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JUNOS Software

Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

Release 10.0

Juniper Networks, Inc.


1194 North Mathilda Avenue Sunnyvale, California 94089 USA 408-745-2000

www.juniper.net
Published: 2009-10-09

This product includes the Envoy SNMP Engine, developed by Epilogue Technology, an Integrated Systems Company. Copyright 1986-1997, Epilogue Technology Corporation. All rights reserved. This program and its documentation were developed at private expense, and no part of them is in the public domain. This product includes memory allocation software developed by Mark Moraes, copyright 1988, 1989, 1993, University of Toronto. This product includes FreeBSD software developed by the University of California, Berkeley, and its contributors. All of the documentation and software included in the 4.4BSD and 4.4BSD-Lite Releases is copyrighted by the Regents of the University of California. Copyright 1979, 1980, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994. The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. GateD software copyright 1995, the Regents of the University. All rights reserved. Gate Daemon was originated and developed through release 3.0 by Cornell University and its collaborators. Gated is based on Kirtons EGP, UC Berkeleys routing daemon (routed), and DCNs HELLO routing protocol. Development of Gated has been supported in part by the National Science Foundation. Portions of the GateD software copyright 1988, Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Portions of the GateD software copyright 1991, D. L. S. Associates. This product includes software developed by Maker Communications, Inc., copyright 1996, 1997, Maker Communications, Inc. Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo, JUNOS, NetScreen, ScreenOS, and Steel-Belted Radius are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. in the United States and other countries. JUNOSe is a trademark of Juniper Networks, Inc. All other trademarks, service marks, registered trademarks, or registered service marks are the property of their respective owners. Juniper Networks assumes no responsibility for any inaccuracies in this document. Juniper Networks reserves the right to change, modify, transfer, or otherwise revise this publication without notice. Products made or sold by Juniper Networks or components thereof might be covered by one or more of the following patents that are owned by or licensed to Juniper Networks: U.S. Patent Nos. 5,473,599, 5,905,725, 5,909,440, 6,192,051, 6,333,650, 6,359,479, 6,406,312, 6,429,706, 6,459,579, 6,493,347, 6,538,518, 6,538,899, 6,552,918, 6,567,902, 6,578,186, and 6,590,785.

JUNOS Software Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide Release 10.0 Copyright 2009, Juniper Networks, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in USA. Writing: Mark Barnard Editing: Ben Mann Illustration: Nathaniel Woodward, Mark Barnard Cover Design: Edmonds Design Revision History October 2009R1 JUNOS 10.0 The information in this document is current as of the date listed in the revision history. YEAR 2000 NOTICE Juniper Networks hardware and software products are Year 2000 compliant. The JUNOS Software has no known time-related limitations through the year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036.

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READ THIS END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT (AGREEMENT) BEFORE DOWNLOADING, INSTALLING, OR USING THE SOFTWARE. BY DOWNLOADING, INSTALLING, OR USING THE SOFTWARE OR OTHERWISE EXPRESSING YOUR AGREEMENT TO THE TERMS CONTAINED HEREIN, YOU (AS CUSTOMER OR IF YOU ARE NOT THE CUSTOMER, AS A REPRESENTATIVE/AGENT AUTHORIZED TO BIND THE CUSTOMER) CONSENT TO BE BOUND BY THIS AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT OR CANNOT AGREE TO THE TERMS CONTAINED HEREIN, THEN (A) DO NOT DOWNLOAD, INSTALL, OR USE THE SOFTWARE, AND (B) YOU MAY CONTACT JUNIPER NETWORKS REGARDING LICENSE TERMS. 1. The Parties. The parties to this Agreement are (i) Juniper Networks, Inc. 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Customer may operate the Software after the 30-day trial period only if Customer pays for a license to do so. Customer may not extend or create an additional trial period by re-installing the Software after the 30-day trial period. e. The Global Enterprise Edition of the Steel-Belted Radius software may be used by Customer only to manage access to Customers enterprise network. Specifically, service provider customers are expressly prohibited from using the Global Enterprise Edition of the Steel-Belted Radius software to support any commercial network access services. The foregoing license is not transferable or assignable by Customer. No license is granted herein to any user who did not originally purchase the applicable license(s) for the Software from Juniper or an authorized Juniper reseller. 4. Use Prohibitions. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the license provided herein does not permit the Customer to, and Customer agrees not to and shall not: (a) modify, unbundle, reverse engineer, or create derivative works based on the Software; (b) make unauthorized copies of the Software (except as necessary for backup purposes); (c) rent, sell, transfer, or grant any rights in and to any copy of the Software, in any form, to any third party; (d) remove any proprietary notices, labels, or marks on or in any copy of the Software or any product in which the Software is embedded; (e) distribute any copy of the Software to any third party, including as may be embedded in Juniper equipment sold in the secondhand market; (f) use any locked or key-restricted feature, function, service, application, operation, or capability without first purchasing the applicable license(s) and obtaining a valid key from Juniper, even if such feature, function, service, application, operation, or capability is enabled without a key; (g) distribute any key for the Software provided by Juniper to any third party; (h) use the Software in any manner that extends or is broader than the uses purchased by Customer from Juniper or an authorized Juniper reseller; (i) use Embedded Software on non-Juniper equipment; (j) use Embedded Software (or make it available for use) on Juniper equipment that the Customer did not originally purchase from Juniper or an authorized Juniper reseller; (k) disclose the results of testing or benchmarking of the Software to any third party without the prior written consent of Juniper; or (l) use the Software in any manner other than as expressly provided herein. 5. 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6. Confidentiality. The Parties agree that aspects of the Software and associated documentation are the confidential property of Juniper. As such, Customer shall exercise all reasonable commercial efforts to maintain the Software and associated documentation in confidence, which at a minimum includes restricting access to the Software to Customer employees and contractors having a need to use the Software for Customers internal business purposes. 7. Ownership. Juniper and Junipers licensors, respectively, retain ownership of all right, title, and interest (including copyright) in and to the Software, associated documentation, and all copies of the Software. Nothing in this Agreement constitutes a transfer or conveyance of any right, title, or interest in the Software or associated documentation, or a sale of the Software, associated documentation, or copies of the Software. 8. Warranty, Limitation of Liability, Disclaimer of Warranty. The warranty applicable to the Software shall be as set forth in the warranty statement that accompanies the Software (the Warranty Statement). Nothing in this Agreement shall give rise to any obligation to support the Software. Support services may be purchased separately. Any such support shall be governed by a separate, written support services agreement. TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW, JUNIPER SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY LOST PROFITS, LOSS OF DATA, OR COSTS OR PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES, OR FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THIS AGREEMENT, THE SOFTWARE, OR ANY JUNIPER OR JUNIPER-SUPPLIED SOFTWARE. IN NO EVENT SHALL JUNIPER BE LIABLE FOR DAMAGES ARISING FROM UNAUTHORIZED OR IMPROPER USE OF ANY JUNIPER OR JUNIPER-SUPPLIED SOFTWARE. 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Customers obligations under this Section shall survive termination or expiration of this Agreement. 11. Export. Customer agrees to comply with all applicable export laws and restrictions and regulations of any United States and any applicable foreign agency or authority, and not to export or re-export the Software or any direct product thereof in violation of any such restrictions, laws or regulations, or without all necessary approvals. Customer shall be liable for any such violations. The version of the Software supplied to Customer may contain encryption or other capabilities restricting Customers ability to export the Software without an export license. 12. Commercial Computer Software. The Software is commercial computer software and is provided with restricted rights. Use, duplication, or disclosure by the United States government is subject to restrictions set forth in this Agreement and as provided in DFARS 227.7201 through 227.7202-4, FAR 12.212, FAR 27.405(b)(2), FAR 52.227-19, or FAR 52.227-14(ALT III) as applicable. 13. Interface Information. To the extent required by applicable law, and at Customer's written request, Juniper shall provide Customer with the interface information needed to achieve interoperability between the Software and another independently created program, on payment of applicable fee, if any. Customer shall observe strict obligations of confidentiality with respect to such information and shall use such information in compliance with any applicable terms and conditions upon which Juniper makes such information available. 14. Third Party Software. Any licensor of Juniper whose software is embedded in the Software and any supplier of Juniper whose products or technology are embedded in (or services are accessed by) the Software shall be a third party beneficiary with respect to this Agreement, and such licensor or vendor shall have the right to enforce this Agreement in its own name as if it were Juniper. In addition, certain third party software may be provided with the Software and is subject to the accompanying license(s), if any, of its respective owner(s). To the extent portions of the Software are distributed under and subject to open source licenses obligating Juniper to make the source code for such portions publicly available (such as the GNU General Public License (GPL) or the GNU Library General Public License (LGPL)), Juniper will make such source code portions (including Juniper modifications, as appropriate) available upon request for a period of up to three years from the date of distribution. Such request can be made in writing to Juniper Networks, Inc., 1194 N. Mathilda Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94089, ATTN: General Counsel. You may obtain a copy of the GPL at http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html, and a copy of the LGPL at http://www.gnu.org/licenses/lgpl.html. 15. Miscellaneous. This Agreement shall be governed by the laws of the State of California without reference to its conflicts of laws principles. The provisions of the U.N. Convention for the International Sale of Goods shall not apply to this Agreement. For any disputes arising under this Agreement, the Parties hereby consent to the personal and exclusive jurisdiction of, and venue in, the state and federal courts within Santa Clara County, California. This Agreement constitutes the entire and sole agreement between Juniper and the Customer with respect to the Software, and supersedes all prior and contemporaneous

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agreements relating to the Software, whether oral or written (including any inconsistent terms contained in a purchase order), except that the terms of a separate written agreement executed by an authorized Juniper representative and Customer shall govern to the extent such terms are inconsistent or conflict with terms contained herein. No modification to this Agreement nor any waiver of any rights hereunder shall be effective unless expressly assented to in writing by the party to be charged. If any portion of this Agreement is held invalid, the Parties agree that such invalidity shall not affect the validity of the remainder of this Agreement. This Agreement and associated documentation has been written in the English language, and the Parties agree that the English version will govern. (For Canada: Les parties aux prsents confirment leur volont que cette convention de mme que tous les documents y compris tout avis qui s'y rattach, soient redigs en langue anglaise. (Translation: The parties confirm that this Agreement and all related documentation is and will be in the English language)).

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Table of Contents
About This Guide xvii JUNOS Documentation and Release Notes ...................................................xvii Objectives ...................................................................................................xviii Audience .....................................................................................................xviii Supported Routing Platforms ........................................................................xix Using the Index ............................................................................................xix Using the Examples in This Manual ..............................................................xix Merging a Full Example ..........................................................................xix Merging a Snippet ...................................................................................xx Documentation Conventions .........................................................................xx Documentation Feedback ............................................................................xxii Requesting Technical Support ......................................................................xxii Self-Help Online Tools and Resources ..................................................xxiii Opening a Case with JTAC ....................................................................xxiii

Part 1
Chapter 1

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


Subscriber Management Basics Overview 3

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview ................................................3 Broadband Subscriber Management Platform Support ....................................4 Broadband Subscriber Management Network Topology Overview ..................4 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Terms and Acronyms ..............5 Supporting Documentation for Broadband Subscriber Management ...............7 Triple Play and Multiplay Overview .................................................................7 Chapter 2 Residential Broadband Technology Overview 9

Broadband History ..........................................................................................9 DHCP in Broadband Networks ......................................................................10 Broadband Service Delivery Options .............................................................11 Digital Subscriber Line ............................................................................11 Active Ethernet .......................................................................................11 Passive Optical Networking ....................................................................11 Hybrid Fiber Coaxial ...............................................................................12 Broadband Delivery and FTTx .......................................................................12

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Chapter 3

Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Hardware Overview

15

Broadband Subscriber Management Edge Router Overview ..........................15 Broadband Services Router Overview .....................................................15 High-Speed Internet Access Support .................................................16 IPTV Support ....................................................................................16 Video Services Router .............................................................................16 Services Router Placement ......................................................................16 Single Edge Placement .....................................................................17 Multiedge Placement ........................................................................17 Multiservice Access Node Overview ..............................................................17 Ethernet MSAN Aggregation Options .............................................................19 Direct Connection ...................................................................................19 Ethernet Aggregation Switch Connection ................................................20 Ring Aggregation Connection ..................................................................20 Chapter 4 Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Software Overview 21

Broadband Subscriber Management VLAN Architecture Overview ................21 Broadband Subscriber Management VLANs Across an MSAN .................22 Customer VLANs and Ethernet Aggregation ............................................22 VLANs and Residential Gateways ............................................................23 Broadband Subscriber Management IGMP Model Overview ..........................23 DHCP and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview .............................24 Extended DHCP Local Server and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview ..........................................................................................24 Extended DHCP Relay and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview ..........................................................................................25 AAA Service Framework and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview ................................................................................................25 Class of Service and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview ..............25 Policy and Control for Broadband Subscriber Management Overview ...........26 Chapter 5 Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Overview 27

DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Overview ...............................................................27 DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Configuration Interface Support ............................28 Layer 3 Wholesale Configuration DHCP Support ...........................................28 Subscriber to Logical System and Routing Instance Relationship ...................29 RADIUS VSAs and Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Configuration Overview ..........................................................................29

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Part 2
Chapter 6

Configuring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions


Broadband Subscriber Management Configuration Overview 33

Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Topology and Configuration Elements .................................................................................................33 Subscriber Management Licensing ................................................................34 Chapter 7 Configuring a Basic Triple Play Subscriber Management Network 35

Triple Play Subscriber Management Network Topology Overview .................35 Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements ...........36 Configuring a Loopback Interface for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution ..................................................................................................37 Configuring Static Customer VLANs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution .............................................................................38 Configuring Dynamic Customer VLANs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution .............................................................................39 Configuring a Global Class of Service Profile for the Subscriber Management Solution ..................................................................................................41 Configuring a Class of Service Profile ......................................................41 Configuring CoS Fowarding Classes ........................................................42 Configuring CoS Schedulers ....................................................................43 Configuring Scheduler Maps ...................................................................44 Configuring CoS Classifiers .....................................................................45 Configuring CoS Interface Properties ......................................................46 Configuring Dynamic Firewall Filter Services for Use in Dynamic Profiles .....47 Configuring AAA Service Framework for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution .............................................................................48 Configuring RADIUS Server Access Information ......................................48 Configuring RADIUS Server Access Profile ..............................................49 Configuring Address Server Elements for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution .............................................................................50 Configuring an Address Assignment Pool ...............................................50 Configuring Extended DHCP Local Server ...............................................51 Configuring a Dynamic Profile for the Triple Play Solution ............................53 Chapter 8 Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Configuration Overview 55 Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Topology and Configuration Elements ..........................................................................55

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Chapter 9

Configuring the Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution

57

DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Topology Overview .................................57 Configuring Loopback Interfaces for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Solution ..................................................................................................59 Configuring VLANs for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution .........60 Configuring Static Customer VLANs for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution ..............................................................................60 Configuring Dynamic Customer VLANs for the Wholesale Network Solution ............................................................................................61 Configuring Access Components for the Wholesale Network Solution ...........63 Configuring RADIUS Server Access .........................................................63 Configuring a DHCP Wholesaler Access Profile .......................................64 Configuring Retailer Access Profiles ........................................................64 Configuring Dynamic Profiles for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution ..................................................................................................65 Configuring a Wholesale Dynamic Profile ...............................................66 Configuring a Retail Dynamic Profile ......................................................66 Configuring Separate Routing Instances for Service Retailers ........................66 Configure Default Forwarding Options for the DHCP Wholesale Network Solution ..................................................................................................69 Chapter 10 Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Configuration Examples 71 Example: Wholesaler Dynamic Profile for a DHCP Wholesale Network .........71 Example: Retailer Dynamic Profile for a DHCP Wholesale Network ..............72 Example: Default Forwarding Options Configuration for the DHCP Wholesale Network ..................................................................................................72 Example: Retailer Routing Instances for a DHCP Wholesale Network ...........73

Part 3
Chapter 11

Monitoring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions


Related Broadband Subscriber Management CLI Commands 79

Subscriber Management AAA and DHCP CLI Commands ..............................79 Subscriber Management DHCP Local Server CLI Commands ........................79 Subscriber Management DHCP Relay CLI Commands ...................................80 Subscriber Management Interface CLI Commands ........................................80 Subscriber Management Dynamic Protocol CLI Commands ..........................81 Subscriber Management Subscriber CLI Commands .....................................81

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Part 4

Index
Index .............................................................................................................85

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Table of Contents

List of Figures
Part 1
Chapter 1

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


Subscriber Management Basics Overview 3 Figure 1: Subscriber Management Residential Broadband Network Example ...................................................................................................5 Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Hardware Overview 15 Figure 2: Choosing an MSAN Type ................................................................19

Chapter 3

Part 2
Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8

Configuring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions


Broadband Subscriber Management Configuration Overview 33 Figure 3: Basic Subscriber Management Solution Topology ...........................33 Configuring a Basic Triple Play Subscriber Management Network 35 Figure 4: Triple Play Network Reference Topology ........................................36 Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Configuration Overview 55 Figure 5: Basic Subscriber Management Layer 3 Wholesale Solution Topology .................................................................................................56 Configuring the Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution 57 Figure 6: DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Reference Topology ..................58

Chapter 9

List of Figures

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

xiv

List of Figures

List of Tables
About This Guide xvii Table 1: Notice Icons ....................................................................................xxi Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions .........................................................xxi

Part 1
Chapter 1 Chapter 3 Chapter 5

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


Subscriber Management Basics Overview 3 Table 3: Triple Play and Multiplay Comparison ...............................................8 Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Hardware Overview 15 Table 4: Ethernet MSAN Aggregation Methods ..............................................19 Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Overview 27 Table 5: Required Juniper Networks VSAs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Network Solution ..............................................29

Part 2
Chapter 7

Configuring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions


Configuring a Basic Triple Play Subscriber Management Network 35 Table 6: Class of Service Queue Configuration ...............................................42

Part 3
Chapter 11

Monitoring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions


Related Broadband Subscriber Management CLI Commands 79 Table 7: Subscriber Management AAA and Address Assignment Pools CLI Commands .............................................................................................79 Table 8: Subscriber Management DHCP Local Server CLI Commands ...........80 Table 9: Subscriber Management DHCP Relay CLI Commands .....................80 Table 10: Subscriber Management Interface CLI Commands .........................80 Table 11: Subscriber Management Dynamic Protocol CLI Commands ..........81 Table 12: Subscriber Management Subscriber CLI Commands ......................81

List of Tables

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

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List of Tables

About This Guide


This preface provides the following guidelines for using the JUNOS Software Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide:

JUNOS Documentation and Release Notes on page xvii Objectives on page xviii Audience on page xviii Supported Routing Platforms on page xix Using the Index on page xix Using the Examples in This Manual on page xix Documentation Conventions on page xx Documentation Feedback on page xxii Requesting Technical Support on page xxii

JUNOS Documentation and Release Notes


For a list of related JUNOS documentation, see http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/junos/. If the information in the latest release notes differs from the information in the documentation, follow the JUNOS Software Release Notes. To obtain the most current version of all Juniper Networks technical documentation, see the product documentation page on the Juniper Networks website at http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/. Juniper Networks supports a technical book program to publish books by Juniper Networks engineers and subject matter experts with book publishers around the world. These books go beyond the technical documentation to explore the nuances of network architecture, deployment, and administration using JUNOS Software and Juniper Networks devices. In addition, the Juniper Networks Technical Library, published in conjunction with O'Reilly Media, explores improving network security, reliability, and availability using JUNOS configuration techniques. All the books are for sale at technical bookstores and book outlets around the world. The current list can be viewed at http://www.juniper.net/books .

JUNOS Documentation and Release Notes

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

Objectives
This guide provides an overview of broadband subscriber management using JUNOS Software and describes how to configure and manage remote subscribers on the routing platform.

NOTE: For additional information about JUNOS Softwareeither corrections to or information that might have been omitted from this guidesee the software release notes at http://www.juniper.net.

Audience
This guide is designed for network administrators who are configuring and monitoring a Juniper Networks MX Series Ethernet Services Router. To use this guide, you need a broad understanding of networks in general, the Internet in particular, networking principles, and network configuration. You must also be familiar with one or more of the following Internet routing protocols:

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP) Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) router discovery Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) Protocol-Independent Multicast (PIM) Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) Routing Information Protocol (RIP) Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)

Personnel operating the equipment must be trained and competent; must not conduct themselves in a careless, willfully negligent, or hostile manner; and must abide by the instructions provided by the documentation.

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Objectives

About This Guide

Supported Routing Platforms


For the features described in this manual, the JUNOS Software currently supports the following router:

MX Series Ethernet Services Router

Using the Index


This reference contains a complete index that includes topic entries.

Using the Examples in This Manual


If you want to use the examples in this manual, you can use the load merge or the load merge relative command. These commands cause the software to merge the incoming configuration into the current candidate configuration. If the example configuration contains the top level of the hierarchy (or multiple hierarchies), the example is a full example. In this case, use the load merge command. If the example configuration does not start at the top level of the hierarchy, the example is a snippet. In this case, use the load merge relative command. These procedures are described in the following sections.

Merging a Full Example


To merge a full example, follow these steps:
1.

From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration example into a text file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing platform. For example, copy the following configuration to a file and name the file ex-script.conf. Copy the ex-script.conf file to the /var/tmp directory on your routing platform.
system { scripts { commit { file ex-script.xsl; } } } interfaces { fxp0 { disable; unit 0 { family inet { address 10.0.0.1/24; } } }

Supported Routing Platforms

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

}
2.

Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the load merge configuration mode command:
[edit] user@host# load merge /var/tmp/ex-script.conf load complete

Merging a Snippet
To merge a snippet, follow these steps:
1.

From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration snippet into a text file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing platform. For example, copy the following snippet to a file and name the file ex-script-snippet.conf. Copy the ex-script-snippet.conf file to the /var/tmp directory on your routing platform.
commit { file ex-script-snippet.xsl; }

2.

Move to the hierarchy level that is relevant for this snippet by issuing the following configuration mode command:
[edit] user@host# edit system scripts [edit system scripts]

3.

Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the load merge relative configuration mode command:
[edit system scripts] user@host# load merge relative /var/tmp/ex-script-snippet.conf load complete

For more information about the load command, see the JUNOS CLI User Guide.

Documentation Conventions
Table 1 on page xxi defines notice icons used in this guide.

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Documentation Conventions

About This Guide

Table 1: Notice Icons


Icon Meaning Informational note Description Indicates important features or instructions.

Caution

Indicates a situation that might result in loss of data or hardware damage.

Warning

Alerts you to the risk of personal injury or death.

Laser warning

Alerts you to the risk of personal injury from a laser.

Table 2 on page xxi defines the text and syntax conventions used in this guide.
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions
Convention
Bold text like this

Description Represents text that you type.

Examples To enter configuration mode, type the configure command: user@host> configure

Fixed-width text like this

Represents output that appears on the terminal screen.


user@host> show chassis alarms No alarms currently active

Italic text like this

Introduces important new terms. Identifies book names. Identifies RFC and Internet draft titles.

A policy term is a named structure that defines match conditions and actions. JUNOS System Basics Configuration Guide RFC 1997, BGP Communities Attribute

Italic text like this

Represents variables (options for which you substitute a value) in commands or configuration statements.

Configure the machines domain name: [edit] root@# set system domain-name domain-name

Plain text like this

Represents names of configuration statements, commands, files, and directories; IP addresses; configuration hierarchy levels; or labels on routing platform components.

To configure a stub area, include the stub statement at the [edit


protocols ospf area area-id]

hierarchy level.

The console port is labeled CONSOLE.

< > (angle brackets)

Enclose optional keywords or variables.

stub <default-metric metric>;

Documentation Conventions

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Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued)


Convention | (pipe symbol) Description Indicates a choice between the mutually exclusive keywords or variables on either side of the symbol. The set of choices is often enclosed in parentheses for clarity. Indicates a comment specified on the same line as the configuration statement to which it applies. Enclose a variable for which you can substitute one or more values. Identify a level in the configuration hierarchy. Identifies a leaf statement at a configuration hierarchy level. Examples
broadcast | multicast (string1 | string2 | string3)

# (pound sign)

rsvp { # Required for dynamic MPLS only

[ ] (square brackets)

community name members [ community-ids ]

Indention and braces ( { } )

; (semicolon)

[edit] routing-options { static { route default { nexthop address; retain; } } }

J-Web GUI Conventions

Bold text like this

Represents J-Web graphical user interface (GUI) items you click or select.

In the Logical Interfaces box, select All Interfaces. To cancel the configuration, click Cancel.

> (bold right angle bracket)

Separates levels in a hierarchy of J-Web selections.

In the configuration editor hierarchy, select Protocols>Ospf.

Documentation Feedback
We encourage you to provide feedback, comments, and suggestions so that we can improve the documentation. You can send your comments to techpubs-comments@juniper.net, or fill out the documentation feedback form at https://www.juniper.net/cgi-bin/docbugreport/. If you are using e-mail, be sure to include the following information with your comments:

Document or topic name URL or page number Software release version (if applicable)

Requesting Technical Support


Technical product support is available through the Juniper Networks Technical Assistance Center (JTAC). If you are a customer with an active J-Care or JNASC support

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About This Guide

contract, or are covered under warranty, and need postsales technical support, you can access our tools and resources online or open a case with JTAC.

JTAC policiesFor a complete understanding of our JTAC procedures and policies, review the JTAC User Guide located at http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/downloads/710059.pdf . Product warrantiesFor product warranty information, visit http://www.juniper.net/support/warranty/ . JTAC Hours of Operation The JTAC centers have resources available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

Self-Help Online Tools and Resources


For quick and easy problem resolution, Juniper Networks has designed an online self-service portal called the Customer Support Center (CSC) that provides you with the following features:

Find CSC offerings: http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/ Search for known bugs: http://www2.juniper.net/kb/ Find product documentation: http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/ Find solutions and answer questions using our Knowledge Base:
http://kb.juniper.net/

Download the latest versions of software and review release notes:


http://www.juniper.net/customers/csc/software/

Search technical bulletins for relevant hardware and software notifications:


https://www.juniper.net/alerts/

Join and participate in the Juniper Networks Community Forum:


http://www.juniper.net/company/communities/

Open a case online in the CSC Case Management tool: http://www.juniper.net/cm/

To verify service entitlement by product serial number, use our Serial Number Entitlement (SNE) Tool: https://tools.juniper.net/SerialNumberEntitlementSearch/

Opening a Case with JTAC


You can open a case with JTAC on the Web or by telephone.

Use the Case Management tool in the CSC at http://www.juniper.net/cm/ . Call 1-888-314-JTAC (1-888-314-5822 toll-free in the USA, Canada, and Mexico).

For international or direct-dial options in countries without toll-free numbers, visit us at http://www.juniper.net/support/requesting-support.html

Requesting Technical Support

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Part 1

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


Subscriber Management Basics Overview on page 3 Residential Broadband Technology Overview on page 9 Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Hardware Overview on page 15 Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Software Overview on page 21 Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Overview on page 27

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview

JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview

Chapter 1

Subscriber Management Basics Overview


Broadband Subscriber Management Overview on page 3 Broadband Subscriber Management Platform Support on page 4 Broadband Subscriber Management Network Topology Overview on page 4 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Terms and Acronyms on page 5 Supporting Documentation for Broadband Subscriber Management on page 7 Triple Play and Multiplay Overview on page 7

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


Broadband Subscriber Management is a method of dynamically provisioning and managing subscriber access in a multiplay or triple play network environment. This method uses AAA configuration in conjunction with dynamic profiles to provide dynamic, per-subscriber authentication, addressing, access, and configuration for a host of broadband services including Internet access, gaming, IPTV, Video on Demand (VoD), and subscriber wholesaling.

NOTE: The JUNOS broadband subscriber management solution currently supports only DHCP-based configuration and RADIUS authentication and authorization. This guide focuses on the general components necessary for configuring a Juniper Networks MX Series Ethernet Services Router to dynamically provision and manage subscribers. However, you can also use a Juniper Networks EX Series Ethernet Switch in a subscriber network. Managing subscribers in a DHCP-based residential broadband network using an MX Series router requires the following:

Planning and configuring a virtual LAN (VLAN) architecture for the access network. Configuring an authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) framework for subscriber authentication and authorization through external servers (for example, RADIUS) as well as accounting and dynamic-request change of authorization (CoA) and disconnect operations through external servers, and address assignment through a combination of local address-assignment pools and RADIUS. Configuring DHCP local server or DHCP relay for subscriber address assignment.

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview

JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

Configuring dynamic profiles to include dynamic IGMP, firewall filter, and class of service (CoS) configuration for subscriber access. Configuring multicast access to the core network.

To better understand the subscriber access network, this guide also provides general information about some hardware not from Juniper Networks and suggests methods for choosing different network configuration options. You can configure a subscriber network in many different ways. This guide does not cover all configuration scenarios. It is intended as a starting point for understanding subscriber management and how you can use Juniper Networks hardware and software to plan and build your own subscriber management solution.
Related Topics

Broadband Subscriber Management Platform Support on page 4 Broadband Subscriber Management Network Topology Overview on page 4 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Terms and Acronyms on page 5 Supporting Documentation for Broadband Subscriber Management on page 7 Triple Play and Multiplay Overview on page 7 Broadband History on page 9

Broadband Subscriber Management Platform Support


Juniper Networks currently supports DHCP broadband subscriber management solutions only on MX Series routers.
Related Topics

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview on page 3 Broadband Subscriber Management Edge Router Overview on page 15

Broadband Subscriber Management Network Topology Overview


Figure 1 on page 5 illustrates how network elements can make up a residential broadband access network.

Broadband Subscriber Management Platform Support

Chapter 1: Subscriber Management Basics Overview

Figure 1: Subscriber Management Residential Broadband Network Example


VHO/Regional Data Center

BSR

EX Series

Apps
g016989

VSO/Central Office MX Series MX Series MX Series SIP

MX Series MSAN VSR and Aggregation Switch Edge Access MX Series MX Series MX Series

EX Series

Video

Metro Core

Super Core

Super Head-End

Related Topics

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview on page 3

Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Terms and Acronyms

AAA (authentication, authorization, and accounting)An IP-based networking system that controls user access to computer resources and manages the activity of users over a network. ASM (Any Source Multicast)A method of allowing a multicast receiver to listen to all traffic sent to a multicast group, regardless of its source. BSR (broadband services router)A router used for subscriber management and edge routing. CoA (change of authorization)RADIUS messages that contain information for dynamically changing session authorizations. CoS (class of service)A method of managing network traffic by grouping similar types of traffic together and treating each traffic type as a class with a defined service priority. DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol )A networking protocol used by subscribers to obtain the addressing information necessary for operation in an Internet Protocol (IP) network. IGMP (Internet Group Membership Protocol)A host to router signaling protocol for IPv4 used to support IP multicasting.

Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Terms and Acronyms

JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

IS-IS (Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System)A link-state, interior gateway routing protocol (IGRP) for IP networks that uses the shortest-path-first (SPF) algorithm to determine routes. LSP (label-switched path)The path traversed by a packet that is routed by MPLS. Some LSPs act as tunnels. LSPs are unidirectional, carrying traffic only in the downstream direction from an ingress node to an egress node. MPLS (Multiprotocol Label Switching)A mechanism for engineering network traffic patterns that functions by assigning to network packets short labels that describe how to forward the packets through the network. MSAN (multiservice access node)A group of commonly used aggregation devices including digital subscriber line access multiplexers (DSLAMs) used in xDSL networks, optical line termination (OLT) for PON/FTTx networks, and Ethernet switches for Active Ethernet connections. MultiplayA networking paradigm that enables the ability to add new and robust networking services that individual subscriber can access. OIF (outgoing interface)An interface used by multicast functions within a router to determine which egress ports to use for fowarding multicast groups. OSPF (Open Shortest Path First)A link-state interior gateway protocol (IGP) that makes routing decisions based on the shortest-path-first (SPF) algorithm (also referred to as the Dijkstra algorithm). PIM (Protocol Independent Multicast)A multicast routing protocol used for delivering multicast messages in a routed environment. RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service)A networking protocol that provides centralized access, authorization, and accounting management for subscribers to connect and use a network service. Residential gatewayA firewall, Network Address Translation (NAT) router, or other routing device used as a customer premises equipment (CPE) terminator in the home, office, or local point of presence (POP). SSM (single-source multicast)A routing method that allows a multicast receiver to detect only a specifically identified sender within a multicast group. set-top boxThe end host or device used to receive IPTV video streams. Triple playA networking paradigm that dedicates bandwidth to data, voice, and video service. VOD (video on demand)A unicast streaming video offering by service providers that enables the reception of an isolated video session per user with rewind, pause, and similar VCR-like capabilities. VSR (video services router)A router used in a video services network to route video streams between an access network and a metro or core network. The video services router is any M Series Multiservice Edge Router or MX Series router that supports the video routing package provided with JUNOS Software Release 8.3 or later.

Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Terms and Acronyms

Chapter 1: Subscriber Management Basics Overview

Related Topics

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview on page 3

Supporting Documentation for Broadband Subscriber Management


The JUNOS Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide relies heavily on existing configuration documentation. In particular, this guide references configuration material presented in the JUNOS Subscriber Access Configuration Guide. We recommend you become familiar with the configuration options presented for subscriber access before reading this guide. Several guides in the JUNOS Software documentation set provide detailed configuration information that is not fully covered in this guide. This guide might reference other JUNOS Software configuration and solutions documents that can provide more detail about a specific feature or configuration option. For more detailed configuration information, see the following JUNOS Software documents:

JUNOS Subscriber Access Configuration Guide JUNOS MX Series Ethernet Services Routers Layer 2 Configuration Guide JUNOS Multicast Protocols Configuration Guide JUNOS Network Interfaces Configuration Guide JUNOS Policy Framework Configuration Guide

For other solution examples, see the following JUNOS Software solutions guides:

JUNOS MX Series Ethernet Services Routers Solutions Guide JUNOS Multiplay Solutions Guide

In addition to related JUNOS documentation, you can obtain useful information from the JUNOSe Software documentation. Many features described in the JUNOSe Broadband Access Configuration Guide are similar to those described in both this guide and the JUNOS Subscriber Access Configuration Guide.
Related Topics

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview on page 3

Triple Play and Multiplay Overview


This document defines triple play and multiplay networks as different entities:

A triple play network dedicates bandwidth to each possible servicedata, voice, and video. This method works well when a limited number of services are deployed and sufficient bandwidth is available. A multiplay network refers to the ability to add new and robust networking services that each subscriber can access. This method requires the integration of dynamic bandwidth management and the ability to manage subscribers dynamically though the use of features such as hierarchical quality of service

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

(QoS) and a AAA service framework that provides authentication, accounting, dynamic change of authorization (CoA), and dynamic address assignment. Table 3 on page 8 provides some comparison between a triple play and multiplay network and the level of flexibility associated with certain networking options.
Table 3: Triple Play and Multiplay Comparison
Flexibility Bandwidth Management Adding New Services Triple Play Fixed bandwidth allocation for each service. Multiplay One bandwidth pool for each subscriber is shared by all services. The existence of one shared bandwidth pool eliminates the need to reallocate bandwidth to new services.

Requires deallocating bandwidth from one service and allocating that bandwith to the new service. Limited subscriber flexibility because a fixed bandwidth is allocated to each service or application. Client devices (PCs or set-top boxes) are dedicated to specific services and often assigned to specific ports on customer premise equipment.

Subscriber Flexibility

Subscribers can use their share of bandwidth for whatever applications they want to run.

Client Device Types

Client devices are not assigned to any specific ports. This flexibility enables the ability to use client devices for various services (for example, adding software to a PC to enable television broadcasts) and allows different client devices (PCs, Voice-over-IP phones, and set-top boxes) to reside on a single LAN.

With software and hardware now available to enable client devices to access and use the network in a variety of ways, bandwidth demands increasing, and new networking business models emerging, dynamic support of new applications is required to ensure subscriber satisfaction. A dynamic multiplay network configuration can provide the flexibility to meet these demands.
Related Topics

Broadband Subscriber Management Overview on page 3

Triple Play and Multiplay Overview

Chapter 2

Residential Broadband Technology Overview


Broadband History on page 9 DHCP in Broadband Networks on page 10 Broadband Service Delivery Options on page 11 Broadband Delivery and FTTx on page 12

Broadband History
Residential broadband services developed using a mainly ATM-based infrastructure and early Internet access required that each subscriber access the network using a dial-up modem to connect from a PC to a Remote Access Server (RAS), or bank of servers, which was connected directly to the Internet. Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), originally defined by the IETF in RFC 1661, was already in use on leased lines. It was well suited for use on the existing ATM infrastructure and enabled operators to better manage subscriber connections by providing authentication and accounting, along with a level of protocol flexibility due to it being connection-oriented and enabling service providers to customize it to their needs. The use of the PPP model, however, required special software (including the PPP protocol stack) be installed on each PC to communicate within the PPP network. After establishing a connection to the Internet, the subscriber logged in using a PPP user identifier provided by the service provider. This always on model quickly evolved in several ways. Dedicated broadband access such as DSL replaced dial-up service, replacing the dial-up modem with a DSL modem. Dial-up remote access servers were replaced by the Broadband Remote Access Server (B-RAS) and residential gateways were introduced to allow multiple PCs from one site to connect to the broadband network. Residential gateways have since evolved to provide a wide range of functions including firewall and wireless (802.1b/g/n wi-fi) connectivity. The residential gateway also became the termination point for the PPP connection, eliminating the need for the installation of special PC software. These new broadband networks were built based on the following two key assumptions:

Only a small percentage of subscribers were expected to be using network bandwidth at any given time and, even if many subscribers logged in to the network concurrently, few subscribers were likely to enter data at the exact same time.

Broadband History

JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

Traffic was TCP-based and not real-time. If a packet was lost due to network congestion, TCP detected the loss and retransmitted the packets.

Based on these assumptions, operators over-subscribed the network, enabling more subscribers than a limited amount of bandwidth can support if all subscribers were to access the network simultaneously. For example, if 50 subscribers were to sign up for service that required bandwidth of 1 Mbps for each subscriber, the network did not necessarily need to support a full 50 Mbps of throughput. Instead, operators designed the network to support much lower traffic volumes, expecting maximum traffic flow for all subscribers to occur rarely, if ever. For example, a 50:1 over-subscription needed to support only 1 Mbps of bandwidth. Bandwidth requirements have changed significantly over the years and this method of access is becoming more difficult to maintain. The basic broadband architecture was initially defined by DSL Forum TR-025 (November 1999). This specification assumed only one service was provided to subscribersInternet Access (or data). DSL Forum TR-059 (September 2003) introduced quality of service (QoS) to allow broadband networks to deliver voice over IP (VoIP) in addition to data. Because VoIP is a small percentage of overall network traffic, its introduction has not significantly altered the broadband delivery landscape. It is also worth noting that these original standards specified ATM as the Layer 2 protocol on the broadband network.
Related Topics

DHCP in Broadband Networks on page 10 Broadband Service Delivery Options on page 11 Broadband Delivery and FTTx on page 12

DHCP in Broadband Networks


Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is an alternative to PPP for assigning IP addresses and provisioning services in broadband networks. Using DHCP helps to simplify network configuration by decreasing (and in some cases eliminating) the need for manually configuring static IP addresses on network devices. For example, DHCP enables PCs and other devices within a subscriber residence to obtain IP addresses to access the Internet. Due to its general simplicity and scalability, along with the increased usage of Ethernet in access networks, DHCP deployments in broadband networks have increased.

NOTE: The JUNOS subscriber management solution currently supports only DHCP as a multiple-client configuration protocol. This guide provides only DHCP-based configuration examples where applicable.

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Chapter 2: Residential Broadband Technology Overview

Related Topics

Broadband Service Delivery Options on page 11

Broadband Service Delivery Options


Four primary delivery options exist today for delivering broadband network service. These options include the following:

Digital Subscriber Line Active Ethernet Passive Optical Networking Hybrid Fiber Coaxial

The following sections briefly describe each delivery option.

Digital Subscriber Line


Digital subscriber line (DSL) is the most widely deployed broadband technology worldwide. This delivery option uses existing telephone lines to send broadband information on a different frequency than is used for the existing voice service. Many generations of DSL are used for residential service, including Very High Speed Digital Subscriber Line 2 (VDSL2) and versions of Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL, ADSL2, and ADSL2+). These variations of DSL primarily offer asymmetric residential broadband service where different upstream and downstream speeds are implemented. (VDSL2 also supports symmetric operation.) Other DSL variations, like High bit rate Digital Subscriber Line (HDSL) and Symmetric Digital Subscriber Line (SDSL), provide symmetric speeds and are typically used in business applications. The head-end to a DSL system is the Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer (DSLAM). The demarcation device at the customer premise is a DSL modem. DSL service models are defined by the Broadband Forum (formerly called the DSL Forum).

Active Ethernet
Active Ethernet uses traditional Ethernet technology to deliver broadband service across a fiber-optic network. Active Ethernet does not provide a separate channel for existing voice service, so VoIP (or TDM-to-VoIP) equipment is required. In addition, sending full-speed (10 or 100 Mbps) Ethernet requires significant power, necessitating distribution to Ethernet switches and optical repeaters located in cabinets outside of the central office. Due to these restrictions, early Active Ethernet deployments typically appear in densely populated areas.

Passive Optical Networking


Passive Optical Networking (PON), like Active Ethernet, uses fiber-optic cable to deliver services to the premises. This delivery option provides higher speeds than DSL but lower speeds than Active Ethernet. Though PON provides higher speed to each subscriber, it requires a higher investment in cable and connectivity.

Broadband Service Delivery Options

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

A key advantage of PON is that it does not require any powered equipment outside of the central office. Each fiber leaving the central office is split using a non-powered optical splitter. The split fiber then follows a point-to-point connection to each subscriber. PON technologies fall into three general categories:

ATM PON (APON), Broadband PON (BPON), and Gigabit-capable PON (GPON)PON standards that use the following different delivery options:

APONThe first passive optical network standard and is primarily used for business applications. BPONBased on APON, BPON adds wave division multiplexing (WDM), dynamic and higher upstream bandwidth allocation, and a standard management interface to enable mixed-vendor networks. GPONThe most recent PON adaptation, GPON is based on BPON but supports higher rates, enhanced security, and a choice of which Layer 2 protocol to use (ATM, Generic Equipment Model [GEM], or Ethernet).

Ethernet PON (EPON)Provides capabilities similar to GPON, BPON, and APON, but uses Ethernet standards. These standards are defined by the IEEE. Gigabit Ethernet PON (GEPON) is the highest speed version. Wave Division Multiplexing PON (WDM-PON)A nonstandard PON which, as the name implies, provides a separate wavelength to each subscriber.

The head-end to a PON system is an Optical Line Terminator (OLT). The demarcation device at the customer premises is an Optical Network Terminator (ONT). The ONT provides subscriber-side ports for connecting Ethernet (RJ-45), telephone wires (RJ-11) or coaxial cable (F-connector).

Hybrid Fiber Coaxial


Multi-System Operators (MSOs; also known as cable TV operators) offer broadband service through their hybrid fiber-coaxial (HFC) network. The HFC network combines optical fiber and coaxial cable to deliver service directly to the customer. Services leave the central office (CO) using a fiber-optic cable. The service is then converted outside of the CO to a coaxial cable tree using a series of optical nodes and, where necessary, through a trunk radio frequency (RF) amplifier. The coaxial cables then connect to multiple subscribers. The demarcation device is a cable modem or set-top box, which talks to a Cable Modem Termination System (CMTS) at the MSO head-end or master facility that receives television signals for processing and distribution. Broadband traffic is carried using the Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification (DOCSIS) standard defined by CableLabs and many contributing companies.
Related Topics

Broadband Delivery and FTTx on page 12

Broadband Delivery and FTTx


Many implementations use existing copper cabling to deliver signal to the premises, but fiber-optic cable connectivity is making its way closer to the subscriber. Most

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Broadband Delivery and FTTx

Chapter 2: Residential Broadband Technology Overview

networks use a combination of both copper and fiber-optic cabling. The term fiber to the x (FTTx) describes how far into the network fiber-optic cabling runs before a switch to copper cabling takes place. Both PON and Active Ethernet can use fiber-optic portion of the network, while xDSL is typically used on the copper portion. This means that a single fiber-optic strand may support multiple copper-based subscribers. Increasing the use of fiber in the network increases cost but it also increases network access speed to each subscriber. The following terms are used to describe the termination point of fiber-optic cable in a network:

Fiber to the Premises (FTTP), Fiber to the Home (FTTH), Fiber to the Business (FTTB)Fiber extends all the way to the subscriber. PON is most common for residential access, although Active Ethernet can be efficiently used in dense areas such as apartment complexes. Active Ethernet is more common for delivering services to businesses. Fiber to the Curb (FTTC)Fiber extends most of the way (typically, 500 feet/150 meters or less) to the subscriber. Existing copper is used for the remaining distance to the subscriber. Fiber to the Node/Neighborhood (FTTN)Fiber extends to within a few thousand feet of the subscriber and converted to xDSL for the remaining distance to the subscriber. Fiber to the Exchange (FTTE)A typical central office-based xDSL implementation in which fiber is used to deliver traffic to the central office and xDSL is used on the existing local loop. Broadband Service Delivery Options on page 11

Related Topics

Broadband Delivery and FTTx

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Broadband Delivery and FTTx

Chapter 3

Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Hardware Overview


Broadband Subscriber Management Edge Router Overview on page 15 Multiservice Access Node Overview on page 17 Ethernet MSAN Aggregation Options on page 19

Broadband Subscriber Management Edge Router Overview


The edge router is the demarcation point between the residential broadband access network and the core network. The Juniper Networks MX Series router (along with the Juniper Networks EX Series Ethernet Switch) can play multiple roles as an edge router. The most common include the following:

Broadband services router (BSR)This router supports high speed Internet access along with several other subscriber-based services including VoIP, IPTV, and gaming. Video services router (VSR)The video services router capabilities are a subset of those provided by a broadband services router. In general, using the MX Series router as a video services router provides bi-directional traffic destined for the set-top box (STB). This traffic includes IPTV and video on demand (VoD) streams as well as associated control traffic such as IGMP and electronic program guide (EPG) updates.

You can also use the MX Series router in certain Layer 2 solutions. For information about configuring the MX Series router in Layer 2 scenarios, see the JUNOS MX Series Ethernet Services Routers Layer 2 Configuration Guide or the JUNOS MX Series Ethernet Services Routers Solutions Guide.

Broadband Services Router Overview


A broadband services router is an edge router that traditionally supports primarily Internet-bound traffic. This router replaces and provides a superset of the functionality provided by a Broadband Remote Access Server (B-RAS). The broadband services router functions can be broken into two key areashigh speed Internet access and IPTV support.

Broadband Subscriber Management Edge Router Overview

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

High-Speed Internet Access Support


The broadband services router communicates with the RADIUS server to enforce which services each subscriber can access. For example, one subscriber might have signed up for a smaller Internet access service of 1 Mbps where another subscriber might have signed up for a higher, 10 Mbps service. The broadband services router manages the traffic to each subscriber, ensuring that each subscriber obtains the level of access service they have purchased, while also ensuring that any VoIP traffic receives priority. The broadband services router also makes traffic forwarding decisions based on aggregate bandwidth detected on any adjacent multiservice access node (MSAN).

IPTV Support
The broadband services router supports IPTV traffic including support for IGMP multicast group start and stop requests from downstream MSANs. The broadband services router manages the bandwidth allocations associated with high-bandwidth IPTV as well as video on demand (VoD) traffic to ensure high quality service delivery.

Video Services Router


When configuring a multiedge network, you can use the MX Series router as a video services router (VSR) to support only video traffic without supporting the high-speed Internet access (HSIA) capabilities.

NOTE: We recommend a single-edge network model but the MX Series router allows for flexibility when defining a multiplay network topology. Some advantages of using a separate video services router for video traffic include the following:

Provides the ability to add IPTV service without the need to modify an existing edge router that is performing other functions. Reduces network bandwidth by moving the video edge further out to the network edge while still allowing for centralized broadband services router operation. Typically requires less capital investment because the video services router does not need to provide per-subscriber management.

Services Router Placement


Depending on the type of network you are creatingsingle edge or multiedgeyou can place a broadband services router or video services router in various locations.

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Broadband Subscriber Management Edge Router Overview

Chapter 3: Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Hardware Overview

Single Edge Placement


In a single edge network, you use only broadband services routers because the single device must perform all of the necessary edge functionsproviding subscriber management for high-speed Internet access and IPTV services. You can use the two following topology models when placing the broadband services router:

Centralized single edgeThe edge router is centrally located and placed at one location to cover a particular region. A secondary router is sometimes placed in this location to act as a backup. Downstream MSANs are connected to the broadband services router using a ring or mesh topology. Distributed single edgeThe edge router is placed further out into the network, typically in the central office (CO) closest to the subscribers it services. Downstream MSANs are typically connected directly to the broadband services router (in a true, single edge topology) or through an Ethernet aggregation switch.

In general, the addition of IPTV service favors a more distributed model because it pushes the need for subscriber management farther out into the network.

Multiedge Placement
In a multiedge network, you use both broadband services routers and video services routers. The broadband services router controls any high-speed Internet traffic and the video services router controls video traffic. You can use the two following topology models when placing service routers in a multiedge network topology:

Co-located multiedgeThe broadband services router and video services router are housed in the same location and an Ethernet switch directs traffic in the CO to the appropriate edge router.

NOTE: A single MX Series router can serve as both Ethernet switch and video services router. For information about configuring the MX Series router in Layer 2 scenarios, see the JUNOS MX Series Ethernet Services Routers Layer 2 Configuration Guide or the JUNOS MX Series Ethernet Services Routers Solutions Guide. Split multiedgeThe video services router and broadband services router reside in different locations. In this model, the broadband services router is typically located more centrally and video services routers are distributed. Multiservice Access Node Overview on page 17 Ethernet MSAN Aggregation Options on page 19 Broadband Subscriber Management Platform Support on page 4

Related Topics

Multiservice Access Node Overview


A multiservice access node is a broader term that refers to a group of commonly used aggregation devices. These devices include digital subscriber line access multiplexers

Multiservice Access Node Overview

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

(DSLAMs) used in xDSL networks, optical line termination (OLT) for PON/FTTx networks, and Ethernet switches for Active Ethernet connections. Modern MSANs often support all of these connections, as well as providing connections for additional circuits such as plain old telephone service (referred to as POTS) or Digital Signal 1 (DS1 or T1). The defining function of a multiservice access node is to aggregate traffic from multiple subscribers. At the physical level, the MSAN also converts traffic from the last mile technology (for example, ADSL) to Ethernet for delivery to subscribers. You can broadly categorize MSANs into three types based on how they forward traffic in the network:

Layer2 MSANThis type of MSAN is essentially a Layer 2 switch (though typically not a fully functioning switch) with some relevant enhancements. These MSANs use Ethernet (or ATM) switching to forward traffic. The MSAN forwards all subscriber traffic upstream to an edge router that acts as the centralized control point and prevents direct subscriber-to-subscriber communication. Ethernet Link Aggregation (LAG) provides the resiliency in this type of network. Layer 2 DSLAMs cannot interpret IGMP, so they cannot selectively replicate IPTV channels.

Layer3 aware MSANThis IP-aware MSAN can interpret and respond to IGMP requests by locally replicating a multicast stream and forwarding the stream to any subscriber requesting it. Layer 3 awareness is important when supporting IPTV traffic to perform channel changes (sometimes referred to as channel zaps). Static IP-aware MSANs always receive all multicast television channels. They do not have the ability to request that specific channels be forwarded to the DSLAM. Dynamic IP-aware DSLAMs, however, can inform the network to begin (or discontinue) sending individual channels to the DSLAM. Configuring IGMP proxy or IGMP snooping on the DSLAM accomplishes this function. Layer3 MSANThese MSANs use IP routing functionality rather than Layer 2 technologies to forward traffic. The advantage of this forwarding method is the ability to support multiple upstream links going to different upstream routers and improving network resiliency. However, to accomplish this level of resiliency, you must assign a separate IP subnetwork to each MSAN, adding a level of complexity that can be more difficult to maintain or manage.

In choosing a MSAN type, refer to Figure 2 on page 19:

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Multiservice Access Node Overview

Chapter 3: Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Hardware Overview

Figure 2: Choosing an MSAN Type


Start

Replicate Multicast at DSLAM

Yes

Usage Tracking or QoS Adjust?

Yes Where?

At BSR

L3 MSAN with IGMP Snooping

No

No

At MSAN L3 MSAN with IGMP Proxy


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L2 MSAN

L3-aware MSAN

Related Topics

Ethernet MSAN Aggregation Options on page 19

Ethernet MSAN Aggregation Options


Each MSAN can connect directly to an edge router (broadband services router or video services router), or an intermediate device (for example, an Ethernet switch) can aggregate MSAN traffic before being sent to the services router. Table 4 on page 19 lists the possible MSAN aggregation methods and under what conditions they are used.
Table 4: Ethernet MSAN Aggregation Methods
Method Direct connection When Used Each MSAN connects directly to the broadband services router and optional video services router. Each MSAN connects directly to an intermediate Ethernet switch. The switch, in turn, connects to the broadband services router or optional video services router. Each MSAN connects to a ring topology of MSANs. The head-end MSAN (the device closest to the upstream edge router) connects to the broadband services router.

Ethernet aggregation switch connection

Ethernet ring aggregation connection

You can use different aggregation methods in different portions of the network. You can also create multiple layers of traffic aggregation within the network. For example, an MSAN can connect to a central office terminal (COT), which, in turn, connects to an Ethernet aggregation switch, or you can create multiple levels of Ethernet aggregation switches prior to connecting to the edge router.

Direct Connection
In the direct connection method, each MSAN has a point-to-point connection to the broadband services router. If an intermediate central office exists, traffic from multiple MSANs can be combined onto a single connection using wave-division multiplexing

Ethernet MSAN Aggregation Options

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(WDM). You can also connect the MSAN to a video services router. However, this connection method requires that you use a Layer 3 MSAN that has the ability to determine which link to use when forwarding traffic. When using the direct connection method, keep the following in mind:

We recommend this approach when possible to simplify network management. Because multiple MSANs are used to connect to the services router, and Layer 3 MSANs generally require a higher equipment cost, this method is rarely used in a multiedge subscriber management model. Direct connection is typically used when most MSAN links are utilized less than 33 percent and there is little value in combining traffic from multiple MSANs.

Ethernet Aggregation Switch Connection


An Ethernet aggregation switch aggregates traffic from multiple downstream MSANs into a single connection to the services router (broadband services router or optional video services router). When using the Ethernet aggregation switch connection method, keep the following in mind:

Ethernet aggregation is typically used when most MSAN links are utilized over 33 percent or to aggregate traffic from lower speed MSANs (for example, 1 Gbps) to a higher speed connection to the services router (for example, 10 Gbps). You can use an MX Series router as an Ethernet aggregation switch. For information about configuring the MX Series router in Layer 2 scenarios, see the JUNOS MX Series Ethernet Services Routers Layer 2 Configuration Guide or the JUNOS MX Series Ethernet Services Routers Solutions Guide.

Ring Aggregation Connection


In a ring topology, the remote MSAN that connects to subscribers is called the remote terminal (RT). This device can be located in the outside plant (OSP) or in a remote central office (CO). Traffic traverses the ring until it reaches the central office terminal (COT) at the head-end of the ring. The COT then connects directly to the services router (broadband services router or video services router).

NOTE: The RT and COT must support the same ring resiliency protocol. You can use an MX Series router in an Ethernet ring aggregation topology. For information about configuring the MX Series router in Layer 2 scenarios, see the JUNOS MX Series Ethernet Services Routers Layer 2 Configuration Guide or the JUNOS MX Series Ethernet Services Routers Solutions Guide.
Related Topics

Multiservice Access Node Overview on page 17

20

Ethernet MSAN Aggregation Options

Chapter 4

Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Software Overview


Broadband Subscriber Management VLAN Architecture Overview on page 21 Broadband Subscriber Management IGMP Model Overview on page 23 DHCP and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview on page 24 AAA Service Framework and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview on page 25 Class of Service and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview on page 25 Policy and Control for Broadband Subscriber Management Overview on page 26

Broadband Subscriber Management VLAN Architecture Overview


The subscriber management logical network architecture is as important as the physical network architecture. You configure the logical portion of the subscriber management network using virtual local area networks (VLANs). Three VLAN models deliver multiple services to subscribers. These models include the following:

Service VLANThe service VLAN (S-VLAN) provides many-to-one (N:1) subscriber-to-service connectivity: The service VLAN carries a service (for example, data, video, or voice) to all subscribers instead of having different services share a VLAN. Adding a new service requires adding a new VLAN and allocating bandwidth to the new service. The service VLAN model enables different groups that are using the broadband network (for example, external application providers) to manage a given service. One limitation of service VLANs is the absence of any logical isolation between user sessions at the VLAN level. This lack of isolation requires that the multiservice access node (MSAN) and broadband services router provide the necessary security filtering. Customer VLANThe customer VLAN (C-VLAN) provides one-to-one (1:1) subscriber-to-service connectivity: One VLAN carries all traffic to each subscriber on the network. Having a single VLAN per subscriber simplifies operations by providing a 1:1 mapping of technology (VLANs) to subscribers. You can also understand what applications any subscriber is using at any given time. Because you use only one VLAN to carry traffic to each subscriber, this approach is not affected when adding new services. However, using a pure C-VLAN model consumes more bandwidth because a single television channel being viewed by multiple subscribers is carried across the network several timesonce on each

Broadband Subscriber Management VLAN Architecture Overview

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C-VLAN. This approach requires a more scalable, robust edge router that can support several thousand VLANs.

Hybrid C-VLANThe hybrid VLAN combines the best of both previous VLANs by using one VLAN per subscriber to carry unicast traffic and one shared multicast VLAN (M-VLAN) for carrying broadcast (multicast) television traffic. You can use both the pure and hybrid C-VLAN models in different portions of the network, depending upon available bandwidth and MSAN capabilities.

NOTE: The term C-VLAN, when used casually, often refers to a hybrid C-VLAN implementation.

We recommend using one of the C-VLAN models to simplify configuration and management when expanding services. However, some MSANs are limited to the number of VLANs they can support, limiting the ability to use either C-VLAN model.

NOTE: Most MSANs can support the service VLAN model.

Broadband Subscriber Management VLANs Across an MSAN


You configure VLANs to operate between the MSAN and the edge router (broadband services router or video services router). However, the MSAN might modify VLAN identifiers before forwarding information to the subscriber in the following ways:

NOTE: Not all MSANs support these options. The VLAN identifiers can be carried within the ATM VCs or they can be removed. The value of keeping the VLAN header is that it carries the IEEE 802.1p Ethernet priority bits. These priority bits can be added to upstream traffic by the residential gateway, allowing the DSLAM to easily identify and prioritize more important traffic (for example, control and VoIP traffic). Typically, a VLAN identifier of zero (0) is used for this purpose. In a C-VLAN model, the MSAN might modify the VLAN identifier so that the same VLAN is sent to each subscriber. This enables the use of the same digital subscriber line (DSL) modem and residential gateway configuration for all subscribers without the need to define a different VLAN for each device.

Customer VLANs and Ethernet Aggregation


The 12-bit VLAN identifier (VLAN ID) can support up to 4095 subscribers. When using an aggregation switch with a C-VLAN topology, and fewer than 4095 subscribers are connected to a single edge router port, the aggregation switch can transparently pass all VLANs. However, if the VLAN can exceed 4095 subscribers per broadband services router port, you must use VLAN stacking (IEEE 802.1ad, also known as Q-in-Q). VLAN stacking includes two VLAN tagsan outer tag to identify the destination MSAN and

22

Broadband Subscriber Management VLAN Architecture Overview

Chapter 4: Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Software Overview

an inner tag to identify the subscriber. For downstream traffic (that is, from the broadband services router or Ethernet switch to the MSAN), the outer tag determines which port to forward traffic. The forwarding device then uses the VLAN pop function on this tag before forwarding the traffic. The reverse process occurs for upstream traffic. VLAN stacking is not necessary for S-VLANs or M-VLANs. However, for the hybrid (C-VLAN and M-VLAN) model, the Ethernet switch or services router must be able to pop or push tags onto C-VLAN traffic while not modifying M-VLAN packets.

VLANs and Residential Gateways


One function provided by a residential gateway is to enable each subscriber to have a private (in-home) network, unseen by other broadband subscribers, while enabling the subscriber to have multiple devices connected to the broadband network. This private network is made possible by using Network Address Translation (NAT). Most conditional access systems require detecting the real IP address of the set-top box (STB). This security measure means that traffic to and from the STB must be bridged, not routed, across all network elements including aggregation switches, MSANs, and residential gateways. NAT cannot be used at the residential gateway for traffic to and from the STB. In addition, some residential gateways associate VLANs (or ATM virtual circuits) with ports. Traffic on a given VLAN is always forwarded to specific downstream port. Use caution when mapping VLANs on an MSAN.
Related Topics

Static Subscriber Interfaces and VLAN Overview

Broadband Subscriber Management IGMP Model Overview


In an IPTV network, channel changes occur when a set-top box (STB) sends IGMP commands that inform an upstream device (for example, a multiservice access node [MSAN] or services router) whether to start or stop sending multicast groups to the subscriber. In addition, IGMP hosts periodically request notification from the STB about which channels (multicast groups) are being received. You can implement IGMP in the subscriber management network in the following ways:

Static IGMPAll multicast channels are sent to the MSAN. When the MSAN receives an IGMP request to start or stop sending a channel, it performs the request and then discards the IGMP packet. IGMP ProxyOnly multicast channels currently being viewed are sent to the MSAN. If the MSAN receives a request to view a channel that is not currently being forwarded to the MSAN, it forwards the request upstream. However, the upstream device does not see all channel change requests from each subscriber. IGMP SnoopingOnly multicast channels currently being viewed are sent to the MSAN. The MSAN forwards all IGMP requests upstream, unaltered, even if it is already receiving the channel. The upstream device sees all channel change requests from each subscriber. Using IGMP snooping enables the broadband

Broadband Subscriber Management IGMP Model Overview

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

services router to determine the bandwidth requirement of each multicast group and adjust the bandwidth made available to unicast traffic.

IGMP PassthroughThe MSAN transparently passes IGMP packets upstream to the broadband services router.

IGMP hosts (sources) also periodically verify that they are sending the correct traffic by requesting that each client send information about what multicast groups it wants to receive. The responses to this IGMP query can result in a substantial upstream traffic burst. IGMPv2 is the minimum level required to support IPTV, and is the most widely deployed. Emerging standards specify IGMPv3.
Related Topics

Dynamic IGMP Configuration Overview

DHCP and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


You use DHCP in broadband networks to provide IP address configuration and service provisioning. DHCP, historically a popular protocol in LANs, works well with Ethernet connectivity and is becoming increasingly popular in broadband networks as a simple, scalable solution for assigning IP addresses to subscriber home PCs, set-top boxes (STBs), and other devices. The JUNOS broadband subscriber management solution currently supports the following DHCP allocation models:

DHCP Local Server DHCP Relay

DHCP uses address assignment pools from which to allocate subscriber addresses. Address-assignment pools support both dynamic and static address assignment:

Dynamic address assignmentA subscriber is automatically assigned an address from the address-assignment pool. Static address assignmentAddresses are reserved and always used by a particular subscriber.

NOTE: Addresses that are reserved for static assignment are removed from the dynamic address pool and cannot be assigned to other clients.

Extended DHCP Local Server and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


You can enable the services router to function as an extended DHCP local server. As an extended DHCP local server the services router, and not an external DHCP server, provides an IP address and other configuration information in response to a client request. The extended DHCP local server supports the use of external AAA authentication services, such as RADIUS, to authenticate DHCP clients.

24

DHCP and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview

Chapter 4: Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Software Overview

Extended DHCP Relay and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


You can configure extended DHCP relay options on the router and enable the router to function as a DHCP relay agent. A DHCP relay agent forwards DHCP request and reply packets between a DHCP client and a DHCP server. You can use DHCP relay in carrier edge applications such as video and IPTV to obtain configuration parameters, including an IP address, for your subscribers. The extended DHCP relay agent supports the use of external AAA authentication services, such as RADIUS, to authenticate DHCP clients.
Related Topics

Extended DHCP Local Server Overview Extended DHCP Relay Agent Overview Address-Assignment Pools Overview

AAA Service Framework and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


You use AAA Service Framework for all authentication, authorization, accounting, address assignment, and dynamic request services that the services router uses for network access. The framework supports authentication and authorization through external servers, such as RADIUS. The framework also supports accounting and dynamic-request CoA and disconnect operations through external servers, and address assignment through a combination of local address-assignment pools and RADIUS.

NOTE: The broadband subscriber management solution currently supports the use of only RADIUS servers. The broadband services router interacts with external servers to determine how individual subscribers access the broadband network. The router also obtains information from the external server for the following:

Methods used for authentication and accounting. How accounting statistics are collected and used. How dynamic requests are handled. RADIUS Authentication and Accounting for Subscriber Access Management RADIUS-Initiated Change of Authorization (CoA) Overview RADIUS-Initiated Disconnect Overview

Related Topics

Class of Service and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


Class of service (CoS) is a mechanism that enables you to divide traffic into classes and offer various levels of throughput and acceptable packet loss when congestion occurs. CoS also provides the option of using differentiated services when best-effort traffic delivery is insufficient. You can also configure the services router to provide

AAA Service Framework and Broadband Subscriber Management Overview

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

hierarchical scheduling for subscribers by dynamically adding or deleting queues when subscribers require services. By using a dynamic profile, you can provide all subscribers in your network with default CoS parameters when they log in. For example, you can configure an access dynamic profile to specify that all subscribers receive a basic data service. If you use RADIUS variables in the dynamic profile, you can enable the service to be activated for those subscribers at login. You can also use variables to configure a service profile that enables subscribers to activate a service or upgrade to different services through RADIUS change-of-authorization (CoA) messages following initial login.
Related Topics

CoS for Subscriber Access Overview

Policy and Control for Broadband Subscriber Management Overview


You can use the Juniper Networks Session and Resource Control (SRC) software to implement policy and control in the subscriber management network. The SRC software provides policy management, subscriber management, and network resource control functions that enable the creation and delivery of services across the network. For additional information about the Juniper Networks SRC software, go to http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/management/src/.

26

Policy and Control for Broadband Subscriber Management Overview

Chapter 5

Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Overview


DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Overview on page 27 DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Configuration Interface Support on page 28 Layer 3 Wholesale Configuration DHCP Support on page 28 Subscriber to Logical System and Routing Instance Relationship on page 29 RADIUS VSAs and Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Configuration Overview on page 29

DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Overview


In general, wholesaling broadband services allows service providers to resell broadband services and allows other providers to deploy their own services over the incumbent network. Layer 3 wholesale access is the process by which the access network provider (the wholesaler) partitions the access network into separately manageable and accountable subscriber segments for resale to other network providers (or retailers). Layer 3 wholesaling partitions the wholesaler access network at the network layer or the subscriber IP component by associating the IP component with a distinct Layer 3 domain. In a JUNOS DHCP subscriber access configuration, Layer 3 partitioning is accomplished through the use of logical systems and routing instances within the router. Logical systems offer a stricter partitioning of routing resources than routing instances. The purpose behind the use of logical systems is to distinctly partition the physical router into separate administrative domains. This partitioning enables multiple providers to administer the router simultaneously, with each provider having access only to the portions of the configuration relevant to their logical system. JUNOS Software supports up to 15 named logical systems in addition to the default logical system (that is, inet.0). Unless otherwise specified in configuration, all interfaces belong to the default logical system.

NOTE: This release supports the use of only the default logical system. Partitioning currently occurs through the use of separate routing instances. A logical system can have one or more routing instances. Typically used in Layer 3 VPN scenarios, a routing instance does not have the same level of administrative

DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Overview

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

separation as a logical system because it does not offer administrative isolation. However, the routing instance defines a distinct routing table, set of routing policies, and set of interfaces.

DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Configuration Interface Support


DHCP Layer 3 wholesale currently supports only the use of IP demux interfaces. For general additional information about configuring IP demux interfaces, see the JUNOS Network Interfaces Configuration Guide.
Related Topics

JUNOS Network Interfaces Configuration Guide Configuring Dynamic Subscriber Interfaces Using IP Demux Interfaces in Dynamic Profiles Configuring Static IP Demux Interfaces for Subscribers Configuring a Subscriber Interface Using a Set of Static IP Demux Interfaces

Layer 3 Wholesale Configuration DHCP Support


DHCP Layer 3 wholesale supports the following DHCP configuration options:

DHCP Relay DHCP Relay Proxy DHCP Local Server

NOTE: All routing instances within the same wholesale network must use the same DHCP configuration option. For additional information about any of these DHCP options, see the AAA Service Framework Overview.
Related Topics

DHCP Relay Overview DHCP Relay Proxy Overview Extended DHCP Relay Agent Overview Enabling the DHCP Relay Agent on Specified Interfaces Configuring Dynamic Subscriber Interfaces for Interoperation with DHCP Relay and DHCP Relay Proxy Overriding the Default DHCP Relay Configuration Enabling DHCP Relay Proxy Mode Configuring AAA Authentication for DHCP Local Server Standalone Mode Configuring the Router as an Extended DHCP Local Server

28

DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Configuration Interface Support

Chapter 5: Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Overview

Subscriber to Logical System and Routing Instance Relationship


As subscriber sessions are established, subscriber to logical system/routing instance memberships are established by the AAA framework configured for the default logical system. When configuring Layer 3 wholesaling, you typically configure global (wholesale) information within the default (master) logical system and default routing instance. Incoming subscribers must then be authenticated, but this authentication can be handled in one of two ways:

Single (wholesaler only) authenticationIncoming subscribers are authenticated by the wholesaler RADIUS server. After authentication, the subscribers are assigned values specified by dynamic profiles (routing instances, interfaces, and any configuration values) specific to a particular retailer. Dual (wholesaler and retailer) authenticationSometimes referred to as double-dip authentication, incoming subscribers are initially authenticated by RADIUS using the wholesale configuration. Authenticated subscribers are then redirected to other routing instances associated with individual retailer network space. When you redirect subscribers, and those subscribers are to be authenticated by AAA servers owned by individual retailers, the subscribers must be authenticated again by the AAA servers before they are provided an address and any dynamic profile values are assigned. After reauthentication, however, the subscribers are managed normally using any values specific to the retailer routing instance to which they are assigned. See Routing Instances Overview in the JUNOS Routing Protocols Configuration Guide.

Related Topics

RADIUS VSAs and Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Configuration Overview


You can use RADIUS to assign various values through the use of dynamic variables within dynamic profiles. However, the configuration of at least one of the two VSAs described in Table 5 on page 29 is required for a wholesale network to function.
Table 5: Required Juniper Networks VSAs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Network Solution
Attribute Number 26-1 Attribute Name LSRI-Name Description Client logical system:routing instance name. Allowed only from RADIUS server for default logical system:routing instance. Value string: logical system:routing instance

Subscriber to Logical System and Routing Instance Relationship

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Table 5: Required Juniper Networks VSAs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Network Solution (continued)
Attribute Number 26-25 Attribute Name Redirect-LSRI-Name Description Client logical system:routing instance name indicating to which logical system:routing instance the request is redirected for user authentication. Value string: logical system:routing instance

Specifying the $junos-routing-instance dynamic variable in a dynamic profile triggers a RADIUS access-accept response of either the LSRI-Name VSA or the Redirect-LSRI-Name VSA. Returning an LSRI-Name attribute in the access-accept response provides the logical system and routing instance in which the logical interface is to be created and the router updates the session database with the specified routing instance value. Returning a Redirect-LSRI-Name attribute in the access-accept response results in the router immediately sending a second access-request message (sometimes referred to as a double-dip) to the RADIUS server specified by the logical system:routing instance attribute specified by the Redirect-LSRI-Name VSA.

NOTE: Attributes returned as a result of a second access-request message to the logical system:routing instance specified by the Redirect-LSRI-Name VSA override any prior attributes returned by initial access-accept responses to the default logical system:routing instance.
Related Topics

Juniper Networks VSAs Supported by the AAA Service Framework

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RADIUS VSAs and Broadband Subscriber Management Wholesale Configuration Overview

Part 2

Configuring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions


Broadband Subscriber Management Configuration Overview on page 33 Configuring a Basic Triple Play Subscriber Management Network on page 35 Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Configuration Overview on page 55 Configuring the Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution on page 57 Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Configuration Examples on page 71

Configuring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions

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32

Configuring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions

Chapter 6

Broadband Subscriber Management Configuration Overview

Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Topology and Configuration Elements on page 33 Subscriber Management Licensing on page 34

Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Topology and Configuration Elements


The network topology for the broadband subscriber management solution focuses on configuring the access network to which the MX Series routers connect. There are many possible broadband subscriber management configurations. Figure 3 on page 33 illustrates a basic topology model from which you can expand.
Figure 3: Basic Subscriber Management Solution Topology
Access Network Edge Access MSAN MX Series Access Network Configuration AAA Service Framework DHCP Relay / DHCP Local Server Dynamic Profiles - Interfaces - Firewall filters - Protocols (IGMP) - Class of Service RADIUS server DHCP server Core Network

SRC

When configuring the broadband subscriber management solution, specific configuration elements come into play. In one form or another, you must configure each of these elements for the subscriber management solution to function. The configuration elements include the following:

Subscriber network VLAN configuration AAA Service Framework configuration

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Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Topology and Configuration Elements

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Addressing server or addressing server access configuration Dynamic profile configuration Core network configuration Triple Play Subscriber Management Network Topology Overview on page 35 Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36

Related Topics

Subscriber Management Licensing


To enable some JUNOS subscriber management software features or router scaling levels, you must purchase, install, and manage certain software license packs. The presence on the router of the appropriate software license keys (passwords) determines whether you can configure and use certain features or configure a feature to a predetermined scale. For information about how to purchase Juniper Networks JUNOS Software licenses, contact your Juniper Networks sales representative. For information about installing and managing software licenses that pertain to your broadband subscriber management network, see the JUNOS Software Installation and Upgrade Guide.
Related Topics

Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36

34

Subscriber Management Licensing

Chapter 7

Configuring a Basic Triple Play Subscriber Management Network


Triple Play Subscriber Management Network Topology Overview on page 35 Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36 Configuring a Loopback Interface for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution on page 37 Configuring Static Customer VLANs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution on page 38 Configuring Dynamic Customer VLANs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution on page 39 Configuring a Global Class of Service Profile for the Subscriber Management Solution on page 41 Configuring Dynamic Firewall Filter Services for Use in Dynamic Profiles on page 47 Configuring AAA Service Framework for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution on page 48 Configuring Address Server Elements for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution on page 50 Configuring a Dynamic Profile for the Triple Play Solution on page 53

Triple Play Subscriber Management Network Topology Overview


This configuration explains the basics in configuring a basic triple-play (data, voice, and video) network. Figure 4 on page 36 provides the reference topology for this configuration example.

Triple Play Subscriber Management Network Topology Overview

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JUNOS 10.0 Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions Guide

Figure 4: Triple Play Network Reference Topology


Access Network Core Network

GE-1/3/0 MSAN

MX Series

GE-1/3/1

RADIUS server

Related Topics

Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36

Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements


When configuring an MX Series router to act as a broadband services router (BSR) or video services router (VSR), you initially define elements that the router uses to define both subscriber access and the level of service a subscriber can have in your network. Many of these elements are profiles (groups of configuration statements) or static configuration components (like firewall filters) that typically do not change after you create them. After you define these elements, the router can use them to enable subscribers to gain access to your network. The top-level steps for configuring the edge access in the subscriber management network include the following:
1.

Configure the subscriber loopback interface and VLANs. See Configuring Static Customer VLANs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution on page 38.

2.

Configure a class of service profile. See Configuring a Global Class of Service Profile for the Subscriber Management Solution on page 41.

3.

Configure a firewall filter for use with the dynamic profile. See Configuring Dynamic Firewall Filter Services for Use in Dynamic Profiles on page 47.

4.

Configure AAA Framework Services.

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Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements

g017269

Access Network Elements Access Network Interface: GE-1/3/0 Loopback (lo0) Interface Address: 33.33.0.1/32 C-VLANs: Five (unit 1 to 5); Outer tag: 3; Inner tags: 1 to 5 Logical Interfaces: GE-1/3/0.1 to GE-1/3/0.5 Extended DHCP Local Server Address Pool Network: 33.33.0.0/16 Address Pool Range: 33.33.0.10 to 33.33.127.254 RADIUS Authentication Server Address: 222.222.222.42 RADIUS Accounting Server Address: 222.222.222.42 Dynamic Profile: Profile-Triple-Play

Chapter 7: Configuring a Basic Triple Play Subscriber Management Network

See Configuring AAA Service Framework for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution on page 48.
5.

Configure an address assignment pool for use by the address server. See Configuring Address Server Elements for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution on page 50.

6.

Configure DHCP local server to assign subscriber addresses. See Configuring Address Server Elements for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution on page 50.

Related Topics

Triple Play Subscriber Management Network Topology Overview on page 35 Broadband Subscriber Management Solution Topology and Configuration Elements on page 33

Configuring a Loopback Interface for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution


You must configure a loopback interface for use in the subscriber management access network. The loopback interface is automatically used for unnumbered interfaces.

NOTE: If you do not configure the loopback interface, the routing platform chooses the first interface to come online as the default. If you configure more than one address on the loopback interface, we recommend that you configure one to be the primary address to ensure that it is selected for use with unnumbered interfaces. By default, the primary address is used as the source address when packets originate from the interface. To configure a loopback interface:
1.

Edit the loopback interface.


[edit] user@host# edit interfaces lo0

2.

Edit the loopback interface unit.


[edit interfaces lo0] user@host# edit unit 0

3.

Edit the loopback interface family.


[edit interfaces lo0 unit 0] user@host# edit family inet

4.

Specify the loopback interface address.


[edit interfaces lo0 unit 0] user@host# set address 33.33.0.1/32

Configuring a Loopback Interface for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution

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Related Topics

Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36 JUNOS Network Interfaces Configuration Guide

Configuring Static Customer VLANs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution
In this example configuration, the access interface (ge-1/3/0) connects to a device (that is, a DSLAM) on the access side of the network. You can define static customer VLANs (C-VLANs) for use by the access network subscribers. To configure the customer VLANs:
1.

Edit the access side interface.


[edit] user@host# edit interfaces ge-1/3/0

2.

Edit the interface unit for the first VLAN.


[edit interfaces ge-1/3/0] user@host# edit unit 1

3.

Define the VLAN tags for the first VLAN.


[edit interfaces ge-1/3/0 unit 1] user@host# set vlan-tags outer 3 inner 1

4.

Specify that you want to create IPv4 demux interfaces.


[edit interfaces ge-1/3/0 unit 1] user@host# set demux-source inet

5.

Edit the family for the first VLAN.


[edit interfaces ge-1/3/0 unit 1] user@host# edit family inet

6.

Define the unnumbered address and the preferred source address for the first VLAN.
[edit interfaces ge-1/3/0 unit 1 family inet] user@host# set unnumbered-address lo0.0 preferred-source-address 33.33.0.1

7. Related Topics

Repeat steps 2 through 6 for VLAN interface units 2 through 5. Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36 JUNOS Network Interfaces Configuration Guide

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Configuring Static Customer VLANs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution

Chapter 7: Configuring a Basic Triple Play Subscriber Management Network

Configuring Dynamic Customer VLANs for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution
In this example configuration, the access interface (ge-1/3/0) connects to a device (that is, a DSLAM) on the access side of the network. This procedure enables the dynamic creation of up to five customer VLANs (C-VLANs) for use by the access network subscribers. To configure dynamic VLANs for the solution:
1.

Configure a dynamic profile for dynamic VLAN creation.


a.

Name the profile.


[edit] user@host# edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF

b.

Define the interface-name statement with the internal $junos-interface-ifd-name variable used by the router to match the interface name of the receiving interface.
[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF] user@host# edit interfaces $junos-interface-ifd-name

c.

Define the unit statement with the predefined $junos-interface-unit variable:


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF] user@host# set unit $junos-interface-unit

d.

(Optional) To configure the router to respond to any ARP request, specify the proxy-arp statement.
[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit"] user@host# set proxy-arp

e.

Specify that you want to create IPv4 demux interfaces.


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit"] user@host# set demux-source inet

f.

Specify the VLAN ID variable.


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit"] user@host# set vlan-tags outer $junos-stacked-vlan-id

The variable is dynamically replaced with an outer VLAN ID within the VLAN range specified at the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level.
g.

Specify the inner VLAN ID variable.

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[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit"] user@host# set vlan-tags inner $junos-vlan-id

The variable is dynamically replaced with an inner VLAN ID within the VLAN range specified at the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level.
h.

Specify the family type.


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit"] user@host# set family inet

i.

(Optional) Enable IP and MAC address validation for dynamic IP demux interfaces in a dynamic profile.
[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit" family inet] user@host# set mac-validate strict

j.

Specify the unnumbered address and preferred source address.


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit" family inet] user@host# set unnumbered-address lo.0 preferred-source-address 33.33.0.1

2.

Associate the dynamic profile with the VLAN interface.


a.

Access the interface that you want to use for creating VLANs.
[edit interfaces] user@host# edit interfaces ge-1/3/0

b.

Specify that you want to automatically configure VLAN interfaces.


[edit interfaces ge-1/3/0] user@host# edit auto-configure

c.

Specify that you want to configure stacked VLANs.


[edit interfaces ge-1/3/0 auto-configure] user@host# edit stacked-vlan-ranges

d.

Specify the dynamic VLAN profile that you want the interface to use.
[edit interfaces ge-1/3/0 auto-configure stacked-vlan-ranges] user@host# set dynamic-profile (Stacked VLAN) VLAN-PROF

3.

Specify the Ethernet packet type that the VLAN dynamic profile can accept.
[edit interfaces ge-1/3/0 auto-configure stacked-vlan-ranges VLAN-PROF] user@host# set accept inet

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NOTE: This release supports only INET (IPv4) Ethernet packet types. Define VLAN ranges for use by the dynamic profile when dynamically creating VLAN IDs. For this solution, specify the outer and inner stacked VLAN ranges that you want the dynamic profile to use. To mimic the static VLAN configuration, the following example specifies an outer stacked VLAN ID range of 33 (enabling only the outer range of 3) and an inner stacked VLAN ID range of 15 (enabling a range from 1 through 5 for the inner stacked VLAN ID).
[edit interfaces ge-0/0/0 auto-configure vlan-ranges] user@host# set ranges (Dynamic Stacked VLAN) 33,15
Related Topics

4.

Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36 Broadband Subscriber Management VLAN Architecture Overview on page 21 Dynamic 802.1Q VLAN Overview Configuring VLAN Dynamic Profiles Configuring VLAN Interfaces to Use Dynamic Profiles Configuring Which VLAN Ethernet Packet Types Dynamic Profiles Can Accept Configuring VLAN Ranges for Use with Dynamic Profiles JUNOS Network Interfaces Configuration Guide

Configuring a Global Class of Service Profile for the Subscriber Management Solution

Configuring a Class of Service Profile on page 41 Configuring CoS Fowarding Classes on page 42 Configuring CoS Schedulers on page 43 Configuring Scheduler Maps on page 44 Configuring CoS Classifiers on page 45 Configuring CoS Interface Properties on page 46

Configuring a Class of Service Profile


You can configure class of service (CoS) for all subscribers that successfully establish connection to the broadband network. After you create the CoS profile, you can attach it to subscriber interfaces using a dynamic profile. Configuring a CoS profile includes the following general steps:
1. 2. 3.

Configuring forwarding classes. Configuring schedulers. Configuring scheduler maps.

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4. 5.

Configuring classifiers. Configuring CoS interface properties.

In the configuration we build in this section, we configure three forwarding classes, each with its own scheduler, and an IP precedence classifier for the traffic destined for the access network. Table 6 on page 42 provides an overview of the queue configuration:
Table 6: Class of Service Queue Configuration
Differentiated Services Classification Expedited forwarding (EF) Assured forwarding (AF) Best effort (BE) Bandwidth Priority Purpose

128 Kbps 29.4 Mbps remainder

strict high low low

voice traffic video traffic data traffic

Configuring CoS Fowarding Classes


Forwarding classes identify output queues for packets. For a classifier to assign an output queue to each packet, it must associate the packet with one of the following forwarding classes:

Expedited forwarding (EF)Provides a low loss, low latency, low jitter, assured bandwidth, end-to-end service. Assured forwarding (AF)Provides a group of values you can define and includes four subclasses: AF1, AF2, AF3, and AF4, each with three drop probabilities: low, medium, and high. Best effort (BE)Provides no service profile. For the BE forwarding class, loss priority is typically not carried in a class-of-service (CoS) value, and random early detection (RED) drop profiles are more aggressive. Network control (NC)This class is typically high priority because it supports protocol control.

NOTE: The MX Series router enables you to configure up to eight forwarding class queues. To configure forwarding class queues:
1.

Edit the best effort queue.


[edit] user@host# edit class-of-service forwarding-classes queue 0

2.

Name the queue.

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[edit class-of-service forwarding-classes queue 0] user@host# set fc_be


3.

Edit the expedited forwarding queue.


[edit] user@host# edit class-of-service forwarding-classes queue 1

4.

Name the queue.


[edit class-of-service forwarding-classes queue 1] user@host# set fc_ef

5.

Edit the assured forwarding queue.


[edit] user@host# edit class-of-service forwarding-classes queue 2

6.

Name the queue.


[edit class-of-service forwarding-classes queue 1] user@host# set fc_af

Configuring CoS Schedulers


CoS schedulers define the properties of output queues. These properties can include the amount of interface bandwidth assigned to the queue, the size of the memory buffer allocated for storing packets, the priority of the queue, and the random early detection (RED) drop profiles associated with the queue. To configure CoS schedulers for the existing queues:
1.

Create a scheduler and name it for the best effort traffic.


[edit] user@host# edit class-of-service schedulers sched_be

2.

Define the best effort scheduler buffer size.


[edit class-of-service schedulers sched_be] user@host# set buffer-size remainder

3.

Set the priority of the best effort scheduler.


[edit class-of-service schedulers sched_be] user@host# set prioritiy low

4.

Create a scheduler and name it for the expedited forwarding traffic.


[edit] user@host# edit class-of-service schedulers sched_ef

5.

Configure the transmit rate for the expedited forwarding scheduler.


[edit class-of-service schedulers sched_ef] user@host# set transmit-rate 128k

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6.

Define the expedited forwarding scheduler buffer size.


[edit class-of-service schedulers sched_ef] user@host# set buffer-size remainder

7.

Set the priority of the expedited forwarding scheduler.


[edit class-of-service schedulers sched_ef] user@host# set prioritiy strict-high

8.

Create a scheduler and name it for the assured forwarding traffic.


[edit] user@host# edit class-of-service schedulers sched_af

9.

Configure the transmit rate for the assured forwarding scheduler.


[edit class-of-service schedulers sched_af] user@host# set transmit-rate 29400000

10. Define the assured forwarding scheduler buffer size.

[edit class-of-service schedulers sched_af] user@host# set buffer-size remainder


11. Set the priority of the expedited forwarding scheduler.

[edit class-of-service schedulers sched_af] user@host# set prioritiy low

Configuring Scheduler Maps


After configuring both CoS forwarding classes and schedulers, you must use scheduler maps to associate them. To map CoS forwarding classes to schedulers:
1.

Create a forwarding map and name it.


[edit] user@host# edit class-of-service scheduler-maps SchedulerMap_Triple_Play_Basic

2.

Edit the best effort forwarding class queue.


[edit class-of-service scheduler-maps SchedulerMap_Triple_Play_Basic] user@host# edit forwarding-class fc_be

3.

Associate the scheduler that you want this forwarding class to use.
[edit class-of-service scheduler-maps SchedulerMap_Triple_Play_Basic forwarding-class fc_be] user@host# set scheduler sched_be

4.

Edit the expedited forwarding class queue.

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[edit class-of-service scheduler-maps SchedulerMap_Triple_Play_Basic] user@host# edit forwarding-class fc_ef


5.

Associate the scheduler that you want this forwarding class to use.
[edit class-of-service scheduler-maps SchedulerMap_Triple_Play_Basic forwarding-class fc_ef] user@host# set scheduler sched_ef

6.

Edit the assured forwarding class queue.


[edit class-of-service scheduler-maps SchedulerMap_Triple_Play_Basic] user@host# edit forwarding-class fc_af

7.

Associate the scheduler that you want this forwarding class to use.
[edit class-of-service scheduler-maps SchedulerMap_Triple_Play_Basic forwarding-class fc_af] user@host# set scheduler sched_af

Configuring CoS Classifiers


You can override the default IP precedence classifier by defining a custom classifier. You can then apply the classifier to a logical interface. To define a custom CoS classifier:
1.

Create a Differentiated Services code point (DSCP) classifier and name it.
[edit] user@host# edit class-of-service classifiers dscp Class_DSCP

NOTE: DSCP classifiers handle incoming IPv4 packets. Edit the best effort forwarding class queue.
[edit class-of-service classifiers dscp Class_DSCP] user@host# edit forwarding-class fc_be
3.

2.

Edit the loss priority level for the forwarding class queue.
[edit class-of-service classifiers dscp Class_DSCP forwarding-class fc_be] user@host# edit loss-priority high

4.

Set code points for the loss priority level.


[edit class-of-service classifiers dscp Class_DSCP forwarding-class fc_be loss-priority low] user@host# set code-points be

5.

Edit the expedited forwarding class queue.


[edit class-of-service classifiers dscp Class_DSCP]

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user@host# edit forwarding-class fc_ef


6.

Edit the loss priority level for the forwarding class queue.
[edit class-of-service classifiers dscp Class_DSCP forwarding-class fc_ef] user@host# edit loss-priority low

7.

Set code points for the loss priority level.


[edit class-of-service classifiers dscp Class_DSCP forwarding-class fc_ef loss-priority low] user@host# set code-points ef

8.

Edit the assured forwarding class queue.


[edit class-of-service classifiers dscp Class_DSCP] user@host# edit forwarding-class fc_af

9.

Edit the loss priority level for the forwarding class queue.
[edit class-of-service classifiers dscp Class_DSCP forwarding-class fc_af] user@host# edit loss-priority low

10. Set code points for the loss priority level.

[edit class-of-service classifiers dscp Class_DSCP forwarding-class fc_af loss-priority low] user@host# set code-points af41

Configuring CoS Interface Properties


Configuring CoS interface properties enables the router to throttle and classify the traffic from the Internet that is sent to subscriber local loops. Limiting the traffic to the access network ensures that the traffic sent to the subscriber local loops does not exceed the current data transmission rate of those lines. Limiting traffic also ensures that changes to subscriber local loop speeds do not cause bandwidth contention at the subscribers residential gateway. You apply the classifier to the core-facing interface to classify incoming traffic for the queues you are using in the access network. To configure CoS interfaces:
1.

Edit the core CoS interface you want to configure.


[edit] user@host# edit class-of-service interfaces ge-1/3/0

2.

Edit the interface shaping rate.


[edit class-of-service interfaces ge-1/3/0] user@host# edit class-of-service interfaces ge-1/3/0 shaping-rate

3.

Set the shaping rate value to throttle traffic to the subscriber local loops.
[edit class-of-service interfaces ge-1/3/0 shaping-rate]

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user@host# set 500m


4.

Edit the interface connected to the core network.


[edit] user@host# edit class-of-service interfaces ge-1/3/1

5.

Edit the interface unit.


[edit class-of-service interfaces ge-1/3/1] user@host# edit unit 0

6.

Edit the interface unit classifiers.


[edit class-of-service interfaces ge-1/3/1 unit 0] user@host# edit classifiers

7.

Apply the classifier to the interface to classify traffic coming from the Internet.
[edit class-of-service interfaces ge-1/3/1 unit 0 classifiers] user@host# set dscp Class_DSCP

Configuring Dynamic Firewall Filter Services for Use in Dynamic Profiles


Firewall filters provide rules that define whether to permit or deny packets that are transiting an interface on a router. You can configure firewall filters for use in dynamic profiles. After you configure dynamic firewall filters, you can specify which filters you want to apply to subscriber interfaces using a dynamic profile. To create a firewall filter:
1.

Create and name a firewall filter.


[edit] user@host# edit firewall filter fw_fltr_af41

2.

Specify the filter to be interface specific.


[edit firewall filter fw_fltr_af41] user@host# set interface-specific

3.

Edit a first term for the firewall filter.


[edit firewall filter fw_fltr_af41] user@host# edit firewall filter fw_fltr_af41 term 1

4.

Set the from match condition.


[edit firewall filter fw_fltr_af41 term 1] user@host# set from dscp af41

5.

Set the then action to take when a match occurs.


[edit firewall filter fw_fltr_af41 term 1] user@host# then count c2 accept

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6.

Edit a second term for the firewall filter.


[edit firewall filter fw_fltr_af41] user@host# edit firewall filter fw_fltr_af41 term 2

7.

Set the then action to take when a match occurs for term 1.
[edit firewall filter fw_fltr_af41 term 1] user@host# then accept

8.

Apply the dynamic firewall filter to interfaces using a dynamic profile. See Configuring a Dynamic Profile for the Triple Play Solution on page 53.

Related Topics

Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36 Dynamic Firewall Filters Overview Dynamic Profiles Overview JUNOS Policy Framework Configuration Guide

Configuring AAA Service Framework for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution

Configuring RADIUS Server Access Information on page 48 Configuring RADIUS Server Access Profile on page 49

Configuring RADIUS Server Access Information


Define the RADIUS server address and secret data that RADIUS access profiles can reference. Define an access profile that includes specific RADIUS configuration. To configure RADIUS server access:
1.

Edit router access to the RADIUS server.


[edit] user@host# edit access radius-server

2.

Set the address to the RADIUS server.


[edit access radius-server] user@host# set 222.222.222.42

3.

Edit the RADIUS server.


[edit access radius-server] user@host# edit 222.222.222.42

4.

Configure the source address for the RADIUS server.


[edit access radius-server 222.222.222.42] user@host# set source-address 222.222.222.1

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5.

Configure the secret for the RADIUS server.


[edit access radius-server 222.222.222.42] user@host# set secret "$EcReTRad1uSdAta4f0rTh3rtR"

Configuring RADIUS Server Access Profile


You can define a RADIUS access profile that references defined RADIUS servers and includes specific RADIUS configuration for authentication and accounting. To configure a RADIUS access profile:
1.

Create and name a RADIUS access profile.


[edit] user@host# edit access profile AccessProfile_general

2.

Edit the order in which authentication mechanisms are used.


[edit access profile AccessProfile_general] user@host# set authentication-order radius

3.

Edit the RADIUS access addresses.


[edit access profile AccessProfile_general] user@host# edit access profile AccessProfile_general radius

4.

Set the address or address list for the RADIUS authentication server.
[edit access profile AccessProfile_general radius] user@host# set authentication-server 222.222.222.42

5.

Set the address or address list for the RADIUS accounting server.
[edit access profile AccessProfile_general radius] user@host# set accounting-server 222.222.222.42

6.

Edit the RADIUS accounting values for the access profile.


[edit access profile AccessProfile_general] user@host# edit accounting

7.

Set the RADIUS accounting order.


[edit access profile AccessProfile_general accounting] user@host# set order radius

8.

Specify that RADIUS accounting stop when a user fails authentication but is granted access.
[edit access profile AccessProfile_general accounting] user@host# set accounting-stop-on-failure

9.

Specify that RADIUS accounting stop when access is denied to a subscriber.


[edit access profile AccessProfile_general accounting]

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user@host# set accounting-stop-on-access-deny


10. Specify that RADIUS provide immediate updates.

[edit access profile AccessProfile_general accounting] user@host# set immediate-update


11. Specify the amount of time (in minutes) between RADIUS updates.

[edit access profile AccessProfile_general accounting] user@host# set update-interval 10


12. Specify that RADIUS accounting report only subscriber uptime.

[edit access profile AccessProfile_general accounting] user@host# set statistics time


Related Topics

Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36 AAA Service Framework Overview

Configuring Address Server Elements for the Broadband Subscriber Management Solution

Configuring an Address Assignment Pool on page 50 Configuring Extended DHCP Local Server on page 51

Configuring an Address Assignment Pool


Address assignment pools enable you to specify groups of IP addresses that different client applications can share. In this configuration, the extended DHCP local server configuration uses the address pool to provide addresses to subscribers that are accessing the network. To configure an address assignment pool:
1.

Create and name an address assignment pool.


[edit] user@host# edit access address-assignment pool AddressPool_1

2.

Edit the address pool family.


[edit access address-assignment pool AddressPool_1] user@host# edit family inet

3.

Define the address pool network.


[edit access address-assignment pool AddressPool_1 family inet] user@host# set network 33.33.0.0/16

4.

Specify the network for the pool.

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[edit access address-assignment pool AddressPool_1 family inet] user@host# set network 33.33.0.0/16
5.

Set the address range for the network.


[edit access address-assignment pool AddressPool_1 family inet] user@host# set range all low 33.33.0.10 high 33.33.127.254

6.

Edit the family DHCP attributes.


[edit access address-assignment pool AddressPool_1 family inet] user@host# edit family inet dhcp-attributes

7.

Set the maximum lease time.


[edit access address-assignment pool AddressPool_1 family inet dhcp-attributes] user@host# set maximum-lease-time 3600

8.

Set the grace period.


[edit access address-assignment pool AddressPool_1 family inet dhcp-attributes] user@host# set graceperiord 60

9.

Set the router IP address that you want advertised to subscribers.


[edit access address-assignment pool AddressPool_1 family inet dhcp-attributes] user@host# set router 33.33.0.1

10. Specify which access profile you want to instantiate.

[edit] user@host# set access-profile AccessProfile_general

Configuring Extended DHCP Local Server


You can enable the MX Series router to function as an extended DHCP local server. The extended DHCP local server provides IP addresses and other configuration information to a subscriber logging into the network. To configure the DHCP local server:
1.

Edit the routing system services.


[edit] user@host# edit system services

2.

Edit the DHCP local server.


[edit system services] user@host# edit dhcp-local-server

3.

Edit the DHCP local server trace options.


[edit system services dhcp-local-server] user@host# edit traceoptions

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4.

Specify a log file into which you want trace option information to be saved.
[edit system services dhcp-local-server traceoptions] user@host# set file dhcp-server-msgs.log

5.

Specify the DHCP local server message operations that you want saved in the log file.
[edit system services dhcp-local-server traceoptions] user@host# set flag all

6.

Define the DHCP pool match order.


[edit system services dhcp-local-server] user@host# set pool-match-order ip-address-first

7.

Set the authentication password.


[edit system services dhcp-local-server] user@host# set authentication password auth-psswrd

8.

Edit the values you want included with the username.


[edit system services dhcp-local-server] user@host# edit authentication username-include

9.

Set the values you want included with the username.


[edit system services dhcp-local-server username-include] user@host# set domain-name yourcompany.com user@host# set user-prefix user-defined-prefix

10. Create and name a DHCP local server group.

[edit system services dhcp-local-server] user@host# edit group dhcp-ls-group


11. Specify a dynamic profile that you want the DHCP local server group to use.

[edit system services dhcp-local-server group dhcp-ls-group] user@host# set dynamic-profile Profile-Triple_Play
12. Assign interfaces to the group.

[edit system services dhcp-local-server group dhcp-ls-group] user@host# set interface ge-1/3/0.1 upto ge-1/3/0.5
Related Topics

Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36 Address-Assignment Pools Overview Extended DHCP Local Server Overview

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Configuring a Dynamic Profile for the Triple Play Solution


A dynamic profile is a set of characteristics, defined in a type of template, that you can use to provide dynamic subscriber access and services for broadband applications. These services are assigned dynamically to interfaces. To configure a dynamic profile:
1.

Create and name the dynamic profile.


[edit] user@host# edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play

2.

Edit the profile dynamic interfaces.


[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play] user@host# edit interfaces

3.

Set the dynamic interfaces and unit variables.


[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play interfaces] user@host# set $junos-interface-ifd-name unit $junos-underlying-interface-unit

4.

Edit dynamic interfaces.


[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play interfaces] user@host# edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play interfaces $junos-interface-ifd-name unit $junos-underlying-interface-unit

5.

Set the dynamic interface family.


[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-underlying-interface-unit"] user@host# set family inet

6.

Edit the dynamic interface family.


[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-underlying-interface-unit"] user@host# edit family inet

7.

Specify the input filter that you want to apply to each dynamic interface when it is created.
[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-underlying-interface-unit" family inet] user@host# set filter input fltr_af41

8.

Specify the output filter that you want to apply to each dynamic interface when it is created.
[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-underlying-interface-unit" family inet] user@host# set filter output fltr_af41

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9.

Edit dynamic class of service.


[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play] user@host# edit class-of-service

10. Edit the dynamic CoS traffic control profile.

[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play class-of-service] user@host# edit traffic-control-profiles


11. Create and name a traffic control profile.

[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play class-of-service traffic-control-profiles] user@host# edit TrafficProfile_Triple_Play


12. Specify a scheduler map that you want the dynamic CoS traffic control profile

to use.
[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play class-of-service traffic-control-profile] user@host# set scheduler-map SchedulerMap_Triple_Play_Basic
13. Specify the shaping rate that you want the dynamic CoS traffic control profile to

use.
[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play class-of-service traffic-control-profile] user@host# set shaping-rate 32700000
14. Edit the dynamic CoS interfaces.

[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play class-of-service] user@host# edit interfaces


15. Apply CoS to the dynamic interfaces and apply an output traffic control profile.

[edit dynamic-profiles Profile-Triple_Play class-of-service] user@host# set interfaces $junos-interface-ifd-name unit $junos-underlying-interface-unit output-traffic-control-profile otcp-profile
Related Topics

Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36 Dynamic Profiles Overview

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Configuring a Dynamic Profile for the Triple Play Solution

Chapter 8

Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Configuration Overview

Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Topology and Configuration Elements on page 55

Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Topology and Configuration Elements
The network topology for the subscriber management DHCP Layer 3 wholesale solution includes configuring separate routing instances for individual retailers that use a portion of the router. This solution uses a DHCP relay configuration. However, you can also implement DHCP Relay Proxy or DHCP Local Server configuration. To explain the concept, but to limit complexity, this solution provides a configuration with one wholesaler and only two retailers. Figure 5 on page 56 illustrates a basic Layer 3 wholesale topology model from which you can expand.

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Figure 5: Basic Subscriber Management Layer 3 Wholesale Solution Topology

Retailer 1 Network Space Retailer 1 DHCP Retailer 1 server RADIUS server Wholesaler RADIUS server Wholesaler DHCP server

MSAN

MX Series

Wholesaler Network Space

Retailer 2 RADIUS server MSAN Retailer 2 Network Space

Retailer 2 DHCP server


g017381

When you are configuring a DHCP Layer 3 wholesale network solution, the following configuration elements are required:

Subscriber network VLAN configuration DHCP configuration Addressing server or addressing server access configuration RADIUS server access configuration Dynamic profile configuration for default (wholesaler) access Dynamic profile configuration for retailer access (following subscriber redirection; if applicable) Routing instance configuration for individual retailers Group configuration and forwarding options for the network Core network configuration

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Chapter 9

Configuring the Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution

DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Topology Overview on page 57 Configuring Loopback Interfaces for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Solution on page 59 Configuring VLANs for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution on page 60 Configuring Access Components for the Wholesale Network Solution on page 63 Configuring Dynamic Profiles for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution on page 65 Configuring Separate Routing Instances for Service Retailers on page 66 Configure Default Forwarding Options for the DHCP Wholesale Network Solution on page 69

DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Topology Overview


This configuration explains how to configure a simple DHCP Layer 3 wholesale subscriber access network. This solution incorporates two retailers sharing resources on a wholesaler router. Figure 6 on page 58 provides the reference topology for this configuration example.

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Figure 6: DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Reference Topology


Retailer 1 Network Elements Access Network Interface: GE-2/3/0 Loopback (lo0.1) Interface Address: 44.44.0.1/32 C-VLANs: Three (unit 1 to 3) Logical Interfaces: GE-2/3/0.1 to GE-2/3/0.3 RADIUS Authentication Server Address: 10.10.10.1 RADIUS Accounting Server Address: 10.10.10.1 DHCP Server Address: 10.10.100.1 Access Profile: Retailer_Access1 Routing Instance: Retailer_Instance1 Dynamic Profile: Subscriber_Profile_Retail1

Retailer 1 Network Space Retailer 1 DHCP Retailer 1 server RADIUS server Wholesaler RADIUS server Wholesaler DHCP server

MSAN

GE-2/3/0 MX Series GE-2/3/0

Retailer 2 RADIUS server MSAN Retailer 2 Network Space

Retailer 2 Network Elements Access Network Interface: GE-2/3/0 Loopback (lo0.2) Interface Address: 44.42.0.1/32 C-VLANs: Three (unit 4 to 6) Logical Interfaces: GE-2/3/0.4 to GE-2/3/0.6 RADIUS Authentication Server Address: 10.20.20.1 RADIUS Accounting Server Address: 10.20.20.1 Wholesaler-Specific Network Elements DHCP Server Address: 10.20.200.1 Access Profile: Retailer_Access2 Access Network Interface: GE-2/3/0 Routing Instance: Retailer_Instance2 Loopback (lo0.3) Interface Address: 44.40.0.1/32 Dynamic Profile: Subscriber_Profile_Retail2 C-VLANs: One (unit 7) Logical Interfaces: GE-2/3/0.7 RADIUS Authentication Server Address: 192.168.1.1 RADIUS Accounting Server Address: 192.168.1.1 DHCP Server Address: 192.168.100.1 Access Profile: Wholesaler_Access Routing Instance: Wholesaler_Instance Dynamic Profile: Wholesaler_Profile

Related Topics

DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Overview on page 27 Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Topology and Configuration Elements on page 55

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Retailer 2 DHCP server

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Configuring Loopback Interfaces for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Solution


You must configure loopback interfaces for use in the subscriber management access network. The loopback interfaces are automatically used for unnumbered interfaces.

NOTE: If you do not configure the loopback interface, the routing platform chooses the first interface to come online as the default. If you configure more than one address on the loopback interface, we recommend that you configure one to be the primary address to ensure that it is selected for use with unnumbered interfaces. By default, the primary address is used as the source address when packets originate from the interface. To configure loopback interfaces:
1.

Edit the loopback interface.


[edit] user@host# edit interfaces lo0

2.

Edit the unit for the wholesale loopback interface.


[edit interfaces lo0] user@host# edit unit 3

3.

Edit the wholesale loopback interface family.


[edit interfaces lo0 unit 3] user@host# edit family inet

4.

Specify the wholesale loopback interface address.


[edit interfaces lo0 unit 3] user@host# set address 44.40.0.1/32

5.

Edit the unit for a retail loopback interface.


[edit interfaces lo0] user@host# edit unit 1

6.

Edit the retail loopback interface family.


[edit interfaces lo0 unit 1] user@host# edit family inet

7.

Specify the retail loopback interface address.


[edit interfaces lo0 unit 1] user@host# set address 44.42.0.1/32

8.

Repeat steps 5 through 7 for additional retailers, making sure to use unique unit and address values for each retailer loopback interface.

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Related Topics

Configuring Top-Level Broadband Subscriber Management Elements on page 36 JUNOS Network Interfaces Configuration Guide

Configuring VLANs for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution


You can configure either static or dynamic customer VLANs for use in the DHCP wholesale network solution.

Configuring Static Customer VLANs for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution on page 60 Configuring Dynamic Customer VLANs for the Wholesale Network Solution on page 61

Configuring Static Customer VLANs for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution
In this example configuration, the access interface (ge-2/3/0) connects to a device (that is, a DSLAM) on the access side of the network. You c an define static customer VLANs (C-VLANs) for use by the access network subscribers. To configure the customer VLANs:
1.

Edit the access side interface.


[edit] user@host# edit interfaces ge-2/3/0

2.

Specify the use of stacked VLAN tagging.


[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0] user@host# set stacked-vlan-tagging

3.

Edit the interface unit for the first VLAN.


[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0] user@host# edit unit 1

4.

Define the VLAN tags for the first VLAN.


[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0 unit 1] user@host# set vlan-tags outer 3 inner 1

5.

Specify that you want to create IPv4 demux interfaces.


[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0 unit 1] user@host# set demux-source inet

6.

Edit the family for the first VLAN.


[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0 unit 1] user@host# edit family inet

7.

(Optional) Define the unnumbered address and the preferred source address for the first VLAN.

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[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0 unit 1 family inet] user@host# set unnumbered-address lo0.1 preferred-source-address 44.44.0.1
8.

Repeat steps 2 through 7 for additional VLAN interface units.

Configuring Dynamic Customer VLANs for the Wholesale Network Solution


To configure dynamic VLANs for the solution:
1.

Configure a dynamic profile for dynamic VLAN creation.


a.

Name the profile.


[edit] user@host# edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF

b.

Define the interfaces statement with the internal $junos-interface-ifd-name variable used by the router to match the interface name of the receiving interface.
[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF] user@host# edit interfaces $junos-interface-ifd-name

c.

Define the unit statement with the predefined $junos-interface-unit variable:


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces $junos-interface-ifd-name] user@host# edit unit $junos-interface-unit

d.

(Optional) To configure the router to respond to any ARP request, specify the proxy-arp statement.
[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit"] user@host# set proxy-arp

e.

Specify that you want to create IPv4 demux interfaces.


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit"] user@host# set demux-source inet

f.

Specify the VLAN ID variable.


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit"] user@host# set vlan-tags outer $junos-stacked-vlan-id

The variable is dynamically replaced with an outer VLAN ID within the VLAN range specified at the [interfaces] hierarchy level.
g.

Specify the inner VLAN ID variable.


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit"]

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user@host# set vlan-tags inner $junos-vlan-id

The variable is dynamically replaced with an inner VLAN ID within the VLAN range specified at the [interfaces] hierarchy level.
h.

Access the family type.


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit"] user@host# edit family inet

i.

(Optional) Enable IP and MAC address validation for dynamic IP demux interfaces in a dynamic profile.
[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit" family inet] user@host# set mac-validate strict

j.

(Optional) Specify the unnumbered address and preferred source address.


[edit dynamic-profiles VLAN-PROF interfaces "$junos-interface-ifd-name" unit "$junos-interface-unit" family inet] user@host# set unnumbered-address lo.0 preferred-source-address 33.33.0.1

2.

Associate the dynamic profile with the VLAN interface.


a.

Access the interface that you want to use for creating VLANs.
[edit interfaces] user@host# edit interfaces ge-2/3/0

b.

Specify the use of stacked VLAN tagging.


[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0] user@host# set stacked-vlan-tagging

c.

Specify that you want to automatically configure VLAN interfaces.


[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0] user@host# edit auto-configure

d.

Specify that you want to configure stacked VLANs.


[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0 auto-configure] user@host# edit stacked-vlan-ranges

e.

Specify the dynamic VLAN profile that you want the interface to use.
[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0 auto-configure stacked-vlan-ranges] user@host# set dynamic-profile VLAN-PROF

f.

Repeat steps a through e for any other interfaces that you want to use for creating VLANs.

3.

Specify the Ethernet packet type that the VLAN dynamic profile can accept.

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[edit interfaces ge-2/3/0 auto-configure stacked-vlan-ranges VLAN-PROF] user@host# set accept inet

NOTE: This release supports only INET (IPv4) Ethernet packet types. Define VLAN ranges for use by the dynamic profile when dynamically creating VLAN IDs. For this solution, specify the outer and inner stacked VLAN ranges that you want the dynamic profile to use. The following example specifies an outer stacked VLAN ID range of 33 (enabling only the outer range of 3) and an inner stacked VLAN ID range of 13 (enabling a range from 1 through 3 for the inner stacked VLAN ID).
[edit interfaces ge-0/0/0 auto-configure vlan-ranges] user@host# set ranges 33,13

4.

Configuring Access Components for the Wholesale Network Solution


When configuring a wholesale network, you must configure several components globally. This configuration provides access to RADIUS servers (if used) that you want the wholesaler and any configured retailers to use globally. The access configuration includes the following general steps: 1. Configuring RADIUS Server Access on page 63 2. Configuring a DHCP Wholesaler Access Profile on page 64 3. Configuring Retailer Access Profiles on page 64

Configuring RADIUS Server Access


You can globally define any RADIUS servers in your network that either the wholesale access profile or retailer access profile can use. After you define the global RADIUS servers, you can specify specific RADIUS servers within individual access profiles. To define RADIUS servers for profile access:
1.

Access the [edit access radius-server] hierarchy level.


[edit ] user@host# edit access radius-server

2.

Specify the address and secret for any RADIUS servers in the network.
[edit access radius-server] user@host# set 192.168.10.1 secret $9$CzBxBBf1eWx-wM8xgaU.m345B02EcyKXL user@host# set 10.10.10.1 secret $7$OsCsBAf1fXx-wY3xgaU.m123A02ZtyNMT

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Configuring a DHCP Wholesaler Access Profile


You must define the network and interface over which you want subscribers to initially access the network with a wholesale access profile. When a subscriber attempts to access the network, the access profile provides initial access information including authentication and accounting values that the router uses for the accessing subscriber. To define a wholesale access profile:
1.

Create the wholesale access profile.


[edit] user@host# edit access profile Wholesale1

2.

Specify the authentication methods for the profile and the order in which they are used.
[edit access profile Wholesaler1] user@host# set authentication-order radius password

3.

Specify that you want to configure RADIUS support.


[edit access profile Wholesaler1] user@host# edit radius

4.

Specify the IP address of the RADIUS server used for authentication.


[edit access profile Wholesaler1 radius] user@host# set authentication-server 192.168.10.1

5.

Specify the IP address of the RADIUS server used for accounting.


[edit access profile Wholesaler1 radius] user@host# set accounting-server 192.168.10.1

6.

Configure any desired options for the RADIUS server. See Configuring RADIUS Parameters for AAA Subscriber Management.

7.

Configure subscriber accounting (RADIUS accounting). See Configuring How Accounting Statistics Are Collected for Subscriber Access.

Configuring Retailer Access Profiles


In this solution, subscribers are redirected to a networking space used by a specific retailer and defined by a unique routing instance. This method requires that you define the network and interface over which you want subscribers to access the network after being redirected by the wholesale access profile. To define a retailer access profile:
1.

Create the retailer access profile.

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[edit] user@host# edit access profile Retailer1


2.

Specify the authentication methods for the profile and the order in which they are used.
[edit access profile Retailer1] user@host# set authentication-order radius password

3.

Specify that you want to configure RADIUS support.


[edit access profile Retailer1] user@host# edit radius

4.

Specify the IP address of the RADIUS server used for authentication.


[edit access profile Retailer1 radius] user@host# set authentication-server 10.10.10.1

5.

Specify the IP address of the RADIUS server used for accounting.


[edit access profile Retailer1 radius] user@host# set accounting-server 10.10.10.1

6.

Configure any desired options for the RADIUS server. See Configuring RADIUS Parameters for AAA Subscriber Management.

7.

Configure subscriber accounting (RADIUS accounting). See Configuring How Accounting Statistics Are Collected for Subscriber Access.

Configuring Dynamic Profiles for the DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Solution
A dynamic profile is a set of characteristics, defined in a type of template, that you can use to provide services for broadband applications. These services are assigned dynamically to interfaces as they access the network. When configuring dynamic profiles for the DHCP Layer 3 wholesale network, you can choose to configure one dynamic profile to address all incoming subscribers or you can configure individual dynamic profiles for use by the different network management groups (that is, the wholesaler and any retailers). In fact, you can create multiple dynamic profiles that you can use to roll out different services and selectively apply those dynamic profiles to different subscriber groups as necessary. In this solution example, one dynamic profile is created for use by the wholesaler when subscribers initially access the network. Other dynamic profiles are created for the subscribers for each individual retailer to use after they are redirected to that retailer network space.

Configuring a Wholesale Dynamic Profile on page 66 Configuring a Retail Dynamic Profile on page 66

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Configuring a Wholesale Dynamic Profile


You can configure a basic access profile to initially manage subscribers that access the network. To configure a dynamic profile for use by the wholesaler:
1.

Create a wholesale dynamic profile.


[edit] user@host# edit dynamic-profiles Wholesaler1

2.

Define the dynamic profile interfaces. See Configuring Dynamic Subscriber Interfaces Using IP Demux Interfaces in Dynamic Profiles for the minimal dynamic demux interface configuration.

Configuring a Retail Dynamic Profile


To configure a dynamic profile for use with retailer access:
1.

Create a retail dynamic profile.


[edit] user@host# edit dynamic-profiles Subscriber_Profile_Retail1

2.

Define the dynamic routing instance variable in the dynamic profile.


[edit dynamic-profiles Subscriber_Profile_Retail1] user@host# edit routing-instances $junos-routing-instance

3.

Set the dynamic interface variable for the dynamic routing instance.
[edit dynamic-profiles Subscriber_Profile_Retail1 routing-instances $junos-routing-instance] user@host# set interface $junos-interface-name

4.

Define the dynamic profile interfaces. See Configuring Dynamic Subscriber Interfaces Using IP Demux Interfaces in Dynamic Profiles for the minimal dynamic demux interface configuration.

Configuring Separate Routing Instances for Service Retailers


As the owner of the system, the wholesaler uses the default routing instance. You must create separate routing instances for each individual retailer to keep routing information for individual retailers separate and to define any servers and forwarding options specific to each retailer. To define a retailer routing instance:
1.

Create the retailer routing instance.

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[edit] user@host# edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1


2.

Specify the routing instance type for the retailer.


[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1] user@host# set instance-type vrf

3.

Specify the access profile that you want the routing instance to use.
[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1] user@host# set access-profile Retailer1

4.

Specify the interface that faces the Retailer1 RADIUS server.


[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1] user@host# set interface ge-11/1/9.10

5.

Specify the interface that faces the Retailer1 DHCP server.


[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1] user@host# set interface ge-11/1/10.100

6.

Specify the loopback interface unit for this routing instance.


[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1] user@host# set interface lo0.1

NOTE: Loopback interfaces must be unique for each routing instance. Access the DHCP Relay forwarding options hierarchy for the routing instance.
[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1] user@host# edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay

7.

NOTE: The configuration for this wholesale solution uses DHCP Relay. However, you can also configure DHCP Proxy Relay or DHCP Local Server for the DHCP Layer 3 wholesale network. Specify that you want to configure authentication options and use external AAA authentication services.
[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1 forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# edit authentication
9.

8.

(Optional) Configure a password that authenticates the username to the external authentication service. See Configuring Passwords for Usernames.

10. (Optional) Configure optional features to create a unique username.

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See Creating Unique Usernames for DHCP Clients.


11. Specify the default dynamic profile that you want to attach to DHCP subscriber

for this retailer.


[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1 forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# set dynamic-profile Subscriber_Profile_Retail1
12. Specify any overrides for the default DHCP Relay configuration.

See Overriding the Default DHCP Relay Configuration.


13. Configure a named server group for the retailer.

[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1 forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# edit server-group Retailer1_Group


14. Specify the DHCP server address for the retailer group.

[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1 forwarding-options dhcp-relay server-group Retailer1_Group] user@host# set 10.10.100.1
15. Specify the retailer group as the active server group for this routing instance.

[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1 forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# set active-server-group Retailer1_Group


16. Configure a group you can use to define the retailer dynamic profile and DHCP

access interface.
[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1 forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# edit group Retailer1_Group
17. Specify the dynamic profile that the retailer DHCP subscribers use.

[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1 forwarding-options dhcp-relay group Retailer1_Group] user@host# set dynamic-profile Subscriber_Profile_Retailer1
18. Specify the retailer interface that the retailer DHCP subscribers use.

[edit routing-instances RetailerInstance1 forwarding-options dhcp-relay group Retailer1_Group] user@host# set interface ge-2/3/0.2
19. (Optional) Configure any passwords that authenticate the username to the external

authentication service for the retailer groups that you created. See Configuring Passwords for Usernames.
20. (Optional) Configure any unique username values for the retailer groups that you

created. See Creating Unique Usernames for DHCP Clients.


21. (Optional) Specify any overrides for any of the DHCP Relay group configurations

that you created.

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See Overriding the Default DHCP Relay Configuration.


22. Repeat this procedure for other retailers. Related Topics

Configuring Routing Instances

Configure Default Forwarding Options for the DHCP Wholesale Network Solution
You can use DHCP Relay, DHCP Relay Proxy, or DHCP Local Server configuration in a DHCP wholesale network. DHCP configuration is defined at the [edit forwarding-options] hierarchy level.

NOTE: The configuration for this wholesale solution uses DHCP Relay. To configure DHCP Relay forwarding options:
1.

Access the [edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay] hierarchy.


[edit] user@host# edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay

2.

Specify that you want to configure authentication options and use external AAA authentication services.
[edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# edit authentication

3.

(Optional) Configure a password that authenticates the username to the external authentication service. See Configuring Passwords for Usernames.

4.

(Optional) Configure optional features to create a unique username. See Creating Unique Usernames for DHCP Clients.

5.

Specify the default dynamic profile that you want to attach to all DHCP subscriber that access the router.
[edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# set dynamic-profile Wholesaler_Profile

6.

Specify any overrides for the default DHCP Relay configuration. See Overriding the Default DHCP Relay Configuration.

7.

Configure a named server group for default (wholesaler) DHCP server access.
[edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# edit server-group Wholesaler_Group

8.

Specify the DHCP server address for the default (wholesale) group.
[edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay server-group Wholesaler_Group]

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user@host# set 192.168.100.1


9.

Specify the default (wholesale) group as the active server group.


[edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# set active-server-group Wholesaler_Group

10. Configure a group you can use to define the wholesale DHCP access interface.

[edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# edit group Wholesaler_Group


11. Specify the default (wholesale) interface that all DHCP subscribers use when first

accessing the router.


[edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay group Wholesaler_Group] user@host# set interface ge-2/3/0.1
12. Configure a group you can use to define a retail DHCP interface.

[edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay] user@host# edit group Retailer1_Group


13. Specify the logical interface the DHCP subscribers use once redirected.

[edit forwarding-options dhcp-relay group Retailer1_Group] user@host# set interface ge-2/3/0.2


14. Repeat steps 12 and 13 for other retailer groups.

In this solution example, you configure another group name of Retailer2_Group and specify ge-2/3/0.3 for the logical interface.
15. (Optional) Configure any passwords that authenticate the username to the external

authentication service for any of the groups that you created. See Configuring Passwords for Usernames.
16. (Optional) Configure optional features to create a unique username for any of

the groups that you created. See Creating Unique Usernames for DHCP Clients.
17. (Optional) Specify any overrides for any of the DHCP Relay group configurations

that you created. See Overriding the Default DHCP Relay Configuration.
Related Topics

DHCP Relay Overview DHCP Relay Proxy Overview Configuring Passwords for Usernames Creating Unique Usernames for DHCP Clients Overriding the Default DHCP Relay Configuration

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Broadband Subscriber Management DHCP Layer 3 Wholesale Network Configuration Examples


Example: Wholesaler Dynamic Profile for a DHCP Wholesale Network on page 71 Example: Retailer Dynamic Profile for a DHCP Wholesale Network on page 72 Example: Default Forwarding Options Configuration for the DHCP Wholesale Network on page 72 Example: Retailer Routing Instances for a DHCP Wholesale Network on page 73

Example: Wholesaler Dynamic Profile for a DHCP Wholesale Network


This example specifies a dynamic profile name of Wholesaler_Profile, uses dynamic IP demux interfaces, and references the predefined input firewall filter.
dynamic-profiles { Wholesaler_Profile { interfaces { demux0 { unit "$junos-interface-unit" { demux-options { underlying-interface "$junos-underlying-interface"; } family inet { demux-source { $junos-subscriber-ip-address; } filter { input "$junos-input-filter"; } unnumbered-address "$junos-loopback-interface" preferred-source-address $junos-preferred-source-address; } } } } }

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Example: Retailer Dynamic Profile for a DHCP Wholesale Network


dynamic-profiles { Subscriber_Profile_Retailer1 { routing-instances { "$junos-routing-instance" { interface "$junos-interface-name"; } } interfaces { demux0 { unit "$junos-interface-unit" { demux-options { underlying-interface "$junos-underlying-interface"; } family inet { demux-source { $junos-subscriber-ip-address; } unnumbered-address "$junos-loopback-interface" preferred-source-address $junos-preferred-source-address; } } } } }

Example: Default Forwarding Options Configuration for the DHCP Wholesale Network
forwarding-options { dhcp-relay { traceoptions { file size 1g; inactive: flag all; } authentication { password psswd; username-include { user-prefix WholesaleNetwork; } } dynamic-profile Wholesaler_Profile; overrides { always-write-giaddr; always-write-option-82; layer2-unicast-replies; trust-option-82; client-discover-match; } server-group { Wholesaler-Server-Group { 192.168.100.1; }

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} active-server-group Wholesaler-Server Group; group Wholesaler-Group { authentication { password psswd; username-include { user-prefix WholesaleNetwork; } } interface ge-2/3/0.1; } group Retailer1-Group { authentication { password psswd1; username-include { user-prefix WholesaleNetwork_Retailer1; } } interface ge-2/3/0.2; } group Retailer2-Group { authentication { password psswd2; username-include { user-prefix WholesaleNetwork_Retailer1; } } interface ge-2/3/0.3; } } }

Example: Retailer Routing Instances for a DHCP Wholesale Network


routing-instances { Retailer_Instance1 { instance-type vrf; access-profile Retailer_Access1; interface ge-11/1/9.10; interface ge-11/1/10.100; interface lo0.1; route-distinguisher 1:1; forwarding-options { dhcp-relay { authentication { password psswd1; username-include { user-prefix WholesaleNetwork_Retailer1; } } dynamic-profile Subscriber_Profile_Retailer1; overrides { always-write-giaddr; always-write-option-82; layer2-unicast-replies;

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trust-option-82; client-discover-match; } server-group { Retailer1-Server-Group { 10.10.100.1; } } active-server-group Retailer1-Server-Group; group Retailer1-Group { authentication { password psswd1; username-include { user-prefix WholesaleNetwork_Retailer1; } } dynamic-profile Subscriber_Profile_Retailer1; overrides { always-write-giaddr; trust-option-82; client-discover-match; } interface ge-2/3/0.2; } } } } Retailer_Instance2 { instance-type vrf; access-profile Retailer_Access2; interface ge-7/1/9.10; interface ge-7/1/9.100; interface lo0.2; route-distinguisher 2:2; forwarding-options { dhcp-relay { authentication { password psswd2; username-include { user-prefix WholesaleNetwork_Retailer2; } } dynamic-profile Subscriber_Profile_Retailer2; overrides { always-write-giaddr; trust-option-82; client-discover-match; } server-group { Retailer2-Group { 10.20.200.1; } } active-server-group Retailer2-Group; group Retailer2-Group { authentication {

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password psswd2; username-include { user-prefix psswd2; } } dynamic-profile Subscriber_Profile_Retailer2; overrides { always-write-giaddr; trust-option-82; client-discover-match; } interface ge-2/3/0.3; } } } } }

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Part 3

Monitoring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions

Related Broadband Subscriber Management CLI Commands on page 79

Monitoring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions

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Monitoring Broadband Subscriber Management Solutions

Chapter 11

Related Broadband Subscriber Management CLI Commands


You can use a number of JUNOS CLI commands to monitor and troubleshoot a configured subscriber management solution. The following sections provide links to CLI commands that are related to the subscriber management configuration and where to locate details about each command.

Subscriber Management AAA and DHCP CLI Commands on page 79 Subscriber Management DHCP Local Server CLI Commands on page 79 Subscriber Management DHCP Relay CLI Commands on page 80 Subscriber Management Interface CLI Commands on page 80 Subscriber Management Dynamic Protocol CLI Commands on page 81 Subscriber Management Subscriber CLI Commands on page 81

Subscriber Management AAA and DHCP CLI Commands


Table 7 on page 79 provides a list of AAArelated and DHCPrelated CLI commands that are associated with subscriber management configuration. These commands appear in the JUNOS System Basics and Services Command Reference.
Table 7: Subscriber Management AAA and Address Assignment Pools CLI Commands
CLI Command show network-access aaa statistics show network-access aaa subscribers show network-access address-assignment pool Purpose Display AAA accounting and authentication statistics. Display subscriber-specific AAA statistics. Display state information for each address-assignment pool.

Subscriber Management DHCP Local Server CLI Commands


Table 8 on page 80 provides a list of DHCP local serverrelated CLI commands that are associated with subscriber management configuration. These commands appear in the JUNOS System Basics and Services Command Reference.

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Table 8: Subscriber Management DHCP Local Server CLI Commands


CLI Command show dhcp server binding Purpose Display the address bindings in the client table on the extended Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) local server. Display extended Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) local server statistics. Clear the binding state of a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client from the client table on the extended DHCP local server. Clear all extended Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) local server statistics.

show dhcp server statistics

clear dhcp server binding

clear dhcp server statistics

Subscriber Management DHCP Relay CLI Commands


Table 9 on page 80 provides a list of DHCP relayrelated CLI commands that are associated with subscriber management configuration. These commands appear in the JUNOS Routing Protocols and Policies Command Reference.
Table 9: Subscriber Management DHCP Relay CLI Commands
CLI Command show dhcp relay binding Purpose Display the address bindings in the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client table. Display Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) relay statistics. Clear the binding state of a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client from the client table. Clear all Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) relay statistics.

show dhcp relay statistics clear dhcp relay binding

clear dhcp relay statistics

Subscriber Management Interface CLI Commands


Table 10 on page 80 provides a list of interfacerelated CLI commands that are associated with subscriber management configuration. These commands appear in the JUNOS Interfaces Command Reference.
Table 10: Subscriber Management Interface CLI Commands
CLI Command
show interfaces (Loopback)

Purpose Display information about configured loopback interfaces.

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Chapter 11: Related Broadband Subscriber Management CLI Commands

Table 10: Subscriber Management Interface CLI Commands (continued)


CLI Command
show interfaces (Aggregated Ethernet) show interfaces (Fast Ethernet) show interfaces (Gigabit Ethernet) show interfaces demux0 (Demux Interfaces) show interfaces filters show interfaces routing

Purpose Display information about configured interfaces. This command includes brief, detail, and extensive options that you can use to view all interfaces or a specific Ethernet or LAG interface.

Display information about configured Demux interfaces. Display all firewall filters that are installed on each interface. Have the routing protocol process display its view of the state of the router's interfaces.

Subscriber Management Dynamic Protocol CLI Commands


Table 11 on page 81 provides a list of dynamic protocolrelated CLI commands that are associated with subscriber management configuration. These commands appear in the JUNOS Routing Protocols and Policies Command Reference.
Table 11: Subscriber Management Dynamic Protocol CLI Commands
CLI Command
show igmp interface

Purpose Display information about Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP)-enabled interfaces. Display Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) statistics.

show igmp statistics

Subscriber Management Subscriber CLI Commands


Table 12 on page 81 provides the subscriberrelated CLI command that is associated with subscriber management configuration. This command appears in the JUNOS System Basics and Services Command Reference.
Table 12: Subscriber Management Subscriber CLI Commands
CLI Command
show subscribers

Purpose Display information for active subscribers.

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Part 4

Index

Index on page 85

Index

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Index
Symbols
#, comments in configuration statements..................xxii ( ), in syntax descriptions...........................................xxii < >, in syntax descriptions.......................................xxi [ ], in configuration statements..................................xxii { }, in configuration statements.................................xxii | (pipe), in syntax descriptions...................................xxii residential broadband topology...............................4 using DHCP..........................................................10 broadband services router (BSR)..................................15 high-speed Internet access support.......................16 IPTV support.........................................................16 network placement...............................................16 overview...............................................................15 broadband subscriber management AAA service framework........................................25 basic topology.......................................................33 class of service......................................................25 configuration overview.........................................36 DHCP....................................................................24 DHCP Layer 3 wholesale topology........................55 edge routers..........................................................15 licensing...............................................................34 monitoring............................................................79 platform support.....................................................4 residential broadband topology...............................4 solution overview....................................................3 supporting documentation......................................7 terms......................................................................5 VLAN architecture.................................................21 BSR See broadband services router

A
AAA service framework configuring............................................................48 monitoring............................................................79 access Layer 3 wholesale configuring....................................................63 access network delivery active Ethernet......................................................11 digital subscriber line............................................11 passive optical networking....................................11 access profile retailer configuring....................................................64 wholesaler configuring....................................................64 active Ethernet.............................................................11 address assignment pool configuring............................................................50 address server configuring............................................................50

C
class of service configuring............................................................41 configuring classifiers...........................................45 configuring forwarding classes..............................42 configuring scheduler maps..................................44 configuring schedulers..........................................43 classifiers configuring............................................................45 CLI commands.............................................................79 comments, in configuration statements.....................xxii conventions text and syntax....................................................xxi curly braces, in configuration statements...................xxii customer support.......................................................xxii contacting JTAC...................................................xxii customer VLAN configuring............................................................38 configuring dynamic.............................................39 overview...............................................................21

B
braces, in configuration statements............................xxii brackets angle, in syntax descriptions................................xxi square, in configuration statements....................xxii broadband access networks delivery options....................................................11 DHCP....................................................................24 FTTx.....................................................................12 history of................................................................9 IGMP model..........................................................23

Index

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D
DHCP See extended DHCP digital subscriber line (DSL)..........................................11 documentation comments on......................................................xxii DSL See digital subscriber line dynamic profiles configuring............................................................53 firewall filter configuration....................................47 retailer configuring....................................................66 retailer example....................................................72 wholesale network configuring....................................................65 wholesaler configuring....................................................66 wholesaler example..............................................71 dynamic protocols monitoring............................................................81

I
icons defined, notice....................................................xx IGMP network models....................................................23 interfaces loopback configuring....................................................37 DHCP Layer 3 wholesale................................59 monitoring............................................................80

L
Layer 3 wholesale access...................................................................63 RADIUS server...............................................63 access profile configuring....................................................64 basic topology.......................................................55 configuration elements.........................................55 DHCP support.......................................................28 dynamic profiles configuring..............................................65, 66 retailer example.............................................72 wholesaler example.......................................71 forwarding options configuring....................................................69 example........................................................72 interface support...................................................28 overview...............................................................27 RADIUS VSAs........................................................29 reference topology................................................57 routing instances configuring....................................................66 example........................................................73 VLAN dynamic........................................................61 static..............................................................60 vlans.....................................................................60 licensing.......................................................................34 local server configuring DHCP.................................................51 monitoring............................................................79 logical systems subscriber relationship with..................................29 loopback interface DHCP Layer 3 wholesale.......................................59 subscriber management.......................................37

E
edge router placement multiedge network................................................17 single-edge network..............................................17 extended DHCP configuring local server....................................................51 monitoring............................................................79 local server....................................................79 relay server monitoring.....................................................80

F
fiber-optic delivery FTTx.....................................................................12 firewall filters configuring............................................................47 font conventions.........................................................xxi forwarding classes configuring............................................................42 forwarding options configuring............................................................69 example................................................................72

G
global elements configuring............................................................36

M
manuals comments on......................................................xxii MSAN See multiservice access node multiplay overview.................................................................7

H
HFC See hybrid fiber coaxial hybrid customer VLAN.................................................22 hybrid fiber coaxial (HFC)............................................12

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Index

multiservice access node (MSAN) choosing...............................................................18 delivery options....................................................19 overview...............................................................17 VLAN interaction...................................................22

support, technical See technical support syntax conventions.....................................................xxi

T
technical support contacting JTAC...................................................xxii topology DHCP Layer 3 wholesale network.........................55 subscriber management network..........................33 traffic classifiers configuring............................................................45 triple play dynamic profile configuration...............................53 overview.................................................................7 topology overview.................................................35

N
notice icons defined.....................................................xx

P
parentheses, in syntax descriptions............................xxii passive optical networking (PON) APON....................................................................12 BPON....................................................................12 defined.................................................................11 EPON....................................................................12 GPON....................................................................12 optical line terminator..........................................12 WDM-PON............................................................12 PON See passive optical networking

V
video services router (VSR)...........................................15 network placement...............................................16 overview...............................................................16 VLAN configuring customer VLANs.................................38 customer VLAN.....................................................21 dynamic customer VLANs.....................................39 Ethernet aggregation and......................................22 hybrid...................................................................22 multiservice access node interaction.....................22 residential gateway interaction.............................23 service VLAN.........................................................21 wholesale dynamic........................................................61 static..............................................................60 VSR See video services router

R
RADIUS access profile........................................................49 configuring server access......................................48 wholesale VSA support..........................................29 RADIUS server access configuring....................................................63 relay server monitoring............................................................80 routing instances retailer configuring....................................................66 example........................................................73 subscriber relationship with..................................29

W
wholesale See Layer 3 wholesale

S
scheduler maps configuring............................................................44 schedulers configuring............................................................43 service VLAN................................................................21 subscriber management dynamic protocols monitoring.....................................................81 interfaces monitoring.....................................................80 subscribers monitoring.....................................................81 subscribers monitoring............................................................81

Index

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Index