsu 346 Financial Markets, & Nunami 258 Horie 330 Urban Economics 005 Listening & Speaking Thomson E
E Gonzalez E E E of Government E Ryosuke EC
I Monetary Policy
GOV PAD DEV ECO Asian Economic
World Trade & Seminar in Industry Tanaka Gender & Kawai, et
320 Ohshima 257 253 Estudillo 386 Development &
E Diplomacy E & Trade Policy Masami E Development E al
Integration
THU
EPP
Agricultural
201 Hara
E Economics

PFP
Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement at Border Mizutani &
504
E (PF Custom's Course only) Hamaguchi

TEC Innovation, MOR PAD ECO ECO


Woolger & Quantitative Social Oyama & Human Resources Environmental Transportation Economics
254 Sustainability & 250 256 Yamazaki 351 Munro 331 Murakami
E Hope E System Analysis Tsuchiya E Management E Economics E (4/15, 5/6, 5/20, 6/3, 6/17, 7/1, 7/15)
Uncertainty
ECO PAD ECO Economic PAD
Modernization of Transport Policy
315 Local Public Finance Kook 265 Yoshikuni 381 Development of Ohno K. 282 Ono
E E Financial Sector E E (4/8, 4/22, 5/13, 5/27, 6/10, 6/24, 7/8, 7/22)
Japan
FRI
ECO PAD YLP PAD Accounting &
Conflict, Aid & Development Structural Reform & Tanaka
385 Cooray 264 501 Colloquium Horie TBA 252 Financial Lee C
E (9:30-12:45) E Privatization Hideo E E Management II
PAD Policy Design & Ohno K. ,
302 Implementation in Ohno I. &
E Developing Countries Shimamura

GOV National Security


SAT 264 Tokuchi
E Policy

*This timetable is subject to change.


   Master's Programs TIMETABLE (Spring Session II: Jun. 1, 2011 - Jul. 26, 2011)             As of July 28, 2010
1 (9:00-10:30) 2 (10:40-12:10) 3 (13:20-14:50) 4 (15:00-16:30) 5 (16:40-18:10) 6 (18:20-19:50)
Cour Cour Cou Cour Cou Cou
se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room
No. No. No. No. No. No.

IDS IDS ECO Academic Writing


Trade & Industrial
260 Finance & Economic Growth Jeong 288 Sonobe 371 Time Series Analysis Ikeda - Workshops (AE only) Petchko
E E Development E (Apr 11, May 23, Jun 6)

LAN ECO ECO Competition & GOV European


English for Academic Tanaka
004 Nakatsugawa 320 Economics of Law Hatanaka 321 Regulatory 641 International Iwama Souka
EB Purpose E E Makoto E GEN
Economics Relations i
MON 500 GRIPS Forum
-rou
PFP E
Hall
503 Practicum in Customs Administration II CTI F
E

PFP
501 Practicum at the National Tax Agency NTC C
E

Advanced National Development &


ECO ECO Economic Modeling DEV ECO PFP Practicum in
Leon- Institution for Economic & Fiscal
671 Econometrics 374 for Policy Hosoe 250 Morichi 316 Ota 502 Customs Nagase
E Gonzalez E E
Transportation
E Reform in Japan E
II Simulations Infrastructure Administration I
Estudillo,
GOV IDS Applied Development CUL
International Security Jeong,
224 Michishita 380 Research III Yamano, 102 Development & Culture Aikawa
E Studies E Yamauchi, & E
(IDS only) Rundle
TUE
IDS Environment & ECO REG
Dermendzhi
283 Sustainable Otsuka 314 Public Economics eva
301 Local Governance in the Changing World Ikawa
E Development E E

Academic Writing
Workshops (PF only)

(Apr 12, 26, May 17, 31,
Petchko
Jun 7)
Academic Writing
REG IDS IDS ECO
Local Government Hatakeyam Suzuki Development Project Workshops (YLP only)
202 286 Poverty Alleviation 282 Minato 361 Japanese Economy Okita - Petchko
E Finance a
E Aya E Management E
(Apr 27, May 18, 25, Jun
15)
WED
ECO GOV Introduction to
601 Advanced Microeconomics II Yasuda 221 International Political Tsunekawa
E E Economy
ECO Advanced ECO ECO Global Economy, GOV ECO LAN
Leon- Structure & Process Okamoto
671 Econometrics 345 International Finance Hsu 346 Financial Markets, & Nunami 258 Horie 330 Urban Economics 005 Listening & Speaking Thomson E
E Gonzalez E E E of Government E Ryosuke EC
II Monetary Policy
GOV PAD ECO Asian Economic
World Trade & Seminar in Industry Tanaka Kawai, et
THU 320 Ohshima 257 386 Development &
E Diplomacy E & Trade Policy Masami E al
Integration
EPP
Agricultural
201 Hara
E Economics

TEC Innovation, MOR PAD ECO ECO


Woolger & Quantitative Social Oyama & Human Resources Environmental Transportation Economics
254 Sustainability & 250 256 Yamazaki 351 Munro 331 Murakami
E Hope E System Analysis Tsuchiya E Management E Economics E (4/15, 5/6, 5/20, 6/3, 6/17, 7/1, 7/15)
Uncertainty
ECO PAD ECO Economic PAD
Modernization of Transport Policy
315 Local Public Finance Kook 265 Yoshikuni 381 Development of Ohno K. 282 Ono
E E Financial Sector E E (4/8, 4/22, 5/13, 5/27, 6/10, 6/24, 7/8, 7/22)
Japan
FRI
PAD YLP PAD Accounting &
Structural Reform & Tanaka
264 501 Colloquium Horie TBA 252 Financial Lee C
E Privatization Hideo E E Management II
PAD Policy Design & Ohno K. ,
302 Implementation in Ohno I. &
E Developing Countries Shimamura

GOV
National Security
SAT 264 Tokuchi
E Policy

*This timetable is subject to change.


Master's Programs TIMETABLE (Summer: Aug. 1, 2011) As of July 28, 2010
Course No. Subjects Instructor Time Schedule Room

IDS381E Selected Topics in International Development Ⅰ TBA TBA TBA

IDS382E Selected Topics in International Development Ⅱ TBA TBA TBA

PAD255E Foreign Direct Investment Yoshitake TBA TBA

ECO383E Issues of Policy Advisers to Developing Countries Hashimoto Hideo TBA TBA

ECO411E Workshop in Public Finance II Fukushima & Kurosawa TBA TBA

*This timetable is subject to change.


5. Degree Programs for Doctoral Students

Overview of the Doctoral Program

Basic Philosophy 1. It must have policy-relevancy or policy implication

The basic philosophy behind the GRIPS doctoral 2. It must take into account previous trends and studies
program is to nurture the following types of human (both Japanese and international) in the relevant
resources: academic field, as well as present something original
of its own
1. Highly qualified researchers in the field of policy
studies 3. It must either be built on an outstanding analysis of
a specific policy, or a retrospective historical
2. Public administrators with professional expertise research/case-study taken up from a fresh perspective,
and skills in policy analysis based on an academic which shows great analytical acumen.
framework
The thesis must fulfill at least one of the following
requirements in order to be considered as having
Educational Goals achieved the above:

1. A part of the results of the study must have been


The GRIPS doctoral program will, over its standard
published or accepted for publication in an academic
training period of three years, offer students
journal based on a system of peer review
educational instruction with the view to nurturing in
them the following abilities:
2. The results of the study must have either already
been or be scheduled for commercial publication
1. Advanced policy study capabilities based on
(includes subsidy publishing)
academic methods that measure up to international
standards
3. The results of the study must be recognized to be of
a standard comparable to 1. or 2. above
2. Instruction in the various fields of discipline
essential for pursuing a career in policy studies

3. The ability to write academic theses in any of the


Established Programs
social sciences
There are seven programs under the GRIPS doctoral
A thesis submitted for evaluation under the GRIPS program: Policy Analysis, Public Policy, Policy
doctoral program must meet the following three Professionals, Security and International Relations,
conditions in order to be awarded a Ph.D./doctoral Science and Technology Policy, Disaster Management,
degree. and Japanese Language and Culture. For details,
please refer to Table 1.
5. Degree Programs for Doctoral Students

Requirements for Doctoral Students

Course Guidance based on the several disciplines (main field and sub
fields) or that need to be mastered by a student for
The GRIPS doctoral program requires that each pursuing their policy research.
Ph.D./doctoral candidate, having mastered all the
subjects prescribed under their program, take and pass
the Qualifying Examination (QE) before submitting their Curriculum
doctoral thesis. This being the case, course and
educational guidance is offered individually, taking each The general requirements for each program are
student’s priorities and specialization expertise into outlined in Table 2. The curricula and courses for each
account, with the aim of allowing all students to take and program are detailed in Table 3.
master all the subjects required for completing their
doctoral thesis. The lesson format and guidance method
are as follows: Completion Requirements

1. The courses offered under the GRIPS doctoral In order to complete the GRIPS doctoral program, a
program may be conducted in the form of lectures, candidate must have passed the QE, made a
practice sessions, seminars, etc. They may also involve presentation of the results of their research at the
writing and presenting papers with a view to preparing Doctoral Candidate Seminar or another opportunity
for international conferences, or practicing the writing pursuant to it, and passed the Final Thesis Review.
and presentation of papers based on joint research. Thesis reviews under the GRIPS doctoral program are
conducted four times, as per the schedule outlined in
2. Guidance offered to candidates aspiring to be Chart 4. A summary of the QE, Doctoral Candidate
researchers of policy studies aims, broadly speaking, Seminar, and Final Thesis Review are as given below:
toward the presentation of academic results of their
studies in all disciplines, including policy analysis 1. In order to write a doctoral thesis, it is, as a rule,
studies. necessary for students who have already received or
are expected to receive 8 credits or more (14 credits or
3. Guidance offered to candidates aspiring to be public more for students in the Security and International
administrators aims, broadly speaking, to nurture Relations Program, and 10 credits or more for students
shrewd perceptiveness in relation to specific policies, in the Policy Professional Program; for students in the
and the ability to conduct retrospective studies or case Policy Analysis Program, see separate document) to
studies based on historical validation, and presenting pass the QE, which is generally conducted around the
the results to the world. end of the first academic year. QEs comprise both
written and oral examinations (for the Policy Analysis
Program, a field QE is conducted as well as a basic
Research Guidance System QE). The written examinations will be conducted for
one course given by the supervisor, and two or three
Research guidance under the GRIPS doctoral program courses (one, for the Policy Professional Program)
will be provided by an Advisory Committee made up given by the advisors in any of several formats (in
of several advisors, and based on each student’s topic class, take home, open book, and closed book). A
of research, competence in the area, and research student must attain at least 60% marks in every one of
capabilities. The Advisory Committee will comprise the courses in order to pass. The oral examination will
the supervisor, and up to three advisors. It will guide a involve answering questions based on the student’s
student on what courses to take, based on the student's research plan or his/her answers to questions in the
research plan and state of mastery of the various written examination. Whether a student passes or fails
required subjects, etc. The selection of courses shall be will be determined by a joint discussion among all the
5. Degree Programs for Doctoral Students

members of the Advisory Committee. Students who 3. All Ph.D./doctoral candidates are required, after
are unable to pass in either the written or oral submitting their final doctoral thesis, to present the
examination the first time, are allowed one more results of their study at the Final Thesis Presentation,
chance to sit in the QE. Students who pass both the and demonstrate its validity, relevance, and academic
written and oral examinations are considered to have contribution. The evaluation committee of the Final
passed the QE. Thesis Presentation shall comprise four or more
persons including the supervisor, all the other
2. All Ph.D./doctoral candidates who have passed the members of the student’s Advisory Committee, and at
QE are required, before submitting their doctoral least one other examiner (either from an external
thesis, to organize a Doctoral Candidate Seminar or institution or a professor who has not given any of the
similar opportunity in which to present the progress of courses taken by the student either as main or sub
their research. This seminar provides Ph. D./doctoral fields). The evaluation shall be based on the question
candidates with an opportunity to present their and answer session at the end of the presentation. The
research plans or ongoing research and to exchange marks (out of 5) awarded by each of the examiners
ideas with the GRIPS faculty and students of various shall be totaled and averaged for the number of
disciplines. It should be noted that this seminar is not a examiners, and the student shall be awarded a pass if
thesis defense for their Ph. D./doctoral degree but the average comes to 3.0 or above.
rather a casual opportunity for discussion to develop
and improve their ideas and research output. Thus,
while all doctoral students are required to make a
presentation in this seminar, they are not graded or do
not earn any credit. The seminar usually consists of a
40 minute presentation followed by a 20 minute Q&A
session.
Table 1: List of Programs Offered Under the Doctoral Program
Accepted Director
Period Program Field of Research Degrees Offered
Students in Charge
Ph.D. in Public Economics
5 years Economics Ph.D. in Development Economics
Japanese and
(MA. Policy Analysis Fukushima
foreign students Ph.D. in International Economics
Ph.D.)
Innovation Policy Ph.D. in Public Policy

General Ph.D. in Public Policy

Politics Ph.D. in Government

Economics* Ph.D. in Public Policy

Mathematical Analysis
Japanese and
Public Policy Ph.D. in Social Systems Analysis Oyama
foreign students
Development Policy

International Development* Ph.D. in Development Economics


3 years
(Ph.D., Cultural Policy Ph.D. in Cultural Policy
Doctor)
Science and Technology Policy Ph.D. in Public Policy

Japanese and
Security and International Studies Security and International Studies Ph.D. in International Relations Iwama
foreign students

Science and Technology Policy Japanese students Science and Technology II (Policy Professional) * Doctor of Policy Studies Sunami

Japanese and
Disaster Management Disaster Management Ph.D. in Disaster Management Morichi
foreign students

Japanese Language and Culture Foreign students Japanese Language Education Ph.D. in Japanese Language Education Konno

3 years
Policy Professionals Japanese students Case studies Doctor of Policy Studies Iio
(Doctor)
*These fields do not accept applicants.
Table 2: Program Requirements
Program Field of Research First Year (Prior to taking QE) Second Year Onward
Policy Analysis Economics Ten core courses (20 credits) must be completed to take Study for the Field QE, followed by work on the doctoral thesis while
the Basic QE. (This will usually take 1 and half years.) taking courses based on economic theory where necessary.
Innovation Policy Study for the Field QE while taking courses where necessary, followed by
work on the Ph.D. dissertation.
Public Policy General 8 credits or more required in any course related to Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses on politics, economic
politics, economic theory, or basic quantitative analysis theory, or quantitative analysis where necessary.
Politics 8 credits or more required in courses on politics Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses on politics where
necessary.
Economics * 8 credits or more required in economic theory Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses on economic theory
where necessary.
Mathematical Analysis 8 credits or more required in quantitative analysis Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses and practice sessions on
Development Policy 8 credits or more required in courses related to quantitative analysis where necessary.
development policy, economic theory, or quantitative
analysis
International 8 credits or more required in economic theory Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses on economic theory
Development * where necessary.
Cultural Policy 8 credits or more required in cultural policy Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses on cultural policy where
necessary.
Science and 8 credits or more required in any course related to Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses on politics, economic
Technology Policy politics, economic theory, or basic quantitative analysis theory, or quantitative analysis where necessary.
Security and Security and 14 credits or more required centering around theoretical Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses based on theoretical
International Studies
International Studies courses and regional studies. courses and regional studies where necessary.
Science and Science and 10 credits or more required in courses based on the Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses based on the curriculum
Technology Policy Technology II (Policy curriculum for the Policy Professional program, and an for the Policy Professional program where necessary.
Professional) * outline of the thesis must be prepared.
Disaster Management Disaster Management 8 credits or more required in courses that pertain to Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses on disaster management
water related disaster management studies where necessary.
Japanese Language Japanese Language 8 credits or more required in courses related to Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses on language and culture
and Culture Education language and culture studies studies where necessary.
Policy Professionals Case Studies 10 credits or more required in courses based on the Work on the doctoral thesis while taking courses based on the curriculum
curriculum for the Policy Professional program, and an for the Policy Professional program where necessary.
outline of the thesis must be prepared.
*These Fields do not accept applicants.
Doctoral Programs

Five-Year Ph.D. Course Bulletin. GRIPS students enrolled in Masters


Program may apply for the program. The
Policy Analysis Program eligibility requirements are also provided in this
This is a three to five-year program designed for Bulletin.
student research and analysis of real-world policy
issues, utilizing economics methodologies.
1. The Policy Analysis Program accepts students
whose main interest is economics. The Program Three-Year Ph.D./Doctoral Courses
offers specialization in Development Economics,
Public Economics, and Innovation Studies.
(Ph.D.) Public Policy Program
2. Curriculum Features:
This program is designed for public administrators
(a) Candidates in the program start from learning
and researchers in the field of policy studies, who
introductory economics and econometrics.
possess advanced expertise in policy analysis, in the
They are not expected to start their research
fields of General, Politics, Mathematical,Analysis,
immediately. Instead, they are expected to
Dcelopment, Cultural Policy, and Science and
develop their own interest and find their own
Technology Policy.
research topics while taking various courses in
The (Ph.D.) Public Policy Program accepts
the program.
students in the areas of social science except for
(b) Economics and econometrics are required.
economics. Economics students should enroll in
The program requires all students to take
Policy Analysis Program.
introductory and advanced level courses in
Candidates are expected to conduct high-level
microeconomics, macroeconomics, and
policy research and possess the ability to
econometrics.
commence their own research immediately.
(c) Masters and doctorate courses are integrated
GRIPS graduates with Masters Degree and those
into one program. Though five years is the
from other institutions with Masters Degree are
usual time needed to obtain the Ph.D. degree,
welcome to apply to enter the program.
three years is a minimum time period needed
In addition to lectures and seminars, candidates
to finish all the requirements for Ph.D. degree.
also have opportunities to participate in more
3. Other Features of the Program
practical research activities while writing their
(a) All courses (including lectures, seminars,
dissertation. For example, they may get involved in
workshops, tutorials) are taught in English.
on-going research projects at our Policy Research
No knowledge of Japanese language is
Center or participate in collaborative research with
necessary.
governmental research organizations that partner
(b) Master’s degree can be obtained in two years.
with GRIPS.
(c) Normally students enter the program in
October. April entry is possible for those
Security and International Studies Program
with strong background in economics.
This program is designed for foreign policy and
(d) Economics or its related degree or previous
security professionals to conduct in-depth analysis of
knowledge is useful, yet not necessary.
topics related to security and international studies.
(e) Students must pass qualifying exams in basic
It is administered in partnership with the Japanese
economics and econometrics (Basic QE) and
National Defense Academy, the Japanese Ministry
in their specialized field (Field QE) to be able
of Defense, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
to write Ph.D. dissertation.
Target Group:
(f) Many of our faculty members are experienced
We accept applicants who have already acquired
in many actual policy formulations in
Master's Degree in the field of social science,
government and international arena.
especially International Relations, Political Science,
4. Model schedule and Recommended Elective
Economics, and Law. We also accept applicants
Courses are provided in a separate page of this
who may be regarded as having experience and
Bulletin.
expertise equivalent to possessing a Master's degree.
5. GRIPS Fellowship and JICA scholarship
The main target group is officials of national and
information is available in later page of this
local government with already considerable
experience. write papers in areas of social science, teach at
Program Outline: institutions of higher education, and improve their
All courses for international students are taught proficiency in foreign languages.
entirely in English. Foreign students who are This joint program is administered in conjunction
sufficiently proficient in Japanese may also take with the National Institute of Science and
courses in the Japanese programs. Technology Policy and the Japan Science and
The program demands a high level of commitment Technology Agency.
from students, who are generally admitted at the
beginning of either Spring or Fall Term. Disaster Management Program
For international students, the usual resident This program is designed to cultivate professionals
requirement to complete a Ph. D degree at GRIPS is who can educate researchers and take leadership in the
three years. In order to be eligible for a Qualifying planning and implementation of national/international
Exam, students must earn a minimum of 14 credits strategies and policies in the field of water-related risk
from the courses and tutorials offered. It is management.
expected that these credits can be acquired by the Water-related disasters are intensifying in
end of the first year. frequency and magnitude due to urbanization,
At the end of the first year, doctoral students are industrialization, climate changes etc. throughout
expected to submit a thesis proposal and pass the the world, causing devastating losses to human
Qualifying Exam for Doctoral Dissertation. After lives and livelihoods. They also seriously impede
passing the Qualifying Exam, the students can economic development.
begin with working on their dissertation in the It is increasingly evident that capacity
second academic year, aiming to complete the development and human empowerment are the
Dissertation by the end of the third year. basis for resilient societies against disasters and
Advisory Group: sustainable development. In order to improve this
After entering GRIPS, students are expected to basis, there is an urgent need for societies to
choose an Advisory Group consisting of three increase their capacities for training researchers,
professors, associate professors, and assistant educators and strategy/policy specialists for risk
professors. This Advisory Group will help the management.
students decide the optimal combination of courses It is to support countries in this respect that the
and tutorials. The Group will be in constant contact National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies
in order to guide the student to the goal of obtaining (GRIPS) and the International Centre for Water
the degree. Hazard and Risk Management (ICHARM), Public
Works Research Institute (PWRI) jointly launch a
Science and Technology Policy Program Ph.D. program in October 2010. The broad aim of
(for Japanese students) the program is to nurture professionals who can
This program is designed for government officials train researchers and take leadership in planning
who are skilled in the formulation and and implementation of national and international
implementation of policies related to science and strategies and policies in the field of water-related
technology. It is also aims to cultivate become experts risk management.
in both the theory and practice of policymaking. At the end of the first year, doctoral students are
Science and technology have been regarded as expected to submit a thesis proposal and pass a
the foundation of development in Japan, a country Qualifying Examination. In order to be eligible for
lacking in natural resources. The importance of a Qualifying Examination for Doctoral Dissertation,
science and technology have been underscored by students must earn a minimum of 8 credits from the
the enactment of the Science and Technology Basic courses offered. In addition, students who are
Law and the formation of the Science and advised to take disaster management courses by
Technology Basic Plan. Advances in science and their supervising committee must take these for up
technology also present new challenges, including to 4 credits in Category I. After passing the
changes in society and the economy, emerging Qualifying Examination, students can begin
bioethical concerns, increasing need for policies working on their dissertation in their second
that consider risks and social costs (need for academic year, with the aim of completing the
regulatory science), and disputes and protection of dissertation by the end of their third year.
intellectual property rights. After starting dissertation work, students are
Candidates in this Program conduct high-level required to report on research that they are planning
or working on, at Ph.D. Candidate Seminars.
policy research and policy planning, master the
In addition to the completion of the dissertation,
discipline required for performing policy research,
at least two papers should be published in peer comprehensive and high-level education and
reviewed relevant international journals before the research opportunities in Japanese language
awarding of the degree. (“Publish” here includes education and culture.
acceptance for publication.)
In addition, there are courses offered at the
University of Tokyo.
Furthermore, PWRI is seeking candidates for Three-Year Doctoral Course
ICHARM Research Assistantship positions. If
employed for the positions, students will be Policy Professionals Program
working at ICHARM as ICHARM Research This program is designed to cultivate policy
Assistants. This provides an excellent opportunity analysis skills in government officials, journalists,
for them to learn and experience the practical work etc., through the case study approach.
of ICHARM while they carry out their own The central focus of this Program, based on
research. For those interested in the assistantship, GRIPS’ aim of training policy practitioners with a
visit the PWRI website for further information. high level of both practical knowledge and policy
analysis skills based on academic learning, is the
Graduate Program in Japanese Language execution of doctoral theses based on case study
and Culture research. The Program specifically targets
This program is designed for Japanese-language practitioners with substantial professional policy
educators with the linguistic and cultural expertise for experience who also have basic policy analysis
providing high-quality Japanese-language education skills.
and research. First-year students, in principle, attend an
The objective of this program is to educate intensive series of lectures and seminars, drawing
foreign teachers and/or professors who possess a on the latter to create a thesis outline. In their
broad base of knowledge and insight into Japanese second year, they return to their workplaces and
language education, society, and culture. It also their professional duties while continuing research
provides scholarly training in disciplines in order to in order to complete their theses and earn a
develop abilities in conducting advanced academic doctorate within three years.
research. It aims to produce individuals who are The Program seeks to make maximum use of
qualified to take an active role in Japanese language students’ experience and awareness of policy issues,
education in their own countries either as future combining this efficiently with academic training at
leaders in Japanese language education and GRIPS to generate outstanding case study research
research, or as administrators, or specialists. and, in the process, hone students' skills as
Lectures and seminars are given entirely in top-class policy practitioners. To this end, the
Japanese, so that students are required for enough curriculum focuses on development of analytical
knowledge of the Japanese language. The program skills in the necessary academic disciplines,
is demanding, and requires a high level of broadening of students' perspectives, and teaching
commitment from the students to complete the of research skills through such endeavors as thesis
dissertation by the end of their third year. writing. In addition to the disciplines of politics and
This program is jointly administered by two public administration, the program draws widely on
institutions working in close collaboration: the areas such as economics, international relations,
Japan Foundation Japanese-Language Institute, law, and engineering.
Urawa (JFJLI), which has a proven track record and Entry is, in principle, limited to policy
instructional expertise in training non-native practitioners who hold master's degrees and have
Japanese language teachers, particularly in the necessary practical experience and/or research
Japanese teaching methodology; and the National skills to undertake case study research at the
Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), a doctoral level. They should have at least 10 years'
graduate-level academic research institution that experience working in organizations such as
studies societies and cultural policies, particularly government departments, journalism, or non-profit
Japanese culture, as part of a general program of organizations.
policy research. The close collaboration among
these two institutions enables them to provide
Summary Table of Doctoral Programs

Program Summary

Five-Year Ph.D. Course Policy Analysis Program Designed for students to research and analyze real-world policy issues with economics methodology in
five years, or in three years for exceptionally well qualified candidates.

Three-Year (Ph.D.) Public Policy Program Designed for public administrators and researchers in the field of policy studies with advanced skills and
Ph.D./Doctoral Courses deep knowledge for policy analysis.

Security and International Studies Program Designed for security and foreign policy professionals to conduct in-depth analysis of topics related to
security and international studies.

Science and Technology Policy Program Designed for government officials with skills needed to design and implement policies related to science
and technology, and trains other professionals to become experts in the theory and practice of
policymaking.
Disaster Management Program Designed for professionals who can educate researchers and take leadership in the planning and
implementation of national/international strategies and policies in the field of water-related risk
management.
Graduate Program in Japanese Language Designed for Japanese-language educators with linguistic, cultural, and intellectual knowledge and skills
and Culture needed to provide high-quality Japanese-language education and research.

Three-Year Doctoral Policy Professionals Program Designed for government officials, journalists, and other practitioners to develop skills for policy analysis
Course through the case study approach.
Table 3: Curriculums
1-1 Policy Analysis (Economics) (Five Year Ph.D. Course)
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit Master's Ph.D.
ECO600E Advanced Microeconomics I Yasuda Spring (Session I) 2
ECO601E Advanced Microeconomics II Yasuda Spring (Session II) 2
ECO602E Advanced Microeconomics III Sonobe Fall (Session I) 2
ECO603E Advanced Microeconomics IV Sonobe Fall (Session II) 2
ECO605E Advanced Macroeconomics I Hsu Fall (Session I) 2
ECO606E Advanced Macroeconomics II Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session II) 2

I ECO670E Advanced Econometrics I Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session I) 2 26


Core Courses ECO671E Advanced Econometrics II Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session II) 2
(Required) ECO672E Advanced Econometrics III Yamano Fall (Session I) 2
ECO673E Advanced Econometrics IV Ikeda Fall (Session II) 2
A Course from other disciplines I 2
ECO701E Graduate Seminar I Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Spring 4
ECO702E Graduate Seminar II * Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Fall 4
ECO703E Graduate Seminar III * Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Spring 4 10
A Course from other disciplines II 2
ECO704E Graduate Seminar IV * Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Fall 4
ECO705E Graduate Seminar V * Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Spring 4
ECO706E Graduate Seminar VI* Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Fall 4
ECO707E Graduate Seminar VII * Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Spring 4
II ECO100EA Microeconomics I Yoshida Fall (Session I) 2
Strongly
Recommended ECO106EC Macroeconomics I Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session I) 2
ECO200EA Microeconomics II Yoshida Fall (Session II) 2
ECO206EC Macroeconomics II Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session II) 2
ECO272EB Introduction to Applied Econometrics Pfau Fall 2
ECO300E Mathematics for Economic Analysis Yoshida Fall (Session II), Winter 2
ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2
ECO317E Labor Economics Kurosawa Fall (Session II) 2
ECO320E Economics of Law Hatanaka Spring 2
ECO321E Competition and Regulatory Economics Tanaka Makoto Spring 2
Public
ECO330E Urban Economics Okamoto Ryosuke Spring 2
Economics
ECO351E Environmental Economics Munro Spring 2
ECO372E Cost Benefit Analysis I Kidokoro Fall (Session I) 2
ECO373E Cost Benefit Analysis II TBA TBA 2 50
ECO391E Experimental Economics Munro Fall 2 40 (Including
master's
ECO384EA Development Economics Cooray Winter 2
credits)
ECO681E Advanced Development Economics Yamauchi Spring 2
Development GEN690E State Building and Development Otsuka, Shiraishi Winter 2
Economics IDS272E Development Project Analysis Kalirajan Winter 2
IDS287E Strategies and Conditions for Development I Otsuka Fall (Session I) 2
IDS289E Strategies and Conditions for Development II Otsuka Fall (Session II) 2
ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2
ECO345E International Finance Hsu Spring 2
International ECO347E Empirics of Macroeconomic Policies and International Finance TBA TBA 2 14
Economics ECO381E Economic Development of Japan Ohno Kenichi Spring 2
IDS381E Selected Topics in International Development I TBA Summer 2
IDS382E Selected Topics in International Development II TBA Summer 2
ECO290E Game Theory Yasuda Winter 2
III ECO331E Transportation Economics Murakami Spring 2
Recommended
Electives ECO352E Economics of Climate Change TBA Spring 2
ECO353E Resource and Energy Economics Tanaka Makoto Winter 2
ECO361E Japanese Economy Okita Spring 2
ECO363E Japanese Financial System Rhodes Winter 2
ECO364E Financial Economics Kubota Spring (Session I) 2
ECO370E Econometrics/ Quantitative Methods Arai Winter 2
ECO371E Time Series Analysis Ikeda Spring 2
ECO374E Economic Modeling for Policy Simulations Hosoe Spring 2
ECO386E Asian Economic Development and Integration Kawai, et al Spring 2
ECO607E Advanced Macroeconomics III Hsu Spring (Session I) 2
ECO608E Advanced Macroeconomics IV Ikeda Spring (Session II) 2
ECO675E Computer Programming with MATLAB for Economics and Finance Pfau Fall (Session I) 2
ECO770E Empirical Approach to Policy Analysis Arai Spring 2
IDS280E Japan's ODA: Its policies and reform agenda Tomimoto Fall 2
IDS283E Environment and Sustainable Development Otsuka Spring 2
IDS286E Poverty Alleviation Suzuki Aya Spring 2
IDS288E Trade and Industrial Development Sonobe Spring 2
Courses unlisted in this table (with program director's approval).
Notes:
1. This table applies to those who are admitted to five year Policy Analysis Program.
2. Course requirements:
For master's degree, students must complete a minimum of 40 credits, 26 of which must come from Category I and 14 from Category II.
For Ph.D. degree, students must complete a minimum of 10 credits, 10 of which must come from Category I.
3. None of the core courses except for "A Courses from other disciplines" is transferable.
4. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.
5. The courses marked with * can be registered only by those who passed Basic QE.
6. Courses from other disciplines are defined as those beginning with a code other than ECO or IDS, also the lecturer should have a Ph.D. Degree.
7. Students are required to submit a policy paper as a requirement for the Masters degree. In the PA program, this is done in Graduate Seminar 1.
Table 3: Curriculums
1-2 Policy Analysis (Economics) (Three Year Ph.D. Course)
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit Ph.D.
ECO600E Advanced Microeconomics I Yasuda Spring (Session I) 2
ECO601E Advanced Microeconomics II Yasuda Spring (Session II) 2
ECO602E Advanced Microeconomics III Sonobe Fall (Session I) 2
ECO603E Advanced Microeconomics IV Sonobe Fall (Session II) 2
ECO605E Advanced Macroeconomics I Hsu Fall (Session I) 2
ECO606E Advanced Macroeconomics II Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session II) 2

I ECO670E Advanced Econometrics I Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session I) 2


Core Courses ECO671E Advanced Econometrics II Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session II) 2 36
(Required) (28)
ECO672E Advanced Econometrics III Yamano Fall (Session I) 2
ECO673E Advanced Econometrics IV Ikeda Fall (Session II) 2
A Course from other disciplines I 2
ECO701E Graduate Seminar I Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Spring 4
ECO702E Graduate Seminar II * Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Fall 4
ECO703E Graduate Seminar III * Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Spring 4
A Course from other disciplines II 2
ECO704E Graduate Seminar IV * Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Fall 4
ECO705E Graduate Seminar V * Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Spring 4
ECO706E Graduate Seminar VI* Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Fall 4
ECO707E Graduate Seminar VII * Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Spring 4
II ECO100EA Microeconomics I Yoshida Fall (Session I) 2
Strongly
Recommended ECO106EC Macroeconomics I Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session I) 2
ECO200EA Microeconomics II Yoshida Fall (Session II) 2
ECO206EC Macroeconomics II Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session II) 2
ECO272EB Introduction to Applied Econometrics Pfau Fall 2
ECO300E Mathematics for Economic Analysis Yoshida Fall (Session II), Winter 2
ECO314E Public Economics Dermendzhieva Spring 2
ECO317E Labor Economics Kurosawa Fall (Session II) 2
ECO320E Economics of Law Hatanaka Spring 2
ECO321E Competition and Regulatory Economics Tanaka Makoto Spring 2
Public
ECO330E Urban Economics Okamoto Ryosuke Spring 2
Economics
ECO351E Environmental Economics Munro Spring 2
ECO372E Cost Benefit Analysis I Kidokoro Fall (Session I) 2
ECO373E Cost Benefit Analysis II TBA TBA 2 50
ECO391E Experimental Economics Munro Fall 2 (30)
ECO384EA Development Economics Cooray Winter 2
ECO681E Advanced Development Economics Yamauchi Spring 2
Development GEN690E State Building and Development Otsuka, Shiraishi Winter 2
Economics IDS272E Development Project Analysis Kalirajan Winter 2
IDS287E Strategies and Conditions for Development I Otsuka Fall (Session I) 2
IDS289E Strategies and Conditions for Development II Otsuka Fall (Session II) 2
ECO340E International Trade Xing Spring (Session I) 2
ECO345E International Finance Hsu Spring 2
International ECO381E Economic Development of Japan Ohno Kenichi Spring 2
Economics ECO347E Empirics of Macroeconomic Policies and International Finance TBA TBA 2
IDS381E Selected Topics in International Development I TBA Summer 2
IDS382E Selected Topics in International Development II TBA Summer 2 14
ECO290E Game Theory Yasuda Winter 2 (2)
III ECO331E Transportation Economics Murakami Spring 2
Recommended
Electives ECO352E Economics of Climate Change TBA Spring 2
ECO353E Resource and Energy Economics Tanaka Makoto Winter 2
ECO361E Japanese Economy Okita Spring 2
ECO363E Japanese Financial System Rhodes Winter 2
ECO364E Financial Economics Kubota Spring (Session I) 2
ECO370E Econometrics/ Quantitative Methods Arai Winter 2
ECO371E Time Series Analysis Ikeda Spring 2
ECO374E Economic Modeling for Policy Simulations Hosoe Spring 2
ECO386E Asian Economic Development and Integration Kawai, et al Spring 2
ECO607E Advanced Macroeconomics III Hsu Spring (Session I) 2
ECO608E Advanced Macroeconomics IV Ikeda Spring (Session II) 2
ECO675E Computer Programming with MATLAB for Economics and Finance Pfau Fall (Session I) 2
ECO770E Empirical Approach to Policy Analysis Arai Spring 2
IDS280E Japan's ODA: Its policies and reform agenda Tomimoto Fall 2
IDS283E Environment and Sustainable Development Otsuka Spring 2
IDS286E Poverty Alleviation Suzuki Aya Spring 2
IDS288E Trade and Industrial Development Sonobe Spring 2
Courses unlisted in this table (with program director's approval).
Notes:
1. This table applies to those who commenced from a GRIPS master's program with Master's degree (internal students hereafter), and to those with equivalent ability with internal students.
2. Course requirements:
For Ph.D. degree, students must complete a minimum of 50 credits, 36 of which must come from Category I and 14 from Category II.
3. The internal students who successfully completed the courses marked with * are exempted from taking the marked courses . Thus for Ph.D. degree, internal students must complete
a minimum of 30 credits, 28 of which must come from Category I and 2 come from II.
4. None of the core courses except for "A Course from other disciplines" is transferable.
5. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.
6. The courses marked with * can be registered only by those who passed Basic QE.
7. Courses from other disciplines are defined as those beginning with a code other than ECO or IDS, also the lecturer should have a Ph.D. Degree.
8. Students are required to submit a policy paper as a requirement for the Masters degree. In the PA program, this is done in Graduate Seminar 1.
Table 3: Curriculums
1-3 Policy Analysis (Innovation Policy) (Five Year Ph.D. Course)
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit Master's Ph.D.

ECO600E Advanced Microeconomics I Yasuda Spring (Session I) 2

ECO601E Advanced Microeconomics II Yasuda Spring (Session II) 2

ECO602E Advanced Microeconomics III Sonobe Fall (Session I) 2

ECO603E Advanced Microeconomics IV Sonobe Fall (Session II) 2

ECO605E Advanced Macroeconomics I Hsu Fall (Session I) 2

I ECO606E Advanced Macroeconomics II Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session II) 2 26


Core Courses
(Required) ECO670E Advanced Econometrics I Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session I) 2

ECO671E Advanced Econometrics II Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session II) 2 36

ECO672E Advanced Econometrics III Yamano Fall (Session I) 2


50
(Including
ECO673E Advanced Econometrics IV Ikeda Fall (Session II) 2 master's
credits)
TEC254E Innovation, Sustainability and Uncertainty Sunami, Woolger, Hope Spring 2

ECO701E Graduate Seminar I Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda Spring 4

ECO100EA Microeconomics I Yoshida Fall (Session I) 2

ECO106EC Macroeconomics I Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session I) 2

ECO200EA Microeconomics II Yoshida Fall (Session II) 2

ECO206EC Macroeconomics II Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session II) 2 10

ECO272EB Introduction to Applied Econometrics Pfau Fall 2

ECO300E Mathematics for Economic Analysis Yoshida Fall (Session II), Winter 2

Courses unlisted in this table (with program director's approval).

TEC902E Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy IV* Sunami, Suzuki Jun, Nagano Fall 4
II
Recommended TEC903E Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy V* Sunami, Suzuki Jun, Nagano Spring 4
Electives
TEC902E Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy VI* Sunami, Suzuki Jun, Nagano Fall 4

TEC903E Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy VII* Sunami, Suzuki Jun, Nagano Spring 4

TEC611E Introduction to Science, Technology and Innovation Studies Suzuki Jun, Sunami Spring 2

TEC621E Management of Innovation Suzuki Jun Fall 2

TEC631E Policy, Governance in the era of Global Innovation Sunami, Hope, Murakami Spring 2

TEC901E Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy I* Sunami, Suzuki Jun, Nagano Spring 4

TEC902E Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy II* Sunami, Suzuki Jun, Nagano Fall 4

TEC903E Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy III* Sunami, Suzuki Jun, Nagano Spring 4

Notes:

1. This table applies to those who are admitted to Policy Analysis Program with specialty in Innovation policy.
2. Course requirements:
For master's degree, students must complete a minimum of 36 credits, 26 of which must come from Category I and 10 from Category II.
For Ph.D. degree, students must complete a minimum of 14 credits, 14 of which must come from Categegory I.
3. None of the core courses except for "Innovation, Sustainability and Uncertainty" is transferable.

4. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.

5. The courses marked with * can be registered only by those who passed Basic QE..

6. Students are required to submit a policy paper as a requirement for the Masters degree. In the PA program, this is done in Graduate Seminar 1.
Table 3: Curriculums
2 Public Policy (General, Politics, Economics, Quantitative Analysis, Development, International Development, Cultural Policy,
Science and Technology Policy)
Category Course No. Course Title Instructor Term Credit
Politics GOV610J Special Seminar for Policy Process(政策過程論特別演習) Iio Spring 2
GOV611J Special Seminar for Japanese Politics(日本政治研究特別演習) Takenaka Fall 2
GOV620E International Relations(国際関係) Iwama Fall 2
GOV621J International Political Economy(国際政治経済) Tsunekawa Fall 2
GOV651J Special Seminar for Administrative History(行政史研究特別演習) TBA TBA 2
GOV661J Intelligence and Strategy(情報と戦略) Ota Fumio Spring 2
GOV691J Scope and Methods of Case Studies(事例研究方法論) Iio Summer/ Winter 2
GOV692J Methodology of Qualitative Social Sciences(社会科学方法論=質的分析) Iio Fall 2
GOV693J Methodology of Quantitative Social Sciences(社会科学方法論=量的分析) Masuyama Fall 2
GOV700J Thesis -Security and International Studies(安全保障・国際問題論文演習) Shiraishi, Iwama Fall/Spring 2
GOV643E American Foreign Policy(アメリカの外交政策) TBA TBA 2
GOV622E Advanced Security Studies(安全保障論) Michishita Winter 2
GOV640E International Relations in East Asia(東アジア国際関係) Shiraishi Spring 2
GOV642J Japan’s Foreign Policy(日本外交) TBA Spring 2
Strategic Cultures in the Asia-Pacific and Japan's Defense Policy
GOV660J Marumo Fall 2
(戦略文化論と安全保障政策)
GOV641E European International Relations(ヨーロッパ国際関係) Iwama Spring 2
Courses unlisted in this table, admitted by each student's advisory committee.
Economic ECO600E Advanced Microeconomics I Yasuda Spring (Session I) 2
Theory ECO601E Advanced Microeconomics II Yasuda Spring (Session II) 2
ECO602E Advanced Microeconomics III Sonobe Fall (Session I) 2
ECO603E Advanced Microeconomics IV Sonobe Fall (Session II) 2
ECO605E Advanced Macroeconomics I Hsu Fall (Session I) 2
ECO606E Advanced Macroeconomics II Esteban-Pretel Fall (Session II) 2
ECO607E Advanced Macroeconomics III Hsu Spring (Session I) 2
ECO608E Advanced Macroeconomics IV Ikeda Spring (Session II) 2
ECO670E Advanced Econometrics I Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session I) 2
ECO671E Advanced Econometrics II Leon-Gonzalez Spring (Session II) 2
ECO672E Advanced Econometrics III Yamano Fall (Session I) 2
ECO673E Advanced Econometrics IV Ikeda Fall (Session II) 2
ECO681E Advanced Development Economics Yamauchi Spring 2
ECO701E Graduate Seminar I Spring 4
ECO702E Graduate Seminar II Fall 4
ECO703E Graduate Seminar III Spring 4
ECO704E Graduate Seminar IV Fall 4
Pfau, Hsu, Yasuda
ECO705E Graduate Seminar V Spring 4
ECO706E Graduate Seminar VI Fall 4
ECO707E Graduate Seminar VII Spring 4
ECO708E Graduate Seminar VIII Fall 4
Courses unlisted in this table, admitted by each student's advisory committee.
Quantitative MOR600J Statistical Data Analysis(統計データ解析) Morohosi 2
Analysis MOR610J Applied Statistics(応用統計) Morohosi 2
MOR620J Mathematics for Planning(計画数理) Oyama 2
MOR630J Mathematics for Evaluation(評価数理) Tone 2
MOR650J Mathematical Modeling Analysis(数理モデル分析) Oyama 2
MOR660J Game Theory(ゲーム理論) Okada 2
MOR661J Applied Game Theory(応用ゲーム理論) Okada 2
MOR670J Optimization and Simulation(最適化とシミュレーション) Oyama, Morohosi 2
MOR600E Statistical Data Analysis Morohosi 2
MOR610E Applied Statistics Morohosi 2
MOR620E Mathematical Programming Oyama 2
MOR630E Mathematical Evaluation Oyama 2
MOR640E Operations Research Oyama, Tsuchiya 2
MOR650E Advanced Mathematical Modeling Oyama, Tsuchiya, Morohosi 2
MOR660E Game Theory Okada 2
MOR661E Applied Game Theory Okada 2
MOR670E Optimization and Simulation Oyama, Tsuchiya, Morohosi 2
MOR701J Workshop on Statistical Data Analysis(統計データ解析演習) Oyama, Morohosi 2
MOR702J Workshop on Mathematical Modeling Analysis(数理モデル分析演習) Oyama, Morohosi 2
MOR703J Workshop on Policy Simulation(政策シミュレーション演習) Oyama, Morohosi 2
MOR701E Seminar on Statistical Data Analysis Morohosi 2
MOR702E Seminar on Mathematical Modeling Oyama, Tsuchiya, Morohosi Fall 2
MOR703E Seminar on Policy Simulation Oyama, Morohosi 2
Courses unlisted in this table, admitted by each student's advisory committee.
DEV600E Sociological Research Shimomura 2
Development
Policy Advanced Topics in National Development Policy and Infrastructure Investment
DEV6 Morichi 2
(国土政策と社会資本整備特論)
Advanced Topics in Townscape Policy: Control & Urban Design
DEV6 Shinohara 2
(都市計画と景観政策・アーバンデザイン特論)
Advanced Topics in Transportation System and Planning
DEV6 Hibino 2
(交通システムと交通計画特論)
DEV6 Advanced National Development and Institution for Transportation Infrastructure Morichi 2
DEV6 Advanced Disaster Risk Management Okazaki 2
DEV700E Special Seminar for Sociology Shimomura 2
Courses unlisted in this table, admitted by each student's advisory committee.
Cultural CUL601 Advanced Topics in Cultural Capital and Policy Issues(文化資源特論) Kakiuchi Fall 2
Policy CUL602 Advanced Topics in Arts Policy(芸術政策特論) Kakiuchi Winter 2
CUL603 Advanced Topics in Cultural Policy(文化政策特論) Neki Spring 2
CUL604 Cultural Policy Research Seminar I( 文化政策リサーチセミナー I) TBA 2
CUL605 Cultural Policy Research Seminar II(文化政策リサーチセミナー II) TBA 2
CUL606 Cultural Policy Research Seminar III(文化政策リサーチセミナー III) TBA 2
Thesis on Cultural Policy(文化政策論文演習) Kakiuchi, et al All year
Courses unlisted in this table, admitted by each student's advisory committee.
TEC200J Innovation and social impact(技術革新と社会変貌) Sumikura Summer 2
Science and
Technology TEC254E Innovation, Sustainability and Uncertainty Woolgar, Hope Spring 2
Policy Introduction to Science, Technology and Innovation
TEC611 Sunami, Suzuki Jun Spring 2
(科学技術イノベーション政策へのイントロダクション)
TEC621 Management of Innovation (イノベーションのマネジメント) Suzuki Jun Fall 2
TEC631E Policy, Governance in the era of Global Innovation Sunami Spring 2
Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy I
TEC901 Spring 4
(科学技術政策リサーチセミナー I)
Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy II
TEC902 Fall 4
(科学技術政策リサーチセミナー II)
Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy III
TEC903 Sunami, Suzuki Jun, Nagano Spring 4
(科学技術政策リサーチセミナー III)
Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy IV
TEC904 Fall 4
(科学技術政策リサーチセミナー IV)
Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy V
TEC905 Spring 4
(科学技術政策リサーチセミナー V)
Courses unlisted in this table, admitted by each student's advisory committee.
Notes
1. This table is aimed at students who are enrolled in the (Ph.D.) Public Policy Program.
2. The field-wise course requirements for sitting in the QE are as follows:
General : 8 credits or more required in any subjects related to politics, economic theory, or quantitative analysis.
Politics: 8 credits or more required in politics.
Economics and international development:8 credits or more required in economic theory.
Mathematical analysis: 8 credits or more required in quantitative analysis.
Development: 8 credits or more required in courses centering around development policy, economic theory, or quantitative analysis.
International Development: 8 credits or more required in economic theory.
Science and Technology Policy: 8credits or more required in science and technology policy.
Cultural Policy: 8 credits or more required in cultural policy. Students must pass thesis on cultural policy.
3. If both the English and Japanese versions of theoretical courses in the same field, i.e., which offer the same content, are attended, only one of them will be counted for
credit points required for completion.
4. Regarding the above lecture courses, the decision on whether that course is to be offered or not shall be decided each year, prior to the relevant semester. Classes may
be added to or modified midway through the year.
5. Courses unlisted in this table, admitted by each student's advisory committee.
Table 3: Curriculums
3 Security and International Studies

Elective
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit
or Core

GOV620E International Relations Iwama Fall 2

GOV621E International Political Economy Tsunekawa Fall 2


I
Theoretical Elective
courses
GOV622E Advanced Security Studies Michishita Winter 2

GOV231E Comparative Politics Takenaka Fall 2

GOV640E International Relations in East Asia Shiraishi Spring 2

GOV641E European International Relations Iwama Spring 2 14


II
Regional Elective
courses
GOV643E American Foreign Policy TBA TBA 2

GOV225E Chinese Foreign Policy Yu Winter 2

International Situation and Japanese National


GOV661E Ota Fumio Spring 2
III Security Policy
Policy Elective
courses
GOV321E Transnational Organized Crime and Security Fukumi Fall 2

IV General
Elective Courses unlisted in this table, admitted by the Program Committee.
Subjects

V Paper Security and International Studies Dissertation Iwama,


Core GOV700E Spring 2
Writing Seminar Michishita

Notes

1. This table is aimed at students who are enrolled in the Security and International Studies Program.
2. Prerequisites for taking these courses
  Must fulfill conditions 1 and 2, pass the QE as well as the second semester with a total of 14 credits or more, pass the final thesis
evaluation.
    1. CategoryⅠ- Category IV  14 credits or more
    2. Category V  Pass
3. Courses may be added to or modified midway through the year.
4. If both the English and Japanese versions of courses offering the same content are attended, only one of them will be counted for
credits required for completion.
Table 3: Curriculums
4 Disaster Management

Category Course No. Course Title Instructor Term Credit

I
Disaster Management DMP681E Advanced Integrated Flood Management Takeuchi Fall through Winter 2

DMP682E Advanced Hydrology Jayawardena Fall through Winter 2

Advanced Flood Hydraulics and Sediment


DMP683E Fukuoka Fall through Winter 2
Transport

Advanced Mechanics of Sediment


DMP684E Egashira Fall through Winter 2
Transportation and River Changes

DMP685E Advanced Hydraulics Ishikawa Fall through Winter 2

II
Development DMP601E Advanced Disaster Management Policy Morichi Winter 2

8
Advanced Topics in National Development
DMP602E Morichi Spring 2
Policy and Infrastructure Investment

DMP603E Advanced Disaster Risk Management Okazaki Winter 2

III
Others DMP686E Advanced River Engineering Chibana Spring through Summer 2
(The University of Tokyo)

DMP687E Advanced Hydrology Oki Spring through Summer 2

DMP688E Urban Disaster Mitigation Engineering Meguro, Ohara Spring through Summer 2

Natural Disasters and Urban Disaster


DMP689E Konagai, Meguro, Ohara Fall through Winter 2
Prevention

Notes

1. This table is aimed at students who are enrolled in the Disaster Management Program.

2. Course requirements: For Ph.Ds., students must complete a minimum of 8* credits from categories I~III,
pass the Qualifying Examination (QE), and pass the final thesis evaluation.
* In addition, if a student is advised to take disaster management courses by his supervising committee,
he or she will be required to take these for up to 4 credits from category I~III.

3. The written component of the QEs will be conducted for one course given by the supervisor, and two or three couses given
by the advisors. Students must register for the courses taken by the supervisors and advisors.

4. After starting dissertation work, students are required to report on research that they are planning or working on,
at Ph.D. Candidate Seminars.

5. In order to complete Dissertation, at least two papers should be published in peer reviewed relevant international journals
before degrees can be awarded. (“Publish” here includes acceptance for publication.)

6. Courses offered in the Program are subject to change.


Table 3: Curriculums
5 Japanese Language and Culture
Optional or
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit
Core
I Practice Seminar on Second Language Acquisition 1
Fall 2
Courses (第二言語習得論演習1)
Seminar on Second Language Acquisition 2 Kubota, Kondo,
Winter 2
(第二言語習得論演習2) Yokoyama, et al
Seminar on Second Language Acquisition 3
Spring 2
(第二言語習得論演習3)
Seminar on Japanese Linguistics 1
Winter 2
(日本語学演習1)
Seminar on Japanese Linguistics 2 Usami, Noyama,
Spring 2
(日本語学演習2) Maeda, et al
Seminar on Japanese Linguistics 3
Summer 2
(日本語学演習3)
Seminar on Contrastive Linguistics 1
Fall 2
(対照言語学演習1)
Seminar on Contrastive Linguistics 2 Usami, Kubota,
Winter 2
(対照言語学演習2) Maeda, et al
Seminar on Contrastive Linguistics 3
Spring 2
(対照言語学演習3)
Seminar on Educational Language Policies 1
Fall 2 10
(言語教育政策演習1)
Seminar on Educational Language Policies 2 Kaneda, Kondo,
Winter 2 12
(言語教育政策演習2) Noyama, et al
Seminar on Educational Language Policies 3
Spring 2
(言語教育政策演習3)
Optional Seminar on Sociolinguistics 1
Winter 2
Core (社会言語学演習1)
Seminar on Sociolinguistics 2 Ueki, Noyama,
Spring 2
(社会言語学演習2) Yokoyama, et al
Seminar on Sociolinguistics 3
Summer 2
(社会言語学演習3)
Seminar on Japanese Culture 1
TBA 2
(日本文化研究演習1)
Seminar on Japanese Culture 2
TBA TBA 2
(日本文化研究演習2)
Seminar on Japanese Culture 3
TBA 2
(日本文化研究演習3)
Seminar on Language Education Methodology 1
Fall 2
(言語教育研究法演習1)
Seminar on Language Education Methodology 2 Usami, Kaneda,
Winter 2
(言語教育研究法演習2) Kondo, et al
Seminar on Language Education Methodology 3
Spring 2
(言語教育研究法演習3)
Seminar on Teacher Education Research 1
Winter 2
(教師教育研究論演習1)
Seminar on Teacher Education Research 2 Kaneda, Kubota,
Spring 2
(教師教育研究論演習2) Yokoyama, et al
Seminar on Teacher Education Research 3
Summer 2
(教師教育研究論演習3)
Special Study for Dissertation
TBA TBA 2
(特別専門科目)
II Special Special Study in Japanese Language Education Kubota, Yokoyama,
Core TBA 2 2
Research (日本語教育特別研究) et al
Notes
1. This table is aimed at students who are enrolled in the Graduate Program in Japanese Language and Culture.
2. Prerequisites for taking these courses
   Must fulfill conditions 1 and 2 as well as pass the final thesis evaluation
   1. Category I   10 credits or more (must take the QE after Exam with a total of 8 credits or more)
   2. Category II  2 credits (to be taken after passing the QE)
3. Courses may be added to or modified midway through the year.
4. The starting semester of some courses may be changed.
Table 3: Curriculums
6 Policy Professionals
Elective
Category Course No. Course Name Instructor Term Credit
or Core

I Core Subjects GOV691J Scope and Methods of Case Studies(事例研究方法論) Iio Summer / Winter 2

GOV692J Social Science Methodology for Qualitative Analysis(社会科学方法論=質的分析) Iio Fall 2

GOV693J Social Science Methodology for Quantitative Analysis(社会科学方法論=量的分析) Masuyama Fall 2

GOV611J Special Seminar for Japanese Politics(日本政治研究特別演習) Takenaka Fall 2

Optional 6
GOV210J Policy Process(政策過程論) Iio Spring 2
Core

GOV610J Special Seminar for Policy Process(政策過程論特別演習) Iio Spring 2

GOV620E International Relations Iwama Fall 2

GOV350J Theories of Public Administration(行政学理論) TBA TBA 2

GOV651J Special Seminar for Administrative History(行政史研究特別演習) TBA TBA 2

National Development Policy and Infrastructure Investment


DEV204J Morichi Fall 2
II Policy Analysis (国土政策と社会資本整備)
Subjects
DEV210J Transportation System and Planning(交通システムと交通計画) Hibino Spring 2

DEV250E National Development and Institution for Transportation infrastructure Morichi Spring 2

ECO202J Government and Market(政府と市場) Hatanaka, Morita Spring (Session II) 2 10

ECO270J Econometrics(計量経済学) Kurosawa Spring (Session II) 2

ECO271J Cost-Benefit Analysis(費用便益分析) Kidokoro Spring (Session II) 2

ECO314J Public Economics(公共経済学) Okamoto R Summer 2

ECO375J Economic Simulation Analysis(経済シミュレーション分析) Hosoe Summer 2

EPP201E Agricultural Economics Hara Spring 2

Optional
GOV231E Comparative Politics Takenaka Fall 2
Core

GOV330J Comparative Legislative Systems(比較議会制度論) Masuyama Fall 2      4

GOV621E International Political Economy Tsunekawa Fall 2

GOV622E Advanced Security Studies Michishita Winter 2   

GOV640E International Relations in East Asia Shiraishi Spring 2

GOV641E European International Relations Iwama Spring 2

MOR100J Introduction to Quantitative Analysis(数量分析基礎) Oyama, Morohosi Spring (Session I) 2

Oyama, Morohosi, Spring (Session II),


MOR201J Quantitative Data Analysis(計量データ解析法) 2
Tsuchiya Summer

TEC200J Innovation and Social Change(技術革新と社会変貌) Sumikura Summer 2

Ohno Kenichi, Ohno


PAD302E Policy Design and Implementation in Developing Countries Spring 2
Izumi, Shimamura
Introduction to Science, Technology and Innovation
TEC611 Sunami, Suzuki Jun Spring 2
(科学技術イノベーション政策へのイントロダクション)
Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy I
TEC901 Spring 4
(科学技術政策リサーチセミナー I) Sunami, Suzuki Jun,
Research Seminar on Science, Technology, Innovation, Policy II Nagano
TEC902 Fall 4
(科学技術政策リサーチセミナー II)

III General Subjects Elective Courses unlisted in this table, admitted by the Program Committee.

IV Paper Writing Core Seminar for Policy Case Studies(政策事例研究演習) Various All year

Notes
1. This table is aimed at students who are enrolled in the Policy Professionals Program.
2. Prerequisites for taking these courses

Must fulfill conditions 1 and 2, pass the QE as well as the second semester with a total of 10 credits or more, pass the final thesis evaluation after fulfilling condition 3 in the second semester.

   1. Category I -- 6 credits or more


   2. Category II and III -- 4 credits or more
   3. Category IV -- Pass
3. Courses may be added to or modified midway through the year.
4. If both the English and Japanese versions of courses offering the same content are attended, only one of them will be counted for credits required for completion.
Policy Analysis Program TIMETABLE (Fall: Oct. 6, 2010 - Feb. 1, 2011) As of July 28, 201
1 (9:00-10:30) 2 (10:40-12:10) 3 (13:20-14:50) 4 (15:00-16:30) 5 (16:40-18:10) 6 (18:20-19:50)
Cour Cour Cour Cour Cour
Cours
se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room e No. Subjects Instructor Room
No. No. No. No. No.

ECO
602
ECO
Advanced Econometrics IV E(III)
673 Ikeda H Advanced Microeconomics III & IV Sonobe J
E (Session II) ECO
603
E(IV) Souk
GEN
ai
MON 500 GRIPS Forum
E -rou
IDS Hall
287 Strategies &
E(I)
IDS
Conditions for Otsuka F
289 Development I & II
E(II)

ECO
Introduction to 100
ECO ECO
Advanced Macroeconomics I EA(I)
TUE 605 Hsu B 272 Applied Pfau D Microeconomics I & II Yoshida F
E
(Session I) EB
ECO
Econometrics 200
EA(II)
ECO Cost Benefit Analysis ECO Advanced Econometrics ECO Cost Benefit Analysis ECO
372 I Kidokoro L 672 III Yamano G 372 I Kidokoro L 702 Graduate Seminar II
E (Session I ) E (Session I) E (Session I ) E
ECO ECO
Computer Programming with MATLAB for Economics & Finance Pfau, Hsu
WED 675 Pfau B 704 Graduate Seminar IV F
E (Session I ) E & Yasuda
ECO
706 Graduate Seminar VI
E

ECO IDS Japan’s ODA: Its ECO Mathematics for


Labor Economics
317 Kurosawa J 280 policies & reform Tomimoto D 300 Economic Analysis Yoshida D
E (Session II) E E (Fall II & Winter)
agenda
THU
ECO
391 Experimental Economic Munro I
E

ECO IDS
106 Advanced 287 Strategies &
ECO
EC(I) Esteban- E(I)
FRI Macroeconomics I&II D 672 Econometrics III Yamano G Conditions for Otsuka F
ECO Pretel E
IDS
206 (Session I) 289 Development I & II
EC(II) E(II)

*This timetable is subject to change.


Policy Analysis Program TIMETABLE (Winter: Feb. 7, 2010 - Mar. 31, 2011) As of July 28, 201
1 (9:00-10:30) 2 (10:40-12:10) 3 (13:20-14:50) 4 (15:00-16:30) 5 (16:40-18:10) 6 (18:20-19:50)
Cou Cou Cou Cou Cou Cou
rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room
No. No. No. No. No. No.

MON

ECO
Resources and Tanaka
TUE 353
E Energy Economics Makoto
ECO IDS
290 Game Theory Yasuda 272 Development Project Analysis Kalirajan
E E
WED
GEN
State-Building and Development Otsuka and
690
E (16:00-17:30 or 17:00-18:30) Shiraishi

ECO Mathematics for


THU 300 Economic Analysis Yoshida
E (Fall II and Winter)
ECO ECO
Resources and Tanaka
363 Japanese Financial System Rhodes 353
E E Energy Economics Makoto
ECO GEN Otsuka
Development Economics State-Building and
FRI 384 Cooray 690 and
EA
(9:30-12:45) E Development
Shiraishi
ECO
370 Economics/Quantitative Methods Arai
E

*This timetable is subject to change.


Policy Analysis Program TIMETABLE (Spring: Apr. 6, 2010 - Jul. 26, 2011) As of July 28, 201
1 (9:00-10:30) 2 (10:40-12:10) 3 (13:20-14:50) 4 (15:00-16:30) 5 (16:40-18:10) 6 (18:20-19:50)
Cour Cou Cour Cour Cou Cou
se Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room
No. No. No. No. No. No.
ECO IDS ECO
Trade & Industrial
320 Economics of Law Hatanaka 288 Sonobe 371 Time Series Analysis Ikeda Souk
Development GEN
E E E ai-
MON 500 GRIPS Forum
ECO Competition & rou
Tanaka E
321 Regulatory Hall
E Makoto
Economics
ECO
670 Advanced ECO Economic Modeling ECO
E Leon- Dermendz
Econometrics 374 for Policy Hosoe 314 Public Economics
ECO Gonzalez E E hieva
671 I & II Simulations
E
TUE
IDS Environment & ECO
Financial Economics
283 Sustainable Otsuka 364 Kubota
E E (Session I)
Development
ECO ECO
Advanced Macroeconomics III Advanced Macroeconometrics IV
607 Hsu 608 Ikeda
E (Session I) E (Session II)
ECO
600
IDS ECO
E Suzuki
Advanced Microeconomics I & II Yasuda 286 Poverty Alleviation 701 Graduate Seminar I
ECO
E Aya E
601
E
ECO ECO
International Trade
340 Xing 703 Graduate Seminar III Pfau, Hsu
E (Session I) E & Yasuda
WED ECO
705 Graduate Seminar V
E
ECO
707 Graduate Seminar VII
E
ECO
361 Japanese Economy Okita
E
ECO
670 Advanced Advnaced
ECO ECO ECO
E Leon- Okamoto
Econometrics 345 International Finance Hsu 681 Development Yamauchi 330 Urban Economics
ECO Gonzalez E E E Ryosuke
I & II Economics
THU 671
E
ECO Asian Economic
Kawai, et
386 Development &
E al
Integration
ECO ECO ECO
Empirical Approach Environmental Transportation Economics
770 Arai 351 Munro 331 Murakami
E to Policy Analysis E Economics E (4/15, 5/6, 5/20, 6/3, 6/17, 7/1, 7/15)
FRI
TEC Innovation, ECO Economic
Woolgar
254 Sustainability & 381 Development of Ohno K.
E & Hope E
Uncertainty Japan

*This timetable is subject to change.


Doctoral Programs TIMETABLE (2010 Fall - 2011 Spring)                As of July 28, 2010
1 (9:00-10:30) 2 (10:40-12:10) 3 (13:20-14:50) 4 (15:00-16:30) 5 (16:40-18:10) 6 (18:20-19:50)
Term Day Cour
Cour Cou Cour Cour Cou
se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room rse Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room se Subjects Instructor Room
No. No. No. No. No. No.
ECO
602 Souk
ECO GEN
E(III) ai-
Mon 673 Advanced Econometrics IV (Session II) Ikeda H Advanced Microeconomics III & IV Sonobe I 500 GRIPS Forum
E
ECO
E
rou
603 Hall
E(IV)
ECO
Tue 605 Advanced Macroeconomics I (Session I) Hsu B
E
ECO
702
ECO Cost Benefit ECO Cost Benefit Pfau,
E(II) Graduate Seminar
372 Analysis I Kidokoro L 372 Analysis I Kidokoro L Hsu, F
ECO II & IV
E (Session I) E (Session I) Yasuda
ECO Advanced 704
Wed 672 Econometrics III Yamano G E(IV)
Fall
E (Session I) Oyama, Semi
GOV Transnational GOV MOR Seminar on
International Political Tsuchiya nar
625 Organization Crime & Fukumi F 621 Tsunekawa E 702 Mathmatical
E E
Economy E
, Room
Security modeling
Morohosi A

ECO GOV
Experimental 戦略文化論と
Thu 391 Munro I 660 丸茂 I
E
Economics J
安全保障政策

ECO
Esteban-
606 Advanced Macroeconomics II (Session II) D
E
Pretel GOV
International
Fri 620 Iwama J
ECO Advanced E
Relations
672 Econometrics III Yamano G
E (Session I)

GOV GOV Winter Term Intensive Class: "Chinese Foreign Policy " (Professor Yu)
Winter Wed 662 Advanced Security Studies Michishita 225 Feb. 10 (Thu) Period 3 & 4, Feb. 12 (Sat) Period 3 & 4, Feb. 14 (Mon) Period 3 & 4, Feb. 15 (Tue) Period 3 & 4,
E E Feb. 16 (Wed) Period 3 & 4, Feb. 17 (Thu) Period 3 &

GOV European GEN Souka


Mon 641 International Iwama 500 GRIPS Forum irou-
E Relations E Hall
ECO
670
Advanced ECO ECO
E(I) Leon-
Tue Econometrics 607 Advanced Macroeconomics III (Session I) Hsu 608 Advanced Macroeconomics IV (Session II) Ikeda
ECO Gonzalez
I & II E E
671
(II)

TEC Sunami, ECO


ECO Introduction to Sci- 701
611 Suzuki
600 E
Tech-Inno Studies E Pfau,
Jun Graduate Seminar
Spring Wed E(I) Advanced Microeconomics I & II Yasuda 703 Hsu, F
601 GOV International E
I & III & V
Yasuda
E(II) 640 Relations in East Asia Shiraishi 705
E (18:00~) E
ECO
670
Advanced ECO Advnaced
E(I) Leon-
Thu Econometrics 681 Development Yamauchi
ECO Gonzalez E
671 I & II Economics
E(II)

TEC Innovation,
Woolger,
Fri 254 Sustainability &
E
Hope
Uncertainty

*This timetable is subject to change.


Table 4: Schedule for Evaluation of Doctoral Theses

Completion Period

March June September December

Deciding the evaluation committee


2nd Wednesday of December 2nd Wednesday of March 2nd Wednesday of June 1st Wednesday of September
members for the final doctoral thesis

Submitting the thesis and synopsis


( → announcement of peer review and Late December Late March Late June Late September
evaluation)

Final Thesis Presentation and review Late January Late April Late July Late October

Deadline for submission of the final


Friday of the week before the Doctoral Committee meeting
doctoral thesis

Approving the evaluation results


2nd Wednesday of March 2nd Wednesday of June 1st Wednesday of September 2nd Wednesday of December
(Ph.D. Doctoral Committee)

Approving the evaluation results


(steering committee) 2nd Wednesday of March 2nd Wednesday of June 1st Wednesday of September 2nd Wednesday of December
Date of completion

Award of degree March’s Commencement September’s Commencement* September's Commencement March’s Commencement*

*Degrees can be received in private from the Dean at any time after completion.
Financial Aid for Doctoral Students

Scholarships • will return to the school and is expected to submit a


dissertation and graduate within a year following a
■ GRIPS Fellowship leave of absence
*Excluding a leave of absence
Full scholarships provided by GRIPS are available for
exceptionally qualified doctoral students..
Screening
The screening committee assesses applications based on
What the scholarship covers
the progress of students’ dissertations and grades,
1. The monthly stipend is intended to cover living
research results/accomplishments, etc.
expenses that include food, clothing, other daily
necessities, insurance, and other miscellaneous expenses
related to your study at GRIPS. This stipend cannot be Duration
increased to cover family members. The amount of your • Maximum of one year
stipend may change slightly due to the fluctuating • The screening committee will determine the duration
economic climate in Japan. of the waiver based on the student’s application and
2. Tuition fees progress regarding his/her dissertation.
3. Return economy-class air ticket to students’ home
countries How to apply
Students should submit an application form, along with a
How to apply recommendation letter* from their main advisor, in:
Students should submit an application form in: • Early March, for waivers that begin in April
• Late February, for scholarships starting in April • Early September for waivers that begin in October
• Late June, for scholarships starting in October *Free format

Results
■ Scholarships administrated by organizations Applicants will be informed of the screening results by
letter, within one month following the end of the
other than GRIPS
application period.
Some scholarships administrated by organizations other
than GRIPS are available. For further information, please
see:
• International students: Teaching/Research Assistants
http://www.jasso.go.jp/study_j/scholarships_sfisij_e.html
• Japanese students: Doctoral students may work at GRIPS as
http://www.jasso.go.jp/shougakukin/index.html teaching/research assistants if their program director
deems the activity productive to their studies and/or
research, and free of any detrimental effects. An
application form must be submitted to the Academic and
Tuition Waiver for Doctoral Students
Student Affairs Division by professors in charge of their
lecture/research.
Conditions
International students wishing to work must submit a
An applicant must be at GRIPS for more than three
“Request for Permission to Work” to the Academic and
years* and fit one of the following descriptions:
Student Affairs Division, with their program director’s
• held a dissertation defense and is currently revising signature affixed, any time they commence in new
it before graduation employment.
• is expected to submit a dissertation and graduate
within a year, from April or October, when tuition
waivers commence
Guidelines for Financial Assistance Application procedures
to Doctoral Students In principle, the student must submit the following
documents to the Academic Support Team at least three
Who Make Conference Presentations
weeks before the day of departure for the conference.
The approval of the student’s main advisor is necessary
Purpose
for application.
These guidelines stipulate necessary matters relating to
1. Application Form for Payment of Travel Expense
assistance to students in the doctor’s program and the
Assistance for Conference Presentation (Appendix Form
5-year doctoral program at GRIPS (hereinafter referred
1)
to as “students”) for expenses required for travel to and
2. Announcement or program of the applicable academic
participation in academic conferences for the purpose of
conference (any document available at the time of
making presentations.
application that gives an outline of the conference and
shows that the student is giving a presentation)
Objective 3. In the case of travel by plane, an estimate or invoice of
The objective is to promote the acquisition of degrees the airfare (If the amount includes expenses other than
within the standard allocated time by providing students the airfare, a document showing the itemized breakdown
with opportunities to actively present their research is necessary.)
results outside of GRIPS and to accumulate experience 4. A document showing the travel schedule (in the case
in making such presentations. of overseas travel; for example, a printed scheduled
issued by a travel agency)
Application qualifications 5. Creditor Data Registration Request Form (Appendix
Students who are eligible to apply for assistance under Form 2) (Not necessary if the student has already
these guidelines (excluding those on extended leave) registered an account.)
must fulfill all the following conditions: 6. Certificate of payment of conference participation fee
1. The student must have passed the Qualification and advance payment claim (When paid in advance)
Exam (hereinafter referred to as “QE”) or be expected to (Appendix Form 4)
pass the QE by the time of the conference. If the participation fee includes reception, meal,
2. The student must personally be giving a presentation accommodation, and other expenses, attach documents
at a conference recommended by the student’s main showing the itemized breakdown.
advisor.
3. The student’s main advisor must have approved the Amount of assistance
student’s participation in the conference. 1. The amount of assistance paid to the applicant will be
equivalent to all or part of the expenses incurred in travel
Method of payment to and participation in the conference (assistance will not
In principle, an amount calculated based on the be provided for expenses related to receptions, meals,
submitted travel schedule will be paid into a bank etc.) computed in accordance with the GRIPS Travel
account designated by the student prior to the day of Expense Regulations (Regulation No. 7, 2006). However,
departure for the conference. Assistance for conference the maximum amount of assistance that a student may
participation expenses will be paid into the designated receive during a single fiscal year (April 1 to March 31)
bank account after the completion of the trip. shall not exceed JPY300,000, and of that amount, no
more than JPY50,000 of assistance shall be for domestic
travel. Any expenses exceeding these limits shall be
borne by the student.
2. Travel insurance expenses shall be borne by the
student.
3. Travel expenses paid for overseas travel and domestic
travel are shown in Tables 1 and 2, respectively.
Table 1 Overseas Travel
Submission
Types of expenses Remarks
of receipt
Discount economy class on the most economical route from Narita
Air ○
International Airport to the airport nearest the conference venue
Roundtrip fare from GRIPS or the student’s home, whichever is
Rail nearest to Narita International Airport, to Narita International ×
Airport Terminal 1 or 2 Station
Ship Passenger fare according to travel schedule ○
Travel expenses within country of Actual fares from the nearest airport to the venue to the conference

conference venue venue itself
JPY5,000 per day
Per diem allowance ×
JPY6,000 per day for designated cities1
JPY15,000 per night
JPY21,000 per night2 for designated cities1
If accommodation expenses for the designated cities of London,
Accommodation expenses △2
New York, and Washington DC exceed JPY21,000 per night, they
shall be reimbursed at the actual rates (to an upper limit of
JPY35,000 per night2).
Overseas travel special allowance JPY6,000 per trip ×
Actual expenses for vaccination fees, passport issuance fees, visa
Miscellaneous travel expenses issuance fees (including handling fees to travel agency), airport ○
taxes, foreign exchange fees, and immigration taxes
Notes
1) Designated cities are as follows:
Asia: Singapore
North America: Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Washington DC
Europe: Geneva, London, Moscow, Paris
Middle East: Abu Dhabi, Jiddah, Kuwait, Riyadh
Africa: Abidjan
2) All receipts should be preserved, because their presentation might be required up to one month after the trip.

Table 2 Domestic Travel


Submission
Types of expenses Remarks
of receipt
Air ○
Travel expenses for travel via the lowest ordinarily available route and
Rail ×
mode
Car ×
Ship Passenger fare according to travel schedule ○
1
Per diem allowance JPY2,000 per day ×
Accommodation expenses JPY11,000 per night △2
Notes
1) No per diem allowance is provided for day-trips to venues in the prefectures of Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, Chiba,
Ibaraki, Tochigi and Gunma.
2) Please keep all receipts, because you might be required to submit them up to one month after the trip.
4. In cases where students use package tours in which English Editing
travel expenses (air, rail, car, or ship fares) and
accommodation expenses are combined, if the package Doctoral students can seek assistance in
tour fee is less than the total amount equivalent to air English-language editing for their doctoral thesis and
and other travel expenses and accommodation research papers.
expenses calculated on the basis of the regulations, the
package tour fee is paid.

Contact information for applications and further


Procedures following the conference information on financial aid:
presentations To obtain application forms for financial aid, please
Within two weeks from the day following completion contact:
of the conference presentation trip, the student shall Academic Support Team,
submit the following documents to the Academic Academic and Student Affairs Division
Support Team and conduct adjustment procedures. Extension 6042
Please also note that the Conference Presentation E-mail: ast@grips.ac.jp
Report is required to be confirmed by the main
advisor.
1. Conference Presentation Report (Appendix Form 3)
2. In the case of travel by plane, the stubs from the air
tickets used, or other documents allowing
confirmation of boarding, and receipts (If the amount
includes expenses other than the airfare, a document
showing the itemized breakdown is necessary.)
3. Receipts for local travel expenses related to the
conference (in the case of overseas travel)
4. Receipts for accommodation expenses in the
designated cities of London, New York, and
Washington DC if they exceeded the fixed amount
5. Certificate of payment of conference participation
fee and advance payment claim (When paid on the
spot) (Appendix Form 4)
If the participation fee includes reception, meal,
accommodation, and other expenses, attach documents
showing the itemized breakdown.
Information about Policy Analysis Program
Model Schedule

For Five Year Ph.D. Course For those who finished GRIPS Master's Program in/after 2008
◎=Core (required) ◎=Core (required)
Year Term Course Credit Units Year Term Course Credit Units
○=Strongly Recmnded ○=Strongly Recmnded
Year 1 Fall (Session I) Microeconomics I 2 ○ Year 1 Fall (Session I) Microeconomics I 2 ○ finished/exempt
Fall (Session II) Microeconomics II 2 ○ (exemptedFall (Session II) Microeconomics II 2 ○ finished/exempt
Fall (Session I) Macroeconomics I 2 ○ Fall (Session I) Macroeconomics I 2 ○ finished/exempt
Fall (Session II) Macroeconomics II 2 ○ Fall (Session II) Macroeconomics II 2 ○ finished/exempt
Fall Introduction to Applied Econometrics 2 ○ Fall Introduction to Applied Econometrics 2 ○ finished/exempt
Fall (Session II), Winter Mathematics for Economic Analysis 2 ○ Fall (Session II), Winter Mathematics for Economic Analysis 2 ○ finished/exempt
Spring (Session I) Advanced Microeconomics I 2 ◎ Spring (Session I) Advanced Microeconomics I 2 ◎ finished/exempt
Spring (Session II) Advanced Microeconomics II 2 ◎ Spring (Session II) Advanced Microeconomics II 2 ◎ finished/exempt
Spring (Session I) Advanced Econometrics I 2 ◎ Spring (Session I) Advanced Econometrics I 2 ◎ finished/exempt
Spring (Session II) Advanced Econometrics II 2 ◎ Spring (Session II) Advanced Econometrics II 2 ◎ finished/exempt
Sub Total 20 Sub Total 20
Year 2 Fall (Session I) Advanced Microeconomics III 2 ◎ Year 2 Fall (Session I) Advanced Microeconomics III 2 ◎
Fall (Session II) Advanced Microeconomics IV 2 ◎ Fall (Session II) Advanced Microeconomics IV 2 ◎
Fall (Session I) Advanced Econometrics III 2 ◎ Fall (Session I) Advanced Econometrics III 2 ◎
Fall (Session II) Advanced Econometrics IV 2 ◎ Fall (Session II) Advanced Econometrics IV 2 ◎
Fall (Session I) Advanced Macroeconomics I 2 ◎ Fall (Session I) Advanced Macroeconomics I 2 ◎
Fall (Session II) Advanced Macroeconomics II 2 ◎ Fall (Session II) Advanced Macroeconomics II 2 ◎
Winter Basic QE Winter Basic QE
Spring Graduate Seminar I 4 ◎ Spring Graduate Seminar I 4 ◎
Spring A Course from other disciplines I 2 ◎ Spring A Course from other disciplines I 2 ◎ transferable
Spring Elective 1 2 Spring Elective 1 2 transferable
Sub Total 20 Sub Total 20
Year 3 Fall Graduate Seminar II 4 ◎ Year 3 Fall Graduate Seminar II 4 ◎
Fall A Course from other disciplines II 2 ◎ Fall A Course from other disciplines II 2 ◎ transferable
Fall Elective 2 2 Fall Elective 2 2 transferable
Winter Field QE Winter Field QE
Winter Elective 3 2 Winter Elective 3 2 transferable
Spring Graduate Seminar III 4 ◎ Spring Graduate Seminar III 4 ◎
Sub Total 14 Sub Total 14
Year 4 Fall Graduate Seminar IV 4 ○ Year 4 Fall Graduate Seminar IV 4 ○
Winter Winter
Spring Graduate Seminar V 4 ○ Spring Graduate Seminar V 4 ○
Sub Total 8 Sub Total 8
Year 5 Fall Graduate Seminar VI 4 ○ Year 5 Fall Graduate Seminar VI 4 ○
Winter (if Winter
Spring Graduate Seminar VII 4 ○ Spring Graduate Seminar VII 4 ○
Sub Total 8 Sub Total 8

For Ph.D. For MA Credits for Year 2 to 5 Less Transfers


Grand Total (5 years) 70 40 Grand Total 50 40
Core Courses (Required) 36 26 Core Courses (Required) 28 24
Strongly Recommended 28 12 Strongly Recommended 16 16
Electives 6 2 Electives 6 0

Note: The program can accept those who has Masters degree and can study full time only for three years. The
basic curriculum is the same for the five-year program. Consult with our admissions office for more details.
Policy Analysis Program (Economics)
Recommended Elective Courses

For Public Economics For International Economics

ECO314E Public Economics ECO340E International Trade


ECO317E Labor Economics ECO345E International Finance
ECO320E Economics of Law ECO347E Empirics of Macroeconomic Policies and
ECO321E Competition and Regulatory Economics International Finance
ECO330E Urban Economics ECO381E Economics Development of Japan
ECO351E Environmental Economics IDS340E International Monetary Theory and
ECO372E Cost Benefit Analysis I Policy
ECO373E Cost Benefit Analysis II IDS381E Selected Topics in International
ECO391E Experimental Economics Development I
IDS382E Selected Topics in International
Development II
For Development Economics

ECO384EA Development Economics For Innovation Policy


ECO681E Advanced Development Economics
GEN690E State-Building and Development TEC611E Introduction to Science, Technology and
IDS272E Development Project Analysis Innovation Studies
IDS287E Strategies and Conditions for TEC621E Management of Innovation
Development I TEC631E Policy, Governance in the era of Global
IDS289E Strategies and Conditions for Innovation
Development II TEC901E Research Seminar on Science, Technology,
Innovation, Policy I
TEC902E Research Seminar on Science, Technology,
Innovation, Policy II
TEC903E Research Seminar on Science, Technology,
Innovation, Policy III
Qualifying Exams for the Policy Analysis Program

1. Students of the Policy Analysis Program must pass 5. The Basic QE is scheduled to be held mainly in late
both the Basic QE and the Field QE in order to be February and additionally in late August.
eligible to write their Ph.D. Dissertation.
6. The eligibility requirement for taking the Field QE is
2. The Basic QE includes three subjects: that you must:
Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, and Econometrics. (a) pass the Basic QE in all three subjects,
Students must pass all three subjects to pass the Basic (b) successfully complete “Graduate Seminar I”, and
QE. (c) obtain consent from your main adviser for taking the
Field QE.
3. If a student fails to pass the Basic QE, she/he can take
the Basic QE one more time. The student only needs to 7. The Field QE schedule is determined through
retake the subject(s) she/he failed to pass. consultations with the main advisor.

4. The eligibility requirement for taking the Basic QE is


to successfully complete all the courses shown below (20
units).
• Advanced Microeconomics 1, 2, 3, 4
(ECO600E, ECO601E, ECO602E, ECO603E)
• Advanced Macroeconomics 1, 2
(ECO605E, ECO606E)
• Advanced Econometrics 1, 2, 3, 4
(ECO670E, ECO671E, ECO672E, ECO673E)
GRIPS Fellowship Policy

Operation of the GRIPS Fellowship Continuation in year 3


• Received fellowship continuation in year 2
The Fellowship Committee offers fellowships to select • Completed the following courses with grade B or
students; renders decisions on the continuation of higher:
fellowships offered; and can also make special - Advanced Macroeconomics 1, 2
arrangements such as awarding fellowships in the middle (ECO605E, ECO606E)
of academic years. Decisions made by the Fellowship - Advanced Microeconomics 3, 4
Committee must be approved by the Doctoral Program (ECO602E, ECO603E)
Committee and the council meeting. - Advanced Econometrics 3, 4
(ECO672E, ECO673E)
• Passed the Basic Qualifying Exam (Basic QE)
Selection of GRIPS Fellowship Recipients
from among Newly-Enrolled Students Continuation in year 4
• Received fellowship continuation in year 3
The Fellowship Committee selects recipients of the • Passed the Field Qualifying Exam (Field QE)
GRIPS Fellowship from the list of new enrollees
(including transfer students). Continuation in year 5
• Received fellowship continuation in year 4
• All the degree requirements except dissertation are
Fellowship Continuation Policies satisfied
and Requirements • Thesis progress is satisfactory

1. Maximum duration of financial assistance in the


form of a GRIPS Fellowship is 5 years for students Selection of Fellowship Candidates
enrolled in the 5-year Ph.D. course, and 3 years for During an Ongoing Academic Year
students in the 3-year Ph.D. course.
2. The Fellowship Committee selects the candidates In special cases, the Fellowship Committee may award
who can continue their fellowships. fellowships in the middle of the academic year to
3. For Policy Analysis Program students, continuation enrolled students who have excelled in their coursework.
of the fellowship is awarded, in principle, to those who
satisfy the following requirements. The final decision is
made by the Fellowship Committee.

Continuation in year 2
• Completed the following courses with grade B or
higher:
- Advanced Microeconomics 1, 2
(ECO600E, ECO601E)
- Advanced Econometrics 1, 2
(ECO670E, ECO671E)
GRIPS Fellowship and JICA Scholarship
For GRIPS Current Master’s Program Students
An Avenue to Reach Ph.D.

This document is applicable for (b) Then, complete the following two courses with
grade B or higher.
current GRIPS Master’s program students
• ECO600E Advanced Microeconomics 1
Spring I
1. There is an avenue for students to proceed to the
• ECO670E Advanced Econometrics 1
GRIPS Ph.D. program “Policy Analysis Program” with
Spring I
a GRIPS Fellowship or JICA scholarship.*
(c) Then take the following two courses in the Spring
II term.
2. To be eligible to apply for the GRIPS Fellowship
• ECO601E Advanced Microeconomics 2
or JICA scholarship, you must do exceptionally well in
Spring II
your academic work.** (See below for the specific
requirements) • ECO671E Advanced Econometrics 2
Spring II
3. The specific requirements: You must satisfy the (d) Your sponsor(s) must agree that you continue your
following conditions (a), (b), (c) and (d). study as a Ph.D. student.
(a) Complete the following six courses with a GPA
over the six courses of 3.7 or higher. (For IDS students,
the courses can be replaced with the equivalent *The GRIPS Fellowship is available for all students,
courses offered by IDS program.***) and the JICA Scholarship is available for IDS students.
Both provide a stipend and tuition waiver.
• ECO100E Microeconomics 1 Fall I
**Needless to say that “one is eligible to apply” does
• ECO106E Macroeconomics 1 Fall I
not necessarily mean the person will be given the
• ECO200E Microeconomics 2 Fall II
financial assistance automatically. Rather the
• ECO206E Macroeconomics 2 Fall II
fellowships are given on a competitive basis
• ECO272E Introduction to Applied
depending on the availability of funds.
Econometrics Fall
***IDS equivalent courses are as follows: IDS101E,
• ECO300E Mathematics for Economic Analysis
IDS103E, IDS270E, IDS273E, IDS287E, IDS289E
Fall II – Winter
Policy Analysis Program (Ph.D. Program)
To Receive GRIPS Fellowship or JICA Scholarship

GRIPS Master Program Students


Yes Go to Next Page “Self Finance Pattern”
Can you finance yourself?
for Policy Analysis Program
No

GPA 3.7 or Yes Take


Take Six
Higher for the Advanced Microeconomics I
Economics
Six Economics Advanced Econometrics I
Courses*
Courses? in Spring I
while you are
in master program No Congratulations!

Fellowship You will be


No Chance for Take Yes
Both B or Yes Selection placed in the
GRIPS or JICA Advanced Microeconomics II
Higher? by the Policy Analysis
Fellowship Advanced Econometrics II
Committee Program with a
No in Spring II
scholarship.
No
No Chance for File Application
GRIPS or JICA for GRIPS Fellowship No Chance for
Fellowship and Admission for P.A. Program GRIPS or JICA Fellowship
You may look for
outside resources

* The courses are ECO100E, ECO106E, ECO200E, ECO206E, ECO272E, ECO300E to support your study.

and for IDS Students IDS101E, IDS103E, IDS270E, IDS273E, IDS287E, IDS289E
Policy Analysis Program (Ph.D. Program)
Self Finance Pattern

GRIPS master program students who can self finance your study?

Yes

Take Six Economics Yes Take


GPA 3.5 or
Courses* Higher for Advanced Microeconomics I
the Six
while you are in Advanced Econometrics I
Economics
master program. Courses? in Spring I

No Take
Advanced Microeconomics II Admission
Congratulations!
Both B or Yes Advanced Econometrics II Yes
Sorry, Selection
in Spring II You will be placed
Higher? by the
No Admission Granted for and in the PA Program.
PA Program File application for admission Committee
No
to PA Program.
No
Sorry,
No Admission Granted for Sorry,
PA Program No Admission Granted for
PA Program

* The six courses are listed on the first page of this flow chart.
** Admission decisions depend on your overall performance.
6. Centers for Language Learning and Academic Literacy

Academic Writing Center (AWC)

English is the language of international communication permission only.


and research. Competency in English has become
critically important for researchers and professionals Listening and Speaking
around the globe. The mission of the Academic Writing This course focuses on oral communication skills with
Center (AWC) is to help students become competent an emphasis on fluency. Each class has a listening and
users of English in order to succeed in their graduate vocabulary component and provides grammatical
study at GRIPS and in future careers. We offer a range of patterns and speaking techniques to practice in mainly
instruction in fundamental areas of academic and spoken tasks. Students are expected to fully participate
professional English including reading and listening in class discussions and group work activities.
comprehension, vocabulary building, presentation and
discussion skills, and graduate-level writing. Understanding Academic Readings
This course familiarizes students with the conventional
structures of academic writing: the problem, existing
Courses literature, study design, results, and how such results
improve understanding. Students will learn to find the
Academic Presentation Skills writer’s claim (argument) and discuss why it
This course teaches the four elements of a good is distinctive and how it is supported. Before each
academic presentation: organization, language, meeting, students are required to read a paper to be
delivery, and power point slides. Students learn how to discussed in class.
organize an academic presentation that does not bore
the audience and how to prepare slides that help, rather Note on Courses
than hurt, the presentation. Students also learn how to Courses meet weekly. Fifteen-week courses carry two
deliver a presentation clearly and persuasively and credits and 7-week courses carry one credit. Courses
receive guidance on the effective use of verbal and offered may vary.
non-verbal skills. They practice presenting in groups
and in front of the whole class.
Workshops
Academic Writing for the Social Sciences
The goal of this course is to help students improve
Academic Writing for Graduate Study at
their academic writing. Students learn the fundamental
GRIPS
concepts of positioning, flow, and cohesion; common
The writing workshop series is offered in conjunction
patterns of English expository prose; the rhetorical
with individual degree programs. Students learn how
conventions of academic English; and the elements of
to formulate appropriate paper topics for their degree
a research paper. Students will receive individualized
program, evaluate and utilize online sources, avoid
help formulating arguments, organizing paragraphs,
plagiarism through accurate summarizing and citing of
summarizing, paraphrasing, using appropriate
sources, and use general conventions of academic and
vocabulary, and editing for grammar and style.
professional writing.

English for Academic Purposes


This course teaches academic English in a
graduate-study context. Students learn general Writing Tutorials
academic vocabulary, read academic texts, practice
paragraph-level writing, and improve listening Tutorials are one-on-one meetings with an AWC
comprehension and grammar. Students are assessed in instructor that are tailored to a student’s individual
each of these areas using a variety of speaking, writing needs. Students may seek assistance at any
listening, and writing assignments. Enrollment is by stage of writing, including the development of a paper
6. Centers for Language Learning and Academic Literacy

topic, research question, or research design. The Office Hours and Appointments
tutoring process is particularly helpful to those
needing to improve grammar, sentence construction, The Academic Writing Center, located in C507, holds
and paragraph organization. Writing instructors do not regular office hours at least 3 times a week for walk-in
correct student papers, but teach students to recognize consultations and writing tutorials, and appointments
and fix their own mistakes, including persistent are available with AWC faculty upon request.
grammar problems. Writing tutorials are available
throughout the year.
AWC Faculty

• Donna J. Amoroso, Ph.D. (Associate Professor)


• Katerina Petchko, Ed.D. (Assistant Professor)
• Miyuki Nakatsugawa, M.Ed. (Instructor)
• Blair Thomson, M.A. (Instructor)
Center for Japanese Language Learning (CJLL)

Objective of the Course • Japanese Language III


(Course No.: LAN003J, Tem: Spring, 2 credit)
These courses are aimed at learning useful Japanese ‐ J1: Yagi
for your life here. You will also have opportunities to ‐ J2: Kondoh, et al
know the people and culture through the Japanese ‐ J3: Kondoh, et al
language. ‐ J4: Yagi
‐ J5: Yagi
‐ J6: Yatabe
Level of the Courses • Japanese Language IV
(Course No.: n/a, Tem: Summer, no credit)
Center for Japanese Language Learning (CJLL) ‐ J2: Kondoh, Ogasa, et al
offeres the following courses. ‐ J3: Yagi
• J1 (Japanese 1) introduces survival Japanese to ‐ J4: Kondoh, et al
beginners who have no Japanese learning ‐ J5: Yagi
experience. J1 has 4 classes (J1A, J1B, J1C, and ‐ J6: Yatabe
J1D) covering the same material.
• J2 (Japanese 2) offers practical and useful Timetable for Fall Term 2010
Japanese for your life. It is appropriate for
1 2 3 4 5 6
students with basic learning experience. (9:00 (10:40 (13:20 (15:00 (16:40 (18:20
• J3 (Japanese 3) is designed for intermediate -10:30) -12:10) -14:50) -16:30) -18:10) -19:50)
students who have already mastered basic skills. J4 J1A
Mon
• J4 (Japanese 4) is designed to give advanced (Yatabe) (Yatabe)

students the opportunity to engage in intellectual J1B


Tue (Kondoh,
conversation. et al)
• J5 and J6 (Japanese 5 and 6) offers more J1C J3
Wed
advanced Japanese with Japanese TV programs, (Yagi) (Yagi)
newspapers, and so on. Courses will be designed J1D J2
Thu
according to students’ needs. (Yagi) (Yagi)

Fri

Instructors of the Courses

• Japanese Language I Evaluation


(Course No.: LAN001J, Tem: Fall, 2 credits)
‐ J1: Kondoh, et al Evaluation will be based on GRIPS Assessment Policy.
‐ J2: Yagi Your active participation will be highly considered. (In
‐ J3: Yagi the exam, conversational skills are mainly checked.)
‐ J4: Yatabe
• Japanese Language II
(Course No.: LAN002J, Tem: Winter, 1 credit) Credit
‐ J1: Kondoh, et al
‐ J2: Kondoh, et al We give two credits for the courses in Fall and Spring
‐ J3: Yagi Terms, and one credit in Winter Term, but it can not be
‐ J4: Yagi applied toward the degree. The courses in Summer
‐ J5: Yatabe Term does not give any credits.
Course Registration Note

The following registration is required. Detailed curriculum will be given on the first class.
• Choose one class depending on your needs and Courses offered are subject to change.
convenience.
• Register for the course according to the
registration procedures (same with other courses Inquiry of Your Level etc.
to be applied toward the degree) instructed by the
Academic Support Team. Please contact by e-mail to Professor Kondoh
(akondoh@grips.ac.jp).
7. Campus, Support, and Services

GRIPS Library

General Information GRIPS Library Web


The library web provides electronic access to OPAC, and
Operating hours other web links for searching electronic resources, such
Monday - Friday: 9:00 - 21:00 as online journals and online databases available in the
Saturday: 10:30 - 17:00 library. The website also provides updated library
announcements:
Closed http://www.grips.ac.jp/main/lib/
Sundays, National Holidays, Year-End & New Year
Holidays from December 27 to January 5
Exceptions to the above will be posted. How to Use the Library

Admission Borrowing books


Touch the gate sensor with your Student/Faculty ID To borrow books from the library, please take them to the
Card (your ID Card is also your Library Card). However, counter with your ID card.
the ID Card is not necessary to exit the library. Simply An automatic checkout machine is available.
push the bar to proceed through the gate. Number of books: up to 20
Loan period: 1 month

Searching for Materials Return


Please return loaned books to the counter. You do not
Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) need your ID card to do this.
To search for materials, using the Online Public Access Be sure to adhere to the loan due dates.
Catalog (OPAC) is important.
All books and periodicals in the GRIPS Library can be Reservations
searched by utilizing OPAC. If the book you seek is out, you can request a reservation.
You can use the online journal available at GRIPS from → Refer to “My Library”
OPAC. “How to use OPAC”
http://glib.grips.ac.jp/mylimedio/search/search-input.do?la The library will notify you by e-mail when a book
ng=en becomes available.
→ Refer to “How to use OPAC”
Materials not for loan
Online database The following materials can only be used on the
Online databases are useful tools for performing searches premises (the library).
on scholarly information in journals, books, periodicals, • Materials in the textbooks section
and articles. • Materials in the reference books section
You can also access news, business sources, law reports • Periodicals
and patents online. • Newspapers
Please find links to the Library web site. • Audio-visual materials
http://www.grips.ac.jp/main/lib/onlyinside/database.html • CD-ROMs
• Microforms
• Materials that are either damaged, broken, or
susceptible to damage or breakage
• Other materials specified by the library director
7. Campus, Support, and Services

Photocopies Orientation
Photocopiers are activated by prepaid card. The library occasionally organizes orientations to
• Materials that can be copied: materials owned by familiarize students with the library system, its databases,
the GRIPS Library and inter-library loans.
• Limits on photocopying: library users must act in Please check the "GRIPS Library Web" for orientation
accordance with copyright laws. schedules.

Restrictions
• Please be quiet. Use of Other Libraries
• No smoking, drinking, eating, and talking on
mobile phones ILL (Inter Library Loan) service
• Materials in the library are common assets, so we If materials that you need are unavailable in the GRIPS
expect everyone to care for them well, and make all library, we can help you obtain them from other libraries.
efforts to avoid any staining/soiling of books, not to Please inquire at the GRIPS library counter. Book loan
mention refrain from writing on them. policies depend on respective library’s regulations.

Reference Service Letter of introduction to other university libraries


Please inquire at the counter on how to use the library; Please consult with the library staff about a letter of
how to find books, journals, and other items; how to introduction, if you plan to visit other university
check the holdings of other institutions; and how to libraries.
search online databases.

We welcome your questions and requests.


Please feel free to contact us at: lib@grips.ac.jp
How to Use the Online Catalog (OPAC)
OPAC is a system for searching the online catalog database of books and journals held in the GRIPS library.

Keyword Search
You can search our collections (books, journals, and electronic journals) from any PC that has internet access.


3 Enter some keywords delimited by a space.

Complete the fields below and click


to commence search.

Choose the “Material type”


to focus your search.

*If you do not find an objective material in the library, you can continue searching in
“Other university (NII catalog).” →Refer to the ILL (Inter Library Loan) service
* Please choose unique and specific keywords without definite articles (a, the) or symbols (: / ,), etc.
* Can distinguish between capital and small letters
* Cannot distinguish the phonetic sign (often seen in French or German)

Search Result List


“Search Result List” displays
matches that satisfy various search
Click on each book title for more
conditions.
You can view more details upon bibliographical / holding information.
clicking the book title.
Search Result Details (Book)
The bibliographical and holding information (location, call no., circulation status) of books will be displayed. Please
search for books with this call number (spine label number) at each location.

If other user borrowed this book, you can


make a reservation via library portal site
“My Library”

Check the “Location”

“Call no.” equals Spine Label Number

Search Result Details (Journals)


You can find the holding information for various journal publications. You can do a search for books or journals, but not
articles. You should use other databases when you wish to search for articles.

Please check “Holding


volume” in GRIPS library
You can search the online journal available at GRIPS from OPAC, and it links to each site of the online journal.

Link to the online journal

Reservations
Please click the “Reserve” button on the OPAC screen, if you wish to make a reservation.
*You can only reserve a book that has been borrowed by someone else.

The Reservation confirm window in “My Library” will appear.


When the Login window appears before the confirm window, you must input your User ID and Password.
Next, click the “OK” button to confirm your reservation.
My Library: What you can do with “My Library”

Check your loans


You can check your loans and their due dates.

Renew/extend the loan period


You can extend your loans for up to one month from the day you renew.
You cannot renew if your loan is reserved by other users.
You can renew loans twice through My Library. If you wish to renew it more than twice, you must renew at the library
counter.

Make reservations
You can reserve materials, check, or cancel reservations. When a reserved material is ready, it will be announced
through My Library and e-mail.

Keep book lists


You can make your own folder and save your bookmarks in the online catalog.
You can also add your own comments to these bookmarks.

My Library: LOGIN

Please click “My Library” on GRIPS Portal screen.

You can log in to “My Library” from the


OPAC screen.
If you did not proceed through the GRIPS
Portal screen, you have to input your User ID
and Password.
My Library Main Menu
A

Announcements
Announcements about overdue books or your reservation status

Materials under request


You can check or cancel your reservation- please click “View details”…

This is the “Reserved Materials” list.


Please click the “Cancel” button after checking the box, if you want to cancel your reservation.
Please click the “Reserve” button on the OPAC screen, if you wish to make a new reservation.
*You can only reserve a book that has been borrowed by someone else.

The “Reservation Confirm” window will appear.


Click the “OK” button to confirm your reservation.

Materials on loan
You can check and renew your loans. Click on “View details”…

This is the “Materials on Loan” list.


If you want to renew your loan, check the box and click the “Renew” button on the “Materials on Loan” list. You can
extend your loans for up to one month from the day you renew.

My folder
You can make your own folder and save your online catalog bookmarks.
You can also add your own comments to these bookmarks.
Please refer to the online help for more information (some services are unavailable at the GRIPS Library).
IT Support Center

GRIPS Network Manual is on the desktop of your PC.


Refer to it for more information and service.

Introduction you have a special reason for leaving it on.


• Use Internet Explorer to surf the Internet on
Who we are campus.
• We are the GRIPS IT Support Center. Our • Use Fire Fox to surf the Internet of campus.
mission is to provide a better network • A PC infected by a virus can contaminate other
environment, with advanced technology, to all PCs. If you find that your PC is infected with a
GRIPS teachers, students and staff members on virus, immediately run the antivirus software
campus. program, which is installed in each PC.
• Do not use a GRIPS PC for purposes other than
What we provide your research and education.
• Diagnosis of GRIPS PC problems and action to • Do not use your PC as a server.
resolve them. • Do not exchange your PC for another PC or
• Information related to the on-campus network. switch with your fellow students.
• Advice about the use, maintenance, and antivirus • NOTE: The administration has the right to
protection of on-campus PCs. perform maintenance on your PC during your
• Response to questions about PCs, information absence.
technology (IT), and related matters. • Deleting preinstalled OS software in your PC is
strictly prohibited.
What we do not provide • On graduating, delete all of your data before
returning your PC.
• Resupply or ordering of materials (printer paper,
toner cartridges, etc.). Purchasing of software.
• Purchasing of PC accessories. Installing additional software on your PC
• Support to individually owned PCs • You may not install additional software of your
(for example: advice, software installation, virus own on your GRIPS PC.
countermeasures, etc.). • We do not install additional software on your PC.
• Requests to exchange aging PCs now on-campus • Please address questions concerning additional
for newer models. software to the Academic and Student Affairs
• Trouble, repair or maintenance calls off campus. Division.

Bringing your own personal computer


Information and Rules for Care and Use of • Bringing your personal PC on campus is
prohibited.
PCs Lent by GRIPS or FASID
• We cannot support privately owned PCs.
(GRIPS contracts with software suppliers do not
• Take personal responsibility for the care of PCs
extend to private PCs and thus GRIPS cannot
prepared for your use.
honor their maintenance and repair guarantees to
• Do not put any stickers on a keyboard.
individuals.)
e.g) Your native language's letter stickers
You may have to pay for the replacement for the
Managing your data
keyboard.
• You are individually responsible for managing
• Do not peel off the PC number sticker on the PC.
the data you create. GRIPS will not be held
• Shut down your PC when you go home, unless
responsible for any loss or damage to personal
data. Wireless LAN service
• Ensure the safety of your important personal data • Wireless LAN Service is available from the 1st to
by keeping a duplicate copy on a storage 6th floor.
medium.
• Handle your login password with care and do not GRIPS account e-mail addresses
share it with others. • Your e-mail account is your student ID (in
lower-case letters) followed by @grips.ac.jp .
Shared PC and supplies for student use
• A shared PC for students is set up in Study Room Stu-file
B. It has a scanner and CD writer that you can • You will be provided your personal online folder.
use. You can store your data up to 100MB. With
• Contact the Academic and Student Affairs GRIPS Portal, you can access to this file server
Division for resupply of printer paper, toner from anywhere. At your graduation, your data in
cartridges, etc. for this setup. the folder is deleted.
• Do not log in with your login ID and password.
• After use, don’t put your files on a shared PC. GRIPS Portal
• A Shared PC is for everyone. Don’t use it except • For using GRIPS network service from outside,
for study. use GRIPS Portal. Log on with your ID and
password, and you can use email service,
Campus plan, Student File server etc.
GRIPS Network Service

GRIPS network environment Contact Information


• The GRIPS network environment takes various
and thorough countermeasures against such IT SupportCenter (3F)
matters as virus contamination, illegal E-mail address: support@grips.ac.jp
access-protection, and so on. Campus extension: ex6092/2501
Therefore: Telephone: 03- 6439-6092
• You cannot connect to the Internet except via Website:http://www10.local.grips.ac.jp/support-center/
proxy server. You cannot connect to POP3, SMTP, e/
FTP etc.
• You cannot connect to Internet sites that are Office hours
pornographic, defamatory, or otherwise likely to 9:30-20:00 Monday through Friday
carry viruses and undesirable software. Closed Saturday, Sunday, public holiday
Logging in to Your PC
Please Log in to your computer in this way:

User Name: [Your ID]


Password: [Your Password]
Log on to: LOCAL

Your ID

Your Password

※If you could not find the [Log on to] drop-down list, click [Options] to display it.
GRIPS Webmail
1. Log in to WebMail
Access to GRIPS WebMail (http://gwmail.grips.ac.jp/). Put the username and the password. Then, click [Log in].

2. Check messages
Click [Inbox] to read messages you received.
※ You can not receive emails larger than 20M.

3. Send a message
Click [Compose Mail] to compose a message, and then click [Send] to send a message.
If you wish to add Cc or Bcc, click [Add Cc] or [Add Bcc].
To attach a file, click [Attach a file].
4. Delete a message
Check the box next to the title and click [Delete].

② Click [Delete].

①Put the username and the password. Then, click [Log in].
5. Forward a message
Click [Settings] → [Forwarding and POP/IMAP] → [Forward a copy…], put the email address you wish you
forward to, and click [Save Changes].



STU-File Server

1. Click on the Desktop. ※Accessible only on campus.

2. Choose your program from the International Program, and choose the folder the same as your student ID number.
※ If your student ID is MMM00000, choose Public Policy, and click the folder of MMM00000.
※ A file is provided for each student on the STU-file server. Only the owner of the folder can access to the file.

3. You can use the file as the file on the Desktop.

4. You can use the stu-file from outside of GRIPS using GRIPS Portal.

NOTE: The capacity of each folder is 100 MB. Delete unnecessary files to make space if the alert message appears.
Be careful when you delete your files/folders by putting them into the Trash Can or pressing the Delete key. The
files/folders will be deleted from the server completely.
Your personal data is your own responsibility. Back up the data on your storage devices if necessary. GRIPS is
not responsible for any troubles such as lost or damaged data.
Make sure to delete all the data within your personal folder upon your graduation.
GRIPS Portal
1. Log in to GRIPS Portal
Access to GRIPS Portal (https://gportal.grips.ac.jp/fw/dfw/DMP/dp/dmp).
On the log in page, put your user name and the password. Then, click [Login].
2. Services
Select the service you wish to use.

※Services contents
Name System contents
GRIPS Mail GRIPS WebMail
Old Mail Old WebMail System (for students enrolled in/before October 2009)
Campus System Register for classes, Class information, etc
Mygoal Material for the lecture (Used in some classes)
Library Web GRIPS Library Website
My Library Borrow/reserve books
GRIPS OPAC Library book search
File Server Student File (Connects to SSL-VPN System)
IT Support Center IT Support Center website
Change Password Change password (PC Login, e-mail, Library, GRIP Portal)
Campus Plan
Introduction
You are required to use “Campus Plan” which is the system to register for courses online.
*It is usable only during a period of registration in each term.
This manual explains how to register for courses and how to confirm courses that you registered.

Logging in to Campus Plan


1. Start Internet Explorer and enter the URL as below.
http:// sys-ap2/gakusei/

2. Enter your user ID and the password.Then, click [Login]


User ID: Your student ID in CAPITAL LETTERS
Password: Your student ID in CAPITAL LETTERS (Only the first time you log in)

3. When you logging infor the first time, the password changing screenappears.
Enter your student ID in the [Old password], and enter the new password in the [New Password]. Then, click
[Change].
Course registration
1. Click [Online Course Chice System] on the Main Menu.

2. The following screen appears and click [Credit Check sheet/Viewed by Timetable].

3. The following screen appears.


4. Tick the course you want to register for.

Click each course name, and


each syllabus appears.
A grayed out tick-boxmeans
The Academic and Student
Affairs Division has already
registered for you a
requiredclass.

※ Tick off to cancel the course you have registered.

5. After completing your registration, click [Registration] → [OK] at the bottom of the screen.

※You can change the courses which you’ve registered for during a period of registration.
Confirming the registered courses
1. Click [Online Course Choice System] → [Credit Check sheet/ viewed by Timetable].

2. The status of the registered courses is shown on the time table.


If your registration is completed successfully, [99:No errors] appears at the bottom of the student information.

The result of the registered courses is


shown here.
3. If your registration isn’t completed successfully, it shows [90: Some errorcourses exist] at the bottom of the student
information.

The result of the registered courses


is shown here.

※The Course Code, the Course Title and the Content of error are displayed in the lower rightportion of the
screen.Please contact the Academic and Student Affairs Division.
Checking your timetable
1. Click [Personal Student Timetable].

2. Make sure to check your timetable to confirm if your registration successfully completed.

SAMPLE
Download materials
1. Access to Campus Plan (http://sys-ap2/gakusei/). Then, click [student support].

2. Click [student support] and it leads you to .Campus.

3. Select your class from the[CLASSES].


4. From the menu, a chart containing various folders will appear.
Click the material name to download any handouts that have been registered by the instructor.

② Click here to download


any handouts that have been
registered by the instructor.

① Choose the folder which


contains the material you wish
to download.

Submitting assignments manual


1. Select your class from the[CLASSES].
2. Click the report name and the Reports Upload window pops up.
Then, click [Upload file] →[Post] to upload the assignment.

② You can choose either


upload a file or input
message to submit.

① Choose the report you


wish to submit.

③ A file icon will appears


when the instructor returns an
attached assignment to you.
Shared PC
Please follow the instruction when using the PC in the lecture room B, the student lounge, and the library.
1. The window below shows up when the PC is starting up.
To use the PC in English, select 1 and click [Enter].
To use the PC in Japanese, select 2 and click [Enter].
Copyright © 2000.2007 Hewlett-PackadDevelopr
Copyright © 1997-2000 Intel Corporation

CLIENT MAC ADDR: 18 A9 05 95 10 F8 GUID: 503530


CLIENT IP: 10.10.21.29 MASK: 255.255.255.0 DHCP:
GATEWAY IP: 10.10.21.1

Boot Menu:
--------------------------
1) English Windows
2) Japanese Windows
--------------------------
Selection [1-2]:_

2. Make sure not to shut down or restart.


If you do shutdown or restart, whole data will be deleted.

※Do not put out the LAN cable when the PC is on.
Printer
1. Select the printer of your choice [5F-1], [5F-2], [5F-3], [5F-4] or [6F-1],[6F-2] and click [OK].

※Choose [2-sided print] or [Multiple-up] or [Output Color]in the [Property].

2. In the [Enter User Details] window, enter the [Billing ID] and the [Password] and click [OK].
※ You can choose whatever you like for the [Billing ID] and the [Password].
3. Your data will be sent to and stored in the copy machine.

SAVE

4. Insert your pre-paid card in the card dispenser.

5. Press the [ジョブ確認] button (as seen on the picture on the right )on the copy machine.

6. Press the [Stored Documents] →[Charge Print].

7. Select your Billing ID and press [Document List].

8. Enter the password you put.

9. Select the document and press [Print].

10. Select [Print and Delete]. Then printing will start.


Scanner
The scanner in the room 5F Student Lounge
1. Double-click on [EPSON Scan].

※ You see this sign when somebody else is using the scanner.

2. Set up ①~④, and click [Scan].

①[Office Mode]

②Choose either black/white or color.

③Choose Resulution
※Usually, it’s set for 200dpi
As the number is higher, the qualityis
better, but it takes more time.

④The quality might be better when all is


ticked.

⑤Click [Scan].
3. Set up ①~②, and click [OK].

① Choose where you would


like to save.

②Choose Image FormatJPGorPDF

4. Click [Save File].

5. You can find the image on the Desktop.


The scanner in the room 5F Lecture room B
1. Put the paper you want to scan on the scanner - face down - and close the cover.

2. Click on [Start] on the Taskbar. Then click on [Paint].

3. On the [File] menu, click on [From Scanner or Camera…].


4. Choose a scanning type, click to [Scan].

5. To save the scanned picture, go to [File]→[Save As…] .

6. Choose the file type and click [Save]


GRIPS Network FAQ

Only Campus Plan (Register for classes) has a different password.

Campus Plan Example:


CAPITAL LETTERS ○ MED00111
User name: Student ID × med00111
Password: Student ID × Med00111

※ If you failed logging in 3 times, your password


becomes invalid. To reset the password, ask atthe
Academic Support Team.

Can not log in to your PC


Make sure you are logging in to[LOCAL].

PC Log in
SMALL LETTERS
User name: Student ID
Password: Your password

Choose LOCAL

Where to go
Campus Plan problems
Installing software (Getting permission) Academic Support Team

Study Tools (Desk, Locker, light etc)


Student Office
Computer problems
Password problems (PC, GRIPS Web Mail)
Printer Problem ITSupportCenter
Internet problems on campus
URL
System URL Service
GRIPS Portal https://gportal.grips.ac.jp/fw/dfw/DMP/dp/dmp/ Portal website on Campus
Changing password https://gpw.grips.ac.jp/webmtm/ Changing password system
GRIPS Web Mail http://gwmail.grips.ac.jp/ GRIPS Web Mail service
Campus Plan http://sys-ap2/gakusei/ Register for classes
Student file server ¥¥stu-file Student file server
mygoal http://mygoal.local.grips.ac.jp/ e-learning system
The system enables you to access
SSL-VPN System https://gremote.grips.ac.jp/
each service from outside of campus
IT Support Center HP http://www10.local.grips.ac.jp/support-center/ IT Support Center HP
The monthly paper issued by the IT
Monthly Arigato http://www10/support-center/e/weekly_arigato.htm
Support Center

Manual

The detailed PC manual [PC Manual.pdf] is saved in your Desktop on the PC lent by GRIPS.
Academic and Student Affairs Division

The Academic and Student Affairs Division, consists of The Academic and Student Affairs Division is located on
the Academic Support Team (AST), the International the third floor and are open from 9:00 to 12:00 and
Programs Team (IPT), and the Student Office, offers 13:00 to 17:00 from Monday to Friday except for
various services and support for international students. national holidays.

Office Services
Academic Support Team (AST) curriculum certificate
E-mail: ast@grips.ac.jp course registration copy card
class schedule lecture / copy / study room supplies
lecture room -whiteboard marker
notification of address change, etc. -light bulb
International Programs Team (IPT) scholarship -paper for printing / photocopy
E-mail: ipt-ml@grips.ac.jp textbooks -printer cartridge, etc.
request for temporary leave, etc.
Student Office daily life support
E-mail: studentoffice@grips.ac.jp social event
field trip
tutor
health insurance
consultation
student council
JR discount voucher
accommodation
inviting family members
study room, etc.

The Academic and Student Affairs Division issues your ID card, report the AST immediately. The re-
various kinds of certificates as follows. issuance charge is 2,000 yen.
‐ certificate of academic record • If you lose your student commuter pass issuance
‐ certificate of enrollment card, report the AST.
‐ certificate of prospective degree completion • If you have any request or opinions you want share,
‐ certificate of scholarship award please mail to service-ml@grips.ac.jp. We will
Applications for certificates of academic record, consider your requests carefully and try to answer
enrollment, prospective degree completion and them as best we can. Please provide your name or
scholarship award should be made on the prescribed we will not be able to respond to your request.
form by e-mail at certificates@grips.ac.jp (the form • In case of a change in your address, you must notify
will be sent to your GRIPS e-mail account). If you the AST immediately and fill out the prescribed
request the certificate before 17:00, it will be issued form at the office.
after 13:00 of the next working day. The issued • If you wish to take a leave of absence (minimum 3
certificate will be posted into your mailbox in the months), withdraw from school, re-enroll, or extend
Academic and Student Affairs Division. the period of a leave of absence, fill out the
• Student ID card has a magnetic data strip for prescribed form and submit it to the AST at least
entering the GRIPS building at night time and on one month before the preferred date of the status
weekends and a bar code for borrowing books from change.
the library. Please handle it with care. If you lose • If the paper in a copy room runs out, please come
and pick up a new pack of paper. To conserve • When you are asked by an instructor to make
paper, make double-sided prints and photocopies photocopies of class materials, please come to the
whenever possible. GRIPS does not provide any AST with the class materials and a letter of request
other office supplies; please purchase them at your from the instructor to borrow a shared copy card.
own expense. Please return the card immediately after copying.
• GRIPS does not receive incoming telephone calls, You cannot borrow a shared copy card without a
faxes, mail, or parcels for students (except in case letter of request from your instructor.
of emergency). Please use your home telephone • Should you have any inquiries regarding academic
number and address. affairs, please contact the AST.
• You will receive a copy card at the beginning of the • The Student Office can help you with all kinds of
academic year. With this card, you can make 2,000 issues concerning your daily life in Japan. If you
monochrome photocopies/printings free of charge. need information or have any questions or
If you wish to make more than 2,000 problems, please ask the Student Office.
copies/printings in one academic year, you can • The Student Office can issue JR student discount
purchase additional copy card(s). Additional copy vouchers. To apply, you need to visit the Student
cards are available at the AST for 1,000 yen per 200 Office in person. If you apply before 17:00, the
points, and 3,000 yen per 600 points. Please write voucher will be put in your mailbox on the next
your name and ID number on the back of the card in working day.
case you lose it. The card contains magnetic • Supporting goods for softball and table tennis can
information. Please be sure to keep it separately be borrowed at the Student Office.
from other magnetic materials (e.g. TV, speakers • If you have any questions concerning
and bank/creditcards.) Remaining credit on your accommodation, please consult with the Student
card cannot be reimbursed. For details, please refer Office.
to the printing manual. • If you have been allocated a Couple or Family
Room and are planning to invite your family
members to Japan, the Student Office can assist you
to prepare with visa applications for your family
members.
Signing the Register
(except IDS, JLC and DMP)

To confirm that you are fully committed to studying You cannot ask another student to sign on your behalf,
and attending lectures at GRIPS, you are asked to visit nor can you sign on behalf of others. It is also required
the Academic and Student Affairs Division on the third that you use the same signature throughout the year to
floor of the GRIPS building to sign the register during avoid confusion. If you fail to sign the register during
the first three working days of every month during our the first two working days of the month, make sure to
office hours (Monday through Friday, 9:00–12:00 and sign before the last day of that month.
13:00–17:00). You must sign the register in person.

Schedule for Signing the Register


(October 2010 – March 2011)

TERM MONTH SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT


26 27 28 29 30 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
OCTOBER 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
NOVEMBER
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
FALL
28 29 30 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
DECEMBER 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
JANUARY
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 1 *2 *3 *4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
FEBRUARY
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
WINTER 27 28 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
MARCH 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 *1 *2

: Dates for signing the register


: No class (Sundays, National Holidays, and New Year Holidays)
* Interterm Period

1. In case of any changes in the dates, you will be notified by emails.


2. The schedule after March will be announced later.
Temporary Leave

If you need to leave Japan temporarily during your Before leaving Japan, you should obtain a Re-entry
authorized period of stay, you are required to fill out a Permit at the Immigration Office. If you leave without
“Request for Temporary Leave” form and submit it to the this permit, you will not be able to re-enter Japan. Also,
International Programs Team (IPT) at least two weeks be sure to bring your Foreign Resident Registration Card,
prior to your planned date of departure. Before making because it must be shown when you leave and re-enter
any plans, you have to make sure that they will not Japan.
conflict with your study and other academic events at
GRIPS. The form is available at the IPT. Prior to the As soon as you come back to Japan, you are requested to
submission of the form, fill in the class names you will notify the IPT of your return and sign the “Confirmation
miss during your trip, obtain permission from professors of Return” section of the “Request for Temporary Leave”
of each class (including ones from your advisor for the form.
Independent Study / Policy Paper / Policy Proposal Paper
and intensive courses), and receive an approval by the
Program Director (Master’s Program) / Advisor
(Doctoral Program).
Leave of Absence

In the event that you cannot attend school for more Services
than three months because of a compelling reason, The following services are available to you during a
such as illness, you may take a leave of absence with leave of absence:
the permission of the President of GRIPS. • Issue of certificates (transcript, certificate of
enrollment, etc.)
You are generally exempted from paying tuition while • Use of GRIPS email address
you are on a leave of absence. However, if you take a • Use of GRIPS Library. (You must return all
leave of absence in the middle of a term, your tuition books you have borrowed before applying for a
for that term is nonrefundable. Please notify us by leave, then register to use the Library during
March 1 if you know you will need to take a leave your leave.)
during the Spring/Summer term (April-September)
and by September 1 for a leave during the Fall/Winter Procedure for reenrollment at the expiration
term (October-March). Without advance notice, you
of a leave of absence
will be required to pay the six-month tuition.
Please consult with your main advisor and program
director and submit a “Notification of Expiration of
Duration Leave of Absence” form to the Academic Support
The Period of absence is for a period of up to two
Team three weeks before the expected reenrollment
years for master students and three years for doctoral
date.
students.
* The period of leave of absence will not count toward
Reenrollment before expiration
the required term of study (master’s: maximum four
You can reenroll in GRIPS with the President’s
years; doctoral: maximum six years).
permission even before your period of leave of
absence expires. Please consult with your main advisor
Steps to apply for a leave of absence and program director and submit an “Application for
1. Consult with your main advisor and program
Reenrollment” form to the Academic Support Team
director about your future plan of study (course work
three weeks before the expected reenrollment date.
and dissertation).

Extension
2. Complete the following before submitting the
If you would like to extend the duration of your leave
application documents:
of absence, please consult with your main advisor and
• Return all books to the GRIPS Library.
program director and submit an “Application for
• Return your GRIPS computer.
Extension of Leave of Absence” form to the Academic
• Clean out your desktop and drawers. Support Team three weeks before your leave is due to
• Check your scholarship matters (if applicable). expire.
• Pay delinquent tuition (if applicable).
Inquiries
3. Obtain an “Application for Permission to Leave of Academic Support Team (AST)
Absence Application” form and Checklist from the Tel: +81-(0)3-6439-6042
Academic Support Team. Submit your application to Fax: +81-(0)3-6439-6040
the Academic Support Term in person or by mail three Email: ast@grips.ac.jp
weeks before the date you expect to begin the leave. * If your address changes during your leave of absence,
In the event that your leave of absence is due to illness, please submit a “Notification of Address Change”
please also submit a medical doctor’s report. form to the Academic Support Team.
Expenses and Financial Aid
Scholarship Students Non-scholarship Students
(Some Exceptions for IDS Japanese Students)
The following information is for students who are not
Some scholarships are automatically awarded to the receiving the scholarships administered by GRIPS.
qualified students when they are offered admission to the
National Graduate Institute of Policy Studies. If so, the Tuition fee
Scholarship covers the tuition fee and living expenses for Tuition fee payments may be made in two installments.
one year. The application, admission and tuition fee The first installment is due on October 31, the second
will be paid directly to GRIPS and scholars will receive a installment on April 30.
monthly stipend and, in some cases, allowances for The amount is 267,900 yen for six months (535,800
arrival, books/equipment, and study trips. For further yen per year). Please note that any handling fees or surcharges
information about scholarships, please refer to the are to be paid by the student.
scholarship payment regulations. Please note that the amount is subject to change in
another fiscal year. We will inform you in advance if any
change is to occur.
Further details regarding the method of the payment of
tuition fees will be sent to students. Should you have any
queries please contact the Academic Support Team.

Scholarships administrated by organizations


other than GRIPS
Some scholarships administrated by organizations other
than GRIPS are available for international students in
Japan. For further information, please access to the
following URL:
http://www.jasso.go.jp/study_j/scholarships_sfisij_e.html
Scholarship Payment Regulations

Program and Scholarship Monthly Stipend


(except IDS, JLC, DMP and EPP)
• Young Leaders Program (YLP)
Japanese Government (Monbukagakusho) As a part of your scholarship awards, you will be
• One-year Master’s Program of Public Policy (MP1) provided with a fixed amount of stipend every month to
Japanese Government (Monbukagakusho) cover living expenses including food, clothing, and other
Asian Development Bank (ADB) daily necessities, plus accommodation, transportation,
Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and medical treatment, insurance, and other miscellaneous
East Asia (ERIA) expenses related to your study at GRIPS. This stipend
• Asian Economic Policy Program will not be increased to meet any extra cost you may
(formerly known as Transition Economy Program) incur, for example, by supporting your family members
International Monetary Fund (IMF) or by taking any private trips.
• Public Finance Program
Tax Program: World Bank (WB) The payment of your stipend will be made upon
Customs Program: World Customs confirmation that you sign the register.
Organization (WCO)
• International Development Studies Program (IDS) The stipend will be transferred into your postal saving
Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) account (Monbukagakusho and YLP) or bank account
• Graduate Program in Japanese Language and Culture (ADB, ERIA, IMF, WB, WCO and GRIPS). If you fail
(JLC) to sign the register during the first two working days of
Japan Foundation the month and if you sign before the last day of that
• Disaster Management Policy Program (DMP) month, your stipend for that month will be transferred in
Earthquake / Tsunami Disaster Mitigation: the next month.
Building Research Institute
Water-related Disaster Management: Public If you do not sign from the first day to the last day of
Works Research Institute the same month, we consider you not to be studying
• Economics, Planning and Public Policy Program full-time at GRIPS; thus, the stipend will not be paid
(EPP) for that month. For example, the November stipend
Indonesian government will not be paid if you do not sign from November 1
through November 30.
• Policy Analysis Program
Japanese Government (Monbukagakusho)
The amount of your stipend may change slightly due to
GRIPS Fellowship
the economic situation in Japan, especially after April
• Doctoral Programs
2011 when the new fiscal year starts. The amount may be
Japanese Government (Monbukagakusho)
adjusted so as to be sufficient for international students
GRIPS Fellowship
to pursue their graduate studies in Japan. We will
inform you if any change is to occur.

Return Flight Ticket

You will be provided the return flight ticket with the


most direct and reasonable route from Japan to your
home country after the completion of the program.
Accident Property Insurance
(except IDS, JLC, DMP and EPP)

This insurance shall pay for death due to injury and Type of Insurance Money
sickness, and shall cover expenses incurred by
unexpected accident or sickness, medical treatment for • The company shall pay the following expenses
injuries to other people, compensation for property which the policy holder, rescuers, students studying
damage, and rescuer’s expense in the case of student’s in Japan or student’s relatives, should pay in case of
death. above-mentioned situations. Total aggregate limit of
liability is 3,000,000 yen.
a) Rescuers expense
Coverage b) Flight to and from Japan from home country
(maximum limit is 3 person fee of rescuer)
Rescuer’s expense c) Accommodation fee (rescuer’s 3 persons and 14
• This insurance shall cover the rescuer’s expense in days per person )
the case of the following situations. d) Transportation of personal possession from Japan
e) Cost of funeral (limit of liability is 1,000,000 yen)
Accident f) Transportation costs within Japan, cost of
• Death within 180 days counting from the day of the communication with home country (telephone, post,
accident caused by accident during the period of electronic mail) airport taxes (limit of liability is
studying in Japan. 200,000 yen in total)
• In the case of hospitalization more than consecutive g) Air freight is only limited to Economy or Business
3 days caused by accident during the period of class except special case.
studying in Japan.
• In the case of shipwreck, mysterious unexplained Death and permanent disability
disappearance. • The company shall pay the full amount of death and
• Unconfirmed death caused by accident during the permanent disability insurance money due to injury
period of studying in Japan or official during the period of studying in Japan within
organization’s (for example police) confirmation 180days counting from the day of the accident.
that the student is in an emergency situation which • The company shall proportionally pay permanent
necessitates emergency search or rescue. disability insurance money from 3%-100%
depending on the severity in the case of permanent
Sickness disability caused by accident which occurred within
180days counting from the day of the accident.
• Death caused by sickness, birth premature delivery
or abortion during the period of studying in Japan.
• Death within 30 days, counting from return date of Death due to sickness
caused by sickness, feeling ill during the period of • The company shall pay the full amount of death
studying in Japan. In this case the student should insurance money when the insured dies from a
start treatment during the period of studying in disease caught during the insurance period.
Japan and continue the treatment in own country. • Death within 30 days after a student returns to
• In case of hospitalization more than 3 consecutive his/her country, due to sickness developed during
days caused by sickness, felling ill during the the period of studying in Japan and within 72 hours
period of the studying in Japan. The student should after a student returns to his/her country. (Only if
start treatment during the period of studying in the student starts treatment during the period of
Japan. studying in Japan as well as within 72 hours after
the study, and continues the treatment in his/her
own country.)
• Death within 30 days after a student returns to Limit of liability premium per person
his/her country, due to infectious diseases • Duration of Insurance: One Year
contracted during the period of studying in Japan. • Coverage & Limit of Liability
- Rescuer’s Expense: Yen 3,000,000
Main Exclusion - Injury, Death, Disability: Yen 5,000,000
• Willful act of the policy holder, students - Death due to Sickness: Yen 5,000,000
beneficiary’s - Personal Liability: Yen 10,000,000
• Injury caused by suicide, criminal act and • Premium: Yen 12,990
aggressive violence
• War, military act radioactive, explosive or other
hazardous nature of nuclear Materials Procedure of Application
• Cervical syndrome (so called ‘Whiplash’ syndrome
back pain, from any cause without objective • GRIPS students are required to purchase the
Symptom insurance just in case.
• Death due to dental diseases *How to pay the annual premium
- YLP and Monbukagakusho scholarship
students pay by cash at the Student Office.
Personal Liability - Other scholarship students pay by deducting
from the first scholarship.
This insurance provides coverage of liability for causing
accidental bodily injury to someone else or accidental
loss or damage to someone else’s property during the Procedure of Claim
period of studying in Japan. “Bodily Injury” is defined as
injury, sickness, permanent disability or death arising In the case of accident, please notify to the Student
from any of the above. Office.

Exclusion Reference
• Damages to someone else’s property you have been Daiichiseiwa jimusho Co., Ltd
entrusted with liability arising out of ownership, TEL03-3669-2831 FAX03-3667-9031
maintenance or use of motor vehicles Sompo Japan Insurance Inc.
• Damages caused by relatives of the insured

Conditions
• Indemnification will be paid up to the maximum
liability limit per year. You must not discuss or
negotiate your claim with any third party without
the consent of the Company.
Facilities
Common Room Fitness Center

• The Common Room on the third floor deals with • GRIPS has its own Fitness Center, located on the
GRIPS faculty members’ schedules. Each GRIPS first floor, which can be freely used by students,
faculty member has a mailbox in the Common faculty and staff.
Room where you can leave messages. Office hours • Before using the Center, however, you will first
of the Common Room are from 9:00 to 18:00 from have to participate in a training session during
Monday to Friday (except for national holidays). which a professional instructor will explain how to
use the equipment. After finishing the training
session, you are required to fill out a membership
Study Room and Lecture/Seminar Room application form and you will also have to sign up
for Personal Accident Insurance. This compulsory
• We leave the study rooms unlocked so that students insurance covers those sports injuries that are not
can use them at any time. Please make sure not to covered or are covered only partially by Japanese
leave your valuables unattended. There are lockers National Health Insurance. The minimum signup
in the student lounge on the fifth floor, and in the period is one year and will cost you 950 yen.
copy room on the sixth floor. Locker keys can rent • Dates and times for training sessions will be
for students at the Student Office at 2,000 yen as a announced by the Student Office. Until you have
deposit which will be returned at the end of completed the training session, submitted a
academic year. membership application form, and signed up and
• It is the students’ responsibility to keep the study paid for the insurance, you are not allowed to use
rooms neat and tidy. For that purpose, vacuum the Fitness Center.
cleaners are stored in each study room on the fifth • The Fitness Center is open from 9:00 to 21:00 from
and sixth floors. Monday to Friday and from 9:00 to 17:00 on
• For light bulbs in the study/lecture/seminar rooms Saturdays (except for national holidays).
and whiteboard markers in the lecture rooms, please • Please do not leave your personal sport gear at the
ask the Academic and Student Affairs Division. changing rooms.
• Turn off the lights and air conditioner when you are
the last person to leave your study room or lecture
room. Others
• No stickers are permitted on the walls of study
rooms. Stickers on the partitions around your desk • You can enter the GRIPS building 24 hours a day.
are permitted. The entrances are locked between 20:30 and 8:00
• If you wish to use a lecture room/seminar room for on weekdays and between 18:00 and 8:00 on
your study, make reservation at the AST. Saturdays, and all day on Sundays/national holidays
• Devices installed in lecture rooms are as follows: but you can open them using your student ID card
‐ All lecture rooms: laptop computer, projector, and the card reader.
microphone, video player, DVD player • Each of you will have an individual mailbox in the
‐ Some lecture rooms: OHP Academic and Student Affairs Division.
*In addition, the following devices are available at Announcements, some class materials, and
the AST: laptop computer, projector, microphone, handouts will be left in your mailbox, so be sure to
document camera. If you wish to borrow any, check it regularly when coming into GRIPS.
contact the AST well in advance. • Each of you will have a personal mail account at
GRIPS. The e-mail address is your student ID
number plus ‘@grips.ac.jp’ (ex.
med10001@grips.ac.jp). Most of the information
from the offices will be sent to your GRIPS e-mail • Eating and drinking are permitted in the Lounge on
account, so be sure to check it frequently. If you the first floor and the terraces on the fourth and fifth
wish to forward the e-mails to your private account floor (not in the study and lecture rooms). Only
(ex. Yahoo) automatically, please refer to the on- drinking is permitted in the Student Lounge on the
line ‘Help’ section. fifth floor.
• Bulletin boards for students are located in the • Please cooperate in separating garbage into various
terrace on the fifth floor. Be sure to check them categories, including burnable garbage, non-
regularly. burnable garbage, cans, glass bottles, plastic bottles,
• A phone-card payphone (no coins accepted) and and paper.
vending machines for beverages and foods are • Smoking is prohibited except at the designated
located on the first floor. smoking areas on the first, third, and fifth floors.
• The Lounge on the first floor has a TV set that • If you come to GRIPS by bicycle, please park it in
students are free to use between 9:00 and 23:00 one of the designated bicycle parking areas at the
every day. Front or South gate.
• A microwave oven, electric pot, and refrigerator are • You are prohibited to come to GRIPS by car.
located in the pantry on the fifth floor.
• Xerox machines for photocopies and printings are
located in the copy rooms on the fifth and six
floors.
Health Services Center

• E-mail: grips-Clinic@grips.ac.jp • The Center can provide physical examinations such


• Tel: 03-6439-6091 as measuring blood pressure, body fat percentage,
• GRIPS has an in-house Health Services Center and eye tests and can refer you to an appropriate
located on the third floor. A nurse is on duty from hospital or medical clinic when needed. For further
10:00 to 16:45 from Monday to Friday (lunch break details, please visit the website
12:30 – 13:30). A doctor is available weekdays http://www.grips.ac.jp/HScenter/index.htm.
except for Tuesday and Thursday. Please check the • A medical check-up will be held in late October.
notice board outside the Center for further details. Further details will be announced.
Alumni Association

Your affiliation with GRIPS does not end with your Reunions
graduation. On the contrary, since GRIPS aims to Since personal contact is the best way to strengthen
establish an international network of government the ties between alumni and GRIPS and among peers,
officials, policy makers and academics in the field of the Alumni Office places great emphasis on alumni
policy studies, your importance is likely to increase as gatherings and reunions. Each time GRIPS professors
many of you may move on to occupy influential or staff visit a country where we have graduates (e.g.
positions in the public (or private) sector in your for research purposes or the recruitment of new
countries. Our alumni are regarded as vital to GRIPS’ students), an alumni reunion is scheduled. On average,
long-term success. alumni gatherings that are attended by GRIPS
professors and staff are held on some 25 occasions
We believe that the success of alumni relations relies around the world every year.
on building a culture that embraces the principle of
mutual value, considering the common goals and
benefits for both alumni and GRIPS. Alumni add value GRIPS Alumni Online Community
to their alma mater; progressive universities also add
value to their alumni. At GRIPS we try to incorporate Since our alumni are spread around the globe, email
alumni relations in such a way that they can contribute and internet is a major means of communication. The
to our School’s overall long-term mission and strategy. GRIPS Online Community provides a place in
At the same time, we aim to provide value for our cyberspace for graduates to (re)connect, exchange
alumni – by facilitating meaningful interaction ideas, and access career and networking information.
between alumni, a positive connection with the Currently, GRIPS offers the following services:
university, and presenting benefits that add value to
alumni lives.
Alumni directory
Searchable on-line Alumni Directory. All registered
members receive a user-ID and password that gives
Services and Activities them access to the online alumni directory. They can
search the database and manage their own contact
One of the greatest resources and joys of studying at details any time.
GRIPS is the diversity of the international community.
Our alumni are spread around the globe and GRIPS Permanent GRIPS email address
therefore aims to establish and maintain a world-wide The web-based GRIPS email address you will receive
network of local and regional alumni groups. These upon enrollment will be yours for the rest of your life!
groups provide an extensive network to help alumni It can be used as a normal email account or to forward
keep in touch with each other and with GRIPS and mail to an existing work or home email address.
offer an exciting forum for meetings and discussions,
social gatherings and a variety of events for their
GRIPS Alumni on Facebook
members.
The launching of a Facebook group for GRIPS alumni
in September 2007 has proved to be a great success.
Local alumni groups Facebook, the world’s most popular social networking
Currently local alumni groups have been established in site, provides an exciting tool for alumni to keep in
around 70 countries. Alumni Groups have one or more touch in a fun, easy and informal way. The Alumni
key people (or Alumni Group coordinators) who Facebook Group acts as a space where members share
organise networking and other events, help advise and information about what’s going on in their personal
recruit prospective students, and to promote the School and professional lives. Also the Alumni Office posts a
around the world. lot of information on new developments in GRIPS,
news about professors, alumni events, opportunities
for further study or research in Japan, “follow-up Membership
scholarships” etc.. The Facebook group is also open to
current students, professors and staff and thus connects All graduates of GRIPS and its predecessor GSPS are
the whole GRIPS community. The group currently has automatically members of the university's Alumni
around one thousand members. All newly enrolled Association. Membership of the Alumni Association
students are encouraged to sign up for Facebook and and all of the services are free to GRIPS/GSPS alumni.
to join the alumni group. All registered members receive regular news and
information on services available to them.
Alumnus of the Month (ALMO)
The “Alumnus of the Month” is a special feature on For further information about the Alumni Association,
our website. As many of our alumni steadily move up please check out our website:
on the career ladder, the ALMO program is designed http://www.grips.ac.jp/alumni/main.html
to recognize alumni who have made exceptional
contributions to their field of profession or who are
otherwise doing interesting and exciting things. Every
month, one of our outstanding alumni is invited and
interviewed for this feature.
Faculty Directory by Fields
As of October 1, 2010

Name Position Specialty Undergraduate/Master’s Degree Doctoral Degree


Economics
Fukushima Takashi Professor Public Economics International Christian University Ph.D., State University of New York, Buffalo

Kidokoro Yukihiro Professor Cost-Benefit Analysis, Transportation Economics, Regulatory Economics B.A. in Economics, University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Economics), University of Tokyo

Kurosawa Masako Professor Labor Economics, Applied Econometrics London School of Economics Ph.D., London School of Economics
Microeconomics (Behavioral Public Economics, Environmental
Munro Alistair Professor Mathematics and Economics, University of Warwick D.Phil. (Economics), University of Oxford
economics, Experimental Economics)
Ohno Kenichi Professor International Finance, Development Economics B.A. (Economics), Hitotsubashi University Ph.D. (Economics), Stanford University

Ota Hiroko Professor Public Finance Policy B.A. (Sociology), Hitotsubashi University

Rhodes James Professor Macroeconomics, Monetary Economics B.A. (History), University of Washington Ph.D. (Economics), University of Washington

Xing Yuqing Professor International Economics, Development Economics, Chinese Economy B.A. (Mathematics), Peking University Ph.D. (Economics), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Nunami Tadasi Professor Monetary Economics, Macroeconomics B.A., University of Tokyo

Okita Yoichi Academic Fellow Economics University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Economics), Harvard University

Hatanaka Kaori Associate Professor Microeconomics, Law and Economics, Theory of Industrial Organisation B.A. (Economics), University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Economics), University of Tokyo

Hosoe Nobuhiro Associate Professor Computable General Equilibrium Models, Macro-Economic Models B.A. (Faculty of Economics), Osaka University Ph.D. (Economics), Osaka University

Leon-Gonzalez Roberto Associate Professor Econometrics, Empirics of Economic Growth B.Sc. in Economics, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria Ph.D. in Economics, University of York

Okamoto Ryosuke Associate Professor Urban Economics, Spatial Economics B.A. (Economics), Chuo University Ph.D. (Economics), Osaka University

Pfau Wade Associate Professor Public Finance, Social Security and Pensions, Money and Banking University of Iowa Ph.D., Princeton University

Tanaka Makoto Associate Professor Industrial Organization, Regulatory Economics B.A. in Economics, University of Tokyo Ph.D. in Economics, University of Tokyo

Yoshida Yuichiro Associate Professor Urban Economics, Transportation Economics B.A. in Economics, Keio University Ph.D. in Economics, Boston College

Arai Yoichi Assistant Professor Econometrics B.A. (Economics), Hitotsubashi University Ph.D., University of California

Esteban-Pretel, Julen Assistant Professor Macroeconomics B.A. in Economics, University of Valencia Ph.D. in Economics, New York University

Hsu Minchung Assistant Professor Macroeconomics, Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Models B.A. (Economics), National Taiwan University Ph.D. in Economics, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

Ikeda Shinsuke Assistant Professor Economics M.A. (Economics), University of Tokyo Ph.D. in Economics, Boston University

Wie Dainn Assistant Professor Economics M.A .(Economics), Harvard University Ph.D. in Economics, Harvard University

Yasuda Yosuke Assistant Professor Industrial Organization, Microeconomic Theory B.A. in Economics, University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Economics), Princeton University

Political Science and International Relations


Horie Masahiro Professor Public Administration B.A., University of Tokyo MPA, Syracuse University

Iio Jun Professor Contemporary Japanese Politics B.A., Faculty of Law, University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Political Science), University of Tokyo

Ikawa Hiroshi Professor Local Public Administration, Local Government Finance B.A. (Law), University of Tokyo

Iwama Yoko Professor International Politics, European Diplomatic History B.A. (Faculty of Law), Kyoto University Ph.D. (Law), Kyoto University

Masuyama Mikitaka Professor Japanese Politics, Legislative Institutions, Political Methodology B.A., Keio University Ph.D. (Political Science), University of Michigan

Nagano Hiroshi Professor Science and Technology Policy Faculty of Engineering / Faculty of Law, Keio University
Name Position Specialty Undergraduate/Master’s Degree Doctoral Degree
Takenaka Harukata Professor Comparative Politics, International Political Economy B.A. (Law), University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Political Science), Stanford University

Yokomichi Kiyotaka Professor Local Public Administration B.A. (Law), University of Tokyo

Sunami Atsushi Associate Professor Science and Technology Policy, Public Policy Analysis BSFS, Georgetown University PhD in Political Science, Columbia University

Hatakeyama Eisuke Associate Professor Public Administration B.A., Columbia University


Ph.D., International Relations (Asian Studies), The Paul H. Nitze School of
Michishita Narushige Associate Professor International Relations (Strategic Studies), Area Studies (Korea, Japan) B.A., International Relations, University of Tsukuba Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University
Hisasue Ryoichi Research Associate Asian-Pacific Economic and Business History Seikei University Ph.D., University of Tokyo

Nobori Amiko Research Associate International Relations B.A., Keio University Ph.D. (Political Science), Keio University

Multi Disciplinary Policy Studies


Fukui Hideo Professor Administrative Law B.A., University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Engineering), Kyoto University
Small and Medium scale Enterprises Policy, Promotion Policy of
Hashimoto Hisayoshi Professor Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo
Emerging Industries, Research and Development Strategy
Kakiuchi Emiko Professor Cultural Policies B.A. (Law), University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Engineering), University of Tokyo

Konno Masahiro Professor Educational Policy, Life Long Learning, Cultural Policy Faculty of Literature, University of Tokyo
Department of Economics / Department of Business Administration,
Matsutani Akihiko Professor Applied Economics Ph.D. (Civil Engineering), University of Tokyo
University of Tokyo
Morichi Shigeru Professor National Development Policy, Transportation Policy Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo Doctor of Engineering, University of Tokyo

Morohosi Hozumi Professor Operations Research Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Engineering), University of Tokyo

Okamoto Kaoru Professor Chorology B.Sc. (Geography), University of Tokyo

Okazaki Kenji Professor Disaster Risk Management (mainly earthquake) B.A., Engineering, Kyoto University Ph.D. (Engineering), Kyoto University

Oyama Tatsuo Professor Operations Research B.Sc., College of Engineering, University of Tokyo Ph.D., (Engineering), Cornell University

Shimomura Ikuo Professor Public Law, Public Administration, Sociology B.A. (Law), University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Engineering), University of Tokyo

Shinohara Osamu Professor Civil Engineering Design, History of Design and Planning Philosophy B.A., University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Engineering), University of Tokyo

Suzuki Jun Professor Science and Technology Policy, Innovation Management B.S., Molecular Biology, Kyoto University Ph.D., Innovation Management, University of Tokyo

Tsuchiya Takashi Professor Statistics B.A., University of Tokyo Ph. D. (Engineering), University of Tokyo
Doctorat d'etat, Foundation Nationale des Sciences Politiques,
Yamane Hiroko Professor International Economic Law, Competition, Intellectual Property B.A., University of Tokyo
Paris
Sumikura Kouichi Associate Professor Intellectual Property Rights Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo Ph. D. (Engineering), University of Tokyo

Hibino Naohiko Associate Professor Infrastructure Planning, Transportation Planning Tokyo University of Science Ph.D. (Engineering), Tokyo University of Science

Nishiwaki Masato Assistant Professor Empirical Industrial Organization B.A., Waseda University Ph.D. (Economics), Hitotsubashi University

Tao Ryosuke Lecturer Public Administration, Public Finance B.A., University of Tokyo M.A., University of Tokyo

Sumi Miyako Research Associate Cultural Policies University of Tokyo, Tokyo National University of Fine Arts & Music Ph.D. (Philosophy), Tokyo National University of Fine Arts & Music

Program Specific Fileds


Abe Hideaki Professor Urban Planning B.A., Hokkaido University M.A., Hokkaido University

Hara Yonosuke Professor Agricultural Economics, Economic Development B.A. (Agricultural Economics), University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Agricultural Economics), University of Tokyo

Kajiwara Fumio Professor Urban Policies Urban Planning, Land-use Controls Nagaoka University of Technology Ph.D. (Engineering), Tokyo Institute of Technology

Komatsu Masayuki Professor Leadership and Negotiation, Ocean and Marine Resource Policy Tohoku University Ph.D. (Agriculture and Life Sciences), University of Tokyo
Urban Engineering (Housing Policy, Transport Planning, Local Public
Kume Yoshiaki Professor University of Tokyo Ph.D. in Engineering, University of Tokyo
Finance)
Name Position Specialty Undergraduate/Master’s Degree Doctoral Degree
Kurokawa Tsuyoshi Professor Development and Construction Policy B.A., University of Tokyo

Sawaki Toshiaki Professor Urban Engineering University of Tokyo Master of Engineering (University of Tokyo)

Shimazaki Kenji Professor Social Security Law, Health Care Policy B.A., University of Tokyo

Deguchi Kyoko Associate Professor Economics, Finance University of Tokyo M.A. (Finance), City University

Kondo Aya Associate Professor Japanese Language Teaching, Sociolinguistics Japan Women's University Ph.D. (Humanities), Ochanomizu University

Morooka Kenichi Associate Professor Intellectual property Policy Waseda University Master of Engineering, Waseda University

Maruyama Akiko Assistant Professor Population Economics, Family Economics, Law and Economics B.A. in Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University M.A. in Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University

Saito Hiromi Assistant Professor Health Economics, Theory of Social Security, Industrial Organization B.A. (Economics), Tokyo Metropolitan University Ph.D. (Economics), Hitotsubashi University
Ph.D., School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns
Ota Fumio SISP Professor National Security, International Relations National Defense Academy
Hopkins University
Kitano Taiju Assistant Professor International Trade, Industrial Organization B.A. (Economics), Sophia University M.A. (Economics), University of Tokyo

Centers
Kurokawa Kiyoshi Academic Fellow Internal Medicine, Nephrology, Healthcare Policy, Science Policy School of Medicine, University of Tokyo Doctor of Medical Science, University of Tokyo
Professor, Center for Study of
Ohno Izumi Development Economics B.A. (International Relations), Tsuda College MPA (Development Economics), Princeton University
International Development Strategies
Professor,
Suzuki Mari Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Psychosomatic Medicine Faculty of Medicine, Nagasaki University Ph. D. (Medicine), Tokyo Women’s Medical University
Health Service Center
Associate Professor,
Amoroso Donna Southeast Asia Studies A.B., International Affairs, Lafayette University Ph.D. (Southeast Asian History), Cornell University
Academic Writing Center
Assistant Professor,
Petchko Katerina Educational Studies, Language Education B.A./M.S., Teacher Education, Moscow State Linguistics University Ed.D., Temple University
Academic Writing Center
International Development Studies Program
Kalirajan Kaliappa Professor Econometrics, International Economics B.Sc. in Mathematics, Madras University Ph.D. (Economics), Australian National University

Otsuka Keijiro Professor Development Economics B.A. in Agricultural Sciences, Hokkaido University Ph.D. (Economics), University of Chicago

Sonobe Tetsushi Professor Development Economics, Economic Geography, Economic Growth B.A., Department of Economics, University of Tokyo Ph.D., Department of Economics, Yale University
Ph.D. in Economics & Agricultural Economic, Michigan State
Yamano Takashi Professor Development Economics B.S. in Agricultural Engineering, Hokkaido University
University
Estudillo P. Jonna Associate Professor Economics University of the Philippines Ph.D., Department of Economics, University of Hawaii
School of International Politics, Economics and Business, Aoyama
Kajisa Kei Associate Professor Development Economics Ph.D. (Agricultural Economics), Michigan State University
Gakuin University
Mano Yukichi Assistant Professor Development Economics B.A. (Economics), Tokyo Metropolitan University Ph.D. (Economics), University of Chicago
Ph.D. (Agricultural and Resource Economics), University of
Suzuki Aya Assistant Professor Development Economics, Agricultural Economics B.A. (Pedagogy), Waseda University
California, Davis
Kandasamy Paul Lecturer Applied Development Research Management and Marketing, University of Hawaii M.A. (English as a Second Language), University of Hawaii

Hayami Yujiro Visiting Professor Agricultural Economics, Development Economics B.A. in Liberal Arts, University of Tokyo Ph.D. (Agricultural Economics), Iowa State University

Hyeok Jeong Associate Professor Growth and Development, Labor, International Trade and Finance B.A. (Economics), Seoul National University Ph.D. (Economics), University of Chicago

Global COE Program


Hosono Akio Visiting Professor International Development B.A., University of Tokyo Doctor (Economics), University of Tokyo

Onimaru Takashi Assistant Professor Southeast Asian Studies, International Relationship in Asia B.A. (Law), Kyoto University Ph.D. (Area Studies), Kyoto University
Development Economics, Applied Econometrics, Household Survey
Matsumoto Tomoya Assistant Professor B.A. (Economics), Tokyo Metropolitan University Ph.D. (Economics), University of Southern California
Analysis
Uesu Sayoko Research Associate Development Economics, Development Aid Gakushuin University M.A. in International Relations, Waseda University

Yamauchi Chikako Assistant Professor Economics M.A. (Economics), University of Tsukuba Ph.D. in Economics, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
Name Position Specialty Undergraduate/Master’s Degree Doctoral Degree
Professor (Special Assignment)
Kobayashi Kazuhisa Professor (Special Assignment) Monetary Policy B.A., Department of Economics, University of Tokyo

Koga Ryutaro Professor (Special Assignment) Development Aid, Monetary Policy B.A., Department of Economics, University of Tokyo MBA, New York University

Tomimoto Ikuhumi Professor (Special Assignment) Development Aid B.A., Waseda University M.A., University of Wisconsin
Access to GRIPS

• From exit no. 7 at Roppongi station on the Toei • From exit no. 5 at Nogizaka station on the Tokyo
Oedo Line: 5 minutes walk Metro Chiyoda Line: 6 minutes walk
• From exit no. 4a at Roppongi station on the Tokyo
Metro Hibiya Line: 10 minutes walk

• From Narita Airport to Roppongi via Tokyo by


Narita Express: 1 hour 30 minutes
• From Narita Airport to Roppongi via Nippori by
Skyliner: 1 hour 15 minutes
• From Haneda Airport to Roppongi by Tokyo
Monorail: 40 minutes
• From Tokyo to Roppongi: 17 minutes
Academic Support Team (AST)
Academic and Student Affairs Division
National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS)
7-22-1 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8677
JAPAN
Tel: +81-3-6439-6042
E-mail: ast@grips.ac.jp
URL: http://www.grips.ac.jp