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AAERCYHURST COLLEGE

JANUARY14, 1972

^Hurst Seniwr Honored

i Mary Janet Zeitler, a senior

mathematics

major

has

been

cited by the directors sof -the

Argonne National Laboratory for

her

"exceptional

work**} com-

pleted at the Laboratory's 1971

Summer | Student! Training

Program.

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^

Dr. |Richard| J. Ronan iof Argonne's Center for Educational Affairs served as Miss'Zeitler's research supervisor during the

10-week

training * period. Mary

Janet--a^ native of Sharon-

researched the topic "Mercury

Analysis?of

Soil

by

Flameless

Atomic Absorption^ Spec- troscopy." 7% * 4

i

In

letter

to

the

College

a

Science Division, Dr. 5 Ronan commended Miss Zeitler on her problem solving ability. "As a senior mathematics major with no background in chemistry, she did an absolutely great job," said Ronan. "She rapidly focused on the ^almost purely applied analytical chemistry problem, which resulted in perhaps * the

neatestfwork done anywhere'by anybody in this area. Her overall job performance was excellent."

The primary

purpose of the

Argonne Summer Training

Program is? to provide un-

dergraduate students with ex- perience in the area of scientific research. At the same time, the program serves as an opportunity for student-scientists from across the?country to mee^other collegians and exchange | ideas and experiences.1 f i^V
I

Asa participant in the science

confab, Mary | Janet attended various seminars for chemists, worked 1 in t thef instrument laboratory, and presented her research finding to chemistry majors ^and to members off the Argonne staff / fifif f * >Mary Janet isl a consecutive dean's list winner. She served as class officer in ^her freshman

year, and in her second year at the Hurst she was awarded the St Catherine Medal of the Kappa Gamma Pi National Honor Society as the outstanding sophomore student.

She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Norbert Zeitler, 198 Cedar, Sharon, Pa. ijjgjj; f & $ * ?The Argonne National Lab- located approximately 25 miles

from

Chicago-is £ a

of

major .in-

stallation

the U.S. Atomic

Energy Commission.!

ID

; &

Mary Zeitler at work at Argonne.

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It's Your Life

r«.v

2B8R

Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in-the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists,' the hopes of its children, i- f The cost of. one modern

heavy

bomber. is Hhis:

a

modern brick school in more than :J0 cities.

It

is

two electric

power

plants, each serving a town

of 60,000 population.

w;

It

is

two *fine, Ifully

equipped hospitals.

It

is

some

50 miles

of

concrete highway. We pay for a single fighter plane with a half million btishels of wheat.

We <pay

for

a

single

destroyer with new homes

AS FOR TODAY

that could have housed more

than 8,000 people.

j

This, I repeat, is the best

way of life to be found on the

road

the

world

has

been

Tty.s is not a way of life at all, in any true sense.?Under the cloud of threatening war, it is humanity hanging from a cross of iron.

President

Dwight D.

Eisenhower£ April 16.1953

m

I

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What COULD Your Tax Dollars Buy?

17 Army Machine Guna

1 Main Battle Tank

1 Spartan missile for

the ABM system,

four of which have blown up in the Safe-

guard test program

1 B-1 Bomber

i

105 Helicopters, the number totally de stroyed in 1971 campaign in Laos

1 Destroyer

($9,025)

or

($600,000*)

or

($3 million) or

($25 million**) or

($52 5 million) or

($90 million)

1 {elementary salary.

school teacher's* annual

Full-time psychotherapy .Jfor 171 drug addicts for one year (as practiced at Odyssey House. Phoen.x). New York city

'

costs. Keeping the New York Public Library open evenings and weekends for two years, and its Science and Technology Division, threatened with closing, open to the public.

Fifteen 50-bed public hospitals of the type in Gonzales J Louisiana.

1 m health centers treating 40.000 people each per year, tora total of 700.000 people, based on a model in Cleveland. Ohio,

5.6 typical high schools in the Midwest.

1 Aircraft Carrier

Cost overrun of of 1970

the C-5A transport, as

($1 billion)

••« or

67.000 low-cost housing unitSfWlth two bedrooms each.

($2 billion) v i

6.25

billion

passenger-miles

of

mass

transit in a typical American city.

-. t l

h

«« OM

T

•government estimate: budget experts estate muc^ Mtf» costs -government estimate; budget experts estimate up to three times this amount.

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WE NEED YOU!

Dear Friend:

First,

on behalf

of

SANE-

whlch was! founded in 1957 to achieve a* nuclear test ban treaty—1 want to congratulate you for your initiative in helping circulate the" recent student

petition for disarmament As one of the groups working to make the issue of disarmament come alive, we welcome your help and hope that you are publicizing the petition in your area.

We are facing formidable op- ponents. Next month, the right- wing American Security Council and Its affiliate, the Institute for American Strategy, will attempt

to blitz the country

with a

1450,000-campaign of TV shows, full-page newspaper ads, and one million direct mail J letters—all designed to convince the public that "the'Communists are widening their (military) lead every week.** Retired Generals EarM Wheeler and Nathan Twining are lending their names to the effort icalled Operation Alert Harry Treleavan, who

manner Ad

Richard

Nixon's

TV

work injJ968. will produce a 27- minute color Him as part of this campaign. Some of the details

reported

by

Robert

were

Gruenberg in the Washington Star of December 29 and by George C. Wilson In the Washington Post of December :u. Their stories were distributed by wire and probably appeared elsewhere.

If

the

American

Security

Council succeeds In placing Its proposed Him on local TV stations of February 29, as planned, SANE will urge members, to seek time under the Fairness Doctrine to show our film. "Overkill Overrun**, with Ernest Fitzgerald

and Seymour Mel man.

If

you

would like to see a transcript of

"Overkill Overrun*', please let us know* It's the poor man's counter version (cost: $2,735) of the American Security Council film (cost: $1,000,000).

We

are

looking

hearing from you.

forward

*

to

Cordially I Sanford Gottlieb Executi ve D i rector

W h " ^ l

V ^e^r.h e

purse s.rinfl

..

Let your Congressman know how you think the federa. O overnmen.

»

»

TK^^LX^TH

O

S in 9 ,e tetter, phone cat. or ^ , w.H g******

^

M

your

Hfriends to help you maintain a continuing dialogue *«th your elected ^^ e f « e

s

r

communit y forums ,

I

Use the information in this leaflet in letters to the ed.tor. radio ca.l-n shows ant\^°°™«™°* \

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PAGE 2

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

JANUARYJ4^197?

Student Gripes

CLASS OF 500 MARIONETTES

The

re No iSacred \Cows

By Bob Parks Associate (Editor

REGISTRATION

BfflK^W ^

Why Is registration soipoorly

runj each

term.

Students

are

forced to be [sardines in? the business office and when picking up class cards* in the Student Union. Can't our "brain trust" administration come up with a If aster and more efficient set-up?

PING PONG TOURNAMENT^ The Student Activities Council

has not paid one of its winners, Al

Messina,

the

place.

Even

$5.00 for though

second

it

was

probably a fluke, Al still deserves it.

MERCYHURST BOOK STORE B

of

Why is there always a shortage books ordered | by l the

bookstore? Students are forced to

wait

2 weeks

orjj more

iflthey

didn't beat the rush the first day

of classes.

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The shoplifting which exists at the bookstore could possibly be reduced if the bookstore would

|

stop ripping off students with

forced to starve. Couldn't SAGA foods afford to give the returning students a supper or even?a snack?| After all,!without? the students, SAGA would be out of business. a^fflW8i8BBMy£p fchsi HURST CREDIBILITY?* £ J gULast | term, iseveral E students were told that they had to work in the Student Union in return for receiving an assistantship 3 After finding out that (they were being deceived and didn't have to work, they quit. The result is that now there is a staff shortage in the Student Union and the use of the pool tables, ping pong tables, and music may be cutback. ^S^j^%i

SIGN IN PLEASE!

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25 If the purpose of girls signing in during open dorm periods is for security reasons, why don't guys

ha ve to, | or| better

wh y 1 does

anybody have to at all? This appears 8|t o fia be gg unfair discrimination. 5Well, Mr. Ken- nedy, what's the scoop? sligiSII

HS

: GRADUATE FROM MANIPULATION U.

IK'.

By Bonnie Laduca

Marionettes dangling dead; And sensitivity is fed, £? By the pseudo s magic wand While in the spell you're conned, Child hypnotized in the sun.

All the pages I ha ve seen soft-soaped words fail to mean. Every year I pass through, £w'.<>- Just becoming more of you, Child hypnotized in the sun.

Intellectually sterile and aesthetically barren the at- mosphere, what an appalling lack of civility obtains on the part of the teachers and principals,

what contempt

they

un-

consciously display for people as people.

Ivory castles they have built ,

With freed feelings of guilt, And the s igh sttick to the hilt,

>

Learnization and you will wilt, •:

Child hypnotized in the sun. -

try to do their

best

bv

to-

nights. The teacher or prof S

is not the power^hanger | £ students think. HeaooJslUng by the immense bureaucrat? and the Great Invisible Thev which controls them. He likethl

student,

is ornamented wUh

Education in masquerade,. *% Join the invisible parade, Strict formation is their key v '•'

To become less of me. Child hypnotized in the sun. •

Children hypnotized in the sun Regimentation has begun. But answers were never made From screaming grenades. •'

Child battered in the sun.

Imagination caught in sky,f .£»/

Twist and turn, spin and fly,

Trapped^ by }those who

Shun, -|

§^

|

stiffly

%

/.;:'

Children hypnotized in the sun.

high prices.

TEXTBOOKS |

*M

f

Why does thef faculty con- stantly change textbooks for the same course from term to term? Thisikeeps the students from reselling their books. Is-this a faculty plot to keep the publishing companies in business?

VACATION STARVATION Why isn't food served on the day before classes start ifter a^

vacation?

The Jmajority

of

students return to Erie the day^

before classes start and are£:

PROHIBITS EXHIBITS

$W$

Mercyhurst art o students I and

faculty have ] decided | not s to exhibit their works until there is better security.(j Shouldn't something be donejso that (this won't happen again? J Where is

Chaffee and his gang? CANCER PREVENTION

|&

i|jj

When will the school have the cigarette machine in the Student Unfon fixed? Why aren't there,2 machines since the Surgeon General's warning isn't?having much effect and "smoking" is on

the rise?

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2 "The

-most

deadly

of

all

possible sins," Erik jErikson suggests, "is the mutilation of a

child* s spirit. * * ;£& Although a n unfortunate observation, this mutilation is visible everywhere in educ at ions' s | public schools, parochial schools, [state and

private.

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With each new school year, thousands of students enter the doors of a dehumanizing process- -their anticipated enthusiasm turns slowly into apathy, and their eagerness in wanting to go, regresses into an unwillingness to

return. || l J 3 M -S^M

  • I It would be minimal to increase

the efficiency of our schools and

colleges. The objective must be

to create and maintain a humane

society

where 1 while 1 being

educated people are living,land

not while being educated people are waiting to live. '

:?

£

3

f Schools, those! '•killers of dreams**, to appreciate a phrase of Lillian Smith's, are the kinds of institutions one cannot really dislike until one gets to know them well. We fail to appreciate what [grim ? joyless places most American!schools rare, how op- pressive and petty are the rules by which they are governed, how

"To be ksure,| tjia ^teaching profession has its share of sadists and clods, of insecure men j» and women who hate their students for their openness, their color or their affluence." But on the whole, educators are decent, intelligent and caring people who

forms, fliers, and folders. The

education \ system I is 'suffering

from

2 the

same ? affliction

Pinocchio experience. Only, it is not the wooden box turned realnt is the|real turned wooden and education finding itself dangling from strings. C+i&Ssayk l

THEMERCIAD

Second class postage paid at Erie, Pa./ 16501. -$3.00 per year. Published bi-weekly during the college/ year, except Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter vacations/ .and examination periods by|the students of Mercyhurst College-*^—^fc-

Editor

Associate

Assistant

Business!

Student Consultant Faculty Advisor

ft *%$

a

^

Hi!

*••#

cs

'•'

...

,

% '

,«./»

Vincent Doran

Bob Parks

JulieSamick

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Cindy Gustin

Al Messina Barry McAndrew

Editors: Bill Dopierta, Sports>v3^W^4£pnoefer# Entertainment; Bonnie La Due a, Features BiirSechse/ News; Mark Zine, Drama.

Staff Writers; Mary Hoffman, Jf^«vrHla, Bob ^MIlj M Lyon Al Belovarac, D. Vernora, Sports; Thomas G. DlStefano, Kim

i

Wontenay, Sue Weiner, Maureen Jlufit, Rick Lamb, Feature; Gerald Barron, Entertainment; Tom Heberle, News -

i

Staff:

Cathy

Smith, Kathy

Holmes, Christine

Cebula, Roseann

Schiavlo, Carol Aico, typist; Annette D'Urso, Mary Popvich, proof

reader; Dianne Guyda, Jon DeGeorge, Terri Grzankowski, Lay- out; Fran Adhearn, Dave Rohde, Bonnie Clymer, Amparo Alvarado, Art; Carol Kress, Shelle Lichtenwalter, photographer! Mary Tupek, Circulation; Dario Cipriani,'advertising manager;

Bob Beck, editorial assistant*

<

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The\ People Speak

The Summer School In Spain

The 18th Summer

School > in

Spain willi be-held at CIUDAD

UNIVERSITARIA, Madrid, from June 30 to August 8,1972.

fc

This

provides

to

program

an

excellent

opportunity

learn

Spanish, to see the country, and to

enjoy the warm hospitality of this friendly nation. Students will spend six weeks of intensive study

in the Spanish language as well as in the culture and civilization of Spain. Our program is aimed mainly to study, and great em- phasis is placed on the academic

and

cultural

progra m.

aspects

$

of

the

The courses to be offered are:

Elementary- Spanish; Inter- mediate Spanish; Composition and Conversation; Spanish Culture^ iand% Civilization (one section conducted in English); Cervantes; 19th Century Novel; 20th Century Novel; ^Survey of

Spanish |

Literature; f

and

Independent Study. jHT While studying in Madrid, the

students will have opportunities of broadening and enriching their formal studies by visiting the

Prado

Museum,

the

Old City,

Plaza Mayor, the Royal Palace* el Rastro and dozens of in- teresting and historical sites in Madrid and in the surrounding towns and villages. Among these sites are Avila, Segovia,

Salamanca,

El

Escorial,

and

Valle de los Caidos. fej' ?' ^

A

full

day

will

be spent j in

the

famed

Toledo,

visiting

Cathedral, San Juan de los Reyes,

the house and museums

of

El

Greco, the church of San Tome,

and the Alcazar.: |

|

Students

will

travel

through,

Castillian wheat fields, visiting

La Manca of Don Quixote, and his -•

windmills. In Sevilla, they

f\

the

will see

Giralda, Torre de Ora, and the

Barrio Santa Cruz.

In Granada.

1

thev will visit the

i) t i

Alhambra, the deneralife, the palace of Charles V, and the toinb of Columbus, as well as the tombs of Isabella and Ferdinand, the Catholic Monarchs. In Cordoba, they will view the Roman bridge and the Ancient Mosque. . ,_ Students will spend a few days

b each

the

f

the

famous

a

Medi- M J

on

Torremolino, terranean Sea.

This

is only

magnificent

on

^ portion of uie

aw

historical

cultural sites and traditions tnai will be viewed by our students in

Spain,

!•

i

I gi&fl

The cost of^the 1972 program

J

f

^

will be only $790.00.

For brochures and Jfuii «£ formation, interested persons should write to: - Dr. A. Doreste Augustana College Rock Island, Illionois 61201 College students may earn • maximum of 12 quarter crefli^

^

j

|

transferable

to any college^'

university in the U.S.A.

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JANUARY'14, 1972

MERCYHURST CQLLPr.P

Stanley Lantz Honored

wives.

Dick

and

Liz Kubiak will

represent the faculty at the

luncheon, while RUS President Betsy Fierfeldt, and Vince Doran, Merciad editor, will represent the student body. Alfred M. Watson, Bishop of

Erie, Mayor and Mrs. Louis J.

Tullio,

and

LRC

architects

LpPinto, Piasani, and Falco will

also be among the luncheon guests.

The staff ofjthe Merciad wishes;to extend our deepest sympathies to Marianne!Jacobs and Jean Shirley whose fathers passed away.

WASHINGTON

1972

Stanley Lantz

For the first Mercyhurst

honorary

Degree

time since 1966,

award

an

of

Letters

convocation

will

Doctor

at

ceremonies set for Sunday,

January 16, in the new Learning

Center.

*

T

%

Mr. Stanley Wyan Lantz of Warren, Pa., formerly of Erie, has been chosen by the College

Board of Trustees as the degree recipient

  • I Sunday's activities will begin at

1:30 p.m. with a luncheon in the

faculty dining room for the Lantz family and friends, Mercyhurst trustees.and their spouses, and College administrators and their

Sister

M. Anne Francis

Cavanaugh, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, will confer the Doctor of Letters degree, honoris causa, on Stanley W. Lantz at the convocation ceremonies scheduled for three o'clock in the Lea riling Center, g

Lantz

isva

self-taught ar-

chaeologist, "whose digs in 1959 produced the first evidenceffthe pre-historic Iroquois had lived in the Kinzua Valley. «r*

He

will

be

awarded

the

honorary degree as a sign of

Mercyhurst'sf conviction that! achievements should be recognized and people com-1 mended for their contribution io% the field of education. V

Sister M. Carolyn will give the! opening remarks at the awards** program. Attorney Peter G. Schaaf will provide the Trustee! Commentary. Immediately following the degree conferral, a reception for Mr. Lantz will be | given by the Board of Trustees.

The

reception

will

also

be

hosted in the LRC. Mercyhurst administrators and faculty members are invited to attend.

Fifteen thousand bills and 320 days after it convened, the 92nd Congress's first session comes to a close with much still to be done on President Nixon's "New American Revolution" programs outlined last January in his State of the Union Address.

Congress

will

return

next

month and? continue to debate

these and new proposals

in

its

second session. What is in store

for political year 1972?

\

January: Congress will return about the middle of the month— probably Tuesday the 18th—and hear the President's third State of the Union Address. The fiscal 1973 budget will follow,.and probably topi 972's $229 billion figure. Februarys will bring another message from President Nixon on the environment and foreign policy. Lincoln's birthday is the 12th, and on Washington's "new" birthday, the 21st, the President will be in Peking conferring with Chinese leaders. The campaign season meets the snows of New Hampshire in the Nation's ;firstj presidential primary on March 7.f Florida's follows the next week and Illinois'

the week after.

I

,

M

April will see an Easter recess

in

with \ presidential

mixed

primaries in Wisconsin, Rhode

Island, ^Massachusetts, and

Pennsylvania. Earth Week starts

on the 17th.

,

Ten states, including Indiana and Ohio, go to the polls during May and six more—including California and -New {Jersey—in June, wrapping up the slate of 23 presidential primaries before the conventions. President Nixon, in the meantime, will have traveled to Moscow for a summit meeting with Russian leaders in late May.

Democrats go to Miami on July 9 to nominate their candidates, while Congress goes into recess and likely {ails to pass all the appropriation bills fori the new fiscal year. Republicans travel to Sa n Diego for their convention on August 21. Then on Labor Day- September 4—the candidates are off and running.

Two months and three days later up tot83.7 million voter,

including 25 million new voters (18 per cent of total eligible to vote)—go|to the polls, and the

political year ends. 1

bfc

PAGE 3

The People Speak

Summer-Jobs

Now

student

in-

any

can

dependently earn his or her trip to

Europe by simply

paying job

obtaining i a

A

few

in Europe.

f weeks work at a resort, hotel or similar job in Europe paying free t room and board plus a wage more than pays for.the new $165 round- trjp Youth Fare being offered by the scheduled airlines. A couple more' weeks? on the job earns money for traveling around Europe before returning home. - % Thousands, of paying student

rjobs are available in Switzerland, •France, Germany, Italy and Spain. Neither previous working experience nor knowledge of a foreign language are required for

most jobs. However, to make certain every student gets off to a good start on their job the Student Overseas Services (SOS) provides yob orientation in Europe. Jobs immediately

available include resort,

hotel,

restaurant, hospital, farm and

sales work. Jobs almost always

pay free

room and board? in

addition to a standard wage. Jobs, work permits, visas, and other necessary working* papers are issued to students on a first come, first served basis. Although thousands of jobs*are immediately i< available, i ap- plications should be submitted far enough in advance to allow SOS ample time to obtain the necessary working papers and permits. Any student may obtain an application form, job listings, and the SOS handbook on earning a trip to Europe by only sending their, name, address* name of educational institution, and $1 for addressing, handling and air mail Postage from Europe to SOS— Student? Overseas Services, Box 1812, 22^ve, de la Liberte, Luxembourg, Europe.

Summer-Jobs in Europe

|

come|by this past summer,!and all indications are that the situation will not improve much

by this coming summer.

A summer job in Europe is readily available, and a standard

2.

European wage with free room and board is enough to cover the cost of a round-trip youth fare ticket to Europe and money for traveling;around Europe before

returning home!

£

Therefore, with these facts in mind it might just be the time to plan on spending this coming summenjjworking and traveling in Europe—especially if you are faced with the possibility of just "liangin' round" this summer.

Following

examples

of

are

some of the thousands of paying

jobs

immediately

available

in

Europe SWITZERLAND— ..

Resort, hotel, restaurant, hospital, and farm jobs |are

available. A standard Swiss wage (which varies from $170 to $250 a month) is paid and free room and board always provided. Jobs are located throughout the country from lakeside Alpine summer

and 1 winter ^ resorts

to

hotel,

restaurant and other Jobs in the

cities. Switzerland is an excellent location in Europe. (Swiss law requires-that job and worH permit be obtained before entering the country.) ^FRANCE—Factory

jobs.

Good

relatively

wages,

short hours and shift work allows time off to visit* Paris,*Amster- dam and other nearby cities. Grape picking work ^available during the late summer month* in wine regions;; Wages, free room and board, land free wine provided. Camp counseling and child care jobs available to students with somejknowledge of

French.

.j

GERMANY—Resort,

j

.

.

hotel,

restaurant,

factory,!

farm,

hospital, "forestry struction jobs

and

con-

available

throughout the year. Good wages,

and

free

room

and

board

If you're looking for a summerl job, consider these facts&& %> U Summer jobs were hard to^

provided with most jobs. While

the jobs are available

im-

mediately, allow several weeks

for SOS to get your work permit and other necessary papers. ENGLAND—Fun; farm jobs available at international student farm camps. Work and live with students from all around the world. Room and board provided, wages paid on-piece work basis (according to how much fruit you pick). No setting working hours and nearby beaches are added attractions. SPAIN, ITALY and GERMANY—Direct selling jobs selling English bone china and

French crystal are available in

these countries.

All

the

job

on

training in Germany, assignment to other countries later. All work in English -language. Com- missions only are paid and for the past two years students have averaged about $400-$450 per

month.

$.

\

The above temporary paying

jobs in Europe are given on a first

come,

first* served,

basis.

Although thousands of jobs are immediately available, ap- plications should be submitted far enoughijn advance to allow SOS ample time to obtain the necessary working j papers and work permits. Any student may obtain application forms, job lists and descriptions, and .the SOS Handbook on* earning a trip to gurope|by sending their name, address, education institution and $1 for addressing, handling and postage to Euronews, SOS- Student Overseas Services, | 22 Ave. de la Liberte, Luxembourg Europe?

Notes From.Florence

As the First Semester draws to

a close, we are'in

a position to

It

has

evaluate our* program.

been the most stimulating art experience of our lives. Just living in Florence is a never-to-be- forgotten experience, but to have the opportunity to study under instructors internationallyjknown for the excellence of their work

gives the whole program another dimension. For instance, the drawing, the painting, the

sculpture teachers have had large hard back, well illustrated books published extolling their works and listing their

exhibitions:

London, Paris,

Rome. Madrid, New York City, etc. Saks £ Fifth Avenue has engaged one of our ceramic teachers to work exclusively for

them!

I i

|

^ The Second Semester courses will be devoted mostly to crafts:

metal, wood, weaving, etc. These courses, also, are taught by well- known Florentine Masters |and programmed especially for the Mercyhurst junior Abroad

Group.

£ji

Added

to

these

stimulating

experiences we have traveled to

Siena, Pisa, ^Lucca, San

Gimignano, Ravenna,

Padua,

Ferrara, Arezzo, and Venice to

study

the

great

churches,

paintings, and sculpture of those cities. Easter week will find us in Rome—the Eternal City—where in our brief stay we shall try to assimilate as? much as possible the great; civilizations that flourished there: Pagan, Early Christian, and the High Renaissance. We shall spend a

week in Paris before embarking

on the SS France for home. Our

only regret

is that

more "of our

fellow students cannot share what

we have enjoyed.

\

Student

Raps

Union

The Student Union is dying whether you realize it or not. •Those of you who have come to

the union in the past to relieve yourselves of the boredom of life at Mercyhurst by relaxing over some music and a game of pool,

find? these

you

may curtailed^ unless involved now.

soon

services

become

I

> Let's look at the facts. In order for the Student-Union to be open, someone must be present to take

care of the equipment. Last term, there was someone present to provide these services; enabling the Union to be open from 8 a.m.

to 2 a.m. every day, a total of 126 *

hours per week.

Twelve ployed for

students

were

em-

this purpose. This

of

funds,"

term, due to a "lack

the number

of

paid

student

employes has been reduced to 6.

This would necessitate reducing the number of hours to a total of

62 hours per week

(under

workstudy limitations). However, I'm sure you* 11 notice that the union has been main- taining "business as usual** since this term began. Well, judging from the above facts, I'm sure this burning question has em- bedded itself in your mind— "How the hell can it?** For you realize a lot of the students own unpaid time which was given t J assure the services of the union

not be curtailed.

Now, just

who

is

this good

samaritan? The answer un- fortunately is me, Chuck Hayes. And I cant afford to do it much longer, either physically, men- tally or emotionally. Now that I've played the martyrrrlet's get down to it.

I've been involved intimately with the union since September,

and I think it has vet to get off the

ground.

It's

been

stagnant

of

in-

wallowing in the mire

competency. And this dear

friends, 'is what has caused the

present fiasco

but,

with

little

a

..

help from you. the people the union serves, we can get the union

on its feet and off its ass. It you

care. If you

want a place to go for

recreation and entertainment* on campus, make yourself known.

Come to a meeting on Monday, January 17, at 7 p.m. in the union. At that time alternatives to an inefficient faculty run - union will be discussed. 'YOU CAN KEEP

THE UNION OPEN!

Chuck Haves

•*

PAGE 4

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

JANUARY?14,!1972

GET INVOL VED

 

WEIGER T

William P. Garvey, Dean of the

 

ENRICHMENT PROGRAM

 

NAMED I

The

Mercyhurst

College

learning a certain area of music.

CHAIRMAN

Enrichment Program is an un- dertaking of the College, Student, Faculty and Community who are

|

He could make a musical In- strument of his own out of wood or clay.

interested in an educational challenge. What they are doing is

  • 2. To create • an atmosphere

announces

the

ap-

working toward educational

where the student!will enjoy

program where the student who

College, pointment

of

Doctor

Barbara

enrichment of area High School

learning, a situation In which each participant Is allowed to

Weigertj as

Chairman

of

the

students. It is their belief that an

progress at his own rate on a one-

Olvislon

of

Education.

Dr.

integrated educational ex-

to-one basis which Is Invaluable.

Welgert joined the Mercyhurst

perience is received only when students and college take an active position in this com- munity's educational needs. By

3. To establish a friendship between volunteer and student. The volunteer lets the student

faculty In September, 1965 after a 7-year affiliation as a classroom teacher with the Erie City School

encouraging both high school and college students to participate in

know that he Is there to help and that he cares. Outcome

 

ftftfift

their own education, they could turn the classroom into where it's at—a "field of action" and believe it or not, they could study eagerly and learn prodigiously for the best of all reasons. Who is involved

By motivating students in their areas of interest MCEP hope that they will come to appreciate how important!' and worthwhile education*really is. The MCEP hope: to encourage to create, explore .and discover new

 

The Enrichment Program is

avenues in their other academic

directed f to

students

with

 

the

studies,*This is not like a tutorial

potential for further education, who are* having specific

also involved

in college, com-

munity and cultural events which-

Objectives and Goals

academic problems. These

is uninterested in a subject

is

forced

to

learn

it

and

after

 

students are identified as they enter the tenth grade, they are then asked to participate in the program. The volunteers work with these students individually

learning it, he forgets it. Volunteers The MCEP volunteers fare faculty advisors, sophomores,

until they graduate. Each par- ticipating student shows an in-

juniors and seniors majoring in the areas that* are taught in the program. They are actively in-

else.

|

What we need arej more in-

Ken Harris, Baldwin Hall.

DR. BARBARA WEIGERT

 

terest, talents, and abilities in certain areas, such as Art, Music, Math, English and Science. The volunteer student* and faculty members of the college help in every way? possible to develop these interests. The students are

they might not otherwise par- ticipate in.

volved in volunteering their services, opinions and ideas in dealing withithese students. Their rewards are *the satisfaction of knowing that they are needed and that the students depend on them. This is in itself more worthwhile than anything

terested students: and faculty to volunteer for participation in our programs. So if "you want the satisfaction of doing something worthwhile* and you are in-

District In 1968, Miss Welgert, who holds a B.S. ffom Villa Maria College and an M.E.D. from Penn State, entered Ohio University where "^she served as a teaching assistant while! pursuring doc- toral studies in Elementary Education. While there, she served as reading consultant to the Athens County Public Schools, the Lancaster, Ohio Publie Schools, and the State of Ohio Early Childhood Education

I. To motivate the students to the highest level possible. For

or

a.

he

would ' be

&

interested

in

Project.

Dr. Weigert iwas

example, if a student: is* in-

terested in doing your part to turn learning in to the "happening' 1 , a

awarded a Ph. D.* in Elementary

terested in music, maybe he

Education in June, 1971, and

could learn to play an instrument

"field of action". Please contact:

returned to Mercyhurst for the

fall 1971 term.

^\

Fed ? Continue R eform Efforts

While the recent riot at Attica State Prison and subsequent deaths of 42 inmates and guards has focused public? attention on "correctional institutions," the federal government increased its attack on the "prison reform problem" back in 1969.

These funds now represent more than 35 percent of the total spent by the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration (LEAA), the principal federal agency for funding state and local corrections; in 1969 the figure was 4.8 percent. The rest

"The American system for correcting and rehabilitating criminals presents a convincing

of LEAA's 1972 $698 million budget goes to such areas as police education, juvenile

case of failure."SPresident Nixon - delinquency ^programs,

said on Nov. £|3, I960, when he

streamlining court systems.

and

ordered Attorney General John flfi- Unders the 1968 law thai

• Mitchell to implement a>new, 13- point program to improve the corrections system. "A nation as resourceful as ours should not tolerate a record of such futility." I The most dramatic result of the Nixon order was 'last* year's addition to the 1968 Safe Streets Act to provide more funds to state and local corrections systems. The Administration-proposed amendment was sponsored by Sen. Roman Hruskaf (R-Nebr.). ranking minority member on the Senate Judiciary Committee. The increase? ini money available for improving the physical facilities and moder-

nizing

rehabilitation

programs

illustrates how fast the govern-

ment has moved/'

I

\

7

Fiscal Year Corrections Budget

19^9

$ 3 million

1970

60million

1971

; 175 million

1972^1*

^250 million

1973

f'"*

300 million

established

LEAA,

states

received funds through- block grants on a 50-50 basis. The Nixon Administration* addition to

this law, known as "Part E," set

up

discretionary

'• grants

- specifically

for corrections,

to

which states must contribute only

25 percent of the cost/J

f

S

Part E funds in 1971 paid more

* attention

to

community

^programs than any other ^priority; youth services, halfway houses and group or foster homes led the $34 million budget in this

category.

|

In

terms

^

*

f

I

of

improving

3

the

physical ^conditions of prisons, LEAA** Administrator Jerris Leonard reiterated after Mttica the federal government's refusal to fund "more fortress prisons where prisoners are locked away

and forgotten.*' ji'In. fact, I LEAA has turned down several requests for money

to

build such

outmoded

in-

stitutions," Leonard said.

To

help

solve

the

problem

LEAA ini the last two years granted the University of Illinois and the University of Penn- sylvania a total i of j.$250,000 to design new models for prisons of the future. States received more than $20 million in fiscal 1971 to remodel and build their jails—$5 million more than in fiscal 1970.*

Finally, the Administration has encouraged citizen support for

new efforts to upgrade correc-

tions programs.

£

•'None of our ^vocational education programs, our work- release efforts, our ^halfway houses, or our probation systems will succeed if the community is unwilling to extend a new op- portunity," President Nixon said in his 1969 order to Mitchell. "If we turn our back on the s ex- convict, then I we should not ft be surprised if he again turns his back on us." ,

v

Bull

Grand Open! Party And Youth KS

With the Republican convention

eight

months away GOP Committee * Chairman

only

National

Bob Dole has no doubts that it will

open and will involve youth.

states.

That

means l that f if

California has 15 per cent of its

population between IK and 25 then IS per cent of California's delegation should be under 25. • *

"Ever

since

first

con- have been

our

vention in I8S6

we reforming the Republican Party to keep abreast of the expansion of the electorate,'* the Kansas Senator said in an interview. "Today we are moving toward regularizing youth participation in the party." Wt JBB

Dole pointed: out* that J the primary source of new ideas to involve youth in the GOP (what he likes to call the "Grand Open Party") is the DO Committee— for Delegates and Organizations, fi

"This 16-member panel — made up equally of national committeemen, and com- mit teewomen — was authorized by the 1968 convention to look over the rules and procedures of governing the party »at J all levels.," Dole explained. "In passing, you might compare our reform committee with the Democrats', which had less than one-third women members. The DO Committee's recom- mendations will be acted upon at the San Diego convention, star- ting August 21, and those adopted will be fully in force for the convention four years later." He said that the convention can only be changed by another. "On the other hand the Democrats can change theirs through their national committee, and thus be influenced by one candidate's preferences."

"What are tihe DOfJCommittee's recofnmendatlons so far? "The most far reaching idea put forth by the DO Committee,** Dole said, "is that voters under 25 should be represented on state

delegations 'in numerical equity to their voting stength* within the

He noted that * the Democrats* '•guidelines* S only require representation by youth "in relationship to their presence in

the population of the State.**

I

"While |our I recommendation has not been made binding on the states, several have already moved to get as many youth in- cluded in their delegations as possible," Dole said. "Minnesota and Illinois are examples that quickly come to mind.'* 1

Dole went on to outline further

examples of how the GOP is going to increase participation in the convention by all segments of the

party.tHBF

K K

|

I

"For

theI women the GOP

moved long ago to ensure that

they were represented equally on convention committees," he said. "The DC) Committee wants to go

further and require—as much as possible—equal representation at

the

convention

by J men and

women.*'

*SBHjyg jB

He pointed out that the GOP has never recognized the "unit rule" by which a delegation must cast all its! votes for'one can- didate, J regardless of individual preferences by delegates. "This prohibition is so strenuously en- tor eed that one delegate can ask for a roll* call of his delegation, stopping the entire convention proceedings. Note that the Demorcrats settle roll calls off the convention floor, away.from the public eye."^jL * j ^
1

'M

believe

moving

we

are

toward greater opportunity for youth and others to participate in the party generally and the convention specifically," Dole said, "as we do this we must also let them know they are- both welcome and needed. •

SEEKING

SPOUSE?

Seeking a spouse? Where in the

world to go? Surprisingly,

v and! despite

frequent commentary to the contrary, you might try*staying at home. The marriage,rate in the United States has risen 26 per cent in the last decade, according to a recently released study, on international marriage trends by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company.'Last year, the United States recorded 10.6 marriages per 1,000 population, compared to a record low of 8.4 in 1961, and

now has the highest rate* in the world. Nevertheless , not e Metropolitan Life's statisticians, although the United States ranks high, our neighbor to the north, Canada, might also be a good bet. In the past seven years alone, Canadian marriages increased more than 27 per cent, with the annual number of marriages reaching new highs in each of the last three years. Indeed, all of the English speaking, countries around the world are reporting increases in marriage. Another example is Australia, which recorded a-rise of 524.3 per cent in the past decade .j Puerto Rico's marriage rate is also high j paralleling that of the United States and Canada—10.5 per 1,000 population, or a 15.4 per cent increase. European *areas showed

diverse

"marriage

trends.

According-to Metropolitan^ Life,

-'-*

.

,

.

^,.^

..

w

.

^

the marriage rate for the period between 1960-64 and 1969 (or 1970 where available), increased in 10 countries, decreased in 11, and showed little change in Denmark and Yugoslavia. A journey to the Netherlands, where the

newly wed rate of increase is the highest in all of Europe—19.8 per cent—might prove successful.

Bulgaria,

on

the

other hand,

might be less promising, for it

recorded the lowest rate of in-

crease

cent£

iAnd

in all Europe—4.8 per i

trips

to

Romania aand

Sweden, where the rate of marriages decreased by 25.8 and 25. i per cent respectively, should probably be scratched from the itinerary entirely this year. Sweden reported the lowest rate of marriage in all of Europe last year—5.3 per I W, MK population compared with an annual average of 7.1 in 1960-64. The Soviet Union's current marriage rate of 9.7 per 1,000 population is the highest of any European nation, but represents only a slight upswing following several years of a downward trend there, the statisticians note. 3 As for the Middle East and Asia, only Israel and Japan have reported complete marriage statistics for the past 10 years. Israel's rate ?of increase—the highest of ^ any j country reviewed—is a startling 32.9 per cent, while Japan is a relatively

low 3.1 per cent,, concluded Metropolitan Life's study. $

*

* •

v

.

*

PAGE 5

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

JANUARY 14, 1972

(Editor's Note: Nostalgia appears to have become the latest "fad** to permeate American society. Plays such as "The Follies" and "No, No Nanette*' along with the "new" 1920 look in clothing has swept the nation Into a longing for the past To "keep up" with the times, The Merciad now presents memorable articles from past issues of

The Merciad).

?i

/

M^&Odt

umftb $f

By Nellie

Guifoyle 3 1

YoufThink You I Got

Bad

1929

Rales And Regulations

NOTE: Town, late, and Week-,

end permissions

tailed

should

may

the

be cur- student's

scholastic standing so warrant.

A.

For motoring students are

M3B

H

I

required:

To register OUT in the usual

1.

All students on leaving

college for other purposes than short walks on the campus must register in the Registration Book, stating time of departure and

destination.

S| |

%

*

2.

Students are requested to

register IN as soon as possible

upon return.

*

f

3. No student is to register for

another. Violation of this shall be considered a serious breach of

honor. $

I

Freshmen may have Town Permission Saturday and one

4.

other day

in

the

week;

Sophomores, Saturday and two

other days in the week; Juniors

and Seniors may

permission.

In

have no case

daily

is

a

E l .

manner. H&4«? <

2.

To fill out a motoring slip

and deposit it with the Dean of

Residence before they leave the

5

campus. B.**: Auto riding

1

with •

men ; is

permitted only with specific permission from the Dean i of Residence. This rule applies to trips to and from the city. A specific permission from parents must be obtained before students may motor home with men or women friends. This permission must be in writing and addressed

to the Dean of Residence. 1SPIJ*%

A. Quiet Hours I

*$

I

1. Quiet Hours are established

give

students

ample op-

to

portunity to prepare work under ideal conditions. Loud talking or other disturbing noises in the

rooms and in the corridors are

not perm i t ted a t any ti me.

|student permitted to cut classes to avail herself of these per-

missions. Students are to return to the college by 6:00 p.m., unless they have previously obtained a Dinner Permission, in which case

they must register p.m.

IN

by 7:45 *

|

5.

On Friday

and

Saturday

there is a General?Dinner Per-

mission or a Dinner-and!10:30

Permission. requested to Registration

Students ] are

note

in

the

Book • which ^per-

P|

?

i

mission they take.

B.

Spec ia 1 Permissions

1.

Late^ Permissions:

To

return to the College after 10:30 p. in., all students must obtain a I .iite Permission from the Dean of Residence. Later Permissions granted to students are: During the scholastic year. Seniors-one 12:00 o'clock permission each month and six additional later permissions: Juniors, six late permissions: Sophomores, four;

Freshmen, three.

?

2. Absences from*Classes: .

Permissions! for * absence

recitations,

& -

| p

2. 'Study hours on weekdays during which quiet is to be maintained are:

. 8:0Oa.m. —11:30 a.m.

I

1:00 p.m. — 3:30p.m.?

f

8:00 p.m. —10:00 p.m.BHH

7:00 a.m.

B

10:30 p.m.

Quiet Is until '10:00{ a.m.! on

< JjH

m

Saturday

I

3 J During the time assigned

8:00-

lor study in the evening.

10:00, students should remain in

their

have

unless |they

from

the

to

be

*

own

rooms,

permission

Proctor

in i charge

f

elsewhere.

4.

No functions are to be held

|

during study hour, without the

permission of the Dean

College. B. Lights

10:30 p.m. except

Saturday

^

J

..

of :the

|

Lights are out for the night at

Friday

and

.

B

.

.

11 ;00 p.m. Friday and Saturday

after! late

entertainments

from^

and * overnight

preceding a class day are

obtained from College.

the Dean

to be theji

of

C. Vacation Registration Before students leave for the:

vacations scheduled in the

twenty

minutes

allowed

are

catalogue, they are to register in | before lights are extinguished.

the Special Registration Book.? On their return they are« to

register IN, not/later than 8:00 p.m. of the day the vacation ends. Those whose train or bus con- nections make it impossible to return at thisjtime will arrange the hour of their return with the Dean of Residence before leaving

the College for

vacation.

.In case

of an unforeseen delay, students

should

notify

the {college

by

telegram or. telephone as soon as

possible.

*

*

D. Week-end Visits Week-end visits to other than , the students' own homes are limited to once a month. In order to obtain theipermission, it Is necessary to present a letter from the parents authorizing the visit and an invitation from the parent of the student whose guest toe student is to be. This rule applies as t well to overnight absences from the College.

Those |availing

themselves of

week-end privileges will return to the College before 7:00 p.m.«on *

Sunday. S l

1

C. Telephone Calls Students are not to receive or attend to telephone calls during the evening study period, 8:Q0«- 10:00. An exception is made in the case of, an urgent long- distance incoming? call for the student. In this case the call will be transferred to the Residence Hall telephone. There are to be no telephone calls after lights are

extinguished. D. Radios

*

\

_

-

Radio playing is; prohibited during the evening study period. During the ^ Quiet Hour* of the day loud music, which would interfere with study, should be curtailed. Violations of this rule will result in confiscation of the radio.

r

E. Laundry

%

£

Students who have arranged to have their laundry taken care of through the school must mark, very plainly, all clothing. Put the soiled garments in-a marked

laundry bag and deposit it in the

.clothes chute by {10:00

a.m.

.on

Sunday. Do not put wet clothing

g

in the chute. Facilities for

H±.~~-&^'^.y-

pressings are *

provided on each floor.

F.

Students are not to leave the

Residence Hall clad in pajamas

or Kimonas; nor are they to

wear cap and I gown

for

other

than the occasions for which this collegiate attire is intended. G.J In recitation halls quiet must be maintained in the corridors, during the recitation periods. Room Regulations

{

1.

Rooms are to be in order by

on school days; *

* *&

by

10:00 a.m.

noon, on Saturdays, i

si 2,

paste

Students in ay not tack or

pictures

and mother

or-

naments, on the walls and win-

dows.

I Hang

these

from

|

the

picture molding.

3.

Any breakage or damage to

the furniture will be repaired at

the expense of the occupant of the

room.

4

1[

j

Furniture is not to be moved from one room to another without ^

4.

permission,

5.

i

* be kept

Food must

in tin

containers.

Dishes, silver, and

napkins must not be taken from

the dining room.

^

f

5

; Z 6. Students must see that their

rooms are protected from damage by wind, rain, or storm. Windows must be closed and lights turned off when the room is left unoccupied. &&

7, Electricity may not be used in the students* rooms except for lighting purposes.

8.

Students who have radios in

their rooms will be charged two

dollars a semester for the use of

the electricity.

;>

STUDENT DEPORTMENT * f. Every student must be in her

own room at 10:30 p.m.

2.

of

their

'•.;

\

Students ate not to sleep out

own

rooms

without

permission -oi

Residence

or

the

Dean

the

Proctor

of

in

charge of the floor. :*. Baths may not be taken

during the evening study period

or after 10:30 p.m.

|j g

4.

Smoking is forbidden in the

building

or

on

the

College

surrounding campus, fc

5. The possession of or the use of alcoholic liquors islstrictly prohibited. Students are for- bidden to drink in public places or to frequent these places in which alcoholic liquors are dispensed.

6.

At dinner, grace will be said

five minutes after the warning bell rings. I If, a student is unavoidably delayed in entering the dining room, it is customary for her to speak to the one in charge before going to take her lace • at table. Students iabitually arriving late are considered lacking in courtesy.

R

g

jMereyhurst, We Love

You

Mercy hurst, O Mercy hurst loving you as we do.

.. In the years that are to come

we will be loyal to you; Mercyhurst O Mercyhurst, of all the colleges around You are the best, the very best that ever can be found.

chorus:

"

Mercyhurst we 'ove you, to us you* re dear Always we*re faithful whether far or near;

May your spirit guide us all

through life's way.

5

God bless and keep you

forever and aye.

Mercyhurst O Mercyhurst,

«

you'll always guide us through

In adversity and strife

/

we will depend upon you; Mercyhurst. O Mercyhurst, pur mother fond and true, No matter where, oh where we

Our thoughts will turn to you.

Mercyhursti

Fair

Mercyhurst

In all the world the truly good, Mercyhurst, fair Mercyhurst

Is due to noble womanhood, Mercyhurst, fair Mercyhurst*

And that the good may still en- dure

Thy

wisdom

assure.

doth

the;* mind

While virtue keeps thy daughters

pure

1

'

I

Mercyhurst fair Mercyhurst

For God and country is thy cry,- Mercyhurst fair Mercyhurst

A nation's hope In home doth lie, Mercyhurst fair Mercyhurst The mothers of the days to be

Now draw their life and strength from thee

..

To guide and bless posterity, Mercyhurst fair Mercyhurst

A SPECIALiTHANKS TO THE TYPISTS AND LAYOUT STAFF.

YOUR EDITOR!

How I hate them!'I will never again/even if I am given the * opportunity, choose black pumps as the latest thing in footwear. No - matter if Mrs. Nash, the,best dressed woman in America, v passes her approval on them; no %, matter if one is completely "Out^ of it'* if her feet are not encased in j£ black pumps, I, for one, r willv* never again own a pair. ^ V v

Have

you ever

In your

life' ;

become obsessed with the idea r" *•

that you

must have

some one

thing? I have, and my greatest?.?

obsessionwastheblackpumps.lt 7- is the unwritten la w of our fa mily, J :

dating back to our ancestors, that no one should have a new pair of • shoes until the pair last pur* ; chased, soled and re-soled many y time, _ is completely worn out Thus when the last pair of shoes I'? owned was quite worn, I decided r. that my next purchase should be M black pumps—Mack $. patent &

'

leather pumps.

\ -# * £****?. £f ^ % -J:

At last the day dawned when I could procure my heart's desire. ,- Eagerly, if somewhat stealthily

(for

I

did

not want

some one

tagging with me who would most likely prefer French kid. or who 4 would emphatically argue that a black pump did not suit my type of foot), I set out on my; shoe- shopping tour, soon arriving at an exclusive, if rather inexpensive, | bootery. I\ examined the $ glass * showcase in front of thestore, and L

was a trifle disappointed at not J seeing black pumps on display, g

However, I am of the opinion that | displaying an article too lavishly

somewhat detracts from! its E

beauty. 5 With Ithese thoughts p | consoled myself and stepped into | thestore. pmm i

A smiling j young

clerk

ap- IS

* proached me and Inquired my (pleasure. I excitedly stammered. forth my request to be shown a4 pair of black patent-leather pumps. It discomfited me a little that he did not seem one whit

impressed with my discretion in

selection.

In

fact

he

merely.;

motioned me to a seat and

proceeded to take several pairs of shoes from the boxes which lined

the walls of the room, from end to •

end. *

f

v After trying on at least seven of

these, we came to a pair which suited the clerk. I really thought

they should have

been * a

size

smaller, but did not say so. Some kind person once told me that one should choose one's Jhats, shoes

and gloves

to

suit

one's own

personal taste and comfort, but

I

the clerk assured me J that this especial pair of pumps was exactly the thing for my long, slender, Grecian-l think' he called it Grecian-foot. I took him at his word; and why should I not? * Did he not try hundreds of shoes on hundreds of feet daily?

And

did

not

everyone satisfied? Unless, of course they

seem

were ?troubled with those most awful trials of man, corns. Then

(Continued on Page 6)

PAGE 6

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

JANUARY 14, 1972

700til2K>4S

Undoubtedly the last ten years have done much to advance and define the professional status of women. New doors have been set

ajar and old doors set wider open. This has been due, considerably to the reaction from the professional hospitalities ex-

tended during

the

war;

and

women who worked shoulder to shoulder with men are discovering that the masculine shoulder may be coldly turned In a selfish, jealous manner.

Although women have ad- vanced into professional

beginners; and that the prospect

of

marriage! makes

themf a

shifting and undependable labor supply.

|

|

Perhaps

advantages

one

of

of

the

women

greatest

entering

the?

business

world

is

psychological. Women confront the difficulties of a situation with a freshness and disinterestedness they are unhampered by old professional, political, and business entanglements, by catchwords and conventions that clog thinking and impede action.

In

1910

the

percentage

By Mary Ann? Wood '32

groupings of women in the various occupations classified under professional service, showed that eighty percent of the teachers and ninety two percent of the nurses in the United States were women; in the social ser- vice line women were likewise in the majority. In art, music, dancing, * library work, and founders of charitable and penal institutions the percentage was 3 to 1 in favor of women. From 1910 until the present day women have entered almost every kind of profession; there are women lawyers, women bankers, etc., all having responsible positions and meeting to full extent, the numerous qualifications required by various positions. And how have the masculine element accepted this advancement? The majority of them consider it an open challenge arid have resolved to combine their efforts in former prestige. But are women going to permit this? They are not, in- stead they are rooting I them- selves deeper and deeper in the

professions.

?siB^l6™Bffil

Competition, rivalry, and in the

end social betterment have resulted in I the Industrial land professional realms. > Men 1 are being: made to realize! that woman* s opinion, her education* and her activities are every bit as important as theirs. Women delve Into the bottom of affairs and many abuses- in! practise before women placed themselves on an equal footing with [men, have since been cleared up. £ &*fi * Many men have as their ob- jection that! women ^concern themselves with trivialities,and let the more important 'things escape their view. Then if'this were could not women justify this asserted} tendency .by the quotation, "Trifles make per- fection, and | perfection i is no

trifle?" wa

  • I Although I we

m&* m.

:

must admit that

when home life is sacrificed by

woman's gdesire \ to

be ;

a

professional! there lis |a^ great disadvantage, we must likewise be loyal enough to recognize and to cooperate with women who have courage of their own con- victions and enter the professions seriously and earnestly. sSSll&i^

My Black Pumps. •

(Continued from Page 5)

You

Second

Class Citizen

too, I considered, that while mine were black\ pumps, and just a trifle more stylish, they were no different from any others as far as the fitting was concerned.

I paid the clerk and hastened from the store, eager to get home' and put on the new shoes. The first day I walked down. Main Street, painfully conscious.

of

the

black,

flashing

leather,

encasing my feet, thrill after; thrill of pride surged within me.i Out of the corners of my eyes If could see that special crowd oft girls who live on Park Avenue r eyeing my feet as I daintily ckick- c la eked down the v cement. They were probably envying me and thinking to themselves that for all their wealth, they hadt< not my taste in selecting foot-wear. I was certain that they were vowing in their hearts that; the next pair of shoes to be put on their feet should be black, patent-leather pumps. -

After a week of constant wear

and admiration, however, my gpumps began to take on a jaded hlook. Imoticed that the right heel was slightly run over and would

have

to?

be

mediately.^

attended

I

to im- |

.

The increasing mobility that society has attained has in recent years led to the creation of a new type of second-class citizen: the * *sta te non-resident. J' This is a person who lives in the state but is denied some of the services that the state offers to its

  • I For example, a person entering

this state must first work for a

year

at

a

non-university

job

before they receive the benefits of a state tuition subsidy, failing to do this they become non-residents of every state in the union. They may vote, pay property taxes and

citizens V An example of this is automobile registration fees, but

Pennsylvania's policy of state resident' s tuition subsidy.

they continue to pay out-of-state tui tion r a tes. !8p «^.3PHB

The state always has its hands out when it comes to collecting taxes and registration fees. However, when the time comes for sharing of state services, such as welfare, medical care or state university tuition, suddenly we hear that these services are available only to "residents'*. "Residency" is denied by the State Legislature and a ridiculous double subsidy.

For I the

purpose

of

tax

collection one becomes a resident as soon as he crosses the state line. Upon entering a state you are now immediately subject to state and property taxes. As soon as *you find employment, you must pay the state tax, and after 30 days, you must pay automobile registration fees.

However, try to get welfare, medical; assistance, unem- ployment compensation or food

stamps and you find you must

|g A veteran

from

out

of

state

receives federal^ educational benefits of $175 per month but must jpay tuition at the J rate of $245 per month. }This includes a man who if is born, raised Sand educated through high school in Pennsylvania and after his military discharge, lives out of state for a short period of time.

The sexist portions of the law are even more absurd. If married couple enters Pennsylvania and he goes to school' while she works, they must continue to pay out-of-state tuition for as long as he goes to school. If, on the other hand, she goes to school and he works they pay residents tuition for her after the first year. This stems from| the ancient notion that a man's wife is his property and therefore her residency is based on where she works only.

Further,

a$ working women,

wait :iu

days, 60 days, or a year, k who has graduated from ia

At the end of two weeks, I was wholly accustomed to them and no longer eyeing them as I walked to and from school, or across the street to Nancy's.

pumps. Just the other day, when coming down the corridor I heard

one of them make a remark to a

And J now,

after^ two

month's I

friend standing near,

and then

constant usage, ?I have come to hate those black pumps. It's sad, bultrue. They have begun to bag and flap dreadfully at the sides, and it takes all the energy with which I can double up my toes to keep them from falling off. The glossy finish is gone, and that hard section between the heel and the sole has lost its stiffening, causing them to sag in the center and give the impression that I am guilty of having flat feet. Flat feet ol all things!

But worst of all. I'm beginning to think that the g|lrls are getting a secret enjoyment out of my

point in my direction, >whether at

my feet or at all of me, I am not sure. Whereupon they both laughed, which ;leads me to believe that my feet were the real

objects

of

ridicule;

for really

there is nothing about the rest of

which

would

such

me mirth, unless It might be the absurd cow-lick I have over?my right eye, which |was inherited from my grandfather on my mother's side. At any rate, the pumps are almost worn out, but what hurts me most is that they have been repaired but twice.

cause

Pennsylvania high >school and is married to a man who is an out- of-state sutdent must pay out-of- state tuition if she decides to continue her education. Thus it is possible to lose residency without setting a foot outside the state! j*

This is true only for women. If

an out-of-state woman marries state man, she gains not only a husband but an in-state tuition

subsidy.

V

Educationally, these residency laws lead jto an academic provincialism which short- changes students, faculties, and universities. A*, university becomes dominated with members of a small*geographic region, and other ideas land viewpoints that are prevalent in other areas are excluded. Something can be done to stop this ridiculous tomfoolery per- petrated by the state authorities.

Remember|the good,ol' greasy kid stuff look?

74e

"Sap ft ?0a6\S<M*y 99

When the high school graduates of June, 1929, stood at the "Cross Roads " 'Wondering, " "Perhaps," "All Alone," we are glad they heard of "Mercyhurst. Fair Mercy hurst.*' "For Old Times Sake" a school mate said, "I wanna go where you go." and they started down "The long, long road" "Together." The first few weeks they may

have

been

"Pretending"

they

were "Satisfied," but "SposhV n they were "Melancholy" it would

be 3 "No Wonder. "$Show me the

Freshmen

"Who wouldn't be

blue" when she's "Reaching for

someone and not finding anyone

there." p '£• In I 1 * Sleep"

the

£ | Freshmen

f

wandered through "Memory Lane" and "Then came the dawn" "Painting the clouds with sunshine." "School Days" "Once again" and "Little by little" they grew* into "Happy days." "Singin* in the rain" became passe the day it snowed and the Freshmen being i" Really and truly" "Collegiate" f began

"Doing the Raccoon.'Then It was "the Mechanical Man" was told to "Turn on the Heat" and the girls discovered that "Singin' in the Bath Tub" was much more satisfactory than "Singin* in the

Rain."

$r.

* Y

| In the "Wedding of the Painted Doll," thei Freshmen* were "Sweeter than Sweet" and we'll never forget "Piccolo Pete.'^I hope "Some Sweet Day" well have a 4 Talking Picture" of them to cherish "In the Garden of To- morrow." | Each Freshman at the Prom looked "Just dike;a Breath of Spring" and with her "Beloved seemed to sing "When My Dreams Come True." Some of them, so I've heard, are ''Suit Caring" Jtand cherishing their "Withered Roses" in their "Bouquet of Memories." ^ Now, as we leave them, they

J

"Ain't

Misbehavin

lD

a

Kitchenette"

so

I'll

q *

""*

»

Whispering."

join

them

aij

4 1

Cut myself a piece of cake. ana

make myself at home." t

JANUARY 14, 1972

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

John Birch L ives

PAGE 7

M

&#**', ofc*nrC«^-

v?

7Z_1

\

*?

/i

«**"

H

R i "•»**

% 3

i :.;

•HHf c

HEii V£* V

rwdO *

^#3 ^

Yes, Snoopy, there is a winter!

R.U.S. DESIGNATED BULLETIN BOARDS

COLLEGE HALL -

EG AN

Senior

Let 9 Wii n Vietnam

y«?

Over fifty

years ago the first

a

people to be ruled under

communist state were subjected

to the dictates

percent

of

of less their

than ten country's

population. The country" was Russia, and under the communist government the people lost all the freedom that they had gained during the ten previous years. (The Russian people gained more freedom from the Russian Government in 1905 by a revolution against the Czar.) Ever since then the citizens of the Soviet Union have been forced to do whatever the government has ordered them to do. The Russian people were jnot the only un- fortunate people to lose their freedom. The communist of the world, with their orders coming from Moscow, have launched the greatest attack on democracy that the world has lever seen. During the period 1917 -1967, the communists gained control of many former democractic nations, among them $ were the Eastern European countries, China, Cuba, North Korea and North Vietnam. But this is only the start of what the communists want. The communists of today will not be totally satisfied until the • world is J under communist control. The communist of today would like nothing better than to

Therefore it would seem that if

anyone who is j. a gainst com-

munism, but

withdrawal

troops from

for an immediate of United States South Vietnam, is

willing to sell-out the people and

the freedom of the entire? Asian Continent to the communists. BesidesUhe people of Southeast Asia, the following factors must also be taken into consideration. ?*

The loss of South Vietnam to the communists would mean that the balance of power would sway to the Communist bloc. It would providei: the J communists I more

bases to strike out from. It would endanger many other I nations, notably Australia. It would give a

great thrust

to

the

morale of

communists throughout *5the world.^The United^States and many other free countries would lose a valuable trading center. These facts, along with many others, are partially the. reason we should stay in Vietnam.

The main reason the United t stay in Vietnam is to * . £- freedom of the people dat Asia. Many people

does it have to be the

St?

pi of
pi
of

ask wi.j

United States who must play the part of "Big Brother'*? It is not easy to simplify the answer but the fact remains that^no other country can afford to intervene in

f

Civic & Local Gannon

.&•>!

m

A.

Election

Results

Faculty

Announcements

"HE UHO

PIES'

JOINS TmT

THERE ARE BULLETIN BOARDS IN EACH DORM

FOR GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

SIBT hMOU TY

f te£ OOtSSLY

STUDENT UNION

COFFEE HOUSE

Merciad

R.U.S.

ACROSS FROM SNACK BAR:

Sports

Announcements

From

Faculty

Want Ads

see more countries fall into their domain. One of the chief prizes

would be the fall of South Viet-

to

either

nam Liberation Front North Vietnam, jf.

the

National

(NLF)|or

to

South

Vietnam

is

the

chief

  • i country in Southeast Asia; it is the most economically successful country, of the entire Asian Continent The Mekong Delta is the richest section of the Asian Continent, and if this fell into the hands of the communists, it would mean that all of the other coun- tries in Southeast Asia would fall under communist control. The other free countries in Southeast Asia; Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Burma, Malaysia, ^ and the Philippines; are dependent on South Vietnam for much of their trading.) If South Vietnam fell into communist hands, those nations would the forced into trading with a communist nation.

L

1st FLOOR TURN - LOBBY

Home Ec

Music

Art

OTHER DEPARTMENTS HAVE BULLETIN BOARDS

IN THEIR OWN WINGS ON EACH FLOOR

Most of the above nations have democracies that are very weak. The communists jof Southeast Asia, knowing that the United States would not intervene, would slowly deteriorate the free countries' democracy. This of course would only happen if the United States did not intervene by sending troops. Obviously, if the Americans public* stands so strongly against our presence in Vietnam, they would not be willing to get into another con- fliect like that of .'Vietnam. The above* is the Domino Theory.)

a large international conflict. The United States has decided that the freedom their citizens have enjoyed for so . many years is the same freedom they are fighting for in Vietnam.

&As for the war itself, U.S. News & World ^Report *states^.that 'further concessions to the Communists will prolong, not shorten, the conflict." National Review has stated: "Everyone knows the minimum condition for honorable peace: That South Vietnam should be freed, for the next period, from the danger of Communist takeover — like Greece, Malaysia or South Korea in analogous circumstance.j And the truth about the war cannot be stated! without including the truths about} the grim con- sequences for us, on both the domestic and the global scale, if we fail to secure an honorable peace. You don't just lose wars

4

and

welch

on

solemn

com-

mitments-and then go blithely

skipping on your way as if nothing

important

had* happened. You

pay, and you pay plenty. No matter* hdw costly it is to win a war nowadays, it's alot* more

costly to lose one."

t

- y There Jwill be people who

disagree with the premise that

Communism takes away a man's freedom. For those people, I have but ione statement to i make:

Forget about what happened with

the Pueblo and Sh-h-h

don't say

... a word about Czechoslovakia! 1

PAGE 8

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

JANUARY 14, 1970

Into Music

By Denny Woytek

From the music scene:

|

$

The Doors have sold a total of 4,190,457 albums since their first LP, THE DOORS, was released in 1966. The biggest i was their first, THE DOORS which was reported to have sold 1,234,919 copies. Their biggest single came from the first LP, LIGHT MY FIRE, which sold 927,140 copies. The music of the Doors still deals with "apocalypse, but now the group tends to he doing a rueful little dance along the edge of the abyss. The death of lead singer Jim Morrison seemed to make survivors Ray Manzarek, Robie Krieger and John Den-

» .

-w

C

smore a lot freer in their heavy metaphysical outlook with

touches of cosmic humor.

£

B

1

- • »

a*

Their debuti album, OTHER VOICES, with Manzarek taking over the singing responsibilities,

was one of the two or three best

Doors

ever.

Ons t a get minus

Morrison . they have lost something in the fiery charisma at this early phase of their new

career. The Doors trio is sure to maintain their spot as>a major

force

in rock

years.

for many

\

*

more

^

New releases from Motown:

Steve i Wonder's

GREATEST

HITS

VOL.

2

The

Undisputed

.. Truth FACE TO FACE twiTH

aN

#~*SB£as*

The Doors' LP that toppled the 4 million

mark

TRUTH

..

Rare

CERT WMJ

Earth IN CON-

I

Other New Releases:

| Mountain's newest album, FLOWERS* OF EVIL, is von

Windfall records. Included in this disc: FLOWERS \ OF^EVIL— KING'S CHORALE—ONE LAST COLD KISS—PRIDE AND PASSION—and some i tracks

recorded at the Fillmore East in

.. 1971 Linda) have solicited the talents

McCartney's

(Paul and

of the Dennys (drummer Seiwell and guitarists Laine) to become

die first supergroup of '72. Thel

LP

is more

acoustic

and less!

gimicky than McCartney's last 21

andf among the 8 songs, 4 are!

triumphs:

BIG BOP-J

TOMORROW—WILD LIFE-I

and Mickey and Syliva's LOVE!

IS STRANGE

..

«?

^ One listens in awe these days to the superlative work coming out of Pthe - Jefferson Airplane organization. SILVER SPOON is like a novel, with perhaps even

more

social

depth than most

novels being written today.

UNIVERSAL

COPERNICA-

NMUIYIBLES gets

into some

excellent instrumental work. One other that Grace and Paul K a titer put-together with the Jefferson Starship titled BLOWS AGAINST THE EMPIRE has some good tracks,' BLOWS was released about a yea r a go. Jl i

&-i In

the jazz

vein, with more BITCHES BREW,

power than

MILES DAVIS LIFE-EVIL is

making the tip charts around the

country. 'This'two

record set

captures the live performance of

Daviss[ effectively.

Davis*

SIVADSELIM and WHAT I SAY are among the heavy cuts. jSp*^ u If you have any special groups "in mind for special articles just $let me know., Lh• •• : ' - v :&. *M

'* •

K

You've! Been

A ^Friend p |

THE STATE OF THE UNION

By 6.T. Barron

My bark of life was tossing down *

The trouble seas of time, «

When first

&

face. £

I saw J your smiling

mm^^^

^Vhen the Mercy hurst cof- feehouse, called the Watermelon Ballroom was opened in Sep- tember of 1970, it was welcomed by jthe college community as a whole for its potential to develop into a place where first rate entertainment could; be had on I campus. Last year it operated completely under student con- trol, and experienced]a year of nps and downs, both in en- tertainment, student enthusiasm, and student government support and co-operation. The Ballroom had to endure| a lot of growing pains.? as its inexperienced student directors strived to tap this potential, necessarily failing

at times

and

succeeding

at

others. This year, they returned

to the campus with a bit of ex- perience and professional knowledge under their belts, along with an attitude of rededicationjto provide the best in diverse entertainment to the college community through the

vehicle

of

Ballroom.

the Watermelon -'

However, the students soon found themselves unemployed, for it was decided by the powers- that-be that the Ballroom and the student union itself would Jbe placed under "professional" management, in the guise of one Phillip Herring, a new addition to the Mercyhurst faculty, who was presented as a man with ex- perience in the field of providing college entertainment. One of his first changes J was to, deny j the former student directors any association ^whatever with the direction of the Ballroom, citing what Mr. Herring termed ttheir •Incompetency" of the past year, and a "bad attitude" towards him. dismissing their personal dedication and hard-earned knowledge of the Erie music scene in terms ofC good local performers * and , | their

availability.

In effect, Mr. Herring chose to run his own show. In the October 29,1971 edition of the Merciad, he was characterized as a man with great plans for the Watermelon Ballroom. So far this year, none of those reported "plans'* have been translated Into reality, and in my opinion, judging from Mr. Herring's performance, his professionality still remains to be demonstrated.

Let's examine a few cases. Exactly what has Phil Herring done with the coffeehouse? Has he ^provided a-diversity off per- formers to the campus population? As evidenced by his fixation first term with Issac Aaron, in which they provided music at every function in the union for a solid month, the an- swer is . no. The same phenomenon is now developing with Eddy C and the Bees. Has Mr. Herring done his Ibest to locate 4 new sources of talent? And how about the quality of

talent?

Herring

Also

where

first * term?

was Mr.

Since

he

receives a salary * for this post, shouldn't? his presence be required! at the coffeehouse at least occasionally during the performances? This behavior does not seem to reflect the "enthusiasm" and "pride" that Mr.| Herring is reported to possess. What about a variety of entertainment? If you don't particularly care for Beer Blasts, Halloween parties, or high school "hops" in the student union, Mr. Herring has very little to offer you. Where are all the one-act experimental plays he promised to provide? Surely the man's imagination is not that limited.^ Also, what has he done to remedy poor attendance in the Union? Why has outside advertising been neglected? Certainly if the Watermelon Ballroom had a reputation Iwhich equalled Jits

potential, getting people to come would be no problem. $

  • - The coffeehouse's finances are also a good topic for examination. During the first term, per- formers were upset because they sometimes ^had to wait a week before | they received remuneration for their services.

This is professional?

What does

the coffeehouse have to show for

the thousands of dollars already spent this year? Well, it appears, approximate :t0 tapes, a hundred

dollar tape deck,

and j another

office

for

Mr.

Herring

(he

already has one in the Little

Theater)

are

the

only

im-

provements visible. Why

couldn't the!arch by the snack bar have been closed and the stage, moved to the center of the coffeehouse with these funds? ^ What about the current financial predicament of the Union in general? It seems that the Union will now only be able to open 7 hours a day, since a few students first term were told that they had to work in the Union for their financial assistance, when, in actuality, their form of aid did not require it. *~ Understandably, these students aren't working there any more. jSo far this term, Mr. Herring has relied on Chuck Hayes alone to fill the gap created by the missing student help by spending 12 hours of his own time to keep the Union open. Is this fair to Chuck? Student Government should also be brought to task for their handling of the funds for the Union. At a meeting Tuesday night, 30 minutes was spent in discussion about buying a color

television for fthe Union.

Who

needs a|color television when the piano in the coffeehouse for the use of performers is antiquated and untuned? Chuck Hayes, who

was present, didn't even have the

time to tell

them that that ser-

vices of the Union will soon be

curtailed, A classic case of fid-

dling while Rome burns, fig

due,

•&

To give credit where credit is

I'd like

to say

that

Phil

Herring has brought some en-

tertainment for the students.

to

the

nature

of* it

the

Union

Unfortunately, has been

a

throwback to the days when Mr.

Herring himself was in college-a heavy emphasis on beer drinking late 50'x-early 60's type dances in the Union. Is this really what the mature student of the 70's seeks in entertainment? If so, fine, but, for the sake of the college in general, and the coffeehouse in particular, I hope not. It would seem that if' the quality of the entertainment is to be improved, control of the coffeehouse should "be returned totally to the students who know* music and the Erie music scene, and can make the Ballroom into the showcase it has the potential to be. This article was not meant to be vindictive. It was only meant to praise questions-questions which should and must be an- swered if the coffeehouse is ever

going to rise

out of its present

stagnancy. Until these questions are answered,}l( you want to see how a real coffeehouse is run, and hear quality entertainment at the

same time, why not go to Gan- non's Strawberry{ Fields^ cof-

feehouse? ^ For

a

change, you

won't be disappointed. I

(Editor's Note: See letters to Ed. "Student Raps Union.")

When youth was in its prime.

Then! life's 1 dark$ hours? were

  • 85 turned to light, v£^^&F*.

My sorrowed heart was free, 1

And since that time, I've always

B

found ^^^^^f^^HK'

You've been a friend to me.

B

Misfortune I nursed me as her

H child, ^

M

m^M^

And loved me fondly, too, f

I would have had a broken heart.

Had it not been for you.

m

i

Kind

words I were

whispered

softly sweet,i^K^?3

But glad I could not be,

|

Until I found that you had been

A faithful friend to me. %

The light

of hope from your

bright eyes

Dispelled the clouds of strife,

And shed their rays orsunshtae

Idown

My weary path in life.

I now look back upon the past,

Across life's stormy sea.

And smile to think, mid all life's

scenes

You've been a friend to me.

I'll ne'er where'er I roaml

Wherever you may be,

If even I have had a friend,

You*ve been a friend to me.

CALL YOUR CAMPUS NEWSUNE DAILY

864-3009

^

*

JANUARY 14, 1972

MERCYHURST COLLEGE

PAGE 9

ART NEWSLETTER

•t ART STUDENT NEWSLETTER NO. 1

In recent years,

Mercyhurst

the studio lab fee on specific courses. This will be inaugurated in the winter term.

has been in a state of change. The

pjvision of Creative Arts, like the

College, is alsofin a transformation.!

period of .*£

The most obvious difference in the Arts Division has been the addition of new personnel. In the music department. Mr. Carl Stout has become a full time person this year, Mrs. Dorothy • Onisko is part time, and Miss Vitova Prioletti is a Iso part time

4. Open Studio Policy: Based upon past experience, it has become necessary this year to control the studio usage beyond class time. This is being done by the use of student monitors from each of the course offerings this term under the direction of each instructor. Along with this monitor system, we have in- stituted the temporary and permanent pass system for those students who want to use the facilities beyond Art Class time. The permanent pass Is for a student who would like to use a specific studio for the entire term. This pass must be shown to the Security Guard or our own student monitors. The temporary pass is for a person who would

like to use a studio for a limited time for a given day only. These

are

to

be

given

out

by the in-

dividual instructors or the

Departmental Chairman.

5. The Arts Council: The Arts Council is in the^ process of planning their program for the coming year. Membership is open to all students in any area of the

staff* Mr. Pau l Mdtag* * s new in the theater department, and Mr.jJ Phil Herring, part-time in speech. In the visual and plastic arts, we have Mr. Ed Higgins and his wife, Mary Lou* who are both full timeg members; in the department. They came to Mercyhurst from Mansfield* State College where both taught in the Art Depart- ment there. Prior to their being at Mansfield, they taught at Viterbo College in Wisconsin. New also to the Division and the department is the Chairman of the Division and Director* of the Art Com-

ponent, Joseph Pizza t

I

'&<

_•

Some changes that are" under discussion in the Art 5component

<*3*aF*A?.*

Mercyhurst. Obtain them from

your advisor.

*|

7. Policy on Collecting Student Art Work: Many institutions of higher learning establish and maintain a permanent collection Mercyhurst is discussing such a policy.

8. Student Representation: In all of these changes or proposed changes, the Arts staff feel that it is important to have students in- volved in our discussions. We have all talked to our students informally about things that are going on or have talked to in- dividuals in our offices, but we feel that it is important all art students know what is happening.

For this reason, each class has elected an Art representative and an alternate representatives and Invited and encouraged to attend all the art Faculty meetings, at which time they can bring student ideas and comments to us. The Art representatives that can not make scheduled meetings are asked to have the alternate representative! sit in on that specific meeting. The following students are: Senior, Joan McCuire; Jr., Mary Meehan;

Soph., Ken Burkhart; Freshman, Ron Ratliff; Alternates: Senior,

Adele Wilson; Jr.,

Brian Ber-

chtold; Soph., John Fosco;

Freshman. Lenny Mork. In addition to these representatives, Richard Ohman, who is

President of the Arts Council has

also

been

invited ;to

attend.

Students

should

feel

free

to

contact any of the above

representatives about matters of
interest-

to

them. : Your

input,

suggestions

and