Sie sind auf Seite 1von 5

1.

 Bulk – formatting laxative  
 
 
Lini Semen 
Flaxseed (Linseed) 
Linum usitatissimum L. [Fam. Linaceae] 
 
Pharmacology: The fiber in flaxseed binds with water, swelling to form a gel which, like 
other forms of fiber, helps soften the stool and move it along in the intestines.  
 
Used as a medicine for treating chronic or occasional constipation, as a soothing, non‐
irritating bulk laxative; for alleviating irritable bowel syndrome and diverticulitis. 
 
Ingredients: fiber (hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin), fatty oils are over 50%, omega‐3 
fatty acids, albumin, linustatin, and linamarin. 
 
Promoting bowel evacuation by increasing fecal volume.  Bulk‐forming laxatives draw water 
into the stool to create large soft stools. The larger stools help trigger the bowel to contract 
and move the stools out.  Bulk‐forming laxatives are recommended for constipation.  They 
dissolve or swell in the intestines, lubricate and soften the stool, and make the passage of 
bowel movements easier and more frequent. 
 
Ispaghula husk 
The alkali soluble fraction of the husk consisting of highly substituted arabinoxylan 
polysaccharides. These polysaccharides are linear chains of xylose units to which are 
attached single units of arabinose and additional xylose. It contains about 75.0% fiber.  
Stimulates lining of colon, increasing peristalsis and water absorption of stool and 
promoting evacuation.  It increases stool weight and water content due to the biber residue, 
water bount to the biber residue and increased faecal bacterial mass.  The increased volume 
of intestinal contents reduces colonic transit time and the frequency of defecation is 
increased. 
 
 
 
2.  Plants ordered in mild inflammation of the gastric mucosa, peptic and duodenal ulcers, 
gastroenteritis, etc. 
 
Marshmallow Root 
Althaea officinalis L. [Fam. Malvaceae] 
 
The roots of marshmallow are rich in mucilage.,  (mixture of polysaccharides that form a 
soothing gelatinous fiber when water is added). The Pharmacopoeia recommends 
marshmallow root tea for treating inflammation of the mucous membranes of the mouth 
and throat and the associated dry cough. Researchers have found that marshmallow 
soothes and inhibits mucociliary activity (suppresses coughs) and stimulates phagocytosis.  
Mucilage, a good source of soluble fibre, is particularly recommended for soothing 
gastrointestinal diseases. The viscous fiber has several beneficial effects on digestion: 1) 
reduces bowel transit time 2) it absorbs toxins from the bowel; 3) increases fecal bulk and 
dilutes stool materials thereby reducing stool contact with the gastrointestinal mucosa; and 
4) it enhances beneficial bacteria within the gastrointestinal tract and provides an excellent 
substrate for bacterial fermentation. Mucilage, as soluble fibre, also helps to eliminate 
anaerobic pathogens from the gastrointestinal tract.  
 
Ingredients:  The roots of marshmallow contain: 5‐10% mucilage (levels vary greatly 
depending upon time of harvest and post‐harvest processing). The mucilage is made up of a 
complex mixture of acidic polysaccharides containing arabinose, glucose, rhamnose, 
galactose and galacturonic acid. The roots also contain pectin, sugars, asparagines and small 
 
amounts of sterols. 
  
 
3.  Plants soothing mucosa and skin irritation  
 
Marshmallow Root 
Althaea officinalis L. [Fam. Malvaceae] 
 
Mucilage has the tendency to draw water to it so that when water is added it swells to form 
a viscous fluid.  It is able to form a protective layer over mucous membranes and skin thus 
effectively soothing irritation and relieving inflammation.  Studies on irritated mucus 
membranes have shown that the mucilage of marshmallow binds to buccal membranes and 
other mucous membranes of the body. 
 
4. Plants recommended in obesity 
 
Fucus vesiculosus L. [Fam. Fucaceae] 
Bladderwrack 
Fuci thallus 
 
 
The mucilaginous complex polysaccharides in Fucus (brown algae, including alginic acid, 
fucoidan and laminarin), have a soothing and cleansing effect on the digestive tract. They 
are hydrasorbent laxatives because they swell to 20 times their original volume by 
absorbing water.  Bladderwrack mucilage is also useful for treating irritated mucus 
membranes.  Strong adhesive processes are observed with polysaccharides from Fucus 
vesiculosus. Bladderwrack is also an excellent source of iodine, a major component of the 
human hormones thyroxine and triiodothyronine that affect weight gain and cellular 
metabolic rates.  
 
Ingredients: Polysaccharides: alginic acid (algin) as the major component; fucoidan and 
laminarin (sulphated polysaccharide esters). Total iodine varies between 0.1 to 0.8%. 
Part occurs as iodide but more than half is bound to proteins or amino acids.  Diiodotyrosine 
and iodine derivatives of thyronine have been identified. 
 
Pharmacology: Because of the iodine content, it is thought to stimulate the thyroid gland 
and increasing basal metabolism and may assist the lipid balance associated with obesity. 
 
 
 
 
5. Plant diuretics  
 
Verbascum densiflorum 
Mullein Flower 
 
Used in folk medicine as a diuretic. 
 
Couch grass rhizome 
Diuretic effects:  An aqueous infusion of couch grass rhizome will increase urine volume and 
increase calcium excretion while reducing magnesium excretion. 
 
Ingredients:  Polysaccharides (Triticin) 12%, flavonoids, phenolic glucosides, essential oil, 
phenylproponoid esters, and other componets. 
 
 
6.  Plants used in gout and rheumatic disorders  
 
Graminis rhizoma 
Couch grass rhizome 
 
Indications: The drug is also used in folk medicine for gout, rheumatic complaints and 
chronic skin conditions. 
 
Bladderwrack 
Symptomatic relief of rheumatism. 
 
 
7.  Prebiotic 
 
Ispaghula husk  
Plantaginis ovatae testa 
 
As a bulk forming Laxative it increases stool weight and water content due to the fibre 
residue, water bound to the fibre residue and increased faecal bacterial mass. 
 
Lini Semen 
Flaxseed (Linseed) 
Linum usitatissimum L. [Fam. Linaceae] 
This lignan is metabolized by intestinal flora to the lignans enterodiol (2,3,‐bis(3‐
hydrm:ybenzyl)‐butane‐ l ,4‐diol) and eoterolactone (trans‐2,3‐bis(3‐hydroxybenzyl)‐ 
y‐butyrolactone) 14‐16] which have a structural similarity to diethylstilbestrol . 
 
 
8. Plants for common cold 
 
LIME TREE FLOWER 
Tiliae flos 
Uses: Alleviation of cough irritation due to catarrh of the respiratory tract; feverish common 
colds forwhich a sweat treatment is desired. 
 
 
 
Marshmallow Root 
Althaea officinalis L. [Fam. Malvaceae] 
 
Marshmallow root macerate is a component in cough and cold preparations. 
 
Irritation of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa and associated dry cough. 
 
 
Trmilago Jaifara L. (coltsfoot), 
Asteraceae. 
 
Used for: Acute catarrh of the respiratory tract with cough and hoarseness; acute, mild 
inflammations of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa. 
 
Ingredients: 6‐10% acidic mucilagepolysaccharides and inulin [2‐4) as well as incompletely 
characterized tannins (about 5 %) and small amounts of flavonoids, various plant acids, 
triterpencs and sterols. 
 
Tiliae flos 
Lime Flower 
 
To relieve irritated coughs in catarrhs of the respiratory tract due to the effects of the 
mucilage coating the pharyngeal mucosa. 
 
Ingredients: Drugs also contains about 10% mucilage of complex composition 
 
 
9. Plants improving digestion 
 
Ispaghula Husk 
Plantaginis ovatae testa 
As a bulk forming Laxative it increases stool weight and water content due to the fibre 
residue, water bound to the fibre residue and increased faecal bacterial ma..o:;s 
 
Lini Semen 
Flaxseed (Linseed) 
Linum usitatissimum L. [Fam. Linaceae] 
 
Pharmacology: The fiber in flaxseed binds with water, swelling to form a gel which, like 
other forms of fiber, helps soften the stool and move it along in the intestines.  
 
Flaxseed has traditionally been used as a medicine for treating chronic or occasional 
constipation, as a soothing, non‐irritating bulk laxative; for alleviating irritable bowel 
syndrome and diverticulitis 
 
Ispaghula husk 
Stimulates lining of colon, increasing peristalsis and water absorption of stool and 
promoting evacuation.  It increases stool weight and water content due to the biber residue, 
water bount to the biber residue and increased faecal bacterial mass.  The increased volume 
of intestinal contents reduces colonic transit time and the frequency of defecation is 
increased. 
 
 
 
 
 
10. Plant sedatives 
 
Tiliae Flos 
Lime flower 
Has been used as a sedative in folk medicine. 
 
 
 
11. Plants used in skin diseases 
 
For cold sore 
Mullein: virucidal activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 
 
For vitiligo and psoriasis 
Lichen islandicus 
Iceland moss 
 
Anti‐inflammatory activity: Tiliroside inhibited croton  for poorly healing wounds applied   
to   poorly  healing  wounds  (due to   the   antibiotic   effect    of    the    lichen acids