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Play better with...

Your
Ultimate
Practice
Plan
Play: All Styles ON THE CD Tracks 4-12

Your Ultimate
Practice Plan...
A lot of players gravitate towards the things they can already do, wasting
time running around in circles whilst the things they can’t do get further
and further away. John Wheatcroft puts you back on track…
attempting to organise yourself. amount of the groundwork has can disengage the brain and keep
ABILITY RATING You may be the most willing and already been put securely into place. going for longer periods. If you’re
eager guitar scholar, but more often Much better, I’m sure you’ll agree. working on a cognitive skill such as
you’ll not be sure of the best place One massive schoolboy error memorising a new chord sequence
to start, potentially trying to do is to practise by the clock, thinking or analysing fingering choices, you
From 1 to 5 too much too soon and therefore that simply the amount of hours need focus and total concentration.
forced to make a hasty retreat you put in defines how good Intense concentration requires a lot
Will improve your: back to familiar musical pastures. you are going to be. The reality is of energy. If you’re able to focus
Technical ability The best approach is to see your that it’s more down to the level fully for more than 20 minutes
Theory knowledge learning and musical development of intensity - far better to do 30 without falter, then you’re doing
Musical discipline as a progressive pathway, with minutes a day of focused work exceptionally well!
each new piece of information a that‘s designed to strenghten
logical, conceptual and technical weak spots and turn the heat up BREAKING IT DOWN
THE POPULAR VIEW is that to develoment of the things you progressively, than to have the It is a practical and physical
become a better player you should already know. This allows you to guitar in your hands for five hours impossibility to work on every
devote practice time to mastering grow at a steady rate and means while watching TV or looking single element of your playing
things you can’t do at present. that each time you attempt to learn out of the window. This type of every time you sit down to
Whilst this is fine in priciple, in something ‘new’ you don’t have activity is only really useful for play (unless you are a complete
reality it‘s not much help when to start from scratch, as a huge drilling motor skills, where you beginner). To make any real
progress you need to look at the
individual component parts in
isolation and in detail. Always plan
what you’re going to do before
you even pick up the guitar and
be realistic about what you can
achieve in the timeframe provided.
Between 15-20 minutes on
any one topic before taking a
break is ideal. I generally pick
four contrasting things every
day. Choose a timeframe that is
realistic and sustainable in the
long-term, so that when you put
the guitar down you feel a sense of
achievement, not disappointment.
Shorter and more intense sessions
are more effective than the
conservatoire type methodology
of practising for eight hours a day
non-stop. That’s just going to give
you RSI.
Create a log, mapping out
short, mid and long-term goals and
review monthly. This way, if there’s
Are you sitting anything missing (I’ll put money on
comfortably? it being sight-reading!), you should
be able to spot it and put your

Music’s like dinner – you do it a bite at a time Phil Hilborne


16 GuitarTechniques April 2008
Play: All Styles
much information as is humanly missed in your musical education works best when information is
FURTHER STUDY possible; it’s about how you’re up to this point. You need to isolate re-entered periodically in small
■ If you fancy a bit of light going to use the skills creatively as whatever that might be and find amounts, so once again the
bedtime reading then try a musician. I’ll often tell students ways of reinforcing that element of method of ‘little and often’ is best.
the following excellent and that if we both had to make a list your playing and establish what the Anyone who’s crammed for an
inspirational books: Effortless of things we couldn’t do on the problem is, then find some exercises exam to find that two weeks later
Mastery by Kenny Werner guitar, then mine would definitely to strengthen that area. This might they can’t remember a single thing
(Alfred 1996), The Inner Game
be longer, just because my mean learning some other musical knows this is true!
Of Music by Barry Green
experience means I’m more aware examples in order to build that
(Doubleday 1986), and finally
Musical Excellence, a collection of the infinite possibilities music area up. You may have to go back WHEATCROFT’S WAY
of essays outlining strategies has to offer. It’s a constant work a few stages. It can be a humbling My philosophy regarding practice
and techniques to enhance in progress, so surrender to this experience, but you almost always breaks down into three main areas.
performance edited by Aaron marvellous piece of information have to go back before you can go The first deals with tackling new
Williamson (Oxford Press 2004). and enjoy the journey… on to the next stage. material, usually something I’ll have
The part of the brain that is to perform at some stage in the
practice pathway back on track. APPROACHING A associated with long-term memory near future. The second deals with
Obviously this time does not NEW PIECE general musicianship; ear training,
include getting the guitar out of When learning a new piece, often transcribing, reading, harmony,
the case, finding a lead, plugging in you need to break it down into And when theory and so on. In terms of pure
the amp and setting up the music small chunks. There’s always your session instrumental development, it’s
is over, relax!
stand, or turning the CD player on. a reason why you can’t play all about attaining/maintaining
Also, one hour playing with something and it’s usually not control of expression, clarity of
other people is worth ten in the because you’re incapable; it’s tone, fluency, dynamic articulation,
practice room. It helps if the people because previous steps have been flexibility, stamina, consistency,
you’re playing with are just that missed. If you want to achieve a aesthetic beauty etc. I tend more
little bit better/more experienced specific goal there are a number of to think about musicality these
than you too. This also helps you stages before you can get there. If days, rectifying technical problems
to focus and structure your studies I want to play like Steve Vai, that’s as and when they occur. But this
in the best way possible, as you’ll too much of a jump in one go – you is only possible now because of
quickly figure out what works and need to go through many other the work put into just technique
what doesn’t. Don’t put this off steps (often very smalll ones) to get earlier on. Most work that is purely
until you’re ‘good’. This is how to his level. So when you’re trying technical tends to be in the form
you’ll actually get to be good! to play a Steve Vai piece and you of ‘fire-fighting’ - putting out any
I’ll leave you to ponder on this can’t play a specific lick, maybe it’s potentially disastrous ‘flare-ups’ as
thought. It isn’t about amassing as because something else has been and when they occur. GT

A word on how this lesson works. The first five studies all take one - the last of which is always a musical example. Studies 6 to 8 can be
specific technique or concept, selected in order to provide a balanced viewed as practical methods to drill specific disciplines in the minimum
range of skills. We then work through five variations or developments of time - with the maximum results. Ready? Then let’s go!

EXAMPLE 1 PICKING ON THE CD Track 5


Two of the main technical challenges when picking all notes are what in smooth progressive steps. Economy picking is the obvious choice
to do when crossing strings, and also when playing multiple notes on a here, but remember to always accent the notes that land on the beat,
single string. Our study here starts with the most basic combination of
GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 150
even when that happens to be an upstroke.
John Wheatcroft - Practise Examples
these elements and expands into something much more complex, but
SECTION 1 : PICKING

©»¡ºº
Fig 1.1: Initial cell Fig 1.2: Developed Scale Fragment

> > > > œ


& 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .. .. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ..

E
. . .
. . .
B
G 7 7 7 7 7 7 9 7 7
D 10 10 10 10 10 9 7 9 10 9 7 9 10 10 9 10 10 10 9 7 7 9
10
≥≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≤
A
E

≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥
etc (Alt) etc
etc (Eco)

œœ œœœœœœœœ œœ
Fig 1.3a: String crossing cell Fig 1.3b: String crossing pentatonic line with double-stop rolls

œ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœœœœ
œ
E 8 10 8
B 8 10 8 10 8 10 8
G 7 9 7 9 7 9 7 9 9 7 9 7
D 7 10 7 10 7 10 7 10 10 7 10
7 10 7 10 10
≥≥ ≥≤ ≥≤ ≤≤ etc≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ etc
A
E
(Alt)
8 10
Ê
(Eco)

Fig 1.4a: Combined arpeggio/scale with economy picking


April 2008 GuitarTechniques 17
C D m7 E m7 Fmaj7

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
Play: All Styles
E
B
E
B
G
D
G 7
7
7
9
9 10 7
7
7
9
9 10 7 10
7 9
7 7 9 10 7
8 10
7 8 10 9
9
8
8 10
10 8
8
8 8 10 10 8 8 10
9 7
8
10 9 7 8 9 7
9 10 7 7 10
7 10 7 10 7 10 7 7 10 10 7 10 10 7 10 10
≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥≤
A
D
8 7 10 10 7 10 10
(Alt) ≥ ≥ ≥ ≤ ≥ ...CONTINUED
≤ 1≥≤PICKING
≤≤ etc ≤ ≥≤
A
E
E (Alt) 8 etc 10

(Eco) ≥ ≥ ≤
EXAMPLE
(Eco)
etc
etc ON THE CD Track 5
Fig 1.4a: Combined arpeggio/scale with economy picking
Fig 1.4a: Combined arpeggio/scale with economy picking
C D m7 E m7 Fmaj7

œ œ œ œ œ œ
C D m7 E m7 Fmaj7

œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ
& œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ
&
œ
E
B
E
B
G 7 9 7
D
G 9 7 7 10 9 7 9 7 10 9 7 7 10 9 7 10 9 7
7 10 9 7 10 8 7 8 7 10 9 7 10 8 7 10 9 10 9 7 10 8 7 10 10 9 7

≥≥ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≥≥ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤
A
D
A
E 8 7 10 10 8 7 10 8 10 8 7 10 10 8
E (Eco) 8 10
(Eco)

Fig 1.4b: Descending pattern


B m7 b 5 b
œœ œ œ b5
Fig 1.4b: Descending pattern

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ ˙˙
B m7 b 5
œ
G7 A m7 C C maj7 B m7 5
œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ
œ
œœ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ
G7 A m7 C C maj7 B m7

& œ
& œ œ œ œœ
etc
etc
E 7
B
E 8 10 8 7 8 8 10
B
G 7 10 9 7 9 8 10 9 7 7 10 10 8 10 9 7 8 9 7 9 10 8 10 10 7 7 9 10
D
G 9 7 10 9 7 10 9 7 10 9 10 9 7 10 9 7 10 10 9 7 10 9 10 7 9 10 10 7 9 10 7 9 10
10 9 10 9 7 10 10 9 10 10 9 10

≤≤ ≥≥ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≥≥ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥ ≥≥ ≤≤ ≥≥
A
D
A
E 10
E

Fig 1.5: Be-bop jazz phrase (Dorian/Melodic minor)

œœ # œ
œœ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œœ œœ
Fig 1.5: Be-bop jazz phrase (Dorian/Melodic minor)
j
# œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ
D m7 # œj
œ œ œ œ #œ
œœ œœ œœ œ bb œœ # œ œœ œ œ œ n œ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œœ ## œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ
D m7

& œ œ œ ## œ œ œ œœ ‰‰ ŒŒ
œ
& œœ œ #œ œ œ œ nœ 3
3

E 7 10 11 12 9
B
E 10 8 8 7 10 11 12 9 10
B
G 9 7 7 10 10 8 10 7 8 9 8 10 10 9 9
D
G 7 10 9 8 7 7 10 9 7 10 7 8 9 7 10 10 7 8 9 10 9 12 11 9 12
A
D 8 7 10 9 10 8 9 7 10 9 7 8 7 10 10 7 8 9 12 11 12 12
A
E 10 8 10 9 10 9 7 8 12
E 10

EXAMPLE 2 PHRASING WITH CHORD TONES ON THE CD Track 6


Our second study is more conceptual in nature, allowing you associated with learning lots of scales. All of our examples relate to
to develop the essential skill of chord-tone and melodic figure the five CAGED dominant 7th chords, and culminate in a tasty blues
association. This skill allows players such as Eric Clapton to clearly turnaround idea that spells the chords out perfectly, logically and with
outline harmonic changes whilst soloing, without the clutter
2 xxxxxxxxxx great ease.
SECTION 2 : PHRASING WITH CHORD TONES
Fig 2.1: Moveable chord forms (Dominant 7th)

©»¡ºº ˙˙ b ˙˙˙ b ˙˙ b˙
C7
˙
4
&4 b ˙˙˙ ˙ ˙˙ b ˙˙˙ ˙˙
˙ Ó
˙ ˙
E 8 12 3 6
B 8 11 13 5 5
G 9 12 15 3 5
D 8 10 14 5 5
A 10 15 3
E 8
Moveable 'E' form 'D' form 'C' form 'A' form 'G' form

œ œ bœ nœ
Fig 2.2: Moveable chord forms with asociated phrase (1 key)
j
ww œ bœ b www œ
œ œ bœ b www
C7 C7 C7

w bœ nœ œ
j
& b ww ‰ œ Œ w Œ w
w J 3 3 3

BU
E 8 8 12 13 (15 ) 13 11 12
B 8 8 11 11 13 11 13
G 9 8 9 12 12 15
D 8 10 10 14
A 10 15
E 8
Moveable 'E' form Moveable 'D' form Moveable 'C' form

18 GuitarTechniques April 2008


œ œ œœ j œ bœ nœ
j œ œ b œj n œ

j
œ bœ nœ ww
C7
œ œ bœ bCww7 œ bœ
j
œ œ œ bœ nœ ˙
J
w7 J j œ ww
Cw
& www
b ‰ Jœ b œj n œ 3 œ b œ Œ
j œ œ3 b œ n œ 3 œ Œ b wCwww7
b ww œ
œ b œ
C7

w œ œ
& b ww88 ‰ œ b œ n œ 38 8 11 Œ w Œ All13ww Styles
Play:
BU 3 3

w98 J 93
E 12 13(15 ) 13 11 12
B 11 13 11
G 8 12 BU 3 3 12 15
D
E 8 10 8 10
12 13 (15 ) 13 11 12 14
A
B 10
8 8 11 11 13 11 15
13
E 8
EXAMPLE 2 PHRASING
G
D
E
A
9
8
10
8
Moveable
8
10
9
WITH CHORD TONES ...CONT.
'E' form
8
BU
13 (15 ) 13 11
12
10
Moveable
12 'D' form 12
12
ON THE CD 15
Track 6
14 'C' form
Moveable
15
B 8 8 11 11 13 11 13
E
G 8
9 8 9 12 12 15

bœ nœ œ
œ b œj n œ
D 8
Moveable 'E' form 10 10
Moveable 'D' form 14 'C' form
Moveable
10 j 15
œ œ œœ j œ œ œ bœ ˙
A
j
bCw7 œ bœ
j
œMoveable
8
w œ œ b œ'C'n œform
E
C7

œ bœ nœ
bCwww7 bœ nœ œ
œ b œj n œ J w
œ œ b œ ‰ Œ bCww7
Moveable 'E' form Moveable 'D' form

& bœ œ œ œ œ j J œ Œ
j
œ bœ œ œ œ bœ nœ ˙
j j
3 œ b œ n œ3
w
& b œj œ œ œ œ j J œ Œ bCwww7 bœ nœ œ
j 3 œ j
bœ nœ J w
œ œ b œ ‰ Œ bCww7 œ3 œ œ b œ n œ ˙
3
œ BUb œ
3 3
j
3 œ b œ n œ3
w
&
BU
J 13 Œ b www35 BU 3 BU 3 J ‰ Œ ww6
w5 3

w35
E 15 17 5 (6 ) 5 8
B 13 16 (17 ) 16 (17 ) 8 6 4 5
G 15 (17 ) 15 12
3 3 17
3 15 5 BU 3
143
BU BU BU 3
D
E 15 13 3 15 17 17 5
6 5 (6 ) 5 8
A
B 13 13 3
5 16 (17 ) 16 (17 ) 5 8 6 4 5
E
G 15 (17 ) 15 12 3 BU BU 17 15 5 BU
D BU 15 13 14 Moveable
5 'A' form 17 Moveable
5 'G' form
E 3 15 17 6 5 (6 ) 5 8
A
B 13 13 3
5 16 (17 ) 16 (17 ) 5 8 6 4 5
E
G 15 (17 ) 15 12 3
Fig 2.3: Moveable chord transposed to I IV V in each area 17 15 5
15 13 14 Moveable
5 'A' form 17 Moveable
5 'G' form

œœ œ
D

bCœœœ7 Moveable
b œ n œœ'A' form
C 7 F73 G 7
œœ œ b œCœœ7
A

nGœœ7 bCœœ7 F7œ nGœœ7


C7 F7 G7 C7 F7 G7 C7 F7 G 7 C7 F7 G7

bF7œœœ n œGœœ7 Œ œœ Gœ7 bF7œœœ œ b œœœ œ


E

Cœ7
bCœœœ7 œ bœ
Fig 2.3: Moveable chord transposed to I IV V in each area

œ œ n œœœ Œ œ
Moveable 'G' form

& b œœœ œ
œ œ bCœœ7 F7œœ nGœœœ7 Œ
œ b œ b œCœœ7 œ nGœœ7 Œ bCœœ7 F7œœœ nGœœ7 Œ
F7 F7 G 7

Cœ7 bF7œœœ n œGœœ7 Œ bF7œœœ œ


bCœœœ7 bF7œœœ œ
œ bœ
Fig 2.3: Moveable chord transposed to I IV V in each area

& b œœœ œ œ œ nGœœœ7 Œ œ


œ œ
b œœœ8 n œœœ Œ b œœœ b œœœ n œœœ Œ b œœœ œ n œœ Œ b œœ œœœ n œœ Œ
œ œ 11œ 10œœ Œ œ b13œœœ œ Œ œ
b œœœ35 b œœœ5 œ
n œœœ33 Œ œœ6 b œœ œœ7 Œ
& b œœ88 œ8 10œ8 œ œ45 œ4 œ68
œ98 œ35
E 12 13

œ335
B 10 11 10 12 13 13 12 5 6
G 12 10 10 15 14 12 5 7
D
E 8 10
8 9 10
12 10
11 12
10 14 13
13 12
13 3 3
5 5
6 7 5
7
A
B 10
8 8
10 10
8 11 10 10
12 15
13 15
13 12 3
5 4 3 5 8
6 6
E
G 8
9 8 10 12 10 10 15 13
14 12 3 5 3
4 5 8 7
D
E 8
8 10
8 9 10
12 10
11 12
10 14 13
13 12
13 5
3 3
5 3
3 5
6 7 5
7
A
B 10
8 8
10 10
8 11 10 10
12 15
13 15
13 12 3
5 4 5
3 5 8
6 6
E
G 8
9 8 10 12 10 10 15 13
14 12 3 5 3
4 5 8 7
Fig 2.4: Moveable
D 8 chords
10 9 through I IV V with
10 associated
10 phrase (1 area)
12 14 13 12 5 3 3 5 7 5

œ œ b œj n œ œ
10 8 10 10 15 15 3 5 8
œœ œœ œœ j œ œ bœ
A

bœ nœ
C87 F7 G 7 j F713 3

œ œ œ œœœ j œ
E C7 G7
j
œ bœ n œ bœ
Fig 2.4: Moveable chords through I IV V with associated phrase (1 area)

& bCœœœ7 F7œœœ n Gœœœ7 Œ C‰7 œ


b œ (1 Œarea) b œj nF7œ œ œ b œj n œ œ œ J ‰ Œ bœ nœ Œ
b œ
Moveable chords through I IV V with associated œ
J b œj n œ œ3 phrase œ œ œ œ 3œ œ j J œ
G7

œ bœ œ
j

Fig 2.4:

& bCœœœ7 F7œœœ n Gœœœ7 Œ C‰7 œ


J b œj n œ œ3 œ b œ
Œ œ œ b œj n œ 3 œ J ‰ Œ b œ n œ3 Œ
3
bœ nœ
j F7
œBUœ œ œ 3œ œ j J œ
G7

œ bœ œ BU 3œ
j
& b œœœ88 10œœ8 n œœ8 Œ œ ‰ J BU
Œ 3 œ b Jœ ‰ Œ b œ n œ3 Œ
J8
E 8 8 10
B 8 11 9 (10 ) (10 ) 9 8
G 9 8 10 8 9 3 10 8 10(12 ) 10 7
D 8 10 9 10
BU 3 BU 3 10 BU 3 10 8 93
E 8 8 8 8 10
A
B 10
8 8
10 10
8 8 11 (10 )
9 9 (10 ) 8 8
E 8 (12 )
G 9 8 10 9 8 BU BU 10 8 10BU 10 7
D
E 8
8 10
8 9 10 'E' form 8
Moveable Moveable 'A' form
8 10 10 Moveable 'C' form10 8 9
A
B 10
8 8
10 10
8 8 11 9 (10 ) 9 (10 ) 8 8
E
G 8
9 8 10 8 9 10 8 10 (12 ) 10 7
D 8 10 9 10 'E' form
Moveable Moveable 'A' form 10 Moveable 'C' form10 8 9
A 10 8 10
E 8
Moveable 'E' form Moveable 'A' form Moveable 'C' form

3 xxxxxx

/'
Fig 2.5: Blues V VI I ending lick

œ œ b œj n œ j
œ bœ
j F7
œ œ bœ bœ nœ œ œ œ œ
14

œ bœ œ
G7

bœ nœ
j bœ
œ œ œ
& J ‰
'
3 3 3 3 3 3
1/4
BU
BU BU
E 10 12 10 (11 ) 10 13 13 11
B 11 (12 ) 11 (12 ) 14 13 11 13 11 9 10 10
G 12 10 12
D 12
A
E
Moveable 'A' form Moveable 'G' form

D b9
œ œ œ bœ nœ
j C7 C9

œ œ b œ b œj œ b œ œ bœ
œ nœ
j nœ b b œœœ œ
b œœœ
˙˙
˙˙
& œ
3 3 3 3

BU
E 13 (15 ) 13 11 12 8
B 13 11 8 11 9 8
G 12 11 10 8 8 9 8 7
D 9 8
A 8 7
E
Moveable 'D' form Moveable 'E' form
Ê
April 2008 GuitarTechniques 19
Play: All Styles
EXAMPLE 3 HYBRID PICKING ON THE CD Track 7
It’s country madness next with a five-point plan to develop your hybrid nifty rock-style arpeggios in here too. It’s possible to get these up to
picking technique. By now you’ll have figured out how things work; frightening speed with not too much effort, so give them a go. From a
take a basic technique and expand gradually as your accuracy, stamina country perspective, hybrid-picking and scales containing open strings
and consistency responds to the workload. I’ve squeezed a couple of go hand in hand, so I’ve integrated elements of both as we progress.
4 xxxxxxxxxx

SECTION 3 : HYBRID PICKING

Fig 3.1a: Basic cell (1 finger) Fig 3.1b: Basic cell (2 fingers) Fig 3.1c: Fwd/Rvs (2 fingers)

©»¡ºº C œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ
& 44 œ
3 3 3 3

E
B 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
G 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
D 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥m ≥m ≥m ≥m
A
E
m m m m m a m a m a m a a m a m a m a m

Fig 3.2: Basic I IV V sequence plus hammer on

C Fadd9 G C

œ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

E
B 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 3 1 1 1
G 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
D 0 2 2 2 0 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 4 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 0 2 2 2 0 2 2

≥ m≥ a ≥m a
A
E
etc

Fig 3.3: Scales with hybrid picking and open strings

œ œœ
œœœœ œœœœ
C major scale G Mixolydian A Aeolian

& œœœœœœœœ˙ œœœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ


œœœœ œœœœ
E 0 3 0 5
B 0 0 3 6 0 6 8
G 0 5 0 5 0 5 7
D 0 3 7 0 3 7 0 7
3 7 0 3 7 0 7 8

≥m≥ma≥a≥ ≥m≥ma ≥ma≥a≥ma ≥m ≥m ≥ a≥ ≥


A


E 3 7 7 8
m m a m

Fig 3.4a: Rock triad with hybrid picking Fig 3.4b: Rock 7th triad with hybrid picking
C 6 6 6 6 C 6 6
6 6

& .. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .. .. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ..

E
. . . .
. . . .
B
G 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 5
D 2 5 5 2 2 5 5 2 2 5 5 2 2 5 5 2 2 5 5 2 5 2 2 5 5 2 5 2 2 5 5 2
3 3 3 3 3 3 3

≥m ≥ ≥m ≥ ≥
A
E
a etc a m etc

Fig 3.5: Country hybrid picked line with open strings

œ
œ œ œ œ ˙˙
C

b œ n œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ
œ œ j
& œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ

BU
E 0 3 7
B 0 3 6 10 0
G 0 3 5 0 7 7 (9)
D 0 3 7 7 10 10
3 7 10

≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥ ≥
A
E
m m a m a m a m m m a m a
m

20 GuitarTechniques April 2008


Play: All Styles
EXAMPLE 4 SLURS AND HAMMER-ONS ON THE CD Track 8
Hammer-ons and tapping are the order of the day for study number thumb and first finger. We’re simplifying the tapping element for our
5
5 xxxxxx
xxxxxx
4. Initially it’s fretting-hand only, picking the first note on each new
5 xxxxxx final musical example but increasing the complexity both harmonically
5 xxxxxx
string. Before long though we’re incorporating two picking-hand and in freboard movement. The crucial factor here is damping unused
taps.SECTION
Try using44 ::your
SECTION SLURS/TAPPING
‘m’ and ‘a’ fingers so you keep the pick between
SLURS/TAPPING
SECTION 4 : SLURS/TAPPING
strings. Use the palm of your fretting hand to mute all idle bass strings.
Fig 4.1a: Basic
SECTION legato cell
4 : SLURS/TAPPING Fig 4.1b: Basic cell moved across string

œ œ œ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ


Fig 4.1a: Basic legato cell Fig 4.1b: Basic cell moved across string

œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œœœ œœœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ
Fig 4.1a: Basic legato cell Fig 4.1b: Basic cell moved across string

444 œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ


C /Am
/Am
œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ
C
Fig 4.1a: Basic legato cell Fig 4.1b: Basic cell moved across string

& œ œ
C /Am

& œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ5
& 44 œ œ5
C /Am
& œ œ œ œ 5
œ
5 5 5 5 5 5 5
5
5 5 5 5 5 5 5
5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5
5 5 5 5 5 5
E
E
B
E
B
9 12
9 12 9 10 12 9 12
G
B
E
G 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9
9 10
10 12
12 9
9 12
9 10 12
9 10
9 12
9 9 10
12 9 12 9
10 12 9 10
12 9
9 12 12 9
10 12 12 9
9 12 12 9
10 12
9 10 12 9
9 12 10 12
9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12
D
G
B
D 12
A
D
G
A 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12
E
A
D
E 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12
E
A
E

œ œœœ œœœ
Fig 4.2: Basic cell with string skips

œœœ œœœœ œœœ œœœœ


Fig 4.2: Basic cell with string skips

œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœ


Fig 4.2: Basic cell with string skips

œ œœœ œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œ


Fig 4.2: C /Am
Basic
/Am cell 5with string skips 5
œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œœ œ5 œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ
œœœ œœœ œœœ
C 5
œ œ œœ œœ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ
C /Am 5 5
& œœœ œœœ œ œ œ
C /Am 5
&
& œ œ
œ
5
œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ
& œœœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ
œ 5 5
5 5 5
5 5 5 5 5
5
5 5 5
5 5
5 5 5 5 5 5
5 5
E
E 12 8
8 12
8 8 10
10 12
12
B
E
B 8
8 12
12 8
8 10
10 12
12 9 12 9 10 12 8 12 8 10 12
G
B
E 9
9 12 9 10
9 10 12 8 12 8 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 8 12 8 10 12
9 12 12
G
D
G
B 9 12 9 10 12 12 9 10 12 9
9 12
12 9
9 10 12
10 12 8 12 8 10 12 9 12 9 10 12
D 9 12 9 10 12 8 12 8 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 9 12 9 10 12
A
D
G
A 9 12 9 10 12 8 12 8 10 12 9 12 9 10 12
E
A
D
E 8 12 8 10 12
8 12 8 10 12 9 12 9 10 12 8 12 8 10 12 9 12 9 10 12
E
A 8 12 8 10 12 8 12 8 10 12
E 8 12 8 10 12

LLL LLL LLL LLLœœœœ œœœœ LLLœœœœ LLLœœœœ LLLœœœœ LLLœœœœ œœœœ
Fig 4.3: Basic cell with second and third finger taps
Fig 4.3: Basic cell with second and third finger taps
Fig 4.3: Basic cell with second and third finger taps

œœœ œ œœ œ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ


4.3: C /Am

œœœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ
Fig CBasic
/Am cell with second and third finger taps

œœœ œœœ
C /Am

&
& œ œœœ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ
C /Am

&
& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

LL LL LL LL LL LL LL LL
6
6 6 6
6 6
6 6
E
E
B
E
B
G
B
E
G
D
G
B
D 14
14 9
9 12
12 9
9 10
10 12
12 14
14 15
15 14
14 12
12 10
10 9
9 10
10 12
12 14
14 9
9 12
12 9
9 10
10 12
12 14
14 15
15 14
14 12
12 10
10 9
9 10
10 12
12
A
D
G
A 14 9 12 9 10 12 14 15 14 12 10 9 10 12 14 9 12 9 10 12 14 15 14 12 10 9 10 12
E
A
D 14 9 12 9 10 12 14 15 14 12 10 9 10 12 14 9 12 9 10 12 14 15 14 12 10 9 10 12
E
E
A m
m m
m a
a m
m m
m m
m a
a m
m
E m m a m m m a m

LLL LLLœœœœ LLLœœœœ œœœ


m m a m m m a m

LLLœœœœ LLLœœœœ LLLœœœœ œœœ LLLœœœœ


Fig 4.4: String skips in octaves

LLL
Fig 4.4: String skips in octaves
Fig 4.4: String skips in octaves

œ
Fig 4.4: C /Am

œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ


CString
/Am skips in octaves

œœœ
6
œœœ
C /Am
6

& œœ
C /Am 6

& œ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ


& œœ œœœœ œœœ œœœœ œœœœ
& œœœ œœœ œœœ
6
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ
LL LL LL LL
6
6

LL LL LL LL
6
6
E
E
B
E
B
G
B
E
G
D
G
B
D 17
17 10
10 14
14 10
10 12
12 14
14 17
17 19
19 17
17 14
14 12
12 10
10 12
12 14
14
A
D
G
A 17 10 14 10 12 14 17 19 17 14 12 10 12 14
E
A
D 15
15 8
8 12
12 8
8 10
10 12
12 15
15 17
17 15
15 12
12 10
10 8
8 10
10 12
12 17 10 14 10 12 14 17 19 17 14 12 10 12 14

LLL LLL LLL


E

LLLœœœœ
E
A 15 8 12 8 10 12 15 17 15 12 10 8 10 12
E 15 8 12 8 10 12 15 17 15 12 10 8 10 12

& œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ
œ
œœœ œœ œœœ œœœ œ
œ œœ œ œœ œ œ
LLL
œ œœ œ œ œœ œœ œœœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœ œœœ
œ œ
LLL LLL LLL œœœ œœ œœœ œœœ
œ œœ œ œ
LL LL LL LL
&
&
&

LL LL LL LL
6
6
6 6
6
6 6
6
E
E 15
15 8
8 12
12 8
8 10
10 12
12 15
15 17
17 15
15 12
12 10
10 8
8 10
10 12
12
B
E
B 15 8 12 8 10 12 15 17 15 12 10 8 10 12
G
B
E 15 8 12 8 10 12 15 17 15 12 10 8 10 12
G
D
G
B
D 17
17 10
10 14
14 10
10 12
12 14
14 17
17 19
19 17
17 14
14 12
12 10
10 12
12 14
14
A
D
G
A 17 10 14 10 12 14 17 19 17 14 12 10 12 14
E
A
D 17 10 14 10 12 14 17 19 17 14 12 10 12 14
A6 xxxxxxxxxx
E
E
E

Lœ œ œ Lœ œ œ Lœ Lœ œ œ Lœ œ œ Lœ œ œ L Lœ œ œ Lœ n œ nLœ œ œ L œ .
Fig 4.5: Harmonised sequence with string skip tapping

L
D b7

L b Lœ œ
b œ bœbœ
L
j

Lœ œ œ œ
C maj7 D m7 C maj7
6 6 6 6

œœœ œ œ bœ bœ
& œ œ

L L L L L L L LL
œ œ bœ

L L L L
6 6
6

L L L L
6
BU
E 8 3 7 10 5 8 9 4 7 8 3 7 10 12
B
9 4 5 9 4 5 10 5 7 10 5 7 4 6 10 4 6 9 4 5
10
Ê
G
D
A 10 3 7 12 5 8 11 4 8 10 3 7
E

April 2008 GuitarTechniques 21


Play: All Styles
EXAMPLE 5 THUMBPICK ON THE CD Track 9
Just for the record, I’m absolutely hopeless with a thumb-pick, but simple, isolate any movement or idea, expand upon this in stages, and
I resisted the temptation to just cheat and hybrid-pick and worked end with a musical application. This time we finish with a 12-bar study
through these examples progressively for 15 minutes. By the end I with combined root-5th bass and melody on the treble strings. This
was able to record the tracks on the GT CD, so this method obviously example might seem unusual, but consider that players as different as
works. Our musical examples follow the now familiar pattern: start Freddie King, Johnny Marr and Brent Mason all use a thumbpick.
GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 150 John Wheatcroft - Practise Example 5
SECTION 5 : THUMBPICK/FINGERSTYLE
Fig 5.1a: Basic Pattern Fig 5.1b: Elementary melody Fig 5.1c: Expanded melody

©»¡ºº Swing
# # . . w . . w
& # # 44 ..
E E E

∑ ∑ w
œ œ . . œ œ œ œ . . œ œ œ œ
Palm mute bass œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
throughout

. . 0
. . 0
.
E

. .
0
. . .
B
G
D 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
A
E 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Fig 5.2a: Syncopated melody Fig 5.2b: Melody in half-notes (minims) Fig 5.3a-5.3c: Syncopated melody transposed over I IV V

# # # # . œj ˙ . j j j j
E E A B E

& . ‰ œ œ ‰ œ ˙œ . œ .. .. ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ .. .. œ . œœ ˙ œ .. .. œ . œœ ˙ œ .. .. œ . œ ˙ ..
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ

. 0
. . 0 0
. . 0
. . 0
. . 0
.
E
0 0 0
.
0
2 .
2
.
0
. . 2 . . 2 . . .
B
G
D 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1
A 0 0 2 2
E 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Fig 5.4a-5.4c: Expanded melody examples


Fig 5.4d: Bass-line variation
E E E

# # œ œ n˙ ˙ ˙ .. .. n œ œ œ œ œ .. ..
˙
& # # .. Œ œ ‰ œ œœ .. .. œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ .
œ œ œ .
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
. 0 0
. . 3 2 0 2
. . 3 2 0
. . .
E
0 2 0
. . . . . . . .
B
G
D 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
A 2
E 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

j
Fig 5.5: 'Travis-style' complete 12-bar study over I IV V sequence

# # œ . œj ˙ nœ œ œ n
œ. ˙ œ
E A
˙. Œ œ ‰ œ œ œ Œ ˙.
& # # 44 Œ œ œ œ œ œ
œœ
œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
Palm mute bass œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
throughout
E 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 3
B 0 0 0 2
G
D 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
A 0 0 0 0
E 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

E
j B E
˙˙
E 6/ 9

#### nœ œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ. nœ œ œ œ ˙˙
& œ
œœ
œ Œ ‰œœ Œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ Œ œ ‰œœœ Ó ˙
œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ˙
E 3 2 0 0 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 12
B 0 0 2 0 2 0 2 12
G 11
D 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 11
A 2 2 2 2 11
E 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

22 GuitarTechniques April 2008


Play: All Styles
EXAMPLE 6 THE IMPROVISATION ACID TEST ON THE CD Track 10
This example will test how well you have absorbed a musical device, you lose the rhythm, mess up or come back in the wrong place or key
concept or technique. We know the story: you’ve put the hours in then more work is needed. If all goes well then put your new skills to
and are feeling rather smug; you go out to gig or jam with friends and the test by creating as many variations as you can, mixing techniques,
none of the stuff you’ve worked on comes out! Well, help is at hand. fretboard positions etc. Next time you play for real you should have
The trick is to make your practice and performance line up. Your task a far better command of vocabulary you know that you can actually
is simply to play on your own, establish a groove, feel, key and style, get to it on demand. On the GTCD I played all the examples and just
GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE
decide upon how long the soloing gap is going to be andPractice (Section 6 - 8) - John Wheatcroft
go for it. If improvised a couple of things to show you how things may turn out.
SECTION 6 : IMPROVISATION 'ACID-TEST'

©»¡ºº Shuffle
Fig 6.1: Blues-style vamp

4
G7
.
&4 . œ Œ Ó ..
(œ ) œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
( ) œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
Insert fill here (Mixolydian/Blues)
Possibly miss on repeats
E
. .
. .
B
G
D
A (5) 5 7 7 5 5 7 7 5
E (3) 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Fig 6.2: Maiden-style rock vamp

©»¡ºº Straight
œœ œœ œ
A5 G 5/A F5 G5

& .. œ œœ ‰ œœ œœ Œ ∑ ∑ ..
œ œœ œœ œ œœ J Insert fill here
(Aeolian/Minor Pentatonic)
E
. .
. .
B
G 9 9 7 5 7
D 7 7 7 3 5
A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
E

©»¡§º Swing
Fig 6.3: Swing-style minor vamp

œœ. œœ œœ. œœ œœ.


D m11 E m11 D m11 E m11 D m11

& .. œœœ ‰ œœ Ó œœ ‰ œœ Œ . œœ ∑ ∑ ..
œ œ œ œ
J J J Insert fill here
(Dorian/Melodic minor)
E
. 5 7 5 7 5
.
. .
B 6 8 6 8 6
G 5 7 5 7 5
D 5 7 5 7 5
A 5 7 5 7 5
E

©»•º Straight
Fig 6.4: Reggae -style major vamp

C
œœ. œœ. œœ. œœ. œœ. œœ. œœ. œœ. F œœ. œœ. œœ. œœ. G œœ. œœ. œœ. œœ.
C F G

œ œ
& .. ‰
œœ‰ œ œ‰ œ œ‰ œ œ ‰ ‰ œœ‰ œ œ‰ œœ ∑ ∑ ..
Insert fill here
(Major scale/Triad
arpeggios)
E
. 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7
.
.
8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 10 10 10 10 8 8 8 8
.
B
G 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 7 7 7 7
D
A
E

©»•• Straight
Fig 6.5: Funk -style single note riff

C7

j̊ bœ œ
& .. œ b œ œ b œ œ n œ b œ ‰. œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ Ó ..
œ œ
Insert fill here
(Mixolydian/Blues/Extended dom chords)
E
. .
. .
B
G 8
D
A
E
10 8
10 6 7 6
8
10
8
10
8 10
8
Ê
April 2008 GuitarTechniques 23
Play: All Styles
EXAMPLE 7 FRETBOARD FLUENCY ON THE CD Track 11
We all know our pentatonic scales, right? Well, just how well do you scale/mode/chord/pentatonic that you know. Work in this area will be
know them? This little beauty will put your knowledge to the test, highly rewarded, I promise. If you’re ever stuck for something to work
leaving no stone unturned. The trick is in defining the octave points on, this exercise has endless permutations - just think of any scale or
- the crucial landmarks of any scale, arpeggio or chord. Once you’ve mode etc that you feel is a little weaker than you’d like, and give it the
worked through these examples repeat the procedure with any ‘Fretboard Fluency’ treatment. The rewards will be immense!
2 Practice (Section 6 - 8)

SECTION 7 : FRETBOARD

©»¡ºº A m
Fig 7.1a: Basic octave definitions Fig7.1b: Rvs cell Fig7.1c: Fwd cell

A m7/11 A m7/11
4 œ œ
&4 œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
E
B
G 2 2
D 7 2 5 5 7
A 3 5 5 7
E 5 5 5 5 5 8 5

Fig 7.2a-e: Octave definitions/Associated chord/Pentatonic cell

œ œœ
A m7

œ œ œ œ œ ˙˙˙ œ œ œ
& œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ
œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
E 5 5 5 8
B 5 5 8 10 8 8 10
G 5 5 7 9 7 9
D 7 5 5 7 7 7 7 7 7 10 7
A 7 5 7
E 5 5 5 8 5
Moveable 'Em' form Moveable 'Dm' form

œ ˙˙ ˙˙
˙˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙˙ œ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ

E 12
B 10 13 10 13
G 12 9 12 14 12 12 14
D 10 10 12 14 12 14
A 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 15 12
E
Moveable 'Cm' form Moveable 'Am' form

œ œœ œ œ
œ œœ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ œ

E 17 17 15 17
B 17 15 17
G 14 17 14 14 17 14
D 17 14 17
A 15 17
E 17 17 17 17
Moveable 'Gm' form

œ œ œ œ œ
Fig 7.3: Continuous scale exercise

œ œ œ
& œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ
œ
E 5 8
B 5 8 8 10 8 10 13
G 2 5 5 7 9 7 9 12 12
D 2 5 5 7 10 7 10 10 12
A 3 5 10 12
E 5
Moveable 'Gm' form Moveable 'Em' form Moveable 'Dm' form Moveable 'Cm' form

24 GuitarTechniques April 2008


Play: All Styles
EXAMPLE 7 FRETBOARD
3 Practice (Section 6 - 8)
FLUENCY ...CONTINUED ON THE CD Track 11
3 Practice (Section 6 - 8)

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w
œ œ œ œ œ
3 Practice (Section 6 - 8)

& œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w
& œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ
3 Practice (Section 6 - 8)

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w
E
& 14 12 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 12œ
œ œ 14œ 12 œ 14œ
13
w
B

œ œ 12œ œ 15œ œ 15œ œ œ


G 12

&
D 12 14 19
A
E 15 12
E
B 15 13
G
E 14 12 'Am' form
Moveable Moveable 'Gm' form 12 14 12
D 14 12 12 14 19
B
A 15 12 15 12 15 13
G
E 14 12 15 12 14 12
D 14 12 12 14 19
Fig 7.4a: 8ve defs in 5 keys/forms (1 Area: Ascending 4ths)

œ
A
E Moveable 'Am' form 15 12 15 12 15 'Gm' form
Moveable

œ œ
E
B 15 13

œ
E A D 12 G 14 C

œ
14 12 12
œ
G
Moveable 'Am' form Moveable 'Gm' form

œ Ó
14 12 12 14 19
& œ œ
D
Fig 7.4a: 8ve defs in 5 keys/forms (115
Area: 12
Ascending 4ths)

œ
15 12 15
œ
A

œ œ œ
15
œ
E

œ
E defs in 5 keys/forms A D G C

œ œ (Transpose
Fig 7.4a: Moveable
8ve (1 Area: Ascending 4ths) Moveable

œ
'Am' form 'Gm' form

& Eœ œ œ œ œ Ó 5 keys...etc)
entire exercise up

œ œ
A D G C

œ œ œ œ 8 Ó
semitone for next

& Eœ œ
Fig 7.4a: 8ve defs in 5 keys/forms (1 Area: Ascending 4ths)
œ œ
œ œ
E 5
5
œ œ œ
8 (Transpose entire exercise up
B

œ
A D G C

œ œ (Transpose
G 7 5

Ó 5 keys...etc)
semitone for next 5 keys...etc)

& œ7 œ œ
D 7 5
entire exercise up

œ
A 5

œ8
E 5 8

œ
E
B 5 5 8 semitone for next
G 7 5
E
D 7 5 5 8
B
A 7 5 5 8 (Transpose entire exercise up
G
E 5
Fig 7.4b: Complete shapes in 5 keys/forms 7 8 5 semitone for next 5 keys...etc)
D 7(1 Area: Ascending 4ths) 5

œ œ œ œ
A 7 5 5 8

œ œ
E
E m7/11 A m7/11 D m7/11
œ œ œ œ œ œ
E
B 5 5 8 8

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3 7 3 5
œ œ5œ
G
Fig 7.4b: Complete
3 shapes in 5 keys/forms 7(1 Area: Ascending 4ths) 3 3 3

& œ œ
D

œ
œ œ3 œ œ 3 œ œ œ œ3 œ
7 5
œ œ3 œ œ œ3 œ
A

œ3 œ
E m7/11 A m7/11 D m7/11
œ œ œ œ3 œ œ
E 5
Fig 7.4b: Complete shapes in 5 keys/forms (1 Area: Ascending 4ths) 8

œ œ3 œ œ3 œ œ œœ
3
œ œ œ3
3

œ œ œ œ œ
A m7/113
œ œ
3
& 3 œ œ œ3
E m7/11 D m7/11
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ5 œ œ œ œ œ œ3 œ œ œ œ œ5 73
3
œ
Fig 7.4b: Complete shapes in 5 keys/forms (1 Area: Ascending 4ths)

&E m7/11 œ œ
œ œ3 3 œ œ3 œ
œ œ3 œ5 7 53 œ œ3 œ œ œ3 œ5 8
3 7 3 3 8
œ3 œ
E 5 8 5
A m7/11 3 D m7/11 5

œ œ œ œ3 œ œ
B 8 8 5 6 8

œ œ3 œ œ œ œ 7 œ œ œ œ
G 4 7 7 5 3

œ
3
& 5 7 œ œ œ
D 7 7 5 5 7

œ œ œ8 œ5 œ
œ œ œ'Am' form5
A
E 5 7 8 5 5 5 8

œ œ 'Cm' form5
E
B 5 8 8 5 5 8 6 8
G
Moveable 4 7 3 7
3 'Em' form
Moveable 5 Moveable 5 7 3
E
D 7 3 5 7 8 5 3 7 5 7 3 5 8
B
A 5 7 5 8 8 5 7 5 5 8 6 8
G
E 5 7 4 7 7 5 8 5 5 8 5 7
D 5 7 7 5 5 7
Moveable 5
'Am'8form
œ b œ 'Cm'œ form5 7 b œ8 œ
A 5'Cm'
7 form 7 5
G Moveable 5 7 Moveable
8 5 'Em' form C m7/11 5 8
E
m7/11

œ
E 5 7 5 8 8 5 8 5 5 8 6
œ 7 œ
B

b œ
3
œ œ bœ
4 7 3 7 5 5 7

bœ œ
G Moveable 'Am' form
Moveable Moveable 3
'Em' form
7 5 3 5
&G m7/11 œ3 œ œ œ
D

8 œ5
œ b œ œ form b œ œ b œ3 œ
A 5 7 7 5 5 8

Moveableœ3 œ œ3
C m7/11
'Em'b form
œ Cb
E 5 7 5 8

œ œ3 œ b œ œ b œ œ
3
Moveable 'Am' form

& œ bœ œ œ œ
3 b œexercise up semitone for nextb5œkeys...etc)
G Moveable
m7/11 3 'Cm' m7/11 3

œ3 œ b œ œ œ œ 3
3
œ œentire
3 b œ(Transpose
b œ œ œ
&G m7/11 œ3 œ œ œ b œ b œ œ
œ œentire bœ œ
œ b œ3 œ8 6 b œ œ3 b œ(Transpose œ
3 3
œ3 b œ 5 up 8semitone for nextb5œkeys...etc)
E 8 6 C m7/11 3 6 8

œ œ b œ3 œ6 forœ8next 56keys...etc)
B 6 8
3
œ3 œ b œ8
G 7 5

b œ
exercise 3
& 8 6 8 6 œ œ œ 8 6 œ
D 5 5 8
8 5

bœ œ bœ
6
œ
8
A

œ bœ
E
(Transpose entire exercise up semitone 8
E
B 6 8
G
3 7 5 5 8
E
D 8 6 3 8 5 5 8 3 3
6 8
B
A 8 6 8 5 6 8 6 8
G 7 5 modal progression Am7-Cm78
Fig 7.5: Fusion lines through non-diatonic
E 6 6 8 5 up 8semitone for next 5 keys...etc)
(Transpose entire exercise
D 8 5 5 8

œ ~~
A
8 6 8 5 6 8 6 8

b œ~~b œ
E

œ . ~~ œ œ œ œ œ œ ~~
A m7 C m7 A m7 C m7

œ œ A œm76 œ œ œ ≈6 œ œ8œ œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈
E 8 6 8 6 6 8 6 8

bœ œ œ œ
B
G 7 5 modal progression Am7-Cm7 5 8

œ œ ‰
Fig 7.5: Fusion lines through non-diatonic
8 5
&
5 8
œ
D

~~ œ œ œ~~ œ œ œ œœ œ b œ œ œ œ
A 8 5 6 8

b œm7~~b œ ~~ œ œ
A m7 lines through non-diatonic modal
C m7 progression Am7-Cm78 C m7

œ
Fig 7.5: Fusion
E

Aœm7.
& œ .~~ ~~ œ œ œ
~~ œ œ œ~~
C
~~ œ œ ~~‰

œœ œœœ≈œœœœ≈œœœ ≈
m7 C m7

œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œœ
œœ bC œm7~~bœ œ œ ~~‰ œ 8 A œm7 œœœ≈œœœ ≈œœ œœ≈ œ œ bœ œ b œ œ œ6
Fig 7.5: Fusion lines through non-diatonic modal progression Am7-Cm7

& A m7 œ 5 œœœ œ œ œ œ œ
~~ œ œ œ~~
~~ œ œ 7 8 ~~ œ œ bœ 5
8 5

~~
E C m7

œ .~~ œ œ
5 5 8 8 5 5

b œ~~b œ8 œ ~~‰
B

œ œ
& 5 ~~ 5 8 8~~ 5 8 5 œ7 œ 8 5 œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ7 œ5 7 5 ≈ œ
G 5 7 5 7 5 5

œ8 7 7 5
œ 8 bœ
œ
8 5
D

8 8 œ œ œ œ
8~~ ~~ œœ œ œ bœ
A
E 8 6 8
E
B 6
G 5 7 5 7 5 5 5
E
D 8 5 8 8 7 7 5 7 5 5 8 5

~~ ~~ 5
5 5 8 8 5 8 5 6
~~ 8 ~~
B
A 7 5 8 6 8 8
G
E 7 8 5 7 5 7 5 5 8 8 5
D 8 7 7 5 7 5 5 8 5
A
E 8 7 5 8 6 8 8
E
B 5 5 8 8 5 8 5 8 8 6
G 7 8 5 7 5 7 5 5 5
D 8 8 7 7 5 7 5 5 8 5
A 7 5 8 6 8 8
E 8 8 Ê
April 2008 GuitarTechniques 25
Play: All Styles
EXAMPLE 8 SCALE DRILL ON THE CD Track 12
I thought I’d save the easy one until last! Fancy running through all of through all keys and exploits a greater range of fretboard motion. But
the most used scales, pentatonics, 7th arpeggios, triads and intervallic for now this should hit the spot. Notice how each structure morphs
permutations in one minute and eight seconds? Well roll up and give into the next by changing just one note, and remember that the best
this beast a go. Obviously, it’s in one key and is limited to just one way to learn something you don’t know is to relate it to and develop
octave, so you could invent an alternative uber-scale drill that moves something you already do know. Continued next page.
4 Practice (Section 6 - 8)
SECTION 8 : SCALE DRILL
Fig 8: Play as one continual study

©»¡ºº C maj7
4
C7

& 4 œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœ
œœœ œœœœœœ
bœ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œœœœœ œ œ œ bœ
C Lydian (#4) C Ionian C Mixolydian (b7)
E
B
G 2 4 5 4 2 2 4 5 4 2 2 3 5 3 2
D 2 4 5 5 4 2 2 3 5 5 3 2 2 3 5 5 3 2
A 3 5 5 3 2 3 5 5 3 2 3 5 5 3
E 6
1

C m7 C m(maj7) C m7

œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ
&
œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
C Dorian (b3 b7) C Melodic minor (b3) C Aeolian (b3 b6 b7)
E
B
G 2 3 5 3 2 2 4 5 4 2 3 5 3
D 3 5 5 3 3 5 5 3 3 5 6 6 5 3
A 3 5 6 6 5 3 3 5 6 6 5 3 2 3 5 6 6 5 3
E 6 6
4

C m(maj7) C m7 C m7 b 5

œœœœœœ œ œ
&
œ œ bœ œ œ
bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ
C Harmonic minor (b3 b6) C Phrygian (b2 b3 b6 b7) C Locrian (b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7)
E
B
G 4 5 4 3 5 3 3 5 3
D 3 5 6 6 5 3 3 5 6 6 5 3 3 4 6 6 4 3
A 3 5 6 6 5 3 2 3 4 6 6 4 3 3 4 6 6 4 3
E 6 6
7

C m7/C7 C m7 C

& œ b œ n œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ b œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœœœœ
œ b œ œœ bœ œ b œ œ œ œ
œ bœ œ œ œ œœœœ
C Blues scale (R b3 4 b5 5 b7) C minor pentatonic (R b3 4 5 b7) C major pentatonic (R 2 3 5 6)
E
B 4 3
G 3 5 3 5 3 3 5 3 5 3 2 5 2 5 2
D 3 4 5 5 4 3 3 5 5 3 2 5 5 2
A 3 6 6 3 3 6 6 3 6 3 5 5 3 5
E 6 6 5
10

C maj7 C7 C m7 C m7 b 5 C dim

& œ œ œœœœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ b œ œœœœ b œ ∫œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœ


œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ
(1 3 5 7) (1 3 5 b7) (1 b3 5 b7) (1 b3 b5 b7) (1 b3 b5 bb7)
E
B
G 4 5 4 3 5 3 3 5 3 3 5 3 2 5 2 2 5 2
D 2 5 5 2 2 5 5 2 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4
A 3 3 3 6 6 3 6 6 3 6 6 3 6 6
E
13

26 GuitarTechniques April 2008


Play: All Styles
EXAMPLE 8 SCALE DRILL ...CONTINUED ON THE CD Track 12
Two good examples are the relationship between the Dorian mode you finish this, just how well you understand it, so take things one bar
and the melodic minor, and the parallel relationship between the at a time if necessary. Right then, I’m off to do some practice myself
Aeolian mode and harmonic minor. There are no prizes for how fast - on the trumpet (think I’m joking?). Have fun!
5 Practice (Section 6 - 8)

C C aug Cm C dim

& œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ
(1 3 5) (1 3 #5) (1 b3 5) (1 b3 b5)
E
B
G 5 5 1 5 5 1 5 5 5 5
D 2 5 5 2 2 2 5 5 4 4
A 3 3 3 3 3 6 6 3 3 6 6 3
E
16

& œœœœœœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœœ œ œ œœœœœœœœœœ


C

œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
3rds 4ths 5ths
E
B
G 7 10 9 7 7 9 10
D 7 9 7 10 9 10 10 9 7 10 9 7 7 9 10 7 9 10
A 7 8 7 10 8 10 10 8 7 10 10 7 8 10
E 8 10 10 8 8 10
18

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœœœœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ
6ths 7ths 8ves
E 8 7
B 10 8 8 10 10 8
G 10 9 7 7 9 10 10 9 7
D 10 9 7 10 9 9 10 7 9 10 10 9 7
A 10 8 7 7 8 10 10 8 7
E 10 8 8 10 10 8
21

C Dm Em F G Am B dim C

& œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ
œ
Triads
E
B
G 7 9 7 7 10 9
D 7 9 7 7 10 9 9 10 7 10 9 10
A 7 7 10 8 8 10 7 10 8 10
E 8 10
24

April 2008 GuitarTechniques 27