Sie sind auf Seite 1von 24

 

 
 

Geocoding  the  Murals  of  El  Paso,  Texas:    


An  Analysis  by  Addresses  and  Zip  Codes  
 

 
 
 
Sociology  3332/Anthropology  3332  
Intro  to  GIS  Project  (Graduate  student)  
Final  Report  
 
 
 
Miguel  Juárez  
May  4,  2011  

1  
 
Introduction  

The  book  Colors  on  Desert  Walls:  the  Murals  of  El  Paso1  (1997,  Texas  Western  Press)  

features  over  200  murals  that  range  from  works  painted  under  the  Works-­‐Progress  

Administration  (MPA)  in  1938  to  Chicano  murals  painted  under  the  Spaghetti  Bowl  in  

2010.    Even  today  murals  are  being  painted  on  walls  in  El  Paso.      In  retrospect,  when  Colors  

was  published  in  1997,  Texas  Western  Press  did  not  see  a  need  to  include  maps  in  the  

book.    This,  I  believe  is  one  of  the  book’s  deficiencies.    At  the  time  I  did  not  know  whether  

the  TWP  had  the  capacity  to  create  maps  or  if  I  as  the  author,  was  supposed  to  provide  

them—regardless,  the  topic  was  not  discussed.      Another  deficiency  of  the  book  was  that  

the  TWP  wanted  to  produce  a  coffee  table-­‐like  book  of  images  of  the  murals,  whereas  I  

wanted  to  write  a  social  history  of  murals  and  mural-­‐making  in  El  Paso.    I  created  several  

drafts  and  all  met  with  dislike  from  the  Marcia  Daudistel,  the  acquiring  editor  at  the  time  

who  asked  me  to  trim  it  down  and  revise  it  several  times.    In  the  end,  as  a  compromise,  I  

decided  to  interview  the  artists  who  had  painted  the  murals  and  to  publish  their  oral  

histories  and  that  would  comprise  the  text  accompanied  by  images  of  the  murals  created  by  

Cynthia  Farah,  who  was  my  co-­‐researcher  in  the  creation  of  this  work.    I  interviewed  and  

transcribed  the  artists  featured  in  the  book  and  Cindy  provided  the  images.  

Geo-­‐coding  Murals  

Before  beginning  the  project  I  searched  for  other  projects  that  may  had  done  

something  similar  but  I  did  not  find  anything  related  to  what  I  sought  to  do  for  this  project.    

I  did  locate  an  article  on  the  Internet  titled:  “Philly Chooses GIS to Showcase and Manage its

                                                                                                                       
1
 Miguel Juárez, Colors on Desert Walls, the Murals of El Paso (Texas Western Press, 1997).
2
 City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, Muralfarm.org, http://muralarts.org/muralfarm. Accessed May 4, 2011.  
2  
 
Thousands of Murals,” published on 1/7/2009 that documented the City of Philadelphia’s efforts

to geocode its murals. The article described a site titled:

Muralfarm.org, an interactive geographic online web application, pictures and


detailed information about murals [that] can be searched by artist, theme, date,
location, neighborhood, and other key terms. Visitors to Muralfarm.org can tag
favorite photographs, save searches, be notified when new murals are added
thanks to GeoRSS feeds, and enjoy special features such as viewing the murals in
Google Earth and Google Maps. Mural Arts Program staff can easily and
efficiently manage information pertaining to each mural through a sophisticated
asset management back-end interface. The new site, www.muralfarm.org, will
officially launch on January 29, 2009. 2
 
For  the  graduate  project  in  the  Sociology  3332/Anthropology  3332  class  

Introduction  to  GIS  class  I  chose  to  geo-­‐code  murals  in  El  Paso  featured  in  the  Colors  on  

Desert  Walls  book  that  had  addresses  where  murals  had  been  painted.    For  murals  that  had  

addresses  I  added  their  zip  codes  by  looking  up  the  addresses  in  various  Zip  Code  search  

engines  like  the  UPS  Zip  Code  finder.3    I  added  these  Zip  Codes  to  the  Excel  file  that  coupled  

with  the  addresses  produced  the  data  to  produce  this  project.      

It  is  important  to  note  that  not  all  locations  where  murals  had  been  painted  had  

addresses.    I  did  embark  on  locating  addresses  for  various  murals  using  Google  Earth,  as  

well  as  the  Internet,  but  at  a  certain  point  this  proved  to  be  too  laborious,  so  I  limited  the  

number  of  murals  to  200  and  included  the  murals  that  I  felt  were  important  to  include.    

Initially,  I  created  a  spreadsheet  with  various  attributes  but  again  after  entering  data  for  

several  days,  I  chose  to  capture  the  data  I  felt  most  important  like  Title,  Address,  Year  

Painted,  and  Creator  along  with  pertinent  attributes  when  possible.    Among  the  different  

techniques  like  using  x-­‐y  coordinates,  latitude  and  longitude,  addresses  with  zip  codes  

provide  a  means  to  geo-­‐code,  so  this  is  what  I  utilized  for  this  project.  
                                                                                                                       
2
 City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, Muralfarm.org, http://muralarts.org/muralfarm. Accessed May 4, 2011.  
3
 UPS Zip Code Lookup, http://zip4.usps.com/zip4/welcome.jsp, Accessed April 1, 2011.  
3  
 
Producing  Mural  Maps  

I  created  eleven  maps  for  the  following  areas  in  El  Paso:  (1)  a  map  of  murals  in  the  

Upper  Valley;  (2)  a  mural  map  of  Central  El  Paso;  (3)  a  mural  map  of  Downtown  El  Paso;  

(4)  a  mural  map  of  El  Paso  Community  College  murals  at  the  Valle  Verde  Campus  in  East  El  

Paso;  (5)  a  mural  map  of  murals  in  East  El  Paso;  (6)  a  mural  map  of  murals  at  Lincoln  

Center  in  South  Central  El  Paso;  (7)  a  mural  map  of  murals  in  Northeast  El  Paso;  (8)  a  

mural  map  of  works  in  Central  El  Paso;  (9)  a  mural  map  of  works  in  the  Lower  Valley;  (10)  

a  map  of  murals  in  Segundo  Barrio  and  Chihuahuita;  and  lastly  (11)  a  map  of  various  areas  

in  El  Paso  with  murals.    

I  found  difficulty  in  separating  clusters  of  murals  that  shared  one  address  and  one  

zip  code.    There  are  three  clusters  of  murals  in  this  study  that  separately  share  singular  

addresses:  (1)  eight  murals  at  the  University  of  Texas  all  share  one  address—due  to  the  

fact  that  all  buildings  share  the  same  university  address;  (2)  forty-­‐three  murals  at  Lincoln  

Park  that  are  painted  on  the  various  columns  under  what  is  informally  referred  to  as  the  

Spaghetti  Bowl.    With  the  creation  of  the  various  freeways  spanning  the  Lincoln  Park  

Community,  historical  addresses  were  obliterated  and  basically  all  murals  now  share  one  

address.    Another  cluster  of  murals  is  located  at  (3)  the  El  Paso  Community  College  Valle  

Verde  Campus  and  again,  all  buildings,  like  the  ones  at  UT  El  Paso  have  one  address.    

In  the  creation  of  preliminary  maps,  I  tried  to  include  too  much  information  on  the  

various  maps  and  then  Dr.  Collins  suggested  I  create  an  Appendix  so  I  could  list  the  murals  

by  location  instead-­‐-­‐I  have  done  so  (see  Appendix  A).        

I  created  one  shape  file  and  worked  off  of  it  because  I  found  difficult  creating  

separate  files  using  the  Open  Attributes  tool  and  combining  different  SQL  data  because  all  

4  
 
fields  were  classified  as  numerical  data.    This  proved  to  be  effective  but  then  I  found  that  

there  needed  to  be  consistency  in  creating  the  various  maps.    When  I  made  an  edit  to  

improve  one  map  I  then  had  to  go  back  and  apply  the  same  edit  to  all  the  other  maps.    In  

the  middle  of  creating  several  maps,  I  found  that  the  “Save  As”  function  was  easier  than  

creating  an  entirely  new  map.    I  found  it  necessary  to  create  a  hand-­‐drawn  style  sheet  (like  

a  flow  sheet)  to  plan  out  how  I  was  going  to  do  the  project  and  to  have  a  place  where  I  

could  note  what  fonts  I  was  using  for  titles  and  various  labels.    This  style  sheet  also  gave  me  

an  overview  of  my  progress  and  what  needed  fixing.    I  also  noted  the  file  name  for  each  of  

the  maps.    The  sheet  helped  me  “visualize”  the  overall  project  and  complete  it.  

Analysis  “What  I  discovered”  

The  areas  with  the  most  murals  include:  (1)  Segundo  Barrio/Chihuihuita;  (2)  

Lincoln  Park;  and  (3)  Central  El  Paso.    Unbeknownst  to  the  general  public,  murals  are  found  

throughout  the  city.    This  was  a  very  labor-­‐intensive  project  and  might  have  been  too  

ambitious  to  undertake  in  one  semester.  

Conclusion  

  I  found  creating  these  maps  was  a  very  satisfying  and  exhilarating  experience  given  

that  I  was  able  to  use  my  old  data  and  in  effect,  by  geo-­‐coding  it,  make  it  “new”  again.    I  see  

great  possibilities  of  utilizing  this  technology  for  a  myriad  of  uses—for  history,  for  the  

analysis  of  information  needs,  for  tracking  population  and  demographic  patterns,  and  for  

engaging  in  social-­‐political  issues.  

5  
 
I  realize  that  this  project  could  easily  have  risen  to  an  entirely  new  level  if  it  could  

have  incorporated  additional  data,  images  and  indexing,  as  well  as  assigning  numeral  codes  

to  murals  and  describing  each  in  detail.    Or  like  the  Philadelphia  project  mentioned  in  the  

beginning  of  this  essay,  this  work  can  live  online  and  work  similar  to  a  UCLA  product  called  

Hypercities.4      A  separate  section  could  feature  murals  that  have  been  painted  over  and  no  

longer  exist.    Yet  for  this  assignment  none  of  this  was  warranted,  although  I  can  see  how  

this  project  would  be  the  ideal  for  the  merger  of  community  art,  socio-­‐political  art  history,  

urban  history,  politics,  geo-­‐coding  (all  areas  I  am  very  interested  in)  and  with  the  analysis  

of  those  results  and  the  addition  of  some  theory  on  the  built  environment  and  socio-­‐

political  factors  in  the  creation  of  murals  and  mural  making  and  it  could  easily  become  my  

dissertation.  

                                                                                                                       
4
 Hypercities, http://hypercities.com/. Accessed May 4, 2011.  
6  
 
Appendix  A  

Map  of  El  Paso  Areas  with  Murals  

Areas  include:  

• Upper  Valley  and  West  El  Paso  


• The  University  of  Texas  at  El  Paso  
• Downtown  El  Paso  
• Segundo  Barrio  and  Chihuahuita  
• Central  El  Paso  
• Northeast  El  Paso  
• Lincoln  Park  
• East  El  Paso    
• El  Paso  Community  College  
• Lower  Valley  
 
Central  El  Paso  Murals  

• “Stop  the  Killing”  (1995)  


• “La  Virgen  de  Guadalupe  with  Grotto”  
(1989)  
• “Meso-­‐American  Olmec”  (1991)  
• “Vignettes  depicting  U.S./Mexico  border  
life”  (1935)  
• “Los  Paisanos/Five  Points  Block  Party”  
(1985)  
• “Portrait  of  Gene  K.  Wilson”  (1994)  
• “Beall  Elementary  School  cafeteria  mural”  
(1987)  
• “Jesus  Christ  on  Cross  and  Virgen  of  
Guadalupe”  (Date  Unknown)  
• “Hispanic  Heritage  and  Homelessness”  
(1991)  
• “Labors  of  Cotton”  (1992)  
• “Untitled”  (1993)  
• “La  Virgen  de  Guadalupe  con  Juan  Diego”  
• “Memorial  to  Ruben  Salazar”  
• “Christ  Looking  Over  El  Paso/Cd.  Juarez”  
• “Tribute  to  Enedina  "Nina"  Cordero”  
• “La  Nina  Cosmica”  
• “Bear  Mascot”  

7  
 
• “Sports  murals”  
• “Heroes  of  Mexico”  
• “La  Familia”  
• “Senor  Sol”  
• “Nuestra  Herencia/Our  Heritage”  
• “Aztec  Ball  Players”  
• “Iwo  Jima”  
• “Mujer  Obrera/Working  Woman”  
• “75th  Anniversary,  1915-­‐1990”  
• “Emiliano  Zapata”  
• “Aztlan”  
 

Downtown  Murals  

• “Si  Me  Matan:  Resucitare  en  mi  Pueblo”  (1993)  


• “Antidiscrimination  in  the  Workplace”  (1993)  
• “Leyenda  de  los  Volcanes”  (1981)  
• “Cuantos  Hermanos  Han  Muerto”  (1987)  
• “Untitled”  (1987)  
• “Desert  Scene”  (Unknown)  
• “Dixieland”  (1989)  
• “Downtown  El  Paso,  Early  1900s”  (1981)  
• “The  History  of  Money”  (1957)  
• “Netherlands  Scene”  (1952)  
• “Our  History”  (1995)  
• “A  Day  in  El  Paso  Del  Norte”  (1993)  
• “Unite  El  Paso”  (1993)  
• “Modes  of  Transportation”  (1983)  
• “Diorama  murals”  (Unknown)  
• “Four  Nudes  and  a  Cartoon  Character”  (1996)  
• “Bicentennial  Celebration”  (1976)  
• “Boxer  Mural”  (Unknown)  
• “Pass  of  the  North”  (1938)  
• “Southwest”  (1956)  
• “Two  Bullfighters”  (1985)  
 
El  Paso  Community  College,  Valle  Verde  Campus,  919  Hunter  Road,  El  Paso,  Texas,  79915  

• “Time  and  Sand”  (1978)  


• “Visually  Processed  Data”  (1988)  
• “African  Spirit  of  Jazz”  (Unknown)  
• “Together  Then,  Together  Again”  (1995)  
• “Loteria,  La  Sirena,  La  Calaca,  La  Palma,  La  Mano,  El  Aguacote”  (1996)  
8  
 
• “Adam  and  Eve  at  the  Rio  Grande”  (1985)  
• “Futuristic  City”  (1985)  
 
Murals  in  East  El  Paso  

• Class  of  2000  


• UTEP  Athletics  
• Selva  Tropical  
• Folklorico  Dancers  
• Southwest  Wildlife  
• German  Traditions  
• Tribute  to  David  L.  Carrasco  
• Time  and  Sand  
 

Lincoln  Park  Murals  

• Tribute  to  Abraham  Lincoln,    Inside  Lincoln  


Center  
• La  Virgen  de  Guadalupe,  1F  
• Ruben  Salazar,  1B  
• Cesar  Chavez,  2F  
• Zapata  "Tierra  y  Libertad,”  2B  
• Martin  Luther  King  Jr.,  3F  
• Comandanta  Ramona,  3B  
• John  F.  Kennedy,  4F  
• Francisco  "Pancho"  Villa,  4B  
• Blank,  5F  
• Che  Guevara,  5B  
• Nuestra  Reina  de  El  Paso  Ombligo  de  Aztlan,  6F  

9  
 
• Mariachi  Sol,  6B  
• Mariachi  Luna,  7F  
• Music  Under  the  Stars  #1,  7B  
• Music  Under  the  Stars  #2,  9B  
• Music  Under  the  Starts  #3,  10F  
• Daylight,  12F  
• Open  Your  Eyes,  12B  
• The  Struggle,  13F  
• Legends,  17F  
• Chuco  Suave,  23F  
• Twin  Serpents,  23B  
• 2012  A  New  Light,  24F  
• Pachuca  Blood,  25F  
• El  Corazon  de  El  Paso,  28F  
• Festival  San  Elizario  Mission,  28B  
• Our  Lady  of  Guadalupe  Mission,  29F  
• El  Chichihuacaahuco,  29B  
• Tletl  (Fire),  30F  
• Tlalli  (Earth),  30B  
• Ehecatl  (Wind),  31F  
• Atl  (Water),  31B  
• Maiz,  32F  
• Title  Unknown,  32B  
• Native  American,  33F  
• Blank,  33B  
• Aztec  Sunstone,  34F  
• Space  Shuttle  "El  Paso  Through  My  Eyes",  34B  
• UTEP  Campus  "El  Paso  Through  My  Eyes,"  35F  
• UTEP  Campus  "El  Paso  Through  My  Eyes,"  35B  
• Faces  "Faces  Through  My  Eyes,"  36F  
• Faces  "Faces  Through  My  Eyes,"  36B  
• Eddie  Guerrero  "El  Paso  Through  My  Eyes,"  
37F  
• Latino  Heat  "El  Paso  Through  My  Eyes,"  37B  
 

Lower  Valley  Murals  

• Southwestern  Theme  
• El  Santo  Nino  de  Atocha  
• Guardian  Angel  
• In  Memory  of  Andrea  Hensley,  1978-­‐1993  
10  
 
• Mural  de  Senecu  
• Stages  of  Life  
• Tigua  Pueblo,  Ysleta  Mission  
• The  Coming  of  Rain  
• Image  of  Unity  
• La  Virgen  de  Guadalupe  with  Ysleta  Mission  
• Aztec  Gods  Iztaccihuatl  and  Popocatepetl  
• Sports  mural  
• Conquistador    
 

Segundo  Barrio  and  Chihuahuita  Murals  

• “Easy  Rider-­‐In  Memory  to  Nuni”  (1985)  


• “Chuco,  Tejas”  (1975)  
• “History  of  the  Santa  Fe  Railroad”  (1992)  
• “Grandfather  and  his  Nephew”  (1969)  
• “Tribute  to  Joe  Battle”  or  “Lagrimas”  (1978)  
• “Meeting  of  the  Presidents,  Diaz  and  Taft”  (1970)  
• “Cuauhtemoc”  (1982)  
• “Quetzalcoatl”  (1975)  
• “Native  American”  (1982)  
• “La  Fe:  Mantegan  La  Fe:  Support  It”  (1994)  
• “We  the  People”  (1988)  
• “Sacred  Family”  or  “Tribute  to  the  Chicano  Family”  (1990)  
• “Health  and  Technology”  (1985)  
• “Conquistador  with  Friar”  (1981)  
• “El  Chuco/Cd.  Juarez”  (1993)  
• “Emiliano  Zapata”  (1975)  
• “Our  Lady  of  Fatima”  (1996)  
• “Tezcatlipoca”  (1987)  
• “La  Campana:  History  of  Housing  Struggle  in  Segundo”  (1975)  
• “Kofu  Gang  mural”  (1996)  
• “La  Virgen  de  Guadalupe”  (1987)  
• “Aztec  Calendar”  (1979)  
• “Entelequia/Entelechy”  (1976)  
• “Iztaccihuatl.  Mujer  Blanca:  Leyenda  de  los  Volcanes”  (1982)  
• “Che  Guevara”  (1975)  
• “Dale  Gas/El  Pachuco”  (1981)  
• “Iztaccihuatl  and  Popocatepetl”  (1981)  
• “Segundo  Barrio”  (1976)  
• “Education  is  the  Future”  (1982)  
• “La  Virgen  de  Guadalupe”  (1975)  

11  
 
• “Houchen  Bus”  (1982)  
• “Kids  on  the  Moon”  (1987)  
• “Three  Faces  representing  Chicanos”  (1975)  
• “Geometric  Codex”  (1975)  
• “Chicanos  Unidos  del  2nd”  (1975)  
• “The  Children  First/Primero  Los  Ninos”  (1994)  
• “Discover  the  Secrets  of  the  Universe  Through  Your  Library”  (1994)  
• “Zavala  Elementary  School  Mural”  (1986)  
 
 
Upper  Valley  and  West  El  Paso  Murals  

• “Camino  Real”  (1996)  


• “Jesus  Chris”  (1986)  
• “Untitled”  (1958)  
• “Grateful  Dead  (1991)  
• “My  Toys”  (1990)  
• “A  Celebration  of  Women”  (1994)  
• “Murals  on  the  Mall  #1”  (1993)  
• “Murals  on  the  Mall  #2”  (1993)  
• “El  Paso  Historical  Scene”  (1994)  
• “Old  West  Gunfighters”  (1994)  
• “Untitled”  (1995)    
• “Hands  that  Heal”  (1993)  
• “Carpriccio  Espagnol,  Siglo  XVI”  (1967)  
• “Untitled”  (1994)  
• “The  Space  Cowboy  Without  the  Cowboy”  (1975)  
 
Murals  at  the  University  of  Texas  at  El  Paso  

• "Coronado,"  by  Salvador  Lopez,  Centennial  Museum  painted  in  1945,  


restored  in  1981  by  Robert  Massey.  
• "Miners  Inside  Mine,"  by  Emilio  Cahero,  Centennial  Museum,  painted  in  1936,  
under  the  Works  Public  Administration  (WPA).  
• Two  murals  titled  "Mining"  and  "Metallurg,y"  by  Emilio  Cahero,  at  Holliday  
Hall,  painted  in  1936  were  painted  over  in  the  1960s.  
• "Pollution  or  Ecology,"  by  Carlos  R.  Flores,  Second  Floor,  Fox  Fine  Arts,  
painted  in  1973,  painted  over  in  mid-­‐1980s.  
• "Myths  of  Maturity,"  Library  Second  Floor,  painted  in  1991.  
• "Gang  Violence,"  Education  Building,  Third  Floor,  painted  in  1992.    
• "Encounter,"  (former  Geology  Building),  painted  in  1993.  
• "New  Mexico  Scenes,"  Education  Building  (1971)  by  Peter  Hurd.  

12  
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Maps  
 

13  
 
 
 

14  
 
 
 
 

15  
 
 

16  
 
 

 
 
17  
 
 
 

18  
 
 
 

19  
 
 
 

20  
 
 
 

21  
 
 
 

22  
 
 
 

23  
 
 
 

24