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Operation Manual

Tetra
Operation Manual

Version 1.3 September 2010

Dave Smith Instruments 1210 Cabrillo Hwy N Half Moon Bay, CA 94019-1449 USA

2010 Dave Smith Instruments www.DaveSmithInstruments.com

Tested To Comply With FCC Standards FOR OFFICE USE


This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.

Cet appareil numerique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Reglement sur le materiel brouilleur du Canada.

For Technical Support, email: support@davesmithinstruments.com

Contents
Quick Start................................................................................................. 1 Getting Connected .................................................................................... 3 Front Panel Controls ................................................................................. 5 Basic Operation......................................................................................... 9 Global Parameters .................................................................................. 13 Program Parameters............................................................................... 17 Oscillator Parameters .......................................................................... 17 Miscellaneous Oscillator Parameters .................................................. 18 Mixer Parameters ................................................................................ 19 Feedback Parameters ......................................................................... 19 Low-pass Filter Parameters................................................................. 19 VCA Parameters.................................................................................. 20 LFO Parameters .................................................................................. 21 Envelope 3 Parameters ....................................................................... 22 Modulation Parameters ....................................................................... 23 Unison Parameters.............................................................................. 24 Push It Switch Parameters .................................................................. 25 Keyboard Mode Parameters................................................................ 25 Clock Parameters ................................................................................ 26 Arpeggiator Parameters ...................................................................... 26 Sequencer Parameters........................................................................ 27 Name Parameter ................................................................................. 32 Combos ................................................................................................... 33 Creating a Combo ............................................................................... 33 Combos and Multi Mode...................................................................... 35 Using Poly Chain..................................................................................... 36 A Note About Poly Chain and the Mopho Desktop ............................. 36 Using USB............................................................................................... 39 Modulation Destinations.......................................................................... 41 Modulation Sources ................................................................................ 43 Parameter List ......................................................................................... 44

Support.................................................................................................... 45 MIDI Implementation ............................................................................... 47 MIDI Messages.................................................................................... 47 NRPN Messages ................................................................................. 50 Global Parameter Data........................................................................ 51 Program Parameter Data .................................................................... 52 Combo Parameter Data....................................................................... 58 Sysex Messages ................................................................................. 62 Packed Data Format............................................................................ 67 Hidden Functions .................................................................................... 68

Quick Start
Thanks for purchasing your Tetra synthesizer! Listen to the sounds, twiddle some knobs, have some fun! Please Register! Please go to www.davesmithinstruments.com and register your synth. If you purchased directly from us, there is no need to register we already have your contact information. Powering Up So, plug in the power supply, connect (in stereo!) to your mixer/sound system, and start playing! You can use the PUSH IT switch to trigger sounds without a keyboard. If youre using a MIDI keyboard, try applying keyboard pressure (aftertouch) and the mod wheel. Many sounds are fairly simple at first, and then come alive when you use the controllers. With other sounds, you may need to hold the notes a while to let the sound unfold. Playing in different ways has a big effect on the programs. Selecting and Editing Programs, Combos, and Global Settings Use SELECT or the increment and decrement (+ and -) switches to step through the programs. Hold the switches down briefly to increment or decrement the bank. There are 4 banks of 128 programs. Banks 1 and 2 are the Prophet 08 factory programs. If you want to edit a program, just turn any knob. The new value will be displayed in the bottom line of the LCD (the top line displays the programmed value for handy reference). After turning knobs, just press the Mode (PROGRAM/COMBO/GLOBAL) switch to exit Edit Mode and return to Program Mode, allowing you to change programs again. While in Program Mode, press the Mode switch again to change to Combo Mode. Combos contain a combination of four different programsone per voicethat can be used to play polyphonically or in unison, or to play four different sequences simultaneously. Press and hold the Mode switch briefly to display the Global menu and change higher level parameters such as MIDI channel number, Transpose/Detune, and so on. The SELECT knob changes the displayed page and increment and

decrement change the values. These settings are remembered when the synth is turned off. Summary You should be up and running now; for more operation information, read on. Or, just look up specific parameters for detailed notes. Pages 41 through 43 contain a handy reference for mod destinations and sources. At some point you should read through the manual to discover all the little features that you might not notice at first. Dont forget you get a free editor for Mac OS or Windows with your purchase. Download it from www.soundtower.com/tetra. I should mention that this manual does not include explanations of basic analog synthesizer functions. It assumes you already know what an oscillator is, how a low-pass filter affects the sound, what an ADSR envelope looks like, and so on. Fortunately, these days it is quite easy to find such resources on the Internet. If you want to learn the lingo and the basics, just try a search in Google (or the search engine of your choice), something like analog synthesizer tutorial. Youll find plenty of good reading material. Have fun! Dave Smith

Special thanks to: Tim Ande, Dave Polich, Ravi Sharma, James Terris, Stefan Trippler, and Jason Ware for their voicing work. Thanks also to the authors of the Prophet 08 programs, many of which are used in Tetra. Finally, the DSI Team: Chris Hector, Andrew McGowan, Joanne McGowan, and Tracy Wadley.

Getting Connected
Tetra has several inputs and outputs on its back panel.
Power Input Connect the power supply included with your Tetra. The power

supply comes with different AC adaptor prongs that allow it to work anywhere in the world. If for whatever reason you need to use a different supply, it must match the specifications printed on the front panel. Note: The power supply label says Evolver on it; we use the same supply for the mono Evolvers, Mophos, and the Prophets.
USB Tetra transmits and receives MIDI data via this standard, Type B, USB

receptacle.
MIDI In To receive MIDI data from another device, connect this to the other

device's MIDI Out.


MIDI Out To send MIDI data to another device, connect this to the other

device's MIDI In. This output can also be configured as a MIDI Thru using the MIDI Out Select parameter in the Global menu.
Poly Chain Out Up to four Tetras can be chained for increased polyphony

and multiple Tetras can be poly chained with a Prophet 08 or Mopho Keyboard. For details, see Using Poly Chain on page 36. Note: When Poly Chain is turned off in the Global menu, the Poly Chain Out simply mirrors the MIDI Out and transmits the same data.
Audio Outputs Tetra has four, unbalanced, inch outputs. 1/Left and

2/Right are the summed outputs of all four voices in Stereo or Mono mode and are typically used for normal polyphonic or unison playing. They are also the direct outputs of voices 1 and 2 in Quad mode. Outputs 3 and 4 are the direct outputs of voices 3 and 4, respectively, and are always mono. The individual, direct outputs are typically used in Multi Mode or Combo Mode, so that each voice can be mixed and processed separately. For more about the Audio Out and Multi Mode parameters, see Global Parameters on page 13.
Phones A inch stereo headphone jack.

Front Panel Controls

Select Use SELECT to change and scroll through programs and combos. When ASSIGN PARAMS is on, SELECT changes the value of the current parameter. Also used to select parameters in Global mode. Mode (Program/Combo/Global) Tetra has four modes of operation:

program, combo, global, and edit. Press the button to toggle between Program and Combo Mode. When in Program Mode, the display shows the name, number, and bank of the current program. Editing any of the parameters puts Tetra into Edit Mode and displays the last parameter edited and its stored and edited values. To return to Program Mode, simply press the mode switch. See Program Parameters starting on page 17 for more information. In Combo Mode, the display shows the name and number of the current combo. Editing any of the parameters puts Tetra into Edit Mode and displays the voice (V1, V2, V3, or V4) being edited, the last parameter edited and its edited value. To return to Combo Mode, simply press the mode switch. See Combos on page 33 for more information. Global mode is accessed by briefly holding down the mode button. The Global menu is displayed. Use SELECT to scroll the Global menu and the increment and decrement (+ and -) buttons to change the settings. To return to Program or Combo Mode, simply press the mode button. See Global Parameters on page 13 for more information.
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Write Use WRITE to save an edited program or combo to any of Tetras memory locations. To execute the write operation, press the increment (+) button.

To store a program or combo in a different location, press the WRITE button and change the destination using the SELECT knob before executing the write. Note: You can also change program banks by holding the increment (+) and decrement (-) buttons, but be careful! If you hit the increment button quickly, it saves the program wherever you are at that point. If you want to change banks, just be sure to hold the button until you see the bank change. To cancel a write, press WRITE, decrement (-), or the mode button. WRITE is also used to execute certain operations in the Global menu.
Volume The master volume control for all of Tetras audio outputs and the

headphone output.
Increment/Decrement The increment and decrement (+ and -) controls are

used to step through programs in Program Mode, combos in Combo Mode, to change values in the Global menu, and to confirm or cancel various operations. In Edit Mode they increase/decrease the parameter value. They are also used to select Tetras four program banks. Hold increment briefly to switch to the next highest bank; hold decrement to switch to the next lowest bank.
Assignable Parameters 1-4 Any of Tetras program parameters can be

edited from the front panel using the ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS controls and the assignments for the controls are saved per program, to best suit that program. In other words, the assignments for the controls can be completely different from one program to another. In Combo Mode, each of the four controls is routed to the respective voice. That is, parameter 1 controls an assigned parameter for voice 1, parameter 2 controls voice 2, etc. See also Edit B/Combo below for more information.
Assign Parameters When the ASSIGN PARAMETERS LED is lit, turn any of

the ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS controls to select from the list of program parameters. Press ASSIGN PARAMETERS again (turn the LED off) to use the ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS controls to edit the selected parameters. For a description of the parameters, see Program Parameters beginning on page 17. For a list of the parameters, see page 44.

Alternately, with ASSIGN PARAMETERS on, choose a parameter to edit with any of the ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS controls, and change the parameters value using SELECT or the increment (+) or decrement (-) buttons.
Edit B/Combo This button behaves differently depending upon the current

mode. In Program Mode, it switches between program layers. Each program has two layers, A and B. Each layer can be a complete, separate patch. The layers are used in conjunction with the KeyMode parameter for creating stacked or split programs. When EDIT B/COMBO is active, the front panel controls the B layer. Note: The ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS are the same for both layers. In Combo Mode, EDIT B/COMBO is used to access various combo parameters. Press EDIT B/COMBO once to edit voice 1 parameters. Press the button repeatedly to cycle through the voices and exit Edit Mode. See Combos on page 33 for more information. Note: In Combo Mode or when Multi Mode is turned on in the Global menu, a programs B layer is ignored.
Pitch Controls the base frequency of the oscillators. The relative interval

between the two oscillators is in each voice is maintained, even when the extremes are reached.
Cutoff Controls the filter cutoff. Resonance Controls filter resonance.

Note: The filter will only self oscillate when in 4-pole mode. See Lowpass Filter Parameters on page 19 for more information.
Attack Simultaneously adjusts the attack portion of all envelope generators:

filter, amplifier, and Envelope 3.


Decay/Release Simultaneously adjusts the decay and release portions of all envelope generators: filter, amplifier, and Envelope 3. Push It! The PUSH IT button is a manual trigger to play Tetra. In Program Mode, it can trigger a specific note (at a specific velocity) or a gated sequence, latch notes or sequences on and off, and manually step through a sequence. For more information, see Program Parameters, beginning on page 17.

In Combo Mode, the PUSH IT button cycles through the voices for polyphonic combos and plays all voices simultaneously when unison is on. See Combos on page 33 for more information.
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Basic Operation
Tetra has multiple personalities. It is a four-voice, analog poly synth, a sort of mini Prophet. But the voice architecture is based on Mopho, so it has a couple of sonic tricks up its sleevespecifically sub-octave generators and feedback that are absent from the Prophet. Tetra is also a four-part, multitimbral synth with separate outputs, essentially four Mophos in one very compact box. And its a voice expander for other Tetras or for a Prophet 08. (Program banks 1 and 2 are the Prophet 08 factory programs.) In designing Tetra, the goal was to make a great sounding synth that was also affordable. Toward that end, we wanted to give players enough control over parameters to make it useful for performance, so we came up with a combination of hard-wired commonly used controls and user-assignable controls. Any of Tetras parameters can be edited in real time from the front panel controls. But we also recognize that may not be the quickest or easiest way to program sounds from scratch. A free editor for Mac OS and Windows gives you easy access to all of Tetras program parameters. Download it here: www.soundtower.com/tetra. Also, an advanced version of the editor with more features can be purchased from our Web site. Note: The Prophet 08s controls map directly to Tetras, so if you have a Prophet 08, you can use it as a MIDI control surface for Tetra. Programs When Tetra first powers up, it is in Program Mode. The top line of the LCD shows the Program (1128) and Bank (14) number of the currently selected program, and the bottom line shows the 16-character name of the program. SELECT changes the program. The program can also be changed by pressing the increment (+) or decrement (-) switches. To increment to the next bank, hold the increment switch briefly; to decrement to the previous bank, hold the decrement switch. To edit a program, simply turn any knob. The ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS knobs have been preset to useful parameters for the factory programs. To change a knobs assignment, press ASSIGN PARAMETERS to light the LED. Turning any of the ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS knobs now will scroll through the list of available parameters. Choose one or more parameters to edit and then press ASSIGN PARAMETERS again to exit the assignment mode (ASSIGN PARAMETERS LED should now be off). Alternately, turn ASSIGN PARAMETERS on, use any of the ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS knobs to choose a parameter, and change the value with SELECT or the increment (+) and decrement (-) buttons. See Program Parameters on page 17 for a detailed list of all parameters and their functions. After editing parameters, press the Mode (PROGRAM/COMBO/GLOBAL) switch to exit Edit Mode and return to Program Mode.
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Combos When in Program Mode, press the Mode switch to enter Combo Mode. Combos are combinations of four programs, one for each voice. In Combo Mode, use SELECT and increment/decrement to change combos. Each of the ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS knobs controls a parameter for its respective voice: knob 1 for voice 1, knob 2 for voice 2, and so on. And the bottom row of knobs affects all voices and programs in the combo. For more about combos, see Combos on page 33. Saving a Program or Combo To save a program or combo, press WRITE. To store in a different location, use SELECT to choose the target destination, and hold the increment or decrement switch to choose a different bank (programs only; there is only one bank of combos). Press increment (+) to complete the write operation or decrement (-) to cancel (or press WRITE again). Voice Architecture and Feedback As you can see from the illustration on the following page, the left Audio Output goes through a programmable-gain pre-amp (controlled by the Feedback Gain parameter), then through a VCA for feedback volume control, and then to the filter input. Turning up the Feedback Volume will cause varying amounts of the audio output to be mixed back in pre-filter, individually per voice. For most purposes, small amounts of feedback are most useful and the resulting effect is similar to an overdrive distortion. Higher levels of feedback can get very squirrelly and rude (which may be exactly the effect youre looking for). FEEDBACK GAIN also affects the level of the feedback signal, so youll typically want to start with FEEDBACK GAIN turned down. Several of the factory programs already have some level of feedback programmed in, as often indicated by the letters FB following the name. To hear the effect of Feedback Volume and Feedback Gain, call up one of those programs and vary those parameters. Further Reading For information about using Tetra multitimbrally, see Multi Mode and Audio Out in Global Parameters on page 13. For information about using Tetra as a voice expander with a Prophet 08 or another Tetra, or using Mopho as an additional voice for Tetra, see Using Poly Chain on page 36.

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Global Parameters
Tetras Global parameters affect all programs globally. Examples include MIDI channel and fine tune. To edit the Global parameters, hold down the Mode switch (Program/Combo/Global) until the GLOBAL LED lights. The SELECT knob changes the global parameter and the increment and decrement buttons change the value.
Transpose: -12+12 Master Transpose control, 0 is centered. Steps in

semitones.
Fine Tune: -50+50 Master Fine Tune control; 0 centered. Steps in cents (50

cents = 1/2 semitone).


MIDI Channel: ALL, 116 Selects which MIDI channel to send and receive

data, 1 to 16. All receives on all 16 channels.


Clock: see table Selects the MIDI clock status.
Display Internal V1 Master MIDI Out MIDI In Midi In/Out MIDI Clock Setting MIDI clock is neither sent nor received Voice 1 provides the master clock for all 4 voices when in Combo mode. MIDI clock is sent MIDI clock is received MIDI clock is received and transmitted

MIDI Parameter Send: NRPN, CC, Off Changes to the values of Tetras front panel controls are transmitted via MIDI as Non-registered Parameter Number (NRPN) controllers or as Continuous Controllers (CC). Transmission of parameters can also be turned off. See MIDI Implementation on page 45 for details.

Note: NRPNs are the preferred method of parameter transmission, since they cover the complete range of all parameters, while CCs only handle the main parameters.
MIDI Parameter Receive: All, NRPN, CC, Off Sets the method by which Tetra receives parameter changes via MIDI. As with transmission, NRPNs are the preferred method, though some controllers may only be able to send CCs. MIDI Control: Off, On When On, the synth will respond to MIDI controllers,

including Pitch Wheel, Mod Wheel, Pedal, Breath, Volume, and Expression.

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MIDI SysEx: Off, On When On, the synth will respond to received MIDI

SysEx messages, and will transmit them, when prompted, to the MIDI Out. See Sysex Messages on page 62 for details.
MIDI Out Select: Out, Thru MIDI Out can be switched to MIDI Thru to

daisychain multiple MIDI devices.


Poly Chain: Off, Out 1, Out 4, Out 8, Out 12, In End, InOut4, InOut8 Using Poly Chain, up to four Tetras can be chained together for increased polyphony. One or two Tetras can also be chained with a Prophet 08 for twelve- or sixteennote polyphony. And a Tetra and Mopho can be chained for five-note polyphony. For a more complete description of Poly Chain and how to use it, see Using Poly Chain on page 36. Multi Mode: Off, On Multi Mode enables Tetra to respond to four separate

MIDI channels for multitimbral playback. With Multi Mode on, voice one responds to the base MIDI channel and the other three voices respond to the next three consecutive channels. For example, if Tetras base channel setting is 3, voice one responds to MIDI channel 3, voice two to MIDI channel 4, and so on. Note: For all four voices to play in Multi Mode, the base channel must be 13 or lower.
Local Control: Off, On When on (the default), the front panel controls

directly affect Tetra. When off, the controls are transmitted via MIDI but do not directly affect the local device (that is, Tetra). This is primarily useful for avoiding MIDI data loops that can occur with some external sequencers.
Mode Lock: Off, Prog, Combo Prevents Tetra from being switched from

Program mode to Combo mode or vice versa. This prevents the loss of unsaved edits caused by unintentional mode changes.
Audio Out: Stereo, Mono, Quad, Q LR34 Tetra has four audio outputs: 1/Left, 2/Right, 3, and 4. Stereo operation is the default. When set to Stereo, a stereo mix of all voices is available via the Left and Right outputs.

Note: Outputs 3 and 4 are always direct outputs for voices 3 and 4 and are mono, regardless of the Audio Out mode. Inserting a plug into output 3 or 4 does not remove that voice from the mix outputs when in Stereo or Mono mode. When set to Mono, this parameter defeats all pan settings and modulation, effectively making each of the Left and Right outputs a mono output. Quad directs each of the four voices to its respective, mono output.

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Note: Outputs 3 and 4 are noticeably louder than the other two outputs. This is normal. Outputs 3 and 4 are always monophonic and, therefore, do not require as much headroom as the mix outputs, which have to accommodate up to four voices at one time without distorting. The higher level provides optimum signal-to-noise ratio. Compensate for differences in level with a mixer. Choosing Q LR34 is similar to Quad, but voices 1 and 2 retain whatever panning effects are present in the assigned programs and the stereo outputs of those voices are present at both the Left and Right outputs.
PotMode: Relative, Passthru, Jump Tetras Cutoff, Resonance, and Volume controls are potentiometers or pots. There are three pot modes to determine how the synth reacts when the programmable parametersCutoff and Resonanceare edited. (Master volume is not programmable, so these modes dont apply.)

When set to Relative, changes are relative to the stored setting. In Relative mode, the full value range is not available until either the minimum or maximum value and the respective lower or upper limit of the pots travel is reached. For example, the Resonance parameter has a value range of 0 to 127. Lets say the physical position of the Resonance pot is the equivalent of a value of 100. If you switch to a program that has a stored Resonance setting of 63 and turn the pot all the way up, it will only go to 90. To get to the maximum value of 127, you first have to turn down until the value is at the other extreme and the pot is at the limit of its travel (in this case, 0 and fully counter-clockwise, respectively). In Passthru mode, turning the pot has no effect until after the edited value equals the preset value (that is, until the edited value passes through the stored value). Jump mode uses an absolute value based upon the position of the pot when edited: turn a pot and the value jumps immediately from the stored value to the edited value.
Balance V 1 - 4: -14+14 Adjusts the left/right balance of each voice by

approximately +/- 4 dB.


Basic Patch Press the WRITE button to load a basic patch into the edit buffer. (The patch will not actually be written to the current program location unless intentionally written to memory in Program Mode using the WRITE button.)

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Reset Globals Tetra does not have a full hardware reset, but select this

parameter and press WRITE to reset the global parameters to their factory defaults.
MIDI SysEx Dump: see table Allows dumping of programs and combos in

SysEx format via MIDI.


Display Current Program Current Prog Bank All Progrm Banks Current Combo Combo Bank All Progs Combos Current Prog P08 CurrentProgMopho Program Bank P08 Prog Bank Mopho Data to be dumped to SysEx Dump current program Dump all 128 programs in current bank Dump all programs in all 4 banks Dump current combo Dump all combos Dump all program banks and combos Dump current program in Prophet 08 format Dump current program in Mopho format Dump current bank in Prophet 08 format Dump current bank in Mopho format

Press the WRITE switch to start transmission. This feature is handy for saving Programs on a computer in SysEx format, or for sending them to another Tetra via a direct MIDI connection. The dumps include Program and Bank numbers, so when received, the programs will be stored in the same location. Programs can also be exported in Mopho and Prophet 08 formats. Features/parameters not available on those instruments are stripped out. For example, Mopho does not support layers, so only layer A is exported. The Prophet 08 does not have feedback or sub-octave generators.
Program Copy Utility Enables layer A or layer B of a program to be copied

to layer A or B of the same or a different program. The top line displays the current bank and program. Use increment (+) or decrement (-) to choose the layer to be copied. Then use SELECT to select the destination bank, program, and layer and increment/decrement to change the values.

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Program Parameters
All Program parameters can be edited using any of ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS controls. To assign a parameter to a control, press the ASSIGN PARAMETERS button to light the LED, and then turn any of the knobs (1 through 4) to select a parameter. A full list of the parameters can be found on page 44. The selected parameter and value appear in the LCD display. The top line of the LCD displays the programmed value for reference; the bottom line displays the edited value. To then change the value of the parameter you selected, hit the ASSIGN PARAMETERS button again, and the same knob will now change the value. You can also use the increment and decrement switches to adjust parameter values. Note: Once you are done editing a program, before you save it, you should consider what parameters you want to access when playing the new program. Generally, when making a program, we try to assign each of the 4 knobs to a different parameter that makes sense for that particular program, providing extra live control. Though it is certainly possible to perform detailed program generation and editing using these controls, it is usually much faster to use the free editor available for Mac OS or Windows. The minimal front panel of the Tetra is designed for fast, real-time changes in live performance. Following are descriptions of each Tetra Program parameter.

Oscillator Parameters
Tetra has two analog oscillators per voice. The basic controls for each oscillator are the same. Note: There are additional modulation controls that can affect the pitch of Oscillators 1 and 2. These are covered in other sections of the Parameter definitions.
Osc Freq: C 0C 10 Sets the base oscillator frequency over a 10 octave

range, from 8 Hz to 8KHz, stepping in semitones. C3 is middle C, the first octave is 0 (C0, C#0, etc.), the second octave is 1 (C1, C#1, etc.), and so on.
Fine Freq: -50+50 Fine Tune control; 0 centered. Steps in cents (50 cents =

1/2 semitone).
Shape: see table Selects the oscillator waveshape as follows:

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Display Osc Off Sawtooth Triangle Saw-Tri Pulse xx

Waveshape No output Sawtooth Triangle Sawtooth Triangle mix Pulse Wave, with pulse width ranging from minimum (0) to maximum (99). The pulse width will turn off at the two extremes this allows some interesting modulation possibilities. A square wave will be at Pulse 50.

Glide: 0127 Sets the oscillator glide (portamento) rate. Glide can be set

independently for each oscillator. Low values are faster. See Glide Mode below in Miscellaneous Oscillator Parameters for additional Glide settings.
Keyboard: On, Off Turns keyboard tracking for the oscillator on and off. Sub Osc 1: 1...127 Sub-oscillator 1 generates a square wave pitched one

octave below oscillator 1. This parameter controls the level.


Sub Osc 2: 1...127 Sub-oscillator 2 generates a square wave pitched two

octaves below oscillator 2. This parameter controls the level.

Miscellaneous Oscillator Parameters


Sync 2-> 1: Off, On Turns oscillator hard sync on. With sync on, whenever oscillator 2 resets, it will force oscillator 1 to reset for the classic hard sync sound. Glide Mode: see table Sets the way the oscillators respond to Glide settings.
Display FixRate Glide mode The Glide rate is fixed. The time to transition from one note to another varies depending upon the interval between the notes. The same, but Glide is only applied when played legato; that is, when a new note is hit while another note is still held. The Glide time is fixed. The time to transition from one note to another is the same, regardless of the interval. The same, but Glide only is applied when played legato; that is, when a new note is hit while another note is still held.

FixRate A

FixTime FixTime A

Osc Slop: 05 The amount of random oscillator frequency slop. The analog

oscillators in Tetra are very accurate, and will not drift. This works great for
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accurate sounds, and allows precise de-tuning. The Oscillator Slop parameter allows subtle amounts of frequency drift. For larger amounts, use a random LFO or white noise mod.
Pitch Wheel Range: 012 Sets the bend range, in semitones, of the pitch

wheel. The setting is the range in the positive or negative direction. For example, a setting of 7 lets you bend a note up or down by a fifth.

Mixer Parameters
Osc Mix: 0...127 Enables the outputs of Oscillators 1 and 2 to be mixed in

varying amounts. A setting of 0 is equivalent to 100% Oscillator 1 and 0% Oscillator 2. A setting of 127 is just the opposite. A setting of 64 is essentially a 50-50 mix of both oscillators.
Noise Level: 0127 Controls the volume of white noise mixed into the

filter.

Feedback Parameters
Feedback Volume: 0...127 This controls the amount of audio from the left

channel of each voice fed back into that voice's mixer pre-filter. As the value increases, so does the effect of the feedback.
Feedback Gain: 0127 Feedback Gain boosts the level of the feedback

signal and is interactive with and dependent upon Feedback Volume. If Feedback Volume is set to 0, then Feedback Gain has no effect. (There is no feedback signal to boost.) However, Feedback Gain combined with higher levels of Feedback Volume can result in effects ranging from pleasing distortion to squirrelly harmonic weirdness.

Low-pass Filter Parameters


Each of Tetras voices utilizes a switchable, 2- or 4-pole analog low-pass filter coupled with a 4-stage (plus delay) ADSR envelope generator.
Frequency: 0164 Sets the base filter cutoff frequency over more than 13

octaves. This control steps in semitones.


Resonance: 0127 Sets the Resonance level of the filter. At high settings

the filter will self-oscillate in 4-pole mode. If the filter does not oscillate, switch to 4-pole mode.
Keyboard Amount: 0127 Sets the amount of keyboard (MIDI note) to the

filter cutoff. A setting of 64 will step the filter one semitone for each note, 32 would be half-semitones, and so on.

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Audio Mod: 0...127 Controls the amount of audio from Oscillator 1 used to

modulate the filter cutoff frequency. For filter-only audio, set OSCILLATOR MIX to 127, OSCILLATOR 2 SHAPE to Off, and OSCILLATOR 1 SHAPE to the desired waveshape. This is useful for bell-like FM sounds. A wide range of sounds can also be made using AUDIO MOD with the oscillators routed normally through the filter.
Config: 2 Pole, 4 Pole Selects either 2- or 4-pole operation for the filter. Envelope Amount: -127+127 Sets the amount of filter envelope routed to

the cutoff frequency. This can be positive or negative, allowing inverted envelope control of the filter.
Envelope Velocity: 0127 Amount of key velocity controlling the level of

the filter envelope.


Delay: 0...127 Sets a delay between the time the filter envelope is triggered

and when the Attack portion actually begins.


Attack: 0127 Sets the Attack time of the filter ADSR envelope generator. Decay: 0127 Sets the Decay time. Sustain: 0127 Sets the Sustain level. Release: 0127 Sets the Release time.

VCA Parameters
VCA Level: 0127 Sets a base level for the VCA (Voltage Controlled

Amplifier). This allows the VCA to be essentially bypassed, which is necessary for Programs that drone. Note: If VCA LEVEL is on full, Envelope Amount has no effect. You normally want VCA LEVEL set to zero. For droning sounds you will probably turn the VCA Level up.
Env Amount: 0127 Sets the amount of VCA envelope to the VCA level. Env Velocity: 0127 Sets the amount of keyboard velocity controlling the

level of the VCA envelope.


Delay: 0...127 Sets a delay between the time the amplifier envelope is

triggered and when the Attack portion actually begins.


Attack: 0127 Sets the Attack time of the VCA ADSR envelope generator.
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Decay: 0127 Sets the Decay time. Sustain: 0127 Sets the Sustain level. Release: 0127 Sets the Release time. Pan Spread: 0127 There is a pan circuit after the VCA that pans the audio

in the stereo field individually per voice. With a Pan Spread of 0, all four voices are panned dead center. As you turn up Pan Spread, each voice is gradually moved away from the center by different amounts. Every other voice goes in a different direction, left or right. This provides a wide stereo field as the voices play. Note: Any modulation to pan will individually move each voice from its static position as set by Pan Spread.
Program Volume: 0127 Sets the volume of the current program to match

volumes between programs. Note: There is enough gain in the synth voice that with some settings, some mild clipping distortion may be heard. If this happens, try lowering the Voice Volume, and/or the VCA Envelope Amount (or VCA Velocity Amount).

LFO Parameters
Tetra has four Low Frequency Oscillators (LFOs). The same parameters are available for each.
Frequency: 0150, sync Sets the LFO frequency. Range 0150 for un-

synced LFO; speed ranges from slow (30 seconds) to very fast at 90 (8 HZ, C-2) and above the speed steps in semitones, up to 150 (261 Hz, middle C). Note: Some of the analog functions may not respond well to the fastest LFO speeds, due to speed limitations of the control voltages; but they will certainly generate some interesting sounds. Above 150, the sync speeds are as follows:
Display 32 Steps 16 Steps 8 Steps 6 Steps 4 Steps Timing Sync Sequence speed divided by 32; i.e. one LFO cycle takes 32 steps Sequence speed divided by 16 Sequence speed divided by 8 Sequence speed divided by 6 Sequence speed divided by 4

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Display 3 Steps 2 Steps 1.5 Step 1 Step 2/3 Step 1/2 Step 1/3 Step 1/4 Step 1/6 Step 1/8 Step 1/16Step

Timing Sync Sequence speed divided by 3 Sequence speed divided by 2 Sequence speed divided by 1.5 One cycle per step Two cycles every three steps Two cycles per step Three cycles per step Four cycles per step Six cycles per step Eight cycles per step Sixteen cycles per step

Shape: see table Selects the LFO waveshape:


Display Triangle Rev Saw Sawtooth Square Random LFO Shape Triangle Reverse Sawtooth Sawtooth Square Wave Random changes once per cycle for sample-and-hold effects

Amount: 0100 Sets the amount of LFO routed to the destination. Key Sync: Off, On When on, the LFO is re-started each time a new note is

played. Key Sync is set independently on each LFO.


Destination See Modulation Destinations on page 39 for a list of possible

destinations.

Envelope 3 Parameters
Envelope 3 is an auxiliary envelope for modulating various destinations. It can even be used as a sort of LFO using the Repeat parameter, which is unique to Envelope 3.
Destination Sets the Envelope 3 destination. See Modulation Destinations on

page 39 for a list of possible destinations.


Amount: -127+127 Sets the amount of Envelope 3. Env Velocity: 0127 Sets the amount of key velocity controlling the level of

envelope 3.

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Env Delay: 0127 Sets a delay between the time Envelope 3 is triggered and

when the Attack portion actually begins.


Env Attack: 0127 Sets the Attack time of Envelope 3. Env Decay: 0127 Sets the Decay time. Env Sustain: 0127 Sets the Sustain level. Env Release: 0127 Sets the Release time. Repeat: Off, On When on, causes the delay, attack, decay, and sustain

portions of Envelope 3 to loop for as long as the envelope is gated on.

Modulation Parameters
The Modulation Parameters let you configure the modulation routing and amount for Tetras four general-purpose modulation slots as well as for MIDI controllers (Mod Wheel, Key Pressure, Breath Control, Velocity, and Foot Controller). Since each Tetra mod source has a single destination, the four general purpose Mods provide a way to send a mod source (such as a sequence or LFO) to additional destinations, with a different amount. There are also additional mod sources available here, such as Noise, allowing a wide variety of possibilities. To configure a general-purpose modulation slot, select the appropriate modulator (Mod 1, Mod 2, Mod 3, or Mod 4), and use the Source, Destination, and Amount parameters to route the modulation as desired. To configure modulation for a standard MIDI controller, select the desired controller and amount, and then set the destination.
Source Selects a modulation source. See Modulation Sources on page 43 for

possible sources.
Amount: -127+127 Sets the amount of modulation. Destination Selects a modulation destination. See Modulation Destinations on page 39 for a list of possible destinations. Mod Wheel Amount: -127+127 Sets the maximum amount of modulation

that can be applied from MIDI Continuous Controller 1 (mod wheel).

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Mod Wheel Destination Selects the destination to which the mod wheel is

routed. See Modulation Destinations on page 39 for a list of possible destinations.


Press Amount: -127+127 Sets the maximum amount of modulation that can be applied from MIDI Channel Pressure (aftertouch). Press Destination Selects the destination to which the Channel Pressure is

routed. See Modulation Destinations on page 39 for a list of possible destinations.


Breath Amount: -127+127 Sets the maximum amount of modulation that can be applied from MIDI Continuous Controller 2 (breath controller). Breath Destination Selects the destination to which the breath control is

routed. See Modulation Destinations on page 39 for a list of possible destinations.


Veloc Amount: -127+127 Sets the maximum amount of modulation that

can be applied from MIDI note-on velocity.


Veloc Destination Selects the destination to which the note-on velocity is

routed. See Modulation Destinations on page 41 for a list of possible destinations.


Foot Amount: -127+127 Sets the maximum amount of modulation that can be applied from MIDI Continuous Controller 4 (foot controller). Foot Destination Selects the destination to which the foot control is routed.

See Modulation Destinations on page 41 for a list of possible destinations.

Unison Parameters
Unison Mode: see table Sets how voices are allocated and tuned when

unison is on.
Display 1 Voice All Voices AllDetune1-3 Key mode Classic, two oscillator, monophonic mode All available voices stacked in unison All available voices stacked in unison with increasing levels of detuning among the voices

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Unison Assign: see table Determines how Tetra responds to keyed notes

when unison is on.


Display Low Note LowRetrig HighNote HighRetrg LastNote LastRetrg Key mode Low note priority Low note priority, re-trigger envelopes High note priority High note priority, re-trigger envelopes Last note hit priority Last note hit priority, re-trigger envelopes

Unison: On, Off Turns unison on or off. When unison is on, Tetra behaves

like a monophonic synth.

Push It Switch Parameters


These parameters determine the behavior of the PUSH IT switch, Tetras manual trigger.
Note: C0C10 Sets the note that plays when PUSH IT is pressed. Velocity: 0127 Sets the MIDI note-on velocity. Mode: Normal, Toggle When set to Normal, PUSH IT responds like a key: press it and a note plays, release it and the note ends. But when set to Toggle, PUSH IT turns the note on with one press and off with a second press. This is handy for making a note drone or for latching a gated sequence on.

Keyboard Mode Parameters


The keyboard mode parameters determine how programs are mapped to a MIDI keyboard or other MIDI controller and provide compatibility with the Prophet 08s keyboard modes. Note: These parameters only appear in Program Mode, not Combo Mode, and only for layer A.
Split Point: C0C10 When in Split mode, sets the key at which the split

occurs. Layer A (voices 1 and 2) is mapped below the split point. Layer B (voices 3 and 4) is mapped to the chosen split point and above.
Key Mode: Normal, Stack, Split Determines how the layers respond to MIDI

note data in Program Mode. For Normal, layer A plays for the entire key range. Press EDIT B/COMBO to switch to layer B.

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For Stack, both layers respond to MIDI notes for the entire key range, enabling two patches to be played simultaneously with a single key stroke. Voices 1 and 2 are assigned to layer A, 3 and 4 are assigned to layer B. Split assigns layer A from the lowest note to below the split point (see previous parameter) and layer B from the split point to the highest note. Note: In Combo Mode and Multi Mode, layer B is ignored.

Clock Parameters
The sequencer and arpeggiator share the BPM and CLOCK DIVIDE settings.
BPM: 30250 Sets the programmed tempo for the sequencer in BPM (beats

per minute).
Clock Divide: see table Sets the note value for each sequence step relative to

the BPM.
Display Half Quartr Eighth 8 half 8swing 8 trip 16th 16half 16swng 16trip 32nd 32trip 64trip Tempo BPM/2 BPM BPM x 2 BPM x 2 BPM x 2 BPM x 3 BPM x 4 BPM x 4 BPM x 4 BPM x 6 BPM x 8 BPM x 12 BPM x 24 Timing Division Half note Quarter note Eighth note Eighth note, half swing timing Eighth note, full swing timing Eighth note triplets Sixteenth note Sixteenth note, half swing timing Sixteenth note, full swing timing Sixteenth note triplets Thirty-second note Thirty-second note triplets Sixty-fourth note triplets

Arpeggiator Parameters
Tetras arpeggiator has four different operating modes and can be synced to a MIDI clock source. Note: If the arpeggiator does not seem to be working, check the GLOBAL parameters to make sure Clock is set to Internal. If Clock is set to use an external clock source, Tetra must be receiving MIDI clock messages in order for the arpeggiator to run. The tempo and note value are determined by the Clock Parameters.
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Mode: see table Sets the order in which the arpeggiator plays notes.
Mode Up Down Up Down Assign Random 2oct Up 2oct Down 2oct UpDown 2oct Assign 2oct Random 3oct Up 3oct Down 3oct UpDown 3oct Assign 3oct Random Behavior Plays from lowest to highest note. Plays from highest to lowest note. Plays from lowest to highest and back to lowest. Plays notes in the order keys were pressed. Randomly plays notes. Plays keyed notes and the same notes one octave higher, from lowest to highest. Plays keyed notes and the same notes one octave higher, from highest to lowest. Plays keyed notes and the same notes one octave higher, from lowest to highest and back to lowest. Plays a keyed note, then the same note one octave higher, in the order keys were pressed. Randomly plays keyed notes and the same notes one octave higher. Plays keyed notes and the same notes one and two octaves higher, from lowest to highest. Plays keyed notes and the same notes one and two octaves higher, from highest to lowest. Plays keyed notes and the same notes one and two octaves higher, from lowest to highest and back to lowest. Plays a keyed note, then the same note one and two octaves higher, in the order keys were pressed. Randomly plays keyed notes and the same notes one and two octaves higher.

On/Off: Off, On Turns the arpeggiator on and off. Turning it on will turn off

the Sequencer if it is on.

Sequencer Parameters
Seq Trigger: see table Sets the triggering mode for the Sequencer.
Display Normal Trigger mode Sequence plays from the first step when a key is held, and resets to step 1 each time a new note is played. Each sequence step retriggers the envelopes. The same, but does not reset to step 1 on every note. The keyboard triggers the envelopes; the sequence steps do not. Same, but does not reset with subsequent notes.

No Reset No Gate NoGateNR

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Display Key Step

Trigger mode Striking a key advances the sequencer one step.

On/Off: Off, On Turns the sequencer on and off. Seq 1, 2, 3, or 4 Destinations Sets the destination for each of the four

sequence tracks. For a complete list, see Modulation Destinations on page 41.
Seq 1, 2, 3, or 4 Steps: C0D5+ or 0125, Reset, Rest Sets each step value

for each of the four sequence tracks. The values are displayed as both relative note values and as simple numerical values. Note values are displayed in quarter tones with a plus sign (+) indicating that the pitch is a quarter tone higher than the displayed note number. The two highest values are Reset and Rest. Reset causes the sequence to reset to the first step, enabling sequences of fewer than 16 steps or even sequences in which the tracks are different lengths. Rest inserts a rest on the selected step. About the Sequencer For many musicians, the term sequencer has become synonymous with MIDI sequencer; that is, a computer-based application or dedicated hardware device for recording and playing back notes and performance gestures via MIDI. But sequencers were around long before MIDI. Tetras sequencer is much more like the original analog sequencers typically associated with modular synthesizer systems. The sequencer comprises four 16-step sequences that play in parallel. Each sequence can be routed to a chosen destination, and each step in a sequence can be set to a different value used to modulate that destination. Each of the four voices has its own sequencer.
Steps 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 1 2 3 4 v = step value Dest. 1 Dest. 2 Dest. 3 Dest. 4

S e q u e n c e

Strictly speaking, Tetras sequencer does not play notes, nor does it transmit MIDI data. If none of the sequence destinations are routed to oscillator frequency, the sequencer may not even affect the pitch. In Tetra terms, a sequence is just a series of events at timed intervals that changes the value of one of the synths parameters in discrete steps. Because the four sequences play in parallel, up to four parameters can be affected by each step, one per sequence.

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For the most part, the sequence destinations are the same as the modulation destinations, which is appropriate: a sequence is just another modulation source. For each sequence step, the envelopes are gated on for half the steps duration. The duration varies according to the BPM and Clock Divide settings (or the MIDI clock, if synced to an external source). The envelope settings of the current program ultimately determine how long each step plays, though, and longer (more legato) or shorter (more staccato) effects can be achieved by editing the envelope rates. Tetras sequencer is a gated sequencer. That means it requires a note to be gated onthat is played from the PUSH IT button or via MIDIin order for the sequencer to run. There is no dedicated start or play button and it does not respond to MIDI start/stop/continue messages, but it can still sync to an external clock. Simply turn on the sequencer and then play and hold a note to start. Or use the PUSH IT buttons toggle feature to latch a note on with one push and release it with another; in this case, the PUSH IT button is essentially a Start/Stop control. Reset and Rest Sequences have a maximum of 16 steps, but they can have fewerfrom 1 to 15using Reset. (Sequences of 16 steps reset automatically.) Reset appears immediately after the highest value setting for a step. Setting a step to Reset causes the sequence to jump back to the first step and continue playing. Reset is set separately for each of the four sequences, so it must be set at the same step in all four sequences to shorten all the sequences equally. The following illustration shows an example in which all the sequences are eight steps in length.
Steps 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 1 2 3 4 v = step value; R = Reset Dest. 1 Dest. 2 Dest. 3 Dest. 4

S e q u e n c e

Tip: Using Reset while programming a sequence can be helpful. For example, when programming a specific melodic line, start by shortening the sequence to four or eight steps until those steps are set, and then gradually move the reset point to lengthen the loop until the desired number of steps is playing.

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Sequences do not have to be the same length, however, which makes for some very interesting, less repetitive patterns, particularly when sequences are set to odd and even numbers of steps.
Steps 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 1 2 3 4 v = step value; R = Reset Dest. 1 Dest. 2 Dest. 3 Dest. 4

S e q u e n c e

Sequence one has an additional value, Rest, that appears in the list after Reset. Rest prevents the envelopes from being gated by the corresponding step, so a rest in sequence one affects all four sequences. If the sequences are the same length, rests will occur in the same place in all four sequences as they loop. If the sequences are different lengths, the rests in sequence one apply to whatever the current step happens to be in sequences two through four, resulting in a more random-sounding pattern (which can be really cool). In the following example, sequence one is 16 steps long and rests occur at steps 2, 6, 9, and 12. However, sequence two is only eight steps long, so rests occur at steps 2 and 6 the first time it plays through and then at steps 1 and 4corresponding to steps 9 and 12 in sequence onethe first time it repeats. As sequence two loops, the rests will continue in the same alternating pattern.
Steps 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 1 2 3 4 v = step value; r = rest; R = Reset Dest. 1 Dest. 2 Dest. 3 Dest. 4

S e q u e n c e

Programming the Sequencer Programming the sequencer is easy, but there are a few things to consider before you start. Most importantly, what do you want the sequence to do and what modulation destinations will provide the results youre seeking? For example, is the sequencer going to control oscillator frequency? One sequence can control the frequency of both oscillators or one sequence can control oscillator 1 and another sequence can control oscillator 2 for harmonies or countermelodies. A typical application of the sequencer might have sequence one routed to the frequency of both oscillators, sequence two routed to filter cutoff, sequence
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three routed to filter resonance, and sequence four routed to amplifier envelope amount for accents. Many of the factory programs have sequences programmed, so you can refer to those to see how certain effects are being achieved.
To program a sequence:

1. 2.

Set the Sequencer On/Off parameter to On. Play a note to start the sequence playing. To avoid having to hold a key down, set the Push It Mode to Toggle. Then use PUSH IT to start and stop the sequencer. You may also want to change the Push It Note, the BPM, and the Clock Divide.

3. 4.

Choose a destination for the sequence. Set the step values for the corresponding sequence to the desired values. To quickly edit a sequence, turn ASSIGN PARAMS on and use one of the ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS knobs to choose the sequence step and the SELECT or increment (+)/decrement (-) buttons to change the value. As the sequence loops, you will hear your edits.

5. 6.

Follow the same basic steps to program the other sequences. Dont forget to write your edits to memory! Sequences are saved with the related program. Just press WRITE and then the increment (+) button to save the program and sequences.

Slew In modular analog synthesizers, a lag processor or slew limiter is used to create a time-varying changea smooth transitionbetween successive, discrete control voltage levels. The rate of change is called the slew rate and one common application is to create a glide (aka portamento) effect between notes. Among the possible destinations for Tetra sequences two and four is a sequenceonly parameter called Slew. Slew behaves a little differently from the other modulation destinations, in that it is not really a destination at all; instead, it affects the sequence above it. That is, if Slew is the chosen destination for sequence two, it controls sequence one, and Slew in sequence four controls sequence three. In Tetras sequencer, Slew sets the slew rate between the previous steps value and the current steps value when the step is gated on. Confused yet? This should help: lets say sequence one is routed to oscillator frequency and sequence two to Slew. Increasing the Slew value for step four will cause the
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oscillator frequency to glide from the step three value when step four is gated on. The higher the Slew value, the slower the slew rate. And the slew rate can be different for each step. But its not just for oscillator glide. Slew can be applied to any of the destinations. For example, sequence three could be routed to filter cutoff with Slew in sequence four used to create a less abrupt transition from one step to the next. Note: Depending upon the BPM and Clock Divide settings, the slew rate can actually exceed the time the envelopes are gated on, causing a step in the affected sequence to not reach its set value. For example, if Slew is applied to oscillator frequency, high Slew values may cause a step to sound flat or sharp. If thats not what you want, simply reduce the Slew value. Syncing an LFO to the Sequencer One very useful way to modulate a parameter in sync with a sequence is using an LFO with Clock Sync. A setting of 16 Steps for LFO Frequency with a triangle wave selected and routed to the filter will provide a clean filter sweep over a 16-step sequence, perfectly in sync! This is much easier (and smoother) than manually programming a sequence to sweep the filter.

Name Parameter
Edit Name The lower LCD line displays the name of the Program with the

active character blinking. When ASSIGN PARAMETERS is lit, the parameter control changes the position of the active character and SELECT and the increment (+) and decrement (-) buttons change the character.

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Combos
A combo is a collection of four programsone per voicecombined to make a sort of super program. How a combo responds to MIDI note data depends largely upon whether or not it is monophonic (that is, unison is on) or polyphonic. The typical uses for a combo are:
Stacked unisonAll four voices play from a single key or the PUSH IT button with four different programs. Multitimbral sequence playbackFour different programs and their sequences play back simultaneously from a single key or the PUSH IT button. Modular-style polyphonyFour-voice polyphony with a different program per

voice. Tetra has 128 combos. To access them, press the mode button to light the COMBO LED. Change combos using SELECT or increment (+) and decrement (-). The bottom row of knobs (PITCH, CUTOFF, etc.) affects all the programs in the combo. Though this may not make sense in all cases, changing all four programs in a combo with a single control makes for some very interesting live editing possibilities. Each of the Assignable Parameters knobs controls one parameter for the respective voice. That is, knob 1 controls a parameter for voice 1, knob 2 for voice 2, and so on.

Creating a Combo
It probably goes without saying, but it is generally quicker and easier to create combos using the editor. It can be done without the editor, though. To create a combo from scratch, press EDIT B/COMBO while in Combo Mode. The display looks something like this:

The top line shows the program and the voice to which it is assigned, and the bottom line shows the program name. Use SELECT or the increment or decrement buttons to choose another program. Programs can be selected from other combos or from the regular program banks. For example, choosing Combo 55 Prt2 loads the program from voice 2 of combo 55 into the current combo location. To access the regular program banks, hold the increment button briefly until the next bank is displayed. Then the display will look something like the following:
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The top row shows the current combo, the program, the bank, and the voice being edited. The bottom row shows the program name. Note: Though the other combos and program banks can be used as a starting point for building new combos, the actual programs used are copies, so any edits made in Combo Mode do not affect the source programs. The converse is also true. Say a combo is created using the program Arid and then Arid is subsequently edited in Program Mode. Those changes will not be propagated to the combo. (The edited program can be reassigned to the combo, though.) In other words, Combos contain all parameters for all four voices when saved, and do not rely on referencing or mapping other programs, making organization and maintenance much easier. Use the PUSH IT button or a MIDI controller to audition any changes made to voice 1. The ASSIGNABLE PARAMETERS are initially the same as for the chosen program, but can be reassigned, if desired, without affecting the assignments in the original program. Simply press ASSIGN PARAMS and choose the desired parameters as in Program Mode. Note: A few parameters do not appear in Combo Mode, or appear only on certain voices. In addition to the exceptions noted below, Unison Mode, Split Point, and Key Mode never appear in Combo Mode. When satisfied with the selections/edits, press EDIT B/COMBO again to move on to voice 2. When assignments have been made for all four voices, press EDIT B/COMBO to exit and play the combo. To set the relative voice volumes in a combo, press EDIT B/COMBO to enter single voice edit mode. The VOLUME knob can then be used to set the Voice Volume parameter for voice 1. Press EDIT B/COMBO again to move on to voice 2, and so on. The combos name is set using the Edit Name parameter for voice 1 (ASSIGNABLE PARAMETER 1) only when EDIT B/COMBO is turned off. And, of course, dont forget to save changes using WRITE. The combo can be saved to the current, or another, memory location. After pressing WRITE, use SELECT to choose the target combo number. There are other parameters that affect how combos play back. If Unison is set to Off for voice 1 (the Unison on/off parameter only appears under voice 1, not
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voices 2 through 4), the combo will play back polyphonically. If the PUSH IT button is to be used to latch notes on, Push It Mode must be set to Toggle in each of the voices. To start playback of four sequences simultaneously from the PUSH IT button, set Unison to On in voice 1, set the Push It Mode to Toggle for all four voices, and make sure Sequencer is set to On for all four voices. If the Audio Out parameter in the Global menu is set to Quad, each of the voices in a combo can be processed separately. The editor has the ability to copy any combo voice or any program layer (A or B) to any other combo voice or program layer. This provides a very fast way to build up combos. For example, say you like the kick drum on voice 1 of a factory combo. You can copy it and paste it to any voice on a new combo. Then, you could find a snare from a different combo, and copy it into a different voice on your new combo. Do the same for the remaining voices and you have a new customized combo that you can then further edit to your liking.

Combos and Multi Mode


Combos can also be used to cue up programs used in Multi Mode. When Multi Mode is used with an external sequencer, the sequencer typically determines which programs will play by sending MIDI program change messages on the relevant tracks and MIDI channels. As an alternative, a combination of Combo Mode and Multi Mode can be used to recall four programsone per voiceand have each voice respond to a different MIDI channel. For more information about Multi Mode, see Global Parameters on page 13.

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Using Poly Chain


Poly Chain enables multiple Tetras to be chained together for increased polyphony, up to 16 voices. MIDI note data from a keyboard, sequencer, or other controller is intelligently processed so that, when one synths maximum polyphony is reached, additional notes are passed through the Poly Chain Out jack and routed to another synth. All that is required is a single MIDI cable for each of the chained synths and a mixer for combining the audio outputs. Tetra can also be poly chained with a Mopho or Prophet 08. The same programs should be loaded into all the chained synths. The easiest way to do that is to use the Dump command in the Global menu to dump the programs via MIDI from one synth to the other(s). Note: Tetras program banks 1 and 2 come pre-loaded with the Prophet 08 factory programs. On the master instrumentthe first Tetra in the chainset Poly Chain to the number of additional voices that will be chained: Out 1 (for poly chaining a Mopho), Out 4, Out 8, or Out 12. To chain three Tetras, set Poly Chain on the intermediate instrument to InOut4. For four Tetras, set the second instrument in the chain to InOut8 and the third to InOut4. Regardless of how many are chained together, the last Tetra is always set to In End. You can also use one or two Tetras to expand the polyphony of a Prophet 08. See the illustration at the end of this section for more information. You can now virtually ignore the slave unit or units, since the controls on the master will control all units as if they were a single synth. This includes saving a program; if you save an edited program on the master, it will also save the program on the slave(s). Note: If syncing to an external MIDI clock, set MIDI Clock (Global menu) on the master and any intermediate units to MIDI In/Out. Set the last instrument in the chain to MIDI In. When Poly Chain is set to Off, the Poly Chain MIDI out jack simply duplicates the MIDI out jack.

A Note About Poly Chain and the Mopho Desktop


Unlike Tetra and the Prophet 08, Mopho does not have layered programs. It is only one voice and so can not do stacked or split programs. Because of that, when slaving a Mopho to a Tetra for poly chaining (for 5 voices total), only Tetras four voices will play when a stacked or split program is selected. In other words, the Mopho voice will only play in normal keyboard mode.

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Also, Mophos INPUT GAIN (similar to Tetras FEEDBACK GAIN) is not programmable, so it may take some tweaking to get feedback to sound the same on Mopho and Tetra, even if the same programs are loaded in both. Programs that dont use feedback should sound the same.

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Various Poly Chain Configurations Using Tetra, Mopho, and the Prophet 08*

*If Out 4 and Out 8 do not appear as poly chain options on the Prophet, contact support@davesmithinstruments.com for information about updating the OS.
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Using USB
Tetras USB 2.0 port enables bidirectional MIDI communication with a computer. A MIDI interface and MIDI cables are not necessary, just a USB cable. Tetra is a Class Compliant USB device. That means it does not require any additional drivers to be installed to communicate with a Mac or Windows computer. Tetra transmits and receives MIDI data via USB, but does not transmit audio. Note: MIDI In and USB should not be used at the same time, as overlapping messages from different sources may cause Tetra to respond unpredictably. MIDI Out and USB can be used at the same time and transmit the same data. Poly Chain Out is an independent MIDI bus and can be used regardless of the normal MIDI connection. USB Notes Under Mac OS X, Tetra will appear as a MIDI port when connected via USB and can be configured using the Macs Audio MIDI Setup application (typically found in Applications/Utilities). Under Windows XP, the first time Tetra is connected via USB, the Found new hardware alert appears and Tetra is automatically installedsomewhat misleadinglyas USB Audio Device. If there is already another Class Compliant USB device installed, Tetra will show up as USB Audio Device(2) (or 3 or 4 or...).
To determine which USB Audio Device is Tetra:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Open the System Control Panel Click the Hardware tab. Click Device Manager. Expand Sound, video, and game controllers. Right-click any USB Audio Device and choose Properties from the pop-up menu.

The General tab of the USB Audio Device Properties window displays the Device Type, Manufacturer, and Location. For Tetra, the Location should read Location n (DSI Tetra).

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Windows Vista essentially behaves the same as XP, but the device name is DSI Tetra rather than USB Audio Device. In Windows, if you unplug the USB cable and plug it back in while a program has the Tetra port open, you may have to resync. That usually means going to the USB Audio Device (or DSI Tetra) Properties, as in the procedure above, and clicking OK. If Tetra is no longer listed in the Device Manager under Sound, video, and game controllers, power Tetra down and back up again while it is connected via USB. It should be detected on power up.

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Modulation Destinations
Display Off Osc 1 Freq Osc 2 Freq OscAllFreq Osc Mix NoiseLevel Osc1 PulsW Osc2 PulsW Osc All PW Low Pass Resonance Audio Mod VCA Level Output Pan LFO 1 Freq LFO 2 Freq LFO 3 Freq LFO 4 Freq LFOAllFreq LFO 1 Amt LFO 2 Amt LFO 3 Amt LFO 4 Amt LFOAll Amt Env 1 Amt Env 2 Amt Env 3 Amt EnvAll Amt Env1Attack Env2Attack Env3Attack EnvAll Att Env1 Decay Env2 Decay Env3 Decay EnvAll Dec Env1Releas Env2Releas Destination No destination selected Oscillator 1 Frequency Oscillator 2 Frequency Oscillator 1 and 2 Frequency Oscillator Mix Noise Level Oscillator 1 Pulse Width Oscillator 2 Pulse Width All Oscillators Pulse Width Lowpass Filter Frequency Resonance Audio Mod Amount VCA Amount Stereo Pan Position LFO 1 Frequency LFO 2 Frequency LFO 3 Frequency LFO 4 Frequency All LFO Frequencies LFO 1 Amount LFO 2 Amount LFO 3 Amount LFO 4 Amount All LFO Amounts Envelope 1 Amount (Level) Envelope 2 Amount (Level) Envelope 3 Amount (Level) All Envelope Amounts (Levels) Envelope 1 Attack Rate Envelope 2 Attack Rate Envelope 3 Attack Rate All Envelope Attack Rates Envelope 1 Decay Rate Envelope 2 Decay Rate Envelope 3 Decay Rate All Envelope Decay Rates Envelope 1 Release Rate Envelope 2 Release Rate

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Env3Releas EnvAll Rel Mod 1 Amt Mod 2 Amt Mod 3 Amt Mod 4 Amt Fback Vol Sub Osc 1 Sub Osc 2 Fback Gain Seq1 Slew Seq2 Slew

Envelope 3 Release Rate All Envelope Release Rates Modulator 1 Amount Modulator 2 Amount Modulator 3 Amount Modulator 4 Amount Feedback Volume Sub Oscillator 1 Level Sub Oscillator 2 Level Feedback Gain Sequencer 1 Slew Rate (Seq 2 Dest only) Sequencer 2 Slew Rate (Seq 4 Dest only)

42

Modulation Sources
Display Off Sequence1 Sequence2 Sequence3 Sequence4 LFO 1 LFO 2 LFO 3 LFO 4 Filt Env1 VCA Env 2 Envelope3 PitchBend Mod Wheel Pressure MidBreath Midi Foot Midi Exp Velocity KeyNumber Noise Source No source selected Sequence 1 Sequence 2 Sequence 3 Sequence 4 LFO 1 LFO 2 LFO 3 LFO 4 Filter Envelope Amp (VCA) Envelope Envelope 3 Pitch Bend Mod Wheel Pressure (Aftertouch) MIDI Breath Controller MIDI Foot Controller MIDI Expression Keyboard Note Velocity Keyboard Note Number Noise

43

Parameter List
Osc 1 Frequency Osc 1 Fine Freq Oscillator 1 Shape Oscillator 1 Glide Osc 1 Key Track Sub Osc 1 Level Osc 2 Frequency Osc 2 Fine Freq Oscillator 2 Shape Oscillator 2 Glide Osc 2 Key Track Sub Osc 2 Level Osc Hard Sync Glide Mode Oscillator Slop Pitch Wheel Range Oscillator Mix Noise Level Feedback Volume Feedback Gain Filter Cutoff Freq Filter Resonance Filter Keyboard Amt Filter Audio Mod Filter Config/Mode Filter Env Amount Filter Env Velocity Filter Env Delay Filter Env Attack Filter Env Decay Filter Env Sustain Filter Env Release VCA Level VCA Env Amount VCA Env Velocity VCA Env Delay VCA Env Attack VCA Env Decay VCA Env Sustain VCA Env Release Pan Spread Program Volume LFO 1 Frequency LFO 1 Shape LFO 1 Amount LFO 1 Destination LFO 1 Key Sync LFO 2 Frequency LFO 2 Shape LFO 2 Amount LFO 2 Destination LFO 2 Key Sync LFO 3 Frequency LFO 3 Shape LFO 3 Amount LFO 3 Destination LFO 3 Key Sync LFO 4 Frequency LFO 4 Shape LFO 4 Amount LFO 4 Destination LFO 4 Key Sync Env 3 Destination Envelope 3 Amount Envelope 3 Velocity Envelope 3 Delay Envelope 3 Attack Envelope 3 Decay Envelope 3 Sustain Envelope 3 Release Envelope 3 Repeat Mod 1 Source Mod 1 Amount Mod 1 Destination Mod 2 Source Mod 2 Amount Mod 2 Destination Mod 3 Source Mod 3 Amount Mod 3 Destination Mod 4 Source Mod 4 Amount Mod 4 Destination Mod Wheel Amount Mod Wheel Dest Pressure Amount Pressure Destination Breath Amount Breath Destination Velocity Amount Velocity Destination Foot Control Amt Foot Control Dest Unison Mode* Unison Assign Unison On/Off** Push It Note Push It Velocity Push It Mode Split Point Key Mode Clock BPM Clock Divide Arpeggiator Mode Arpeggiator On/Off Sequence Trigger Sequencer On/Off Seq 1 Destination Seq 2 Destination Seq 3 Destination Seq 4 Destination Seq 1 Steps 1 - 16 Seq 2 Steps 1 - 16 Seq 3 Steps 1 - 16 Seq 4 Steps 1 - 16 Edit Name

* Program Mode only; not in Combo Mode ** In Combo Mode, voice 1 only Program Mode, layer A only

44

Support
Troubleshooting Here are a few suggestions for resolving problems that may occur. The sequencer has stopped running. Make sure Clock in the Global menu is set to Internal. Some of the programs sound different. Check the Mod Wheel position. The Mod Wheel can do a lot more than just add vibrato. Also, some of the programs use the sequencer to shape the sound so make sure Clock in the Global menu is set to Internal. There is a ground hum in the audio output. USB can cause ground loops, so try to resolve any grounding issues between the computer and Tetra. Or use MIDI, which is opto-isolated. Tetra is behaving erratically. This is almost always caused by a MIDI data loop. Make sure that any MIDI Thru functionality is turned off on the MIDI interface/hardware or in the MIDI software application (sequencer or whatever). Disconnect all Tetras MIDI connectionsMIDI and USB cablesand see if the problem persists. You can also monitor the MIDI traffic with MIDI Monitor (Mac OS) or MIDI-OX (Windows) to see if Tetra is being overrun with duplicate messages. An oscillator or the filter sounds strange or out of tune. Hold down ASSIGN PARAMS and press the mode switch to run the calibration routine. Note: It is not necessary to run the calibration routine on a regular basis. You should only run it if you are experiencing problems. Still experiencing a problem with Tetra? Reset the Global parameters (in the Global menu). Contacting Technical Support If you are still having a problem with Tetra, contact Technical Support at support@davesmithinstruments.com. Please include your Tetras serial number, the version of the operating systems (Main and Voice displayed on startup), and the purchase date. Note: If you have not already reset the Global parameters and run the calibration routine (see Troubleshooting above), you should do it before

45

contacting Technical Support. Its probably the first thing theyll ask you to do. Warranty Repair Dave Smith Instruments warrants that Tetra will be free from defects in materials and/or workmanship for 1 year from the date of purchase. Please register your product online at www.davesmithinstruments.com to establish the date of purchase. (This is not a requirement for warranty service, but it will help expedite the process.) Please contact support@davesmithinstruments.com to determine the best course of action for getting your Tetra repaired. For your own protection, as well as ours, please do not return any product to Dave Smith Instruments without a return authorization (RA) number. To issue an RA number, Technical Support needs: Your name Your return address Your email address A phone number where you can be reached Your Tetras serial number The date of purchase and where purchased If you need to return your instrument for repair, you are responsible for getting it to DSI. We highly recommend insuring it and packing in the original packaging. Damage resulting from shipping a product with insufficient packaging is not covered by warranty.

46

MIDI Implementation
Tetra receives MIDI data according to the mode controls under GLOBAL. In addition, there is interaction between some of the program parameters that determine the overall response of Tetra to MIDI data. Note that the following applies to using both the MIDI jacks and USB. Following are the Global parameters that affect response to MIDI:
MIDI Channel: ALL, 116 Selects the MIDI channel to send and receive

data, 1 to 16. All receives on any channel.


Clock: see table Selects the MIDI clock status as follows:
Display Internal MIDI Out MIDI In MIDIn/Out MIDI Clock Setting MIDI clock is neither sent nor received MIDI clock is sent MIDI clock is received MIDI clock is received and transmitted

MIDI Parameter Send: NRPN, CC, Off Changes to the values of Tetras front panel controls are transmitted via MIDI as Non-registered Parameter Number (NRPN) controllers or as Continuous Controllers (CC). Transmission of parameters can also be turned off. MIDI Parameter Receive: All, NRPN, CC, Off Sets the method by which Tetra receives parameter changes via MIDI. As with transmission, NRPNs are the preferred method, though some controllers may only be able to send CCs. MIDI Control: Off, On When On, the synth will respond to MIDI controllers,

including Pitch Wheel, Mod Wheel, Pedal, Breath, Volume, and Expression.
MIDI SysEx: Off, On When On, the synth will respond to received MIDI

SysEx messages, and will transmit them, when prompted, to the MIDI Out.

MIDI Messages
System Real-time Messages Status 1111 1000 Description MIDI Timing Clock

47

Received Channel Messages Status 1000 nnnn 1001 nnnn 1010 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1100 nnnn 1101 nnnn 1110 nnnn Notes: Second 0kkkkkkk 0kkkkkkk 0kkkkkkk 0vvvvvvv 0ppppppp 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv Third 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv Description Note Off. Velocity is ignored Note On. Note off if vvvvvvv = 0 Polyphonic Key Pressure Control Change; see Received Controller Messages table following Program change, 0-127 for Programs 1-128 within current Bank Channel Pressure Pitch Bend LS Byte then MS Byte

0vvvvvvv

0kkkkkkk nnnn 0vvvvvvv

Note number 0 127 Channel number 0 to 15 (MIDI channel 1-16). Ignored if MIDI channel set to ALL Value

Received Controller Messages Status 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn Second 1 2 4 7 74 11 32 64 123 121 Third 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv Description Mod Wheel directly assignable controller Breath Controller directly assignable controller Foot Controller directly assignable controller Volume Combined with Master Volume and Voice Volume Brightness Added to low-pass filter cutoff frequency Expression Controller directly assignable controller Bank Select 0 -3 select banks 1 4; others ignored Damper pedal holds envelopes in Sustain if 0100 0000 or higher All Notes Off clear all MIDI notes Reset All Controllers clears all MIDI controllers to 0, MIDI volume to maximum

See sections below for additional Continuous Controller (CC) and Nonregistered Parameter Number (NRPN) messages received.
Transmitted Channel Messages Status 1100 nnnn Second 0ppppppp Third Description Program change, 0 127 for Programs 1 128 within current Bank

48

Transmitted Controller Messages Status 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn Second 0000 0111 0010 0000 Third 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv Description Volume knob Bank Select 0 to 2

See sections below for additional Continuous Controller (CC) and Nonregistered Parameter Number (NRPN) messages transmitted.
Additional Continuous Controllers (CCs) Transmitted/Received

The following table details how CCs are mapped onto Tetras controls. They are transmitted when MIDI Parameter Send is set to CC in Global, and recognized when received when MIDI Parameter Receive is set to either CC or All in Global.
Parameter OSC 1 FREQ OSC 1 FREQ FINE OSC 1 SHAPE GLIDE 1 OSC 2 FREQ OSC 2 FREQ FINE OSC 2 SHAPE GLIDE 2 OSC MIX NOISE LEVEL SUB OSC 1 LEVEL SUB OSC 2 LEVEL FEEDBACK VOLUME FEEDBACK GAIN FILTER FREQ RESONANCE FIL KEY AMT FIL AUDIO MOD FILTER ENV AMT FIL ENV VEL AMT FIL DEL FIL ATT FIL DEC CC 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 52 53 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 FIL SUS FIL REL VCA LEVEL OUTPUT PAN VCA ENV AMOUNT AMP ENV VEL AMT VCA DEL VCA ATT VCA DEC VCA SUS VCA REL ENV3 DEST ENV3 AMT ENV 3 VEL AMT ENV 3 DELAY ENV3 ATT ENV3 DEC ENV3 SUS ENV3 REL TEMPO TIME SIG 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 75 76 85 86 87 88 89 90 77 78 14 15

49

NRPN Messages
The Non-Registered Parameter Number (NRPN) MIDI messages are used to transmit and receive both global and program parameters. They are transmitted when MIDI Parameter Send is set to NRPN in Global, and received when MIDI Parameter Receive is set to either NRPN or All in Global. The messages are handled in standard MIDI format using the NRPN CC commands in running status byte format. Below is the format used for transmitting a NRPN parameter:
Transmitted NRPN Messages

Status
1011 nnnn

Description
Control Change

0110 0011
0vvv vvvv

NRPN parameter number MSB CC


Parameter Number MSB

0110 0010
0vvv vvvv

NRPN parameter number LSB CC


Parameter Number LSB

0000 0110
0vvv vvvv

NRPN parameter value MSB CC


Parameter value MSB

0010 0110
0vvv vvvv

NRPN parameter value LSB CC


Parameter value LSB

The parameter number can be found in the two tables below, one for Global parameters, and the other for Program parameters. The parameter numbers and the parameter values are broken into two 7-bit bytes for MIDI transmission; the LSB has the seven least-significant bits, and the MSB has the seven mostsignificant bits, though in most cases the MSB will be zero or one, and never more than two. When receiving an NRPN, all messages do not necessarily need to be transmitted, since the synth will track the most recent NRPN number, though it is usually good practice to send the entire message above. Once an NRPN is selected, the synth will also respond to NRPN Data Increment and Decrement commands, which some controllers utilize. Finally, it responds to one RPN (Registered Parameter Number) command, the RPN/NRPN Reset command, which can be handy for resetting the currently selected parameter to a known state.

50

Received NRPN Messages

Status
1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn 1011 nnnn

Second
0110 0011 0110 0010 0000 0110 0010 0110 0110 0000 0110 0001 0010 0101

Third
0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0vvvvvvv 0xxxxxxx 0xxxxxxx 0111111

Description
NRPN parameter number MSB CC NRPN parameter number LSB CC NRPN parameter value MSB CC NRPN parameter value LSB CC NRPN parameter value Increment NRPN parameter value Decrement RPN parameter number MSB CC - Reset NRPN parameter number (when both MSB and LSB received) RPN parameter number LSB CC - Reset NRPN parameter number (when both MSB and LSB received)

1011 nnnn

0010 0100

0111111

Global Parameter Data


The following table shows the Global data sent and received on global parameter dumps, and the corresponding NRPN numbers.
NRPN 384 385 386 387 Range 0 - 24 0 - 100 0 - 16 0-7 Description Master Transpose: 0= -12 semitones (1 octave), 12=0 (no transpose), and 24= +12 semitones. Master Fine Tune: 0 = -50 cents, 50 = 0 (centered), 100 = + 50 cents MIDI Channel: if = 0, data received on all MIDI channels. Otherwise = channel number 1 - 16. Poly Chain* 0 Off 1 Out 1 2 Out 4 3 Out 8 4 Out 12 5 In End 6 InOut4 7 InOut8 MIDI Clock Source* 0 Use Internal clock, dont send MIDI clock 1 Voice 1 is the master clock in Combo mode 2 Use Internal clock, send MIDI clock 3 Use MIDI clock In 4 Use MIDI clock In, and retransmit MIDI clock out Local Control* Off/On Parameter Send*: 0 NRPN 1 CC 2 Off

388

0-4

389 390

0-1 0-2

51

391

0-3

Parameter Receive: 0 All 1 NRPN only 2 CC only 3 Off MIDI Controller Send/Receive Off/On MIDI Sysex Send/Receive Off/On Audio Out: 0 Stereo 1 Mono 2 Quad 3 Q LR34 Balance Tweak*: 0 = -7, 7 = 0, and 13 = 7 Pot Mode: Relative, Passthru, Jump MIDI Out Select*: 0 MIDI Out 1 MIDI Thru Multi Mode Off/On Select layer A (0) or B (1) Select Program mode (0) or Combo mode (1) Select voice 0 All voices 1 Voice 1 2 Voice 2 3 Voice 3 4 Voice 4

394 395 400

0-1 0-1 0-3

403 404 406

0 - 13 0-2 0-1

407 411 412 413

0-1 0-1 0-1 0-4

*Received, but not sent. Sent, but ignored when received.

Program Parameter Data


The following table lists Tetras voice parameters. The parameter number in the program and edit buffer dumps are different than the NRPN numbers as seen; this was to maintain NRPN compatibility with the Prophet 08 as much as possible.
Parm 0 1 2 A 0 1 2 B 200 201 202 Range 0 120 0 100 0-103 Description Oscillator 1 Frequency, 0 120 in semitones (10 octave range) Oscillator 1 Fine Tune; 0 = -50 cents, 50 = 0 (centered), 100 = + 50 cents Oscillator 1 Shape 0 Oscillator Off 1 Sawtooth 2 Triangle 3 Sawtooth/triangle mix 4 103 Pulse Wave, Pulse width 0 99 Oscillator 1 Glide

203

0 - 127

52

4 6 7 8

4 5 6 7

204 205 206 207

0-1 0 120 0 100 0-103

9 10 12 13

8 9 10 11

208 209 210 211

0 - 127 0-1 0-1 0-3

14 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 40 41 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236

0-5 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 164 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0-1 0 - 254 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127

Oscillator 1 Keyboard Off/On Oscillator 2 Frequency, 0 120 in semitones (10 octave range) Oscillator 2 Fine Tune; 0 = -50 cents, 50 = 0 (centered), 100 = + 50 cents Oscillator 2 Shape 0 Oscillator Off 1 Sawtooth 2 Triangle 3 Sawtooth/triangle mix 4 103 Pulse Wave, Pulse width 0 99 Oscillator 2 Glide Oscillator 2 Keyboard Off/On Sync off/on Glide Mode: 0 fixed rate 1 fixed rate auto 2 fixed time 3 fixed time auto Oscillator Slop Oscillator 1 - 2 Mix Noise Level Filter Frequency, steps in semitones Resonance Filter Keyboard Amount Filter Audio Modulation Filter Poles 0: 2-pole; 1: 4-pole Filter Envelope Amount; -127 to +127 Filter Envelope Velocity Amount Filter Envelope Delay Filter Envelope Attack Filter Envelope Decay Filter Envelope Sustain Filter Envelope Release VCA Initial Level Output Spread Voice Volume VCA Envelope Amount VCA Envelope Velocity Amount VCA Envelope Delay VCA Envelope Attack VCA Envelope Decay VCA Envelope Sustain VCA Envelope Release

53

42

37

237

0 - 166

43

38

238

0-4

44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65
54

39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260

0 - 127 0 - 43 0-1 0 - 166 0-4 0 - 127 0 - 43 0-1 0 - 166 0-4 0 - 127 0 - 43 0-1 0 - 166 0-4 0 - 127 0 - 43 0-1 0 - 43 0 - 254 0 - 127 0 - 127

LFO 1 Frequency; 0 150 unsynced frequencies 151 Sequence speed divided by 32 152 Sequence speed divided by 16 153 Sequence speed divided by 8 154 Sequence speed divided by 6 155 Sequence speed divided by 4 156 Sequence speed divided by 3 157 Sequence speed divided by 2 158 Sequence speed divided by 1.5 159 One cycle per step 160 Two cycles per three steps 161 Two cycles per step 162 One cycles per three steps 163 Four cycles per step 164 Six cycles per step 165 Eight cycles per step 166 Sixteen cycles per step LFO 1 Shape 0 Triangle 1 Reverse Sawtooth 2 Sawtooth 3 Pulse (square) 4 Random LFO 1 Amount LFO 1 Mod Destination; See Modulation Destination list below LFO 1 Key Sync Off/On LFO 2 Frequency; same as LFO 1 LFO 2 Shape; same as LFO 1 LFO 2 Amount LFO 2 Mod Destination; See Modulation Destination list below LFO 2 Key Sync Off/On LFO 3 Frequency; same as LFO 1 LFO 3 Shape; same as LFO 1 LFO 3 Amount LFO 3 Mod Destination; See Modulation Destination list below LFO 3 Key Sync Off/On LFO 4 Frequency; same as LFO 1 LFO 4 Shape; same as LFO 1 LFO 4 Amount LFO 4 Mod Destination; See Modulation Destination list below LFO 4 Key Sync Off/On Envelope 3 Mod Destination; See Mod Destination list below Envelope 3 Amount; -127 to +127 Envelope 3 Velocity Amount Envelope 3 Delay

66 67 68 69 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82

61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76

261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276

0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 127 0 - 20 0 - 254 0 - 47 0 - 20 0 - 254 0 - 47 0 - 20 0 - 254 0 - 47 0 - 20 0 - 254 0 - 47

Envelope 3 Attack Envelope 3 Decay Envelope 3 Sustain Envelope 3 Release Mod 1 Source; See Modulation Source list below Mod 1 Amount; -127 to +127 Mod 1 Destination; See Modulation Destination list below Mod 2 Source; See Modulation Source list below Mod 2 Amount; -127 to +127 Mod 2 Destination; See Modulation Destination list below Mod 3 Source; See Modulation Source list below Mod3 Amount; -127 to +127 Mod 3 Destination; See Modulation Destination list below Mod 4 Source; See Modulation Source list below Mod 4 Amount; -127 to +127 Mod 4 Destination; See Modulation Destination list below Sequence 1 Destination; See ModDestination list below Sequence 2 Destination; See ModDestination list below Sequence 3 Destination; See ModDestination list below Sequence 4 Destination; See ModDestination list below Mod Wheel Amount; -127 to +127 Mod Wheel Destination; See ModDestination list below Pressure Amount; -127 to +127 Pressure Destination; See ModDestination list below Breath Amount; -127 to +127 Breath Destination; See ModDestination list below Velocity Amount; -127 to +127 Velocity Destination; See ModDestination list below Foot Control Amount; -127 to +127 Foot Control Destination; See ModDestination list below
55

107 108 109 110

77 78 79 80

277 278 279 280

0 - 47 0 - 47 0 - 47 0 - 47

83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92

81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90

281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290

0 - 254 0 - 47 0 - 254 0 - 47 0 - 254 0 - 47 0 - 254 0 - 47 0 - 254 0 - 47

101 102

91 92

291 292

30 - 250 0 - 12

15 105

93 94

293 294

0 - 12 0-4

94

95

295

0-5

BPM tempo Clock Divide: Half Note Quarter Note Eighth Note Eighth Note half swing Eighth Note full swing Eighth Note triplets Sixteenth Note Sixteenth Note half swing Sixteenth Note full swing Sixteenth Note triplets Thirty-second Notes Thirty-second Notes triplets Sixty-Fourth note triplets Pitch Bend Range Sequencer Trigger: 0 Normal 1 Normal, no reset 2 No gate 3 No gate/no reset 4 key step Key Mode: 0 Low note priority 1 Low note priority with re-trigger 2 High note priority 3 High note priority with re-trigger 4 Last note hit priority 5 Last note hit priority with re-trigger Unison Mode: 0 1 voice 1 All voices 2 All voices detune1 3 All voices detune2 4 All voices detune3 Arpeggiator Mode: 0 Up 1 Down 2 Up/Down, 3 Assign 4 Random 5 2 Octaves Up 6 2 Octaves Down 7 2 Octaves Up/Down 8 2 Octaves Assign 9 2 Octaves Random 10 3 Octaves Up 11 3 Octaves Down 12 3 Octaves Up/Down 13 3 Octaves Assign 14 3 Octaves Random Envelope 3 Repear Mode; off/on Unison; off/on

93

96

296

0-4

103

97

297

0-3

70 95

98 99

298 299

0-1 0-1

56

104 106 111

100 101 105

300 301 X

0-1 0-1 0 - 183

Arpeggiator; off/on Gated Sequencer; off/on Assignable Parameter 1

112
113

106
107

X
X

0 - 183
0 - 183

Assignable Parameter 2
Assignable Parameter 3

114 19
96

108 110
111

X 310
311

0 - 183 0 - 127
0 - 127

Assignable Parameter 4 Feedback Gain


Push It Note: C0 to C10

97
98

112
113

312
313

0 - 127
0-1

Push It Velocity
Push It Mode: Normal, Toggle

5
11

114
115

314
315

0 - 127
0 - 127

Sub Oscillator 1 Level


Sub Oscillator 2 Level

18 117 99 100

116 117 118 119

316 X X X

0 - 127

Feeback Volume Editor Byte

0 - 127 0-2

Split Point; 60 = C3 Keyboard Mode: Normal Stack Split Sequence Track1, steps 1 16 0 to 125: Normal sequence step value 126 Reset 127 Rest Sequence Track 2, steps 1 16 0 to 125: Normal sequence step value 126 Reset Sequence Track 3, steps 1 16 0 to 125: Normal sequence step value 126 Reset Sequence Track 4, steps 1 16 0 to 125: Normal sequence step value 126 Reset Name charaters 1 16, in ASCII format

120

120-135

320-335

0 - 127

136

136-151

336-351

0 - 126

152

152-167

352-367

0 - 126

168

168-183

368-383

0 - 126

184

184-199

32 - 127

57

The following tables list the values used with the program parameters to specify modulation destinations and sources.
Mod Destinations Off Osc 1 Freq Osc 2 Freq Osc 1 and 2 Freq Osc Mix Noise Level Osc 1 Pulse Width Osc 2 Pulse Width Osc 1 and 2 Pulse Width Filter Frequency Resonance Filter Audio Mod Amt VCA Level Pan Spread LFO 1 Freq LFO 2 Freq LFO 3 Freq LFO 4 Freq All LFO Freq LFO 1 Amt LFO 2 Amt LFO 3 Amt LFO 4 Amt All LFO Amt Filter Env Amt Amp Env Amt Env 3 Amt All Env Amounts Env 1 Attack Env 2 Attack Env 3 Attack All Env Attacks Env 1 Decay Env 2 Decay Env 3 Decay All Env Decays Env 1 Release Value 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 Env 2 Release Env 3 Release All Env Releases Mod 1 Amt Mod 2 Amt Mod 3 Amt Mod 4 Amt Feedback Volume Sub Osc 1 Level Sub Osc 2 Level Feedback Gain Slew*
*Sequence 2 and 4 only

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

Mod Sources Off Sequence Track 1 Sequence Track 2 Sequence Track 3 Sequence Track 4 LFO 1 LFO 2 LFO 3 LFO 4 Filter Envelope Amp Envelope Envelope 3 Pitch Bend Mod Wheel Pressure MIDI Breath MIDI Foot MIDI Expression Velocity Note Number Noise

Value 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Combo Parameter Data


Combo Mode has its own set of NRPNs that enable the parameters for each of the combos parts to be addressed on one global MIDI channel. Ranges are the same as for the previously listed program parameters.

58

Note: In Multi Mode, the regular, program NRPNs are received and transmitted for each of the four voices on their separate MIDI channels. Quad NRPNs come from/go to all four voices in a combo.
Parm 0 1 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 40 41 33 Parameter OSC 1 FREQ OSC 1 FREQ FINE OSC 1 SHAPE GLIDE 1 OSC 1 KEY OSC 2 FREQ OSC 2 FREQ FINE OSC 2 SHAPE GLIDE 2 OSC 2 KEY SYNC GLIDE MODE OSC SLOP OSC MIX NOISE LEVEL FILTER FREQ RESONANCE FIL KEY AMT FIL AUDIO MOD FILTER POLES FILTER ENV AMT FIL ENV VEL AMT FIL DEL FIL ATT FIL DEC FIL SUS FIL REL VCA LEVEL OUTPUT PAN PRESET VOLUME VCA ENV AMOUNT 1 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531 532 533 534 535 536 537 538 539 540 541 (A) 542 2 768 769 770 771 772 773 774 775 776 777 778 779 780 781 782 783 784 785 786 787 788 789 790 791 792 793 794 795 796 X 798 3 1024 1025 1026 1027 1028 1029 1030 1031 1032 1033 1034 1035 1036 1037 1038 1039 1040 1041 1042 1043 1044 1045 1046 1047 1048 1049 1050 1051 1052 1053 (B) 1054 4 1280 1281 1282 1283 1284 1285 1286 1287 1288 1289 1290 1291 1292 1293 1294 1295 1296 1297 1298 1299 1300 1301 1302 1303 1304 1305 1306 1307 1308 X 1310 Quad 1536 1537 1538 1539 1540 1541 1542 1543 1544 1545 1546 1547 1548 1549 1550 1551 1552 1553 1554 1555 1556 1557 1558 1559 1560 1561 1562 1563 1564 X 1566

59

34 35 36 37 38 39 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 71 72 73 74 75 76

VCA ENV VEL AMT VCA DEL VCA ATT VCA DEC VCA SUS VCA REL LFO 1 FREQ LFO 1 SHAPE LFO 1 AMT LFO 1 DEST LFO 1 SYNC LFO 2 FREQ LFO 2 SHAPE LFO 2 AMT LFO 2 DEST LFO 2 SYNC LFO 3 FREQ LFO 3 SHAPE LFO 3 AMT LFO 3 DEST LFO 3 SYNC LFO 4 FREQ LFO 4 SHAPE LFO 4 AMT LFO 4 DEST LFO 4 SYNC ENV3 DEST ENV3 AMT ENV 3 VEL AMT ENV 3 DELAY ENV3 ATT ENV3 DEC ENV3 SUS ENV3 REL MOD SOURCE 1 MOD AMT 1 MOD DEST 1 MOD SOURCE 2 MOD AMT 2 MOD DEST 2

543 544 545 546 547 548 549 550 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 563 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 571 572 573 574 575 576 577 578 579 580 581 582

799 800 801 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 810 811 812 813 814 815 816 817 818 819 820 821 822 823 824 825 826 827 828 829 830 831 832 833 834 835 836 837 838

1055 1056 1057 1058 1059 1060 1061 1062 1063 1064 1065 1066 1067 1068 1069 1070 1071 1072 1073 1074 1075 1076 1077 1078 1079 1080 1081 1082 1083 1084 1085 1086 1087 1088 1089 1090 1091 1092 1093 1094

1311 1312 1313 1314 1315 1316 1317 1318 1319 1320 1321 1322 1323 1324 1325 1326 1327 1328 1329 1330 1331 1332 1333 1334 1335 1336 1337 1338 1339 1340 1341 1342 1343 1344 1345 1346 1347 1348 1349 1350

1567 1568 1569 1570 1571 1572 1573 1574 1575 1576 1577 1578 1579 1580 1581 1582 1583 1584 1585 1586 1587 1588 1589 1590 1591 1592 1593 1594 1595 1596 1597 1598 1599 1600 1601 1602 1603 1604 1605 1606

60

77 78 79 80 81 82 107 108 109 110 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 101 102 15 105 93 94 97 70 95 104 106 111 112 113

MOD SOURCE 3 MOD AMT 3 MOD DEST 3 MOD SOURCE 4 MOD AMT 4 MOD DEST 4 SEQ 1 DEST SEQ 2 DEST SEQ 3 DEST SEQ 4 DEST MOD WHEEL AMT MOD WHEEL DEST PRESSURE AMT PRESSURE DEST BREATH AMT BREATH DEST VELOCITY AMT VELOCITY DEST FOOT AMT FOOT DEST TEMPO TIME SIG PBEND RANGE SEQ TRIGGER UNISON MODE UNISON ASSIGN ARP MODE REPEAT MODE UNISON ON OFF ARP ON OFF SEQ ON OFF PARAM ENC SEL V1 PARAM ENC SEL V2 PARAM ENC SEL V3

583 584 585 586 587 588 589 590 591 592 593 594 595 596 597 598 599 600 601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 617 618 619

839 840 841 842 843 844 845 846 847 848 849 850 851 852 853 854 855 856 857 858 859 860 861 862 X 864 X 866 867 X 869 X X X

1095 1096 1097 1098 1099 1100 1101 1102 1103 1104 1105 1106 1107 1108 1109 1110 1111 1112 1113 1114 1115 1116 1117 1118 X 1120 X 1122 1123 X 1125 X X X

1351 1352 1353 1354 1355 1356 1357 1358 1359 1360 1361 1362 1363 1364 1365 1366 1367 1368 1369 1370 1371 1372 1373 1374 X 1376 X 1378 1379 X 1381 X X X

1607 1608 1609 1610 1611 1612 1613 1614 1615 1616 1617 1618 1619 1620 1621 1622 1623 1624 1625 1626 1627 1628 1629 1630 X 1632 X 1634 1635 X 1637 X X X

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114

PARAM ENC SEL V4 FEEDBACK GAIN PUSH IT NOTE PUSH IT VELOCITY PUSH IT MODE SUB OSC 1 VOL SUB OSC 2 VOL FEEDBACK VOL EDITOR BYTE SEQ 1 SEQ 2

620

19 96 97 98 5 11 18 117 120 136

622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 632 647 648 663 664 679 680 695 696 712

878 879 880 881 882 883 884

1134 1135 1136 1137 1138 1139 1140

1390 1391 1392 1393 1394 1395 1396

1646 1647 1648 1649 1650 1651 1652

888 903 904 919 920 935 936 951 X

1144 1159 1160 1175 1176 1191 1192 1207 X

1400 1415 1416 1431 1432 1447 1448 1463 X

1656 1671 1672 1687 1688 1703 1704 1719 X

152 168

SEQ 3 SEQ 4

COMBO NAME

Sysex Messages
Universal System Exclusive Message (Device Inquiry) Status 1111 0000 0111 1110 0vvv vvvv 0000 0110 0000 0001 1111 0111 Description System Exclusive (SysEx) Non-realtime message If MIDI channel is set to 1-16, 0vvvvvvv must match (unless MIDI Channel = ALL); always responds if 0vvvvvvv = 0111 1111. Inquiry Message Inquiry Request End of Exclusive (EOX)

Tetra responds with:


Status 1111 0000 0111 1110 Description System Exclusive (SysEx) Non-realtime message

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0vvv vvvv 0000 0110 0000 0010 0000 0001 0010 0110 0000 0001 0000 0000 0000 0000 0jjj nnnn 0000 0000 0000 0000 1111 0111

If MIDI Channel = ALL, 0vvvvvvv = 0111 1111. Otherwise 0vvvvvvv = Channel Number 0-15. Inquiry Message Inquiry Reply DSI ID Tetra ID (Family LS) Family MS Family Member LS Family Member MS Main Software version: jjj Minor rev; nnnn Major rev Zero Byte Zero Byte End of Exclusive (EOX)

Request Program Dump

Status 1111 0000


0000 0001

Description System Exclusive (SysEx)


DSI ID

0010 0110 0000 0101 0000 00vv 0vvv vvvv 1111 0111

Tetra ID Request Program Transmit Bank Number, 0 1 Program Number, 0 127 End of Exclusive (EOX)

Tetra will respond by sending out the Program Data in the format described below in Program Data Dump.
Request Program Edit Buffer Dump

Status 1111 0000 0000 0001 0010 0110 0000 0110 1111 0111

Description System Exclusive (SysEx) DSI ID Tetra ID Request Program Edit Buffer Transmit End of Exclusive (EOX)

Tetra will respond by sending out the current Program edit buffer in the format described below in Program Edit Buffer Data Dump.

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Request Global Parameter Dump

Status 1111 0000 0000 0001 0010 0110 0000 1110 1111 0111

Description System Exclusive (SysEx) DSI ID Tetra ID Request Global Parameter Transmit End of Exclusive (EOX)

Tetra will respond by sending out the current values of Global Parameters in the format described below in Global Parameters Data Dump.
Request Combo Dump

Status 1111 0000


0000 0001

Description System Exclusive (SysEx)


DSI ID

0010 0110 0010 0001 0vvv vvvv 1111 0111

Tetra ID Request Combo Transmit Combo Number, 0 - 127 End of Exclusive (EOX)

Tetra will respond by sending out the Combo Data in the format described below in Combo Data Dump.
Request Combo Edit Buffer Dump

Status 1111 0000


0000 0001

Description System Exclusive (SysEx)


DSI ID

0010 0110 0011 1000 1111 0111

Tetra ID Request Combo Edit Buffer Transmit End of Exclusive (EOX)

Tetra will respond by sending out the Combo Data in the format described below in Combo Edit Buffer Data Dump.

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Program Data Dump

Status 1111 0000 0000 0001 0010 0110 0000 0010 0000 00vv 0vvv vvvv 0vvv vvvv 1111 0111

Description System Exclusive (SysEx) DSI ID Tetra ID Program Data Bank Number, 0 - 3 Program Number, 0 - 127 384 bytes expanded to 446 MIDI bytes in packed MS bit format (see page 66.) End of Exclusive (EOX)

Program Edit Buffer Data Dump

Status 1111 0000 0000 0001 0010 0110 0000 0011 0vvv vvvv 1111 0111

Description System Exclusive (SysEx) DSI ID Tetra ID Edit Buffer Data 384 bytes expanded to 446 MIDI bytes in packed MS bit format (see page 66.) End of Exclusive (EOX)

Combo Data Dump

Status 1111 0000 0000 0001 0010 0110 0010 0010 0vvv vvvv 0vvv vvvv 1111 0111

Description System Exclusive (SysEx) DSI ID Tetra ID Combo Data Combo Number, 0 - 127 1024 bytes expanded to 1177 MIDI bytes in packed MS bit format (see page 66.) End of Exclusive (EOX)

65

Combo Edit Buffer Data Dump

Status 1111 0000 0000 0001 0010 0110 0011 0111 0vvv vvvv 1111 0111

Description System Exclusive (SysEx) DSI ID Tetra ID Edit Buffer Data 1024 bytes expanded to 1177 MIDI bytes in packed MS bit format (see page 66.) End of Exclusive (EOX)

Global Parameters Data Dump

Status 1111 0000 0000 0001 0010 0110 0000 1111 0vvv vvvv 1111 0111

Description System Exclusive (SysEx) DSI ID Tetra ID Main Parameter Data 20 nibbles (LS then MS) for 10 Global parameters. Global Parameters are listed starting on page 51. End of Exclusive (EOX)

Note: The Global Parameters Data Dump is not recognized when received; it is only transmitted when requested. NRPN messages are used to change Globals.
Mode Change: Program Mode

Status 1111 0000 0000 0001 0010 0110 0011 0000 1111 0111

Description System Exclusive (SysEx) DSI ID Tetra ID Select Program Mode End of Exclusive (EOX)

66

Mode Change: Combo Mode

Status 1111 0000 0000 0001 0010 0110 0011 0001 1111 0111

Description System Exclusive (SysEx) DSI ID Tetra ID Select Combo Mode End of Exclusive (EOX)

Packed Data Format


Data is packed in 8 byte packets, with the MS bit stripped from 7 parameter bytes, and packed into an eighth byte, which is sent at the start of the 8 byte packet.
Example: Input Data 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A7 B7 C7 D7 E7 F7 G7 A6 B6 C6 D6 E6 F6 G6 A5 B5 C5 D5 E5 F5 G5 A4 B4 C4 D4 E4 F4 G4 A3 B3 C3 D3 E3 F3 G3 A2 B2 C2 D2 E2 F2 G2 A1 B1 C1 D1 E1 F1 G1 A0 B0 C0 D0 E0 F0 G0 Packed MIDI data 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 G7 A6 B6 C6 D6 E6 F6 G6 F7 A5 B5 C5 D5 E5 F5 G5 E7 A4 B4 C4 D4 E4 F4 G4 D7 A3 B3 C3 D3 E3 F3 G3 C7 A2 B2 C2 D2 E2 F2 G2 B7 A1 B1 C1 D1 E1 F1 G1 A7 A0 B0 C0 D0 E0 F0 G0

This explains why it takes 293 MIDI bytes to transmit 256 Program data bytes.

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Hidden Functions
Hold the ASSIGN PARAMETERS switch and hit the Mode switch to calibrate the low-pass filter and analog oscillator waveshapes. This should not be necessary for normal operation.

68

Dave Smith Instruments 1210 Cabrillo Hwy N Half Moon Bay, CA 94019-1449 USA www.DaveSmithInstruments.com