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PROGRESS ON SCD CURRICULUM CONSOLIDATION AND REVISION: ADVICE TO MEMBER INSTITUTIONS

INTRODUCTION
At the meeting on 6 June 2011, Academic Board considered a report from the Discipline Coordinators on the progress of curriculum consolidation and revision. The Board 1. endorsed the draft report, the direction it is taking, the timeline, and actions proposed by the Director of Coursework and 2. authorised the Director of Coursework to a. advise all Member Institutions of this decision b. request MIs to formally acknowledge receipt of the report c. request all MIs to return any commendations, affirmations, and recommendations to the Director of Coursework by 11 July for consideration by the Discipline Coordinators at their meeting on 13 July and for subsequent report to Academic Board on 18 July This report on the Boards endorsement has highlighted 10 issues that require a response by each Member Institution. Please respond by submitting a comment that commends, affirms, or recommends change or action to each highlighted issue. The issues are highlighted by the use of a subheading eg Response #1. The Board noted that the report includes several incomplete or draft sections. Some statements of rationale are still works in progress. We need to be more consistent in length of rationale statement and we need to improve clarity. Outcome statements are not in a consistent format and in some cases have not been revised to take account of the Knowledge, Skills, and Application classification of outcomes. The curriculum consolidation process for discipline of Christian Praxis is well advanced but incomplete. There will be further changes in this discipline but it will be complete by August. Despite these limitations, the Academic Board believed it was timely to seek endorsement of the current progress from the Member Institutions. Discipline majors were discussed and agreed at the 2011 Planning Days: discipline majors might be introduced in Christian Practice and Humanities in the Christian Tradition. Since then we reviewed the numbers of students who have been taking the range of majors availablewithin the existing curriculum. From highest to lowest, the dominant majors at graduation have been i) Pastoral Theology and Practice ii) Biblical Studies (No student has taken 2 or 3 majors and very few taken OT or NT) iii) Theology (no majors taken except Systematic Theology). These results led us to conclude that Biblical Studies should offer a single major (Biblical Studies only) and Theology should offer a single major (Theology only). In addition to subdiscipline majors, discipline majors will be available in Christian Praxis (title changed from Christian Practicesee below) and Humanities in the Christian Tradition.
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Issue 1: Discipline Majors

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Response #1: Majors


The Academic Board a. Endorsed the principle of discipline majors in each discipline b. Noted that this principle is embedded in the curriculum framework outlined below c. Determined that a subdiscipline can exist only if it has enough units to mount a submajor d. Agreed that if it would assist the development of a sound program of studies, Christian Spirituality, Missiology, Pastoral Counselling, and Christian Ethics could begin as 200 series.

Issue 2: Curriculum Framework


Over the past year, faculty within the SCD have been engaged in an ongoing project of consolidating and revising the curriculum.

Response #2: Framework


The Academic Board approved the following framework:
Discipline Biblical Studies Humanities in Christian Tradition Christian Praxis Sub-disciplines 1. Biblical Studies (including Old
Testament, New Testament, Hebrew, Greek)

Majors / Submajors Biblical Studies (Not to include


language (Greek, Hebrew, Latin) units)

2. Church History 3. Philosophy +Service units coded AL but not comprising a subdiscipline 4. Christian Spirituality 5. Worship & Liturgical Studies 6. Missiology 7. Pastoral Counselling 8. Pastoral Theology 9. Christian Ethics 10. Theology (including Latin)

Church History Philosophy Humanities [Discipline]

Theology

Christian Spirituality Worship & Liturgical Studies Missiology Pastoral Counselling Pastoral Theology Christian Ethics Christian Praxis [Discipline] Theology

Issue 3: Timeline Response #3: Timeline


The Academic Board approved the following timeline: y y y y y
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19 August: All incomplete and draft sections of this report to be completed 9 November: Academic Board to consider all draft course unit outlines and other draft re-accreditation documents and forward to all MIs seeking their endorsement 7 November: Discipline Coordinators to advise the Director of Coursework of names of suitable consultants to review draft units 5 December: Deadline for all MIs to submit endorsements, comments, and recommendations. 12 December: Academic Board to note endorsements from MIs and consider comments and recommendations from MIs.
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y y y

10 January 2012 Send all units to consultants 22 February 2012 Consultants to submit reports 30 March 2012 Draft accreditation document completed for consideration at April Academic Board

Issue 4: Template for Design of Course Unit Outlines


Appendix 1 is a template for preparing course unit outlines for reaccreditation. The Academic Board noted the variation in student workload across Australian universities.
http://www.mq.edu.au/ltc/eval_teaching/workload.htm http://telt.unsw.edu.au/blackboard/content/staff/Bb_student_workload.cfm?ss=0 http://www.acu.edu.au/staff/forms_and_templates/learning_and_teaching/learning_and_teaching_resources/

Response #4: Template


Academic Board (1) Recognises the absence of clear guidelines from TEQSA on any aspect of the accreditation process (2) Endorses the template for the design of course unit outlines at Appendix 1 (3) Endorses the notional workload of 143 hours.

REPORT STRUCTURE
In this Report Structure section, the underlined sub-headings are hyperlinks to the relevant section of the body of the report.

Section 1: Biblical Studies

Rationale for the Discipline of Biblical Studies Outcomes for the Discipline of Biblical Studies Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Discipline of Biblical Studies to Achieve Outcomes

Section 2: Humanities in the Christian Tradition

Rationale for the Discipline of Humanities in the Christian Tradition Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Church History Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Church History Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Church History to Achieve Outcomes Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Philosophy Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Philosophy Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Philosophy to Achieve Outcomes

Section 3: Christian Praxis

Rationale for the Discipline of Christian Praxis Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Christian Spirituality Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Christian Spirituality Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Christian Spirituality to Achieve Outcomes
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Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Counselling Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Counselling Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Counselling to Achieve Outcomes Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Worship and Liturgical Studies Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Worship and Liturgical Studies Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Worship and Liturgical Studies to Achieve Outcomes Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Missiology Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Missiology Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Missiology to Achieve Outcomes Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Theology Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Theology Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Theology to Achieve Outcomes Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Christian Ethics Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Christian Ethics Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Christian Ethics to Achieve Outcomes

Section 4: Theology:

Rationale for the Discipline of Theology Outcomes for the Discipline of Theology Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Discipline of Theology to Achieve Outcomes Generic units

Section 5: Generic Units Section 5: Degree Rules


Academic Regulations Rules for Bachelor of Theology, Bachelor of Ministry, and BTh/BMin Combined

Appendix 1: Template for Design of Course Unit Outlines


Template

SECTION 1: BIBLICAL STUDIES


Response #5: Biblical Studies: Rationale, Outcomes, and Course Unit Titles Rationale for the Discipline of Biblical Studies

Biblical Studies is central to the undergraduate and graduate programs of the SCD because it p rovides a firm grounding in the content of the divine revelation as recorded in Scripture As such, Biblical . Studies forms the basis of theology and related disciplines. Through the study of Scripture, students gain an understanding of the content, purpose, and manner of Gods self-revelation. They learn historical and literary skills that enable them to distil the theological meaning of the original text and its application to issues of modern society and culture.
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Biblical Studies lays a foundation that enables students to think critically, develop analytical skills, and handle a vast body of secondary literature. In coming to appreciate the enormous contribution of biblical scholars throughout the ages, students are able to draw upon the fruits o these studies and to f engage with them as they grow in their ability to form their own judgments.

Outcomes for the Discipline of Biblical Studies


In line with the latest version of the Australian Qualifications Framework, outcomes are presented in three categories: knowledge, skills, and application of knowledge. The outcomes below conform to the new framework.
Type of Outcome Knowledge Outcome Students in the Biblical Studies discipline will:

y y y y
Skills

demonstrate familiarity with the overall structure and contents of the biblical books relate biblical texts to the historical, geographical, socio-cultural and religious contexts of their times describe the principal literary features of the Old and New Testaments identify key theological biblical themes

Application of knowledge and skills

Students in the Biblical Studies discipline will: y exegete critically passages from both the Old and New Testaments y draw upon various lexical and grammatical aids in a biblical language y access, utilise and engage critically with significant secondary literature Students in the Biblical Studies discipline will apply their knowledge and skills to: y articulate the value of the Bible as a primary source of Gods selfrevelation, and its significant contribution to centuries of human civilisation y recognize the contribution of sound biblical interpretation to other theological disciplines y make use of the acquired knowledge and skills in relevant areas of ministry y apply the fruits of sound biblical education to public debate, literature, music and the arts

Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Discipline of Biblical Studies to Achieve Outcomes
Proposed Unit Title 100 Series BB100 Introduction to Biblical Studies
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BB111 Introduction to the Old Testament BB150 Introduction to the New Testament 200 Series BB203Hermeneutics BB214 Pentateuch BB220 Old Testament Historical Books BB229 Wisdom Literature BB231 Prophetic Literature BB254 Synoptic Gospels 300 Series BB326 Psalms BB364 Pauline Literature BB368 Gospel according to John BB382 Hebrews and the General Epistles 500 Series BB500 Introduction to Biblical Studies BB511 Introduction to the Old Testament BB550 Introduction to the New Testament 600 Series BB605 Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments BB610 Israels Beginnings: the Books of Genesis and Exodus BB629 Wisdom and Poetry in Israel BB636 Isaiah BB640 Jeremiah BB657 Lukan Literature BB662 Apocalyptic Literature BB668 Johannine Literature BB672 Romans BB680 Dead Sea Scrolls SECTION 2: HUMANITIES IN THE CHRISTIAN TRADITION

Response #6: Humanities in the Christian Tradition Biblical Studies Rationale, Outcomes, and Course Unit Titles Rationale for the Discipline of Humanities in the Christian Tradition
The arts have been in existence for as long as human civilisation. As a way of human knowing and action, they play a central role in the identities and cultural practices of all indigenous peoples. (Australian Education Review, ACER, 2010). The study of the humanities has long been associated with the study of theology, because the various studies in the humanities shed light on fundamental questions about who we are as human beings, on what it is to be human, and on the history and achievements of human culture and civilisation. The Christian faith holds that human beings are hearers of the Word, the recipients of Gods revelation. Of particular relevance to Christian theology are the study of ancient and ecclesiastical languages, the study of the history of the Christian Church and churches, and the study of philosophy as it seeks to understand reality in all its forms. These studies enhance students understanding of the

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context in which they will study theology and, secondly, provide technical competence in a range of ancient languages and in research methodologies. The study of the Humanities in the SCD is undertaken in two sub disciplines Church History and Philosophy. (Ancient and ecclesiastical languages are grouped with their related disciplines of Biblical Studies and Theology respectively).

Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Church History (HS)

Church History is the study of Christianity's past and its meaning for the present. Church historians reconstruct the past using evidence from a wide range of sources, including documents, visualrecords, and material artefacts. Utilising a range of methodologies, they examine past religious and ecclesiastical events as well as the Church's role in broader cultural, social, and political events, interpret their causes, significance, and long-term impact. Church History is used to enrich our understanding of the place of the Christian Church in the world by considering the changes and continuities in its relationships from earliest times to the present era. A broad knowledge of Church History is foundational to Christian identity and practice. The study of history provides the student with the broad cultural context in which to understand the major events and intellectual movements in the life of the church through the ages. The study of key periods enables students to view the great theological debates within the complex interaction of ideologies, socio-political systems, and personalities. In addition, historical method plays a crucial role in the study of theology because from it are derived many of the tools of the historical critical method, which are essential for the interpretation of text and context. In encouraging th consideration of a e variety of interpretations and perspectives, the study of history contributes to the development of attitudes of tolerance and respect for the views of others. Church history is related to many of the theological disciplines studied in the College. It is strongly associated with Biblical Studies and Philosophy, while Missiology, Christian Spirituality, and Liturgical Studies involve historical perspectives. History is thus valued in its own right and for its contribution to the theological enterprise. Within the College, a variety of Church History programs are offered which cover the crucial centuries of the early church, periods of climactic change such as the Reformation, Australian Religious History and the Church in the Modern World. More specific areas include Women in Christian History, History of Missions, and the History of the Ecumenical Movement.

Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Church History


In line with the latest version of the Australian Qualifications Framework, outcomes are presented in three categories: knowledge, skills, and application of knowledge. The outcomes below are in draft form and need revision to conform to the new framework.
Type of Outcome Knowledge Outcome Students in the Church History subdiscipline will: y y y Demonstrate a broad knowledge of the Churchs past situated within the broader human story. Identify, analyse, contextualise, and synthesise a wide variety of primary and secondary materials. Identify, analyse, contextualise, synthesise, and reflect critically upon historical scholarship.

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y y y Skills

discuss critically the significance of events and periods of change explain how church history must be understood within the context of the history of the wider community recognise the complexity of any given historical situation and the validity of different interpretations Construct and support a coherent historical argument in oral and written form, according to the methodological and ethical conventions of the discipline. Demonstrate knowledge of the varieties of approaches to understanding, constructing and interpreting the past

Students in the Church History subdiscipline will: y

y Application of knowledge and skills

Students in the Church History subdiscipline will apply their knowledge and skills to: y Formulate historical problems and propose and review means for their resolution through the gathering, analysis, and synthesis of historical information. Demonstrate understanding of how historical phenomena and historians inform the present. Appreciate that historical knowledge provides a necessary context for theological studies

y y

Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Church History to Achieve Outcomes
Proposed Unit Title 00 Series HS00x Introduction to the History of Christianity HS00x History of the Church to c.600 CE HS00x History of the Church from c.600-1450 CE HS00x History of the Church from the Reformation to the Present HS00x Tradition-Specific Unit HS00x Issues in Church History 100 Series HS1xx Introduction to the History of Christianity HS1xx History of the Church to c.600 CE 200 Series HS2xx History of the Church from c.600-1450 CE HS2xx History of the Church from the Reformation to the Present HS2xx Tradition-specific Unit 300 Series HS3xx Thematic Unit HS3xx Region-specific unit HS3xx Period-specific unit 500 Series HS5xx Introduction to the History of Christianity HS5xx History of the Church to c.600 CE 600 Series HS6xx History of the Church from c.600-1450 CE
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Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Philosophy (WH)

HS6xx HS6xx HS6xx HS6xx HS6xx

History of the Church from the Reformation to the Present Tradition-specific Unit Thematic Unit Region-specific unit Period-specific unit

Philosophy is that discipline which examines the nature and place of human reasoning and judgement in the quest to understand reality in all its forms. Philosophy seeks on that basis to articulate those most general categories needed for describing and analysing the natural and human world. Philosophy does this by asking after truth, which requires asking after the nature of things and the ends to which they exist. In doing so philosophy addresses issues that are of concern to contemporar culture by y showing how philosophical reasoning clarifies and helps to address problems which are central to human life and action. The study of philosophy enables the student to recognise and analyse the conceptual assumptions and evaluations behind contemporary debates and to make informed judgements about them. Students learn to develop their own philosophical positions and to argue cogently on the basis of them. This is a task which is not done once and for all, but which must be done afresh in re sponse to new situations and new learning. The philosophy units in the SCD cover the main philosophical issues in Western philosophy, such as human knowledge, human nature and moral reasoning, metaphysics and God. These issues are studied both systematically and historically. Indeed the historical study of philosophy is of particular interest and students grasp something of the development of ideas within Western culture and, in particular, the interaction between Christian theology and the Western philosophical tradition. In studying the history of philosophy students grasp both the main features of each major historical period and the ways in which thought has developed from one to another. Our philosophy units also attend to the cultural literacy wh is required of theological students ich whereby they are reasonably versed in contemporary ideas and debates and able to translate and communicate theological truths within a secular milieu, as well as able to translate ideas back from a secular milieu into a theological context. For this end, our units provide some cultural understanding of significant sectors of the broader secular and inter -cultural milieu, the currency of ideas there, especially as signalled by major thinkers, and ways of philosophical reflection. Within the College Philosophy maintains close links with the theological disciplines, particularly Systematic Theology and Christian Ethics. Students who undertake the serious study of philosophy will be able not only more effectively to call people to embrace the Gospel but also to do this with understanding of what the Gospel means, of what a call entails, and of the condition in which people called find themselves.

Outcomes for Subdiscipline of Philosophy

In line with the latest version of the Australian Qualifications Framework, outcomes are presented in three categories: knowledge, skills, and application of knowledge. The outcomes below are in draft form and need revision to conform to the new framework.
Type of Outcome Knowledge
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Outcome Students in the Philosophy subdiscipline will have:


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a coherent knowledge of the major philosophical issues in Western philosophy, relating to the human person, the universe and God, and understand their historical development and significance familiarity with contemporary philosophical ideas in the context of modern society and culture y familiarity with the interactions between Christian theology and Western philosophical inquiry access and utilise the significant literature in this discipline recognise and analyse philosophical assumptions and arguments in various contexts and make informed critical judgements about them argue cogently on the basis of their own philosophical positions

Skills

Students in the Philosophy subdiscipline will have skills to: y y

y Application of knowledge and skills

Students in the Philosophy subdiscipline will apply their knowledge and skills to: y y to pursue philosophical inquiry and to engage in rational dialogue with others while respecting their positions engage in critical thought prior to the acceptance or rejection of new ideas

Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Philosophy to Achieve Outcomes


Proposed Unit Title 100 Series WH1xx Ancient & Medieval Philosophy (to AD 1200) WH1xx Logic and Critical Thinking WH1xx Emergence of Modern Thought (from AD 1200) 200 Series
WH2xx Moral Philosophy WH2xx The Human Person

WH3xx Knowledge, Rhetoric & Science 300 Series


WH3xx Ancient Philosophy WH3xx Medieval Philosophy WH3xx Modern Philosophy WH3xx Contemporary Philosophy WH3xx Philosophy and Culture WH3xx Philosophical Psychology WH3xx Metaphysics (Being, Existence and God) WH3xx Political Philosophy WH3xx Faith, Reason and God

500 Series WH5xx Ancient & Medieval Philosophy (to AD 1200) multistreamed MA unit WH5xx Emergence of Modern Thought (from AD 1200)multistreamed MA unit
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WH5xx Reading in Philosophy WH5xx Independent Guided Study in Philosophy WH5xx Issues in Philosophy

600 Series

WH6xx Philosophical Theology WH6xx Religion and Modernity WH6xx Theories and Issues in Ethics WH6xx Epistemology

Prerequisites: WH106 for WH109; WH106 or WH109 for all further units in the BTh. WH506 and WH509 required for all MA students beginning philosophy. A submajor in philosophy in the BTh or 4 units in philosophy at 500 level is prerequisite for all 600 level units. SECTION 3: CHRISTIAN PRAXIS

Response #7: Christian Praxis Rationale, Outcomes, and Course Unit Titles Rationale for the Discipline of Christian Praxis

Christian Praxis is inspired by a theology of imago Dei (Gen.1:27), a term that denotes the profound relationship between God and humanity. To believe that all humans are in the image of God is to understand the worth and unique gift of human life in which the triune God is made manifest. This perspective nurtures the realisation that Christian discipleship is a call to care for humanity. Within the theological academy, Christian Praxis is an interdisciplinary activity that serves the life and work of the local and universal Christian community. Christian Praxis shares with the rest of Theology the descriptive, normative, critical, dialectical, contextual and practical realities of a living faith. Christian Praxis is fundamentally practical and transformative in character; it seeks to not only understand, but also to transform human life and all of creation in terms of the Kingdom of God. Christian Praxis seeks to unify the various theological concerns scripture, tradition, experience, ethics and reason around a common normative focus. Christian Praxis y y affirms the primacy of praxis in theological method; stresses the importance that theology be concerned not only with orthodoxy but also wih t orthopraxis, i.e. seeks to norm not only ideas and confessions, but Christian practice in the world; grounds the theological endeavour in the faith community in such a way that a possible isolation of theology is overcome; strives to be contextual, to convey an authentic sense of the Christian reality, while consistently guarding against relativism; remains located at the interface between Christian truths and practice; transposes the theoretical question with regard to how the Christian faith fits into the modern world; remains at the service of the Gospel in the church, and acts as a resource, within the academy for critical enquiry into Christian belief and practice.

y y y y y

In the context of the Sydney College of Divinity, Christian Praxis consists of a particular understanding of discipleship in relation to the human person. It provides a matrix for Christian Praxis (ministry),
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drawing upon the relevance of six person centred initiatives: Pastoral Care & Counselling: the person who cares; Ethics: the person who engages reason in making choices; Liturgy: the person who worships, Missiology: the person who dialogues and proclaims; Pastoral Theology: the person who identifies Christ in the neighbour; Spirituality: the person who contemplates.

Outcomes for the Discipline of Christian Praxis


In line with the latest version of the Australian Qualifications Framework, outcomes are presented in three categories: knowledge, skills, and application of knowledge. The outcomes below are in draft form and need revision to conform to the new framework.
Type of Outcome Knowledge Outcome Students in Christian Praxis will have: y a familiarity with the sources and methods of Christian praxis; y a broad and coherent understanding of the primacy of praxis in theological method; y an in-depth knowledge of ministry in one Christian theological tradition; y a familiarity with contemporary issues in Christian praxis Students in Christian Praxis will have: y cognitive skills to ground theological endeavour in a faith community; y cognitive and creative skills to interpret the Gospel to contemporary culture; y relational skills embodying an understanding of personhood in relation to God that further love, justice, and peace Students in Christian Praxis will apply their knowledge and skills: y to teach, counsel, and enable others to connect life issues with theological and spiritual traditions y to form, lead, and sustain faith communities with a theological and spiritual understanding of the Churchs mission in a changing world. y to facilitate interdisciplinary dialogue y in ways that demonstrate accountability in professional practice in ministry

Skills

Application of knowledge and skills

Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Christian Spirituality


Christian Spirituality is the study of the ways whereby the Mystery of Christ Jesus may be followed or lived out in discipleship. As such, it helps to provide an integrative framework for students human and Christian formation and so makes an essential contribution to the overall program of the College. While Theology approaches divine matters largely in terms of belief, Spirituality approaches them in terms of experience. Christian Spirituality draws together studies from across the range of Disciplines. It particularly illuminates central Biblical themes, particularly those drawn from the New Testament, and applies them to contemporary discipleship. It locates the great classics of spiritual literature in their historical context and identifies their recurring themes. It draws on contemporary authors as they develop their insights for Christian Spirituality in the present pastoral setting for Christian life.

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Through their study of Christian Spirituality, students learn to identify the place of the Spirit in everyday life. Most significantly, they learn to integrate insights from Scriptures, from the spiritual classics and from contemporary authors into their personal lives and into the lives of the communities to which they belong. In an Australian setting, this will involve an appreciation of our common search for Christian Spirituality in a pluralist, multicultural and multi-religious society. An appreciation of the diversity of traditions of Christian Spirituality within Christianity will assist in an appreciation of the wider communal search for meaning and direction in life. Member Institution within the College have varying emphases in the study of Christian Spirituality: some emphasise the central place of the Scriptures; some focus more on the spiritual classics; some locate Christian Spirituality more within the lived liturgical tradition of the Church; some draw more on the contribution of contemporary authors struggling with the present context of society. The College recognises each of these as valid approaches to the study of Christian Spirituality and indeed encourages such a diversity of approaches.

Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Christian Spirituality


In line with the latest version of the Australian Qualifications Framework, outcomes are presented in three categories: knowledge, skills, and application of knowledge. The outcomes below are in draft form and need revision to conform to the new framework.
Type of Outcome Knowledge Outcome Students in the Christian Spirituality subdiscipline will have: y develop an integral framework for Christian spiritual growth y identify the theological foundations of Christian spirituality Students in the Christian Spirituality subdiscipline will have: y recognise the key scriptural themes and their relevance for human and Christian formation y recognise the recurring themes of the classics in Christian spiritual literature y recognise the insights into spirituality offered by contemporary writers Students in the Christian Spirituality subdiscipline will apply their knowledge and skills to: y articulate the place of the spiritual in everyday life y discern the contextual and timeless elements in Christian spiritual classics y integrate insights into their own personal and communal living y appreciate the place of spirituality as the basis for living y appreciate the inter-relationship between spirituality and theology y appreciate the various traditions of spirituality within the Christian tradition

Skills

Application of knowledge and skills

Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Christian Spirituality to Achieve Outcomes
Proposed Unit Title 000 Series SP00x Introduction to Christian Spirituality 100 Series

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200 Series SP200 Spiritual Formation for Ministry and Communities SP200 Formation in Prayer and Prayerfulness 300 Series SP300 A Spirituality of the Heart SP300 Spiritual Wisdom from the West SP300 Wesleyan Spirituality SP300 Studies in Historic Spirituality 500 Series SP500 Introduction to Christian Spirituality 600 Series SP600 Wesleyan Spirituality SP600 Studies in Historic Spirituality SP600 Spirit in Context: Australian Spirituality SP600 Roman Catholic Spirituality in the 20th Century

Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Counselling


Pending

Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Counselling


Pending

Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Counselling to Achieve Outcomes
Proposed Unit Title 100 Series

200 Series PC2xx Skills of Counselling 1 PC2xx Counselling Practicum PC2xx Relationship, Grief & Trauma Counselling PC2xx Human Development and Counselling PC2xx Counselling Practice & Supervision 300 Series PC3xx Marriage & Family Counselling 1 PC3xx Marriage & Family Counselling 2 PC3xx Issues in Ethics & Professional Practice PC3xx Skills of Counselling 2 PC3xx Counselling Practicum 2 PC3xx Counselling Children PC3xx Addictive Behaviours; Motivation for Change PC3xx Counselling Assessment PC3xx Counselling Practice & Supervision PC3xx Refocusing Therapy 500 Series PC5xx Studies in Therapy; Solution Focused/Brief Therapy PC5xx Studies in Therapy; Understanding & Working With Trauma
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PC5xx Studies in Therapy; Process/Experiential Therapy/Focusing PC5xx Group Processes PC5xx Skills in Counselling 1 PC5xx Counselling Practicum 1 PC5xx Introduction to Counselling PC5xx Counselling in Context PC5xx Relationship, Grief & Trauma Counselling PC5xx Human Development & Counselling PC5xx Psychology of Leadership PC5xx Theology of Pastoral Care & Counselling PC5xx Counselling Practicum & Supervision 1 PC5xx Introduction to Supervisory Practice PC5xx Educational Theory & the Practice of Pastoral Supervision PC5xx Theological Reflection in Supervision 600 Series PC 6xx Marriage & Family Counselling 1 PC 6xx Marriage & Family Counselling 2 PC 6xx Art of Supervision PC 6xx Issues in Ethics & Professional Practice PC 6xx Skills in Counselling 2 PC 6xx Counselling Practicum 2 PC 6xx Counselling Children PC 6xx Addictive Behaviours; Motivation for Change PC 6xx Counselling Assessment PC 6xx Counselling Practicum & Supervision PC 6xx Refocusing Therapy PC 6xx Advanced Supervisory Practice PC6xx Advanced Practicum in Pastoral Counselling

Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Worship and Liturgical Studies


Although the 2009 AUQA Report on the SCD commended the SCD for developing and implementing a single curriculum that can be adequately and appropriately tailored to satisfy the various traditions of the Member Institutions and for for its model of theological education which encompasses collegiality and community, ecumenicity and fellowship across denominations, the subdiscipline of Worship and Liturgical Studies, perhaps more than any other subdiscipline, throws into contrast the various traditions of the Member Institutions. Some Member Institutions represent churches that are commonly called non-liturgical: their public worship does not involve closely defined ritual of language and action that in other churches is codified in a prayer-book or similar text. However, in strict terms, All methods of conducting public worship in any of its parts, with whatever historic traditions and doctrinal prepossessions, constitute what may properly be called liturgies, the differences between methods being specific rather than generic Inasmuch as public worship in some . form is an institution peculiar to the church, necessary to its existence, expressive of its character, and definitive of it as a social fact, all churches are really liturgical, in spite of their diversity of doctrinal theory and of outward ceremony. Consequently, even those churches that are popularly called non liturgical necessarily have liturgical responsibilities. Liturgics covers the whole field of the science and art of public worship, irrespective of methods of administration, and including in some way the highly specialized department of preaching. As used here, liturgics is broad enough to extend to less
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formal aspects of public worship including a service like a prayer-meeting or a Sunday school. (Pratt, The Liturgical Responsibilities of Non-Liturgical Churches, The American Journal of Theology, 1901). Liturgies include spoken or preached words, texts, movement, silence, music, and the way in which they are all articulated in space. Although the term Liturgical Studies is sufficiently broad to encompass all features of this subdiscipline, the SCD has chosen to call the subdiscipline Worship and Liturgical Studies to signal that this subdiscipline has relevance to the so-called liturgical and non-liturgical traditions.

Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Worship and Liturgical Studies


In line with the latest version of the Australian Qualifications Framework, outcomes are presented in three categories: knowledge, skills, and application of knowledge.
Type of Outcome Knowledge Outcome Students in the Worship and Liturgical Studies subdiscipline will have:

a familiarity with the deep structures of Christian worship and the traditions and practices of worship in Christian history and across the globe; a broad and coherent understanding of the sources from which our current patterns of prayer, preaching, music and other liturgical forms are derived and demonstrate a competence in implementing a range of liturgical forms;

Skills

Students in the Worship and Liturgical Studies subdiscipline will have skills to:

compare sacramental and non-sacramental forms of worship and explain the transformative power of these in the life and work of the Church; contribute effectively to worship, through the use of pitch, pace and body language; skills in arranging liturgical space for worship, in positioning fittings and furniture, in using art, and in creating appropriate space for movement and bodily gesture in acts of corporate prayer;

Application of knowledge and skills

Students in the Worship and Liturgical Studies subdiscipline will apply their knowledge and skills to:

exhibit sensitivity to, and a greater competence in, a variety of liturgical languages, including the use of symbols in worship; measuring the pace and flow of liturgical rites; and the use of silence, music and song; demonstrate an awareness of the need to be as inclusive as possible to the needs of differing groups in preparing and leading worship and of the importance of this within the mission and ministry of the Church.

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Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Worship and Liturgical Studies to Achieve Outcomes
Proposed Unit Title 100 Series LS100 Introduction to Christian Worship LS1xx Communicating the Gospel LS2xx Music in worship 200 Series LS2xx Orthodox Christian Hymnology LS2xx Christian Initiation LS2xx Liturgical Rites 300 Series LS3xx The Liturgical Year LS3xx Preaching LS3xx Iconography and the Liturgical Arts 500 Series LS500 Introduction to Christian Worship LS5xx Communicating the Gospel LS5xx Liturgical Rites and the Assembly LS5xx Liturgical Praxis LS5xx Liturgical Spirituality 600 Series LS6xx Preaching LS6xx Liturgical Sources LS6xx Liturgical Theology LS6xx Specialised Studies in Liturgical Texts (e.g. The Psalter as Liturgical Source, marriage rites) LS6xx Specialised Studies in Liturgical Theology & Praxis (e.g. architecture, Hagia Sophia)

Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Missiology


Mission is God's work of bringing about the Kingdom of God on earth. Mission originates from the nature of God himself; the Father sending the Son, and the Father and the Son sending the Spirit into the world. The triune God sends the Church into the world as an agent of h missio Dei activity. Called is by God to participate in his redemptive drama, the Church is missionary by its very nature. Its task is to seek, uncover and proclaim God's presence and action in the world. Just as God is constantly engaged in creating, healing, reconciling, transforming and uniting the world through Jesus Christ; so the Church is called to embody the life of God within its own community, and to strive for justice, peace, freedom and reconciliation between peoples, religions and the environme in the name of Christ. nt Missiology is the study of mission. Its primary concern and focus is with how the gospel is communicated across geographic, cultural, linguistic and religious boundaries. As an academic discipline, Missiology investigates the foundations, aims, content, methods and models of mission from their biblical, historical, theological and ecclesial sources. Missiology researches and reflects on how the people of God are called and sent out to participate in God's mission for the salvaton of the i world. Missiology stands at the interface between Church and world, and finds its particular point of reference in both the theological academy and the frontiers of ministry. It sharpens theology's critical and constructive reflection on the beliefs and practices of the Christian faith by focusing them towards
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the Church's fulfilment of its missionary mandate, addressing questions related to the ongoing encounter between gospel and culture, and the development of new and creative approaches to communicating the gospel of salvation to a world in need of the obedience of faith. Mission and missiology include the following dimensions: 1. Local the activities of a particular church community to penetrate and transform the surrounding society with Gospel values 2. Ecumenical joint action with other Christian churches in common witness and common service to the wider society 3. Interreligious engaging with believers from other religions and people of good will for mutual understanding and collaboration for the welfare of all 4. Global exchange of people and resources between churches and nations, especially for solidarity on international issues that have global repercussions 5. Frontier reaching out to those nations or sectors of societies where the Gospel message has not yet penetrated or is not yet fully effective 6. Liberation advocacy for justice in support of the poor, the oppressed and the marginalized 7. Inclusive crossing boundaries of culture, language, faith and gender. 8. Environmental recognising that Gods mission is holistic and embraces all of creation

Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Missiology


Type of Outcome Knowledge

Skills

Application of knowledge and skills

Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Missiology to Achieve Outcomes


Proposed Unit Title 000 Series MS0xx Introduction to World Mission MS0xx The Principles of Missiology MS0xx Cross-Cultural Ministry MS0xx Evangelism
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Outcome Students in the Missiology subdiscipline will have: y familiarity with the sources and methods of missiology; y have a broad and coherent understanding of the relevance of the Christian message for society and the world; y have an in-depth knowledge of at least one other culture or religion; y a familiarity with contemporary missiological issues Students in the Missiology subdiscipline will: y have cognitive skills to recognise and critically analyse major missiological issues; y have ministry skills to apply the Gospel message appropriately in new situations; y possess communication skills to develop and present a culturally sensitive synthesis of the Christian message Students in the Missiology subdiscipline will apply their knowledge and skills to: y adapt the Christian message to a range of ecclesial, social, cultural, religious and secular contexts; y make sound judgements about the contribution of Christian faith in the public forum; y be accountable for professional practice in missionary activities

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MS0xx Anthropology for Christian Mission MS0xx Reaching Australians with the Gospel MS0xx Christian Aid and Community Development MS0xx Cross-Cultural Ministry Internship MS0xx Scriptural Foundations for Mission MS0xx Christian Perspectives on World Religions MS0xx History of Christian Mission MS0xx Missionary Biographies MS0xx Evangelising Mission of the Catholic Church MS0xx Justice and the Catholic Church's Mission MS0xx Church and Australian/New Zealand Societies Degree 100 Series MS1xx Introduction to World Mission MS1xx The Principles of Missiology MS1xx Cross-Cultural Ministry 200 Series MS2xx Evangelism MS2xx Scriptural Foundations for Mission MS2xx Reaching Australians with the Gospel MS2xx Principles of Christian Discipleship MS2xx Theology of Christian Mission MS2xx Christian Aid and Community Development MS2xx Christian Perspectives on World Religions MS2xx History of Christian Mission MS2xx Evangelising Mission of the Catholic Church MS2xx Justice and the Catholic Church's mission MS2xx Church and Australian/New Zealand Societies 300 Series MS3xx Mission Strategies for the Local Church MS3xx Early Church in Mission MS3xx Anthropology for Christian Mission MS3xx Missionary Biographies MS3xx Faith, Mission and Culture MS3xx Interreligious Dialogue MS3xx Missiology of Western Culture MS3xx Introducing Islam MS3xx Contemporary Missiology 500 Series MS5xx Introduction to Mission MS5xx Principles of Missiology MS5xx Cross-Cultural Ministry MS5xx Evangelism MS5xx Anthropology for Christian Mission MS5xx Reaching Australians with the Gospel MS5xx History of Christian Mission MS5xx Scriptural Foundations for Mission MS5xx Church in Australian/New Zealand Societies MS5xx Principles of Christian Discipleship MS5xx Theology of Christian Mission MS5xx Christian Aid and Community Development
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MS5xx Christian Perspectives on World Religions MS5xx History of Christian Mission MS5xx Mission and the Catholic/Christian School MS5xx New Paradigms for the Missional Revolution 600 Series MS6xx Mission Strategies for the Local Church MS6xx Early Church in Mission MS6xx Anthropology for Christian Mission MS6xx Missionary Biographies MS6xx Faith, Mission and Culture MS6xx Interreligious Dialogue MS6xx Missiology of Western Culture MS6xx Introducing Islam MS6xx Contemporary Missiology MS6xx Cross-Cultural Ministry Internship MS6xx Justice and Mission

Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Theology


Pastoral Theology is pedagogy of faith, hope, and charity. It is a branch of theology within the wider academic discipline of Christian Praxis; as such, it shares the aims and methodology of Christian Praxis. In making an essential contribution to the overall program of the Sydney College of D ivinity, Pastoral Theology is concerned with the practical application (praxis) of theology to ministry Reciprocally it . also seeks, through lived experience, to give insights into theology, allowing the sensus fidei (the life of faith), to become a locus theologicus. Pastoral Theology is inevitably interdisciplinary, it is the final stage of theological method; it is the place where theology (biblical studies, theology, history, philosophy) bears fruit in the context of contemporary ministry. Central to Pastoral Theology, is its vocational dimension of ministry, both lay and ordained, in all of its diverse manifestations. While traditional theology approaches the divine mystery from a predominately philosophical perspective, Pastoral Theology draws upon the human behavioural sciences, in a lived tension, to advance the treatment of the care of souls. Pastoral Theology is a matrix through which theological endeavour, lived experience, and biblical tradition is inserted into the local and universal ecclesial community.

Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Theology


Type of Outcome Knowledge Outcome Students in the Pastoral Theology subdiscipline will have: y a coherent knowledge of the sources and methods of pastoral theology; y a familiarity with contemporary issues in pastoral theology and practice; y an in-depth understanding of the vocational dimension of ministry; y a broad understanding of theology and the human sciences in relation to contemporary ministry in the church Students in the Pastoral Theology subdiscipline will have: y cognitive skills to critically review, analyse and synthesise theology for the purposes of ministry; y access and utilise contemporary literature and pastoral methodology;

Skills

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Application of knowledge and skills

Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Pastoral Theology to Achieve Outcomes
Introduction to Pastoral Theology 000 Series

communication skills to develop and present a pastoral response to issues in ministry Students in the Pastoral Theology subdiscipline will apply their knowledge and skills to: y adapt theological endeavour to the context of contemporary pastoral ministry; y make sound judgments with regard to all aspects of pastoral ministry; y be accountable for professional practice in pastoral ministry

PT001 Introduction to Pastoral Theology PT002 Introduction to Pastoral Ministry PT003 Introduction to Youth Ministry PT004 Introduction to Christian Education PT005 Introduction to Administration and Leadership PT006 Pastoral Theology in Context PT007 Personal Formation I PT008 Personal Formation II PT009 Childrens Ministry PT010 Issues in Youth Ministry PT011 Youth Ministry & Personal Growth PT012 Marriage and Family PT013 Principles of Christian Leadership PT014 Women and Christian Ministry PT015 Mastering Change in Ministry PT016 Growing Healthy Churches PT017 Supervised Ministry I PT018 Supervised Ministry II PT019 Pastoral Ministry and Communication Skills 100 Series PT1xx Introduction to Pastoral Theology PT1xx Introduction to Pastoral Ministry PT1xx Introduction to Youth Ministry PT1xx Introduction to Christian Education PT1xx Introduction to Administration and Leadership 200 Series PT2xx Pastoral Theology in Context PT2xx Contextual Theology for Ministry PT2xx Personal Formation 1 PT2xx Childrens Ministry PT2xx Issues in Youth Ministry PT2xx Youth Ministry & Personal Growth PT2xx Marriage and Family Life PT2xx Pastoral Theology and Priestly Formation PT2xx Discipleship for the Emerging Church PT2xx Maori Pastoral Care PT2xx Pastoral Ministry and Communication Skills
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PT2xx Human Life Span and Pastoral Ministry PT2xx Transformational Leadership PT2xx The Ministers Personal Growth PT2xx Growing Healthy Churches PT2xx Women and Christian Ministry PT2xx Working in a Team Setting PT2xx Principles in Christian Leadership PT2xx Clinical Pastoral Education Unit 1 PT2xx Clinical Pastoral Education Unit 2 PT2xx Supervised Ministry 1 300 Series PT3xx Youth Ministry: Culture and Context PT3xx Media, Culture and Ethical Value Systems PT3xx Personal Formation 1 PT3xx Advanced Leadership Principles PT3xx Church Administration and Management PT3xx Mastering Change PT3xx Canon Law and the Sacraments PT3xx Selected Themes in Canon Law PT3xx The Psychology of Religious Vocation PT3xx Clinical Pastoral Education Unit 3 PT3xx Supervised Ministry II PT3xx Pastoral Practicum 500 Series PT5xx Introduction to Pastoral Theology PT5xx Introduction to Pastoral Ministry PT5xx Introduction to Youth Ministry PT5xx Introduction to Christian Education PT5xx Introduction to Administration and Leadership PT5xx Childrens Ministry PT5xx Issues in Youth Ministry PT5xx Youth Ministry & Personal Growth PT5xx Marriage & Family PT5xx Contextual Theology for Ministry PT5xx Supervised Ministry I PT5xx Personal Formation I PT5xx Clinical Pastoral Education Unit I PT5xx Discipleship for the Emerging Church PT5xx Pastoral Ministry and Communication Skills PT5xx Principles of Christian Leadership PT5xx Growing Healthy Churches PT5xx Theological Reflection in Supervision PT5xx Working in a Team Setting PT5xx Selected Themes in Canon Law PT5xx Clinical Pastoral Education in Aged Care 600 Series

PT6xx Youth Ministry: Culture and Context


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Rationale for the Subdiscipline of Christian Ethics

PT6xx Media, Culture and Christian Values PT6xx Mastering Change in Ministry PT6xx Personal Formation II PT6xx Supervised Ministry II PT6xx Clinical Pastoral Education II PT6xx Canon Law and the Sacraments PT6xx Pastoral Theology and Priestly Formation PT6xx Clinical Pastoral Education III PT6xx Advance Leadership Principles PT6xx Practical Theology in the Service of the Church PT6xx Supervised Ministry Practicum PT6xx Advanced Church Leadership and Management PT6xx Pastoral Practicum

Christian Ethics finds its distinct objectives in the moral dimension of Christian discipleship. The emphasis is on providing a framework for moral decision making with the goal of promoting Christian moral living. To this end, students gain an understanding of the development of the Christian ethical tradition; they learn how this tradition informs a Christian approach to contemporary issues and how to employ moral principles derived from a variety of sources. This allows students to analyse the ethical elements in concrete situations and arrive at reasoned and informed responses to those situations. Within the SCD, the different member institutions emphasise various aspects of the study of Christian Ethics. Some emphasise the Biblical basis of moral decision-making. Some reflect a more philosophical approach. Some approach the subject area by a consideration of the developing history of moral reflection in the Christian traditions. Some focus more in the concrete pastoral and practical context of moral issues. The SCD recognises each of these approaches as a valid approach to the study of Christian Ethics.

Outcomes for the Subdiscipline of Christian Ethics


Pending

Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Subdiscipline of Christian Ethics to Achieve Outcomes
Proposed Unit Title 100 Series

200 Series ET2xx Theoretical and Practical Foundations for Christian Ethics 2xx Methodologies for Christian Ethics 300 Series ET3xx Environmental Ethics ET3xx Sexual Ethics ET3xx Biomedical Ethics ET3xx Ethics of Peace and War ET3xx Social Ethics 500 Series 5xx Introduction to Christian Ethics 600 Series ET6xx Environmental Ethics
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ET6xx Family, Church and Society ET6xx Sexuality, Marriage and Family in the Catholic Tradition ET6xx Biomedical Ethic ET6xx The Spirituality of Active Non-Violence ET6xx Can War be Just? ET6xx Social Ethics and Catholic Social Teaching ET6xx Ethics and Human Communication ET6xx Applied Ethics within a Post-modern Context ET6xx Conscience and Responsibility SECTION 4: THEOLOGY

Theology is the central intellectual discipline of Christian faith. Theology integrates the sources of revelation, the history of reflection on that revelation, and the practical concerns of Christian living. Theology explores, through the study of the content and development of major Chris doctrines, the tian history of the Christian communitys appropriation of Gods revelation. Theologians are also concerned, however, to articulate the faith of the Church in todays world. In order to do this, theologians must be aware of the interaction between their disciplines and contemporary issues and culture. The study of Theology thus promotes the development of analytical and critical skills and the ability to utilise the corpus of theological literature. Theology is ultimately at the service of the Gospel. For this reason, theology addresses issues such as the division of the Christian Churches, the connection between faith and praxis, and the interaction between faith and culture as these issues affect how the Gospel is lived and perceived in contemporary society. Because of their study of theology, students can come to appreciate the complexities of these issues and be encouraged to make their contribution to the determination of these issues within the Christian Community. Among the different emphases which can be identified in Theology, the following would be most prominent: Systematic Theology, which highlights the integrated understanding of faith, usually within a philosophical framework; Biblical Theology which stresses that it is biblical revelation which determines the content of Christian faith; Historical Theology which gives prominence to the development of Christian doctrines within key eras of the Christian story. Each of these methodologies is likely to be used at some stage in a program of theological studies.

Response #8: Theology Rationale, Outcomes, and Course Unit Titles Rationale for the Discipline of Theology

Outcomes for the Discipline of Theology


In line with the latest version of the Australian Qualifications Framework, outcomes are presented in three categories: knowledge, skills, and application of knowledge. The outcom below have been es written to conform to the new framework.
Type of Outcome Knowledge Outcome Students in the Theology discipline will have: y a familiarity with the sources and methods of theology; y a broad and coherent understanding of the major Christian doctrines and their development in the Christian tradition; y an in-depth knowledge of one Christian theological tradition;
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Skills

Application of knowledge and skills

y a familiarity with contemporary theological writing Students in the Theology discipline will have: y cognitive skills to critically review, analyse and synthesise several major theological texts; y cognitive and creative skills to apply appropriate theological method to address new theological questions; y communication skills to develop and present a synthesis of Christian theology Students in the Theology discipline will apply their knowledge and skills to: y adapt theological knowledge to a range of ecclesial and ministerial contexts; y make sound judgements about the articulation of Christian faith in the public forum; y be accountable for professional practice in ministry

Titles of Proposed Course Units in the Discipline of Theology to Achieve Outcomes


Proposed Unit Title 100 Series TH1xx Introduction to Theology TH1xx Introduction to Christian Doctrines 200 Series TH2xx Spirit and Church TH2xx Christology and Soteriology TH2xx The Self-Revealing God TH2xx Early Church Fathers 300 Series TH3xx Ecclesiology [there will be no Ecclesiology B] TH3xx Christian Apologetics TH3xx Ministry in the Church TH3xx Theology of Priesthood TH3xx The Sacraments TH3xx Anointing and Reconciliation TH3xx Baptism and Confirmation TH3xx The Eucharist TH3xx The Sacrament of Marriage TH33xx The Trinity TH3xx Christian Anthropology and Grace TH3xx Creation and Fulfilment TH3xx Doctrine of Sanctification: Biblical Perspectives TH3xx Early Byzantine Patristic Theology TH3xx Later Byzantine Patristic Theology 500 Series TH5xx Introduction to Theology TH5xx Introduction to Christian Doctrines TH5xx Spirit and Church TH5xx Christology and Soteriology TH5xx The Self-Revealing God TH5xx Research Methods 600 Series (incomplete)
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TH6xx Introduction to Catholic/Orthodox Theology TH6xx The Sacraments TH6xx Christian Anthropology TH6xx The Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed TH6xx Christian Perspectives on the Environment TH6xx Exploring the Philokalia TH6xx The Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed (may need to be excluded from MTh program)

SECTION 5: GENERIC UNITS


Response #9: Generic Units: Rationale, Outcomes, and Course Unit Titles Rationale for the Generic Units
Generic units are generic in the sense that they can be applied (with appropriate coding) to any discipline or subdiscipline. Generic units contribute strongly to several of the goals and strategies of the SCD Teaching and Learning Enhancement Plan 2007-2012. Research generic units (see table below) foster independent research and study skills and enhance initiative and creativity as students pursue ideas and areas of interest in the subject area. In this way, they satisfy Goal 3 of the Plan that seeks to provide a learning environment which fosters increased independence in learning combined with and a higher degree of student centredness. Teaching generic units (see table below) allow lecturers to respond to student initiatives, to the latest developments in the disciplines, and to the availability of leaders in the field. These units provide an opportunity through lectures, seminars, guided research, or other means to engage students with groundbreaking research, creative initiatives, and stimulating variations from the standard curriculum. In this way, the satisfy Goal 4 of the Plan: To develop flexibility in teaching practice through innovations and increased student engagement in learning. Capstone generic units help students synthesise their learning across each semester of the program into a coherent whole. A capstone unit looks forward as well as back having synthesised their studies, the capstone unit assists students consider the implications of their studies for the next stage in their vocational life and to consider further learning experiences that will consolidate and extend their current knowledge, skills, and values. These units satisfy Goal 3, Strategy 3 of the Plan: Foster a culture of life-long learning, peer interaction and the integration of new technologies into the learning process. Although generic units satisfy goals of independence, student centredness and engagement, flexibility, innovation, and a culture of life-long learning, they are subject to some limits to ensure that they do not overly skew the curriculum. Teaching generic units are initiatives of particular Member Institutions and are designed to enhance the overall curriculum. There is no limit to the number of teaching generic units a student may do. However, a student may take a maximum of two Issues in and one Seminar/Advanced Seminar units per subdiscipline. Research generic units, on the other hand, although approved by the Member Institution, require additional limits because they are subject to the research interests of the student. A student may do a maximum of 36 credit points in research generic units with no more than 18cps in Independent Guided Study units and/or 18cps in Research Projects and/or 18cps as a Research Essay.
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Outcome for the Generic Units


When these units are taught they are coded according to the relevant subdiscipline. The outcomes then fall within the outcomes for the relevant disciplines and subdisciplines described above.

Titles of Proposed Generic Course Units


Proposed Unit Title 000 Series Xx093 Independent Guided Study Xx095 Issues in Xx099 Capstone for [xxDiscipline] . . . 100 Series 200 Series 300 Series xx391 Research Project xx392 Research Project xx393 Independent Guided Study xx394 Independent Guided Study xx395 Issues in xx396 Issues in xx397 Seminar [Topic] Xx399 Capstone for [xxDiscipline] . . . 500 Series Xx598 BTh (Honours) Thesis 600 Series xx691 Research Project xx692 Research Project xx693 Independent Guided Study xx694 Independent Guided Study xx695 Issues in xx696 Issues in xx697 Advanced Seminar [Topic] xx698 Research Essay xx699 Capstone for [xxDiscipline] . . . Credit Points 9 9 9 Mode Research Teaching Teaching

9 18 9 18 9 9 9 9 45 9 18 9 18 9 9 9 9 9

Research Research Research Research Teaching Teaching Teaching Teaching Research Research Research Research Research Teaching Teaching Teaching Research Teaching

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SEC

ION 6:

C DE IC REGUL

IONS FOR

C ELOR OF

EOLOG

,B

C ELOR OF

INIS R

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/B

IN CO BINED

Response #10: Acade c Reg at ons for the BTh and B


  

n ( nc d ng pathways)
   

1.1 An app cant for ad ss on to cand dat re for a degree of Bache or of Theo ogy, Bache or of n stry, or BTh/B n Co b ned sha : a) have an A stra an Tert ary Ad ss on Rank (ATAR) of 72.5, or ts e va ent; or b) have reached the age of 21 and so sat sfy the re re ents for at re Age Entry; or c) have ade ate gro nds for Spec a Entry d) seek to art c ate fro other Sydney Co ege of v n ty progra s. For the Bache or of Theo ogy ( orean ed ) and Bache or of n stry ( orean ed ) HSC / ATAR e va ency s dee ed to hav e been ach eved by sat sfactory grad at on of H gh Schoo n orea at a eve that wo d ga n ad ss on nto a n vers ty . Th s grad at on a so s cons dered ev dence of orean ang age teracy s ff c ent to ndertake the co rse.
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dmission to Candidatu e (common to all de ees)


 



1.2 A cand date for a Bache or of Theo ogy, Bache or of n stry, or BTh/B n Co b ned sha be des gnated as f -t e or part-t e. A st dent s des gnated as a f t e f enro ed n three n ts (27 cred t po nts) or ore n a se ester or part -t e f enro ed n ess than three n ts (27 cred t po nts) per s e ester.
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1.3 Un ess approva has been granted by the Acade c Board, no can d date for the BTh, B n, or BTh/B n Co b ned ay be conc rrent y enro ed n any other ndergrad ate or postgrad ate co rse w th n the Sydney Co ege of v n ty or any other ter t ary nst t t on n ess the cand date s enro ed n an approved o nt degree progra .
& & %% 0& & & & & $& & & & %% & $ $ $ $

1.4 App cants whose entry a f cat ons were obta ned n an nst t t on where Eng sh s not the ang age of nstr ct on nor a y w be re red to de onstrate co petency n Eng sh by an IE TS (or e va ent) res t of 6.5 w th no score of ess than 6.0 n a bands of the test. A st d ent can be ad tted prov s ona y nto the BTh or B n when they have an IE TS res t of 6.0 w th no score ess than 6.0 n a ban ds of the test. They st pass a s b ects n the f rst two se esters to be per tted to cont n e.
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Page 28 of 39

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1 5 Application for enrolment in t e Bachelor of Theology, Bachelor of Ministry, or BTh/BMin Combined is made to the Registrar of the appropriate Member Institution offering the program.

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T e Ba e o o T eo og req res the co p etio o 216 credit points (24 units . Every progra for the a ard sha include a. one major and one submajor dra n from Biblical Studies and Theology [90 cps] b. one major in any discipline [54 cps] c. submajor in Christian Praxis [36 cps] d. Electives (chosen from course units listed in the SCD Schedule of Units of Study and which must include 9 credit points in Church History unless already taken as part of a major or submajor) [36 cps] e. Majors and sub-majors drawn from: (1) Biblical Studies (2) Church History, Philosophy (3) Christian Spirituality, Pastoral Counselling, Liturgical Studies, Missiology, Pastoral Theology, Christian Ethics (4) Theology major is made up of 54 credit points drawn from a single discipline or a single sub -discipline a. discipline major is comprised of a minimum of 27 credit points in one sub-discipline including 9 300Series credit points b. sub-discipline major includes not more than 18 100 Series credit points sub-major shall require 36 credit points from units assigned to the major including no more than 18 100 -Series credit points ll course units shall be taken from the SCD Schedule o f Units of Study.

3.

4. 5. 6.

The Bachelor of Ministry requires the completion of 216 credit points (24 units). Every program for the award shall include a. one major and one submajor in Christian Praxis [90 cps] b. submajors in Biblical Studies and Theology [72 cps] c. Electives chosen from course units listed in the SCD Schedule of Units of Study. [54 cps] d. Majors and sub-majors drawn from: (1) Biblical Studies (1) Christian Spirituality, Pastoral Counselling, Liturgical Studies, Missiology, Pastoral Theology, Christian Ethics, Chaplaincy, Ecumenical Studies (2) Theology major is made up of 54 credit points drawn from a single discipline or a single sub-discipline discipline major is comprised of a minimum of 27 a. credit points in one sub-discipline including 9 300Series credit points b. sub-discipline major includes not more than 18 100 Series credit points sub-major shall require 36 credit points from units assigned to the major including no more than 18 100 -Series credit points ll course units shall be taken from the SCD Sc hedule of Units of Study. Pathways a. pathway refers to a pathway through theological studies that will equip a student for particular employment. b. Pathways are complementary to majors and submajors

3.

4. 5.

The Combined Bachelor of Theology/Bachelor of Ministry requires the completion of 360 credit points (40 units). Every program for the award shall include a. one major and one submajor drawn from Biblical Studies and Theology [90 cps] b. one major and one submajor in Christian Praxis [90 cps] c. one further major in any discipline [54 cps] d. Electives (chosen from course units listed in the SCD Schedule of Units of Study and which must include 9 credit points in Church History unless already taken as part of a major or submajor) [126 cps] e. Majors and sub-majors drawn from: (1) Biblical Studies, (2) Church History, Philosophy (3) Christian Spirituality, Pastoral Counselling, Liturgical Studies, Missiology, Pastoral Theology, Christian Ethics (4) Theology major is made up of 54 credit points drawn from a single discipline or a single sub-discipline a. discipline major is comprised of a minimum of 27 credit points in one sub-discipline including 9 300Series credit points sub-discipline major includes not more than 18 100 b. Series credit points sub-major shall require 36 credit points from units assigned to the major including no more than 18 100 -Series credit points ll course units shall be taken from the SCD Schedule of Units of Study.

bc

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RS
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c. d.

e. f.

and will sometimes include studies across disciplines and subdisciplines, studies drawn from different MIs, and studies drawn from outside the SCD. Pathways will be optional and of an advisory nature. Pathways will be proposed by subdisciplines or disciplines and might include chaplaincy, youth work, parish ministry, liturgical ministry, and ecumenical work. Number of units in a pathway. Fixed number or loose connection? To be advised Basic units in a pathway: perhaps 1 unit in Biblical Studies and 1 unit in Theology (to be advised)

3.1 The period of candidature for the BTh and BMin degrees shall normally be 3 years full-time and 9 years part-time. 3.2 The period of candidature for the combined BTh/BMin degree shall normally be 5 years full-time and 15 years part-time. 3.2 In certain circumstances the Student Administration Committee may grant extensions.

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4.1 The Student Administration Committee may grant leave of absence from the Bachelor of Theology/BMin/Combined BTh-BMin. The period of leave shall not be counted as part of the period of candidature for the degree. 4.2 The period of leave shall normally be one semester after which a candidate may apply for a further period of one semester or is required to complete candidature.

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5.1 The assessment of subject units shall be in the manner approved by the Academic Board in line with the Colleges established guidelines for assessment packages at undergraduate level. 5.3 Academic and non-academic misconduct will be penalised severely in accordance with the regulations of the Sydney College of Divinity.

5.

en

6.

6.1 A candidate may seek credit up to a maximum of 144 credit points in the Bachelor of Theology or BMin and 240 credit points in the combined degree

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b ence

Page 30 of 39

7.1 Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained herein, the Academic Board of the Sydney College of Divinity may, in any case in which it may deem it appropriate to do so, vary, dispense with or suspend any requirement or prescription by these regulations, and report forthwi th to the Council of the Sydney College of Divinity.

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APPENDIX A: TEMPLATE FOR COURSE U NIT OUTLINES Accredited Course Unit Outline
Unit Code eg AL111 Unit Name eg Hebrew 1 Unit Weighting eg 9 cps Tier (see Table 1)

Type of Course Unit

1 Foundational unit 2 Intermediate unit 3 Specialised unit Face to face weekly attendance Intensive Extensive Distance education y Online y Other Generic: y Independent guided study y Research project y Research essay Workplace Learning Capstone

Course Unit Workload


Weeks in Teaching Session (t ypically 13 weeks) Timetabled hours/week (time spent at lecturers,
tutorials, engaged with online or other learning package, clinical or other placements) (typically 3 hours)

Weekly hours devoted to assessable & nonassessable tasks (typically 8 hours) Total Workload/week (typically 11 hours ) Total Workload for teaching session (143 hours per 9 cr pt unit)

Prerequisites, corequisites or exclusions Academic Staff


Lecturer Name Qualifications Classification Contact Details

Curriculum Objectives
(2 sentences maximum)

Why is this unit is important to the learner? How does the unit relate to the overall program/major/specialisation? How is the unit relevant to the ministry? Does the unit build on or apply skills/knowledge from a previous unit, or does it develop skills/knowledge that students will then use in other units? Do these objectives build an overall sense of the coherence of the overall major or program of study?
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es (Use Tab es 1 & 2 to gu de the writing o outco es) Knowledge outco e: 2

S ills outco e: 2

1 outco e that demonstrates the application o knowledge and skills Threshold concept to be acquired in this unit (will not apply to all units). See Table 3

Content & Structure including practical


components such as laboratory, studio and work-based placements

Te c ng Methods (Practicum, Group Projects,


Seminars, Tutorials, Lectures, Field ork, Simulations, Student Presentations, Online Tutorials, Other)

Re uired S ecialist Facilities or Equipment (e.g. special computer access /


physical education equipment)

Assessment Item 1
Full description of sample assessment task Number of words, length of exam etc hat outcomes does this assessment item address? Percentage of the total assessment for the unit that this assessment item addresses Full description of sample assessment task Number of words, length of exam etc Date due hat outcomes does this assessment item address? Percentage of the total assessment for the unit that this assessment item addresses Full description of sample assessment task Number of words, length of exam etc Date due hat outcomes does this assessment item address? Percentage of the total assessment for the unit that this assessment item addresses
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Assessment Item 2

Assessment Item 3

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Date eg

eek 5

e e

Standards are relatively stable descriptions o the qualities o performance or learning products that describe how well the assessment task was carried out. Establishing assessment standards requires you to define and publish expected levels of performance in a unit. Assessment of student performance is then determined according to the agreed standards.

Assessment Standards

Outc

At the end of this outline include the assessment standards that will apply to this unit. You may choose to re ine the standards so that they apply to each assessment tas . You will need to be clear about them be ore designing the assessment tas s.

f f f

Additional assessment items (please


insert more lines and add here)

Assessment Total
Total hours of exams/tests/presentations = Total number of words for all assignments =

Assessment Overview:
hy were these particular types and/or combinations of assessment tasks chosen to assess the outcomes? Is there variety in assessment methods?

Representative Re erences

Full description of assessment standards

Table 1: Types of Units


The units in the curriculum fall into five categories. Tie 1 ound ion l units are coursework units that are required for further study in a Discipline. They are appropriate to the outcomes of the award and essential for a major or specialisation. There are only a limited number of foundational units common across the Member Institutions in a Discipline. These units are coded as 100 series in AQF Level 7 Bachelor programs and 500 series in AQF Level 8 in postgraduate diploma programs. In some disciplines, the set of foundational units will include a methodology unit. AQF Level 5 pr ograms are coded as 000 series and there are no categories, although some units have prerequisites... Tie 2 nte ediate units are more specialised units that cover a wider range. They build upon the foundation studies and typically form a self-contained sub-major sequence that provides a suitable foundation for progression to more specialised studies. In addition, they are desi gned in ways that assist students to progress as independent learners, as a more rigorous and analytical thinkers who have an increased ability to solve problems. These units are coded as 200 series in AQF Level 7 Bachelor programs. Tie 3 pecialised units are units that are narrower in scope and of greater depth than Level 2 units. They develop the study of the Discipline beyond the foundational level as appropriate to the outcomes of the award. They further extend the problems solving and application s kills of students and further enhance their critical abilities, their research skills, and their independence. These units are coded as 300 series in AQF Level 7 Bachelor programs and 600 series in AQF Level 9 programs. Gene ic units offer flexibility to the student program. They allow for the testing of new units and provide for the teaching by visiting lecturers and specialists. Units that fall under this category are the Issues units, Independent Guided Study, Advanced Seminars, and Research Projects. Generic units are coded as 300 series, although provision is made for 200 series under
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l m

oj

k j

n j

g j

(1) The list of representative references should: (a) be representative, not comprehensives 10 to 12 (b) contain a mix of both student and lecturer references; (c) be up-to-date though seminal works and primary source material may be included; (d) include major new works which represent accepted breakthroughs; (e) reflect the content and level of the unit. (2) The list of books is to give the panel some idea as to whether the academic is aware of current material.

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special circumstances as outlined in the approved unit outlines for these units, in AQF Level 7 programs. In AQF Level 8 and 9 programs they are coded as 600 series. Wo place Learning Units use the workplace, including parishes, Christian agencies, and the community, as a site for teaching and learning. These units are often called field education, placements, or practicums. Related terms include internship, service learning, fieldwork, cooperative education, internship, workplace project. Workplace Learning placement is guided by written agreements between the participating parties: the Member Institution delivering the course; the placement agency accepting the student; and student undertaking the placement. Capstone units. Typically, a capstone is a wedge-shaped stone (sometimes called the keystone or cornerstone), located at the top of the arch and holding the arch together. In the curriculum, a capstone unit is critical unit at the top of a degree or diploma program that holds the structure together. Offered as a final unit in a program, a capstone unit helps students synthesise their learning across each semester of the program into a coherent whole. A capstone unit looks forward as well as back having synthesised their studies, the capstone unit assists students consider the implications of their studies for the next stage in their vocational life and to consider further learning experiences that will consolidate and extend their current knowledge, skills, and values. Capstone units are coded as 300 series in AQF Level 7 programs and 600 series in AQF Level 8 and 9 programs.
rq

Table 2: Matrix for determining tiers of units


Tier 1 Foundational Tier 2 Intermediate Quality o learning e perienced increases Largely reliant on lecturers to tell them what, when and how to successfully complete their studies. Students are largely accepting of the knowledge, skills and attitudes they encounter. Students focus on what has to be done and concentrate only on parts of a problem rather than seeing the problem in its entirety (atomistic). Students are able to handle problems they are familiar with in contexts they are familiar with. At a transitional stage. Still reliant on occasional assistance from lecturers but increasingly capable of acting on their own initiative. Students begin to challenge the knowledge, skills and attitudes they previously accepted without query. Students are able to construct more meaning. They have moved past mere facts to see the meaning/interpretation behind the facts. Students are largely independent/interdependent learners confident in their own abilities to achieve. Lecturer fulfills a facilitator / mentor role. Students think critically about all they encounter and demonstrate an ability to seek creative responses across disciplines. Students are able to extract the deeper meaning and purpose of a task and see the big picture (holistic).
t s

Tier 3 Specialised

A. Learning Dependency

B. Thinking Skills

C. Marton & Sljs Surface / Deep Approaches to Learning

D. Stephensons Capability Le els.


u

Students are able to handle Students are able to cope unfamiliar problems in with new problems in new familiar contexts or familiar contexts. problems in unfamiliar contexts.

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E. Jonassen et als Constructivist Approach

Learning situations are well structured. This is a time of initial, introductory knowledge acquisition. Students are mostly required to comprehend new knowledge and be able to describe and explain it.
count, demonstrate, define, describe, discover, elucidate, exemplify, explain, expound, identify, indicate, label, list, match, memorise, name, observe, outline, point, quote, read, recall, recite, recognize, record, relate, repeat, reproduce, selects, show, state, transcribe, uncover, account for, associate, call, clarifies, compute, convert, decodes, defend, derive, describe, discuss, distinguish, estimate, explain, express, extend, extrapolate, generalize, give examples, group, identify, illustrate, infer, interpret, locate, paraphrase, predict, report, restate, review, rewrite, sketch, summarize, translate,

Learning situations are less structured. A time of more advanced knowledge acquisition.

Students demonstrate a level of expertise that enables them to solve complex problems.

F. Bloom et als Taxonomy

Students are capable of analysing a problem into its component parts. They are also able to apply theoretical models to a number of situations.
access, add, apply, attempt, calculate, change, classify, code, collect, communicate, complete, compute, construct, control, deduce, demonstrate, designate, determine, display, divide, employ, examine, experiment, exploit, express, find, graph, group, illustrate, implement, integrate, interpolate, interpret, manage, manipulate, model, modify, operate, order, organise, plan, practice, prepare, present, produce, reframe, relate, resolve, schedule, show, sketch, solve, subtract, summarise, translate, use, analyse, appraise, arrange, ascertain, associate, break down, calculate, classify, collect, combine, compare, contrast, critique, criticise, debate, design, detect, develop, diagnose, diagram, differentiate, discriminate, dissect, distinguish, divide, examine, experiment, explore, fill in, graph, identify, illustrate, infer, inspect, invent, investigate, isolate, label, observe, order, outline, part off, pattern, peruse, point out, pursue, question, reduce, relate, research, review, scrutinise, search, select, separate, solicit, solve, sort, subdivide, subtract, summarise, survey, systemise, tabulate, take apart, test, utilize

Students demonstrate an ability to evaluate, synthesise, and design original ways to solve problems.
arrange, assume, calcul ate, categorize, collect, combine, compile, compose, conclude, connect, construct, create, derive, design, determine, develop, devise, distinguish, draw, drive, devise, establish, explain, extend, extrapolate, forecast, formulate, generalise, generate, group, hypothesise, infer, integrate, interpolate, justify, manage, maximise, minimise, modify, order, organise, predict, prepare, prescribe, produce, propose, rearrange, reason, recommend, reconstruct, regroup, relate, reorganize, restate, revise, rewrite, substitute, suggest, summarize, symbolise, systematise, transform, translate, specify, vary, visualise, appraise, assess, choose, comment , compare, conclude, contrast, criticise, critique, decide, determine, discriminate, distinguish, estimate, evaluate, grade, infer, interpret, judge, justify, measure, modify, prove, rank, rate, review, revise, select, solve, substantiate, support, test, validate, value, verify,

G. Useful Verbs

Table 3: Defining and Differentiating Characteristics of SCD Courses


AQF 5: Diploma
(Coded 000)

AQF 7:Bachelor
(Coded 100-200-300)

AQF 8: Graduate Diploma


(Coded 500)

AQF 9: Masters
(Coded 600)

Capable of advanced skilled or paraprofessional work Understand technical and theoretical knowledge and concepts Transfer and apply knowledge and skills in a
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Capable of professional work Understand broad and coherent body of knowledge Adapt and apply knowledge and skills in

Capable of professional work Understand advanced knowledge within a systematic and coherent body of knowledge Apply knowledge and skills to varied specialised technical

Capable of professional practice or scholarship Understand knowledge of recent developments in area Apply knowledge and skills with creativity and initiative
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range of situations Perform complex technical operations with responsibility and autonomy

diverse contexts ; Take initiative and judgement in planning, problem solving and decision making Collaborate with others Work within broad parameters

and/or creative contexts

in new situations

Exercise leadership and collaboration Initiate, plan, implement and evaluate broad functions within varied specialised technical and/or creative contexts Exercise responsibility and accountability for personal outputs and all aspects of the work or function of others within broad parameters

Exercise advanced skills in leadership and collaboration

Work within generally well defined parameters

Take responsibility and accountability for own learning and professional practice

Demonstrate a high level personal autonomy and accountability Plan and execute a substantial research-based project, capstone experience or a piece of scholarship Demonstrate mastery of theoretical knowledge and to reflect critically on theory and professional practice Investigate, analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories and to apply established theories to different bodies of knowledge or practice enerate and evaluate complex ideas and concepts at an abstract level Use communication and technical research skills to justify and interpret theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences Use technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice or scholarship

Identify, analyse, synthesise and act on information from a range of sources Analyse, plan, design and evaluate approaches to unpredictable problems and/or management requirements Apply specialist technical and creative skills to express ideas and perspectives Use communication skills to transfer knowledge and specialised skills to others and demonstrate understanding of knowledge

Critically review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge Demonstrate a broad understanding of knowledge with depth in some areas

Review, analyse, consolidate and synthesise knowledge and identify and provide solutions to complex problems Apply cognitive skills to think critically and to generate and evaluate complex ideas

Use communication skills to demonstrate an understanding of theoretical concepts

Use communication skills to transfer complex knowledge and ideas to a variety of audiences

Table 4: Threshold Concepts


Threshold Concepts Threshold concepts are concepts that are fundamental to a proper understanding of a unit or a course. They are essential for further progress in the discipline but are often troublesome for students. Their often abstract or counter-intuitive nature may create blockages for students, but grasping them enhances student progress and opens the discipline in ways that allow the student to achieve a fluent, fluid, intuitive, and harmonious mastery of the discipline, rather than merely
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Exercise critical thinking and judgement in identifying and solving problems with intellectual independence Use communication skills to present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge and ideas

Apply specialised technical and creative skills in a field of highly skilled and/or professional practice

managing to pass the course while remaining rule-bound, with knowledge that is compartmentalised and a performance in the discipline that is more mimicry than mastery. They will not occur in every unit. Example1: Cookery Imagine that you have just poured two identical hot cups of tea (i.e. they are at the same temperature) and you have milk to add. You want to cool down one cup of tea as quickly as possible because you are in a hurry to drink it. You add the milk to the first cup immediately, wait a few minutes and then add an equal quantity of milk to the second cup. At this point which cup of tea will be cooler, and why? Answer: the second cup because in the initial stages of cooling it is hotter than the first cup with the milk in it and it therefore loses more heat because of the steeper temperature gradient. This concept of heat transfer and temperature gradient is a threshold concept in cookery it is counter intuitive and it alters the way in which you think about cooking. And, in the special case where barbecuing is the method of cooking (where heat transfer is via radiation) you also have to take into account the inverse square law, which explains why so many people find barbecuing a troublesome notion -- another feature of threshold concepts. Example 2: Pure Mathematics Complex number a number that is formally defined as consisting of a real and an imaginary component and which is simply expressed in symbolic (abstract) terms as x + iy, where x and y are real numbers (simply put, the numbers we all deal with in the real world; numbers we can for example count on our fingers), and i is the square root of minus 1 ( 1). In other words i is a number which when squared (multiplied by itself) equals minus one (-1). So a complex number consists of a real part (x), and a purely imaginary part (iy). The idea of the imaginary part in this case is, in fact, absurd to many people and beyond their intellectual grasp as an abstract entity. But although complex numbers are apparently absurd intellectual artifacts they are the gateway to the conceptualization and solution of problems in the pure and applied sciences that could not otherwise be considered. Example 3: Economics The concept of opportunity cost.: Opportunity cost captures the idea that choices can be compared, and that every choice (including not choosing) means rejecting alternatives. A student who has a good grasp of this concept has moved a long way toward breaking out of a framework of thinking that sees choices as predetermined, or unchangeable. They have also moved toward seeing two sides of every choice, and in looking beyond immediate consequences, and even just monetary costs towards a more abstract way of thinking. Opportunity cost in any particular choice is influenced by prior choices that have been made, but with respect to this choice itself, opportunity cost is choice-influencing rather than choiceinfluenced. Thus, if accepted by the individual student as a valid way of interpreting the world, it fundamentally changes their way of thinking about their own choices, as well as serving as a tool to interpret the choices made by others. Example 4: Biblical Studies In Biblical Studies the idea that that this discipline goes beyond received knowledge might be an example of a threshold concept. Beginning Biblical Studies students may have a strong attachment to received knowledge: they see Biblical knowledge as stemming from divine or external authority but not as something that they or ot hers might create on their own. Until students cross this threshold in understanding, they struggle to critically engage with Biblical texts and Biblical theorists.
Examples 1-3 taken from Meyer, J.H.F. & Land, R. (2003). Threshold concepts and troublesome knowledge (1): linkages to thinking and practising within the disciplines. In C. Rust (Ed.), Improving Student Learning: ten years on, OCSLD, Oxford, 412 -424 60669185.Docx 13 June 2011

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