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S T AT E O F C AL I F O R N I A AR N O L D S C H W AR Z E N E G G E R , G O V E R N O R

S T AT E AN D C O N S UM E R S E R V I C E S AG E N C Y D E P AR T M E N T O F G E N E R AL S E R V I C E S

INTERPRETATION REGULATIONS
The DSA IR Manual
Acceptable methods of achieving compliance with applicable building codes and regulations for projects under the jurisdiction of DSA.

OF

Revised 10-07-10

DSA Interpretation of Regulations (IR) Manual


DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual
Introduction
Welcome to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) Interpretation of Regulations (IR) Manual. These interpretations have been developed over many years and were first assembled under one cover in 1984. Additions, deletions and changes are made as necessary to update the interpretations to the latest edition of the California Code of Regulations, Title 24, also referred to as the California Building Standards Code. The IR Manual was created for use by DSA as a documentation of acceptable methods for achieving compliance with applicable building codes and regulations. Its purpose is to promote more uniform statewide criteria in plan review and monitoring of construction of public school, community college and essential services building projects. Other methods proposed by design professionals to solve a particular issue may be considered by DSA and reviewed for code and regulation compliance. These interpretations are neither regulations nor law. The text and drawings in this manual are not appropriate for verbatim inclusion in project specifications. The design professional in responsible charge is responsible for specifying and detailing specific requirements for each project. Please note that the IR Manual can be accessed on the Publications page of the DSA web site at: www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov Should you have any questions about the IR Manual, or wish to offer comments toward improving this publication, please address your questions or comments to: DSAUSP@dgs.ca.gov If you have questions regarding the application of an IR to a specific project, please direct those questions directly to your DSA Regional Office. Four Regional Offices are located to serve California based on the county in which a project is located. To find out which office serves your location, go to: http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/contact

The DSA Regional Offices can be contacted as follows:

Los Angeles Basin Regional Office 700 North Alameda St., Suite 5-500 Los Angeles, CA 90012 Tel. (213) 897-3995 Fax (213) 897-3159 or (213) 897-0726 Oakland Regional Office 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1201 Oakland, CA 94612 Tel. (510) 622-3101 Fax (510) 622-3140

San Diego Regional Office 10920 Via Frontera, Suite 300 San Diego, CA 92127 Tel. (858) 674-5400 Fax (858) 674-5471 Sacramento Regional Office 1102 Q Street, Suite 5200 Sacramento, CA 95811-6550 Tel. (916) 445-8730 Fax (916) 323-5589

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Organization of the IR Manual


This manual is organized so IRs can be located by reference to their location in the California Code of Regulations, Title 24, also referred to as the California Building Standards Code. Title 24 is issued in twelve volumes, called Parts. DSA IR numbers have a letter prefix to designate the correct Part in Title 24. All IRs carry this prefix letter, except those from Part 2, the California Building Code (CBC). Since Part 2 IRs are so numerous, Part 2 IR numbers contain their Part 2 chapter number instead of a prefix letter. No prefix letters have been assigned at this time for Parts 7, 8, 10, 11 and 12. The following list should serve as an aid to understanding this organization:

Title 24
Code Part# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Prefix Title letter California Buildings Standards Administrative Code (CAC) .............. A California Building Code (CBC) ................................................... -California Electrical Code (CEC)................................................... E California Mechanical Code (CMC)................................................ M California Plumbing Code (CPC)................................................... P California Energy Code .............................................................. N Elevator Operation Code ............................................................-Historical .................................................................................-Fire......................................................................................... F Conservation............................................................................ -(reserved) ............................................................................... -Reference ................................................................................ --

IRs that have been revised since August of 2002 may include marginal markings. Solid vertical lines in the margins within the body of the IR indicate a change from the previously published IR, except where a change was minor or editorial. An arrow is provided in the margin to indicate that a deletion has been made from the previously published version. As IRs are added, deleted or revised, the changes will be reflected in the on-line version of the IR -Manual. This publication is available for download or printing (in whole or in part) as Adobe PDF format files on the Publications page of the DSA web site at www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov. When referencing IRs, the user can ensure he or she is using the latest version by checking the on-line IR Manual.

Change of California Building Code


On January 1, 2008, the 2007 CBC took effect for projects under the jurisdiction of DSA. This new edition of the California Building Code is based on a new model code: the 2006 IBC. This means the new code is significantly different from the 2001 CBC. Most California amendments have moved to new locations in the new code. All projects submitted to DSA after January 1, 2008 will be governed by the 2007 CBC. As a result of these changes, some IRs may become unnecessary if their provisions are part of a new model code or have been incorporated into new California amendments. Other IRs may be modified and still others may remain unaffected. Changes have been made to the Table of Contents page to more easily indicate which IRs are applicable to which CBC version and to facilitate navigation. Applicability of IRs to projects submitted under the 2001 CBC or the 2007 CBC is indicated in the last 2 columns. N/A indicates that the IR is not applicable to projects submitted to DSA under that edition of the California Building Code.

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DSA IR Manual - Table of Contents


# Title (previous/ supersedes) issued/ revised

Updated 10-07-10

2001 CBC

2007 CBC

Part 1 - ADMINISTRATIVE A-1 Temporary Approval for School Use of HCD Commercial Coaches A-2 A-3 A-4 A-5 A-6 A-7 A-8 A-9

(PL 97-10) 09-06-07 (r)


09-01-99 11-03-08 (r) 06-25-10 (r) 06-02-08 (r) 11-16-09 (r) 09-18-07 (r)

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Certificate of Compliance without Receipt of All Documents Construction Management Procedures for Public School Projects Geological Hazard Report Requirements Acceptance of Products, Materials, and Evaluation Reports Change Order and Field Change Approval Process Project Inspector Certification and Approval School Site Improvements for School Building Projects

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Project Inspector and Assistant Inspector Duties and Performance 10-07-10 (r)
04-27-10 (r) 07-02-09 (r) 03-11-08 (r) 02-27-09 (r) 04-05-07 08-28-07

A-10 Reconstruction and Alteration Projects Exemption from DSA Approval A-11 Incremental Submittals A-12 Assistant Inspector Approval A-13 Stop Work and Order to Comply A-14 Walk-In Freezers and Cold Storage Boxes A-15 Testing and Inspection of Remotely Fabricated Structural Elements A-16 Charter School Enforcement Jurisdiction A-17 Voidance of Applications and Project Re-Submittal A-18 Use of Construction Documents Prepared by Other Professionals A-19 Design Professionals Signature and Seal (Stamp) on Construction Documents A-20 New Projects Associated with Existing Uncertified Projects A-22 Small Projects Exempt from DSA Review A-23 Construction Cost Reporting and DSA Fees A-24 Construction Phase Duties of School District, Contractor, and Designer A-25 Design, Installation and Maintenance of Automatic Fire Sprinkler Systems (AFSS) A-26 Occupancy Classifications and Occupant Load Factors A-27 Cargo Containers Used as Storage A-28 Fire Alarm System Changes in Existing Buildings Part 2, Chapter 3 - USE OR OCCUPANCY 3-1 Storage Room Occupancy Separation Part 2, Chapter 9 FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS 9-1 Automatic Fire Suppression System Coverage in Concealed Interstitial Spaces (CR A-1) (PL 94-19)

03-17-10 (r) 11-01-07 02-01-08 04-27-10 (r) 04-07-08 (r) 08-06-09 (r)

A-21 Design, Installation and Maintenance of Fire Alarm (F/A) Systems 08-21-09 (r)
08-15-08 11-03-08 11-03-08 05-26-09

Removed 8-25-09 pending review and revision 04-19-10 (r) 04-27-10

X X X X

X X N/A X

09-23-10 (r)

10-15-07

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DSA IR Manual - Table of Contents


# Title (previous/ supersedes) issued/ revised

Updated 10-07-10

2001 CBC

2007 CBC

Part 2, Chapter 10 MEANS OF EGRESS 10-1 Illumination Required for Means of Egress Part 2, Chapter 11B - ACCESS 11B-1 Visual Alarms in Classrooms 11B-2 Beveled Lip at Curb Ramps 11B-3 Detectable Warnings at Curb Ramps 11B-4 Detectable Warnings 11B-5 Effort to Operate Exterior Doors 11B-6 Mechanical Only Projects Exempt From Accessibility Review 11B-7 Requirements for Accessible Parking Spaces 11B-8 Use of Predetermined Construction Tolerance Guidelines for Accessibility Part 2, Chapter 15 - ROOFING AND ROOF STRUCTURES 15-1 Attachment of Clay or Concrete S Roof Tile 15-2 Clay and Concrete Roof Tile Materials and Application Part 2, Chapter 16 - STRUCTURAL DESIGN 16-1 Conditional Certification for Relocatable School Buildings 16-2 Computer or Office Access Floors 16-3 Earth Retaining Systems 16-4 Wind Load Design for One Story Relocatable School Buildings (Less than 2000 Square Feet in Floor Area) 16-5 Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers 16-6 Composite Base for HVAC Units 16-7 Wind Load Determination - Alternate Method 16-8 Solar Photovoltaic and Thermal Systems Acceptance Requirements 16-9 Pendant Mounted Light Fixtures 16-10 Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2007 CBC (CR 16-1)

09-23-10 (r)

X X X X X X X N/A N/A N/A X X X

11-01-07 (r) 11-01-07 (r) 11-01-07 (r) 11-01-07 (r)

Formally Deleted 04-01-10 02-04-08 08-01-09 (r) 11-19-09

N/A X

10-15-07 (r) 09-23-10 (r)

X X X X X X X X

X X X N/A X N/A N/A X

04-15-08 (r) 09-23-10 (r) 09-18-07 (r) 09-23-10 (r) 09-23-10 (r) 09-23-10 (r) 12-18-07 06-25-10 (r) 06-22-09 08-06-09

N/A X N/A X X X

N/A X

Part 2, Chapter 17 STRUCTURAL TESTS AND SPECIAL INSPECTIONS 17-1 Sampling and Testing of Structural Materials (CR 17-1) 10-15-07 (r) 17-2 Nondestructive Testing (NDT) of Welds 17-3 Structural Welding Inspection 17-4 Basics of Structural Tests and Special Inspections 17-5 Structural Testing Laboratory Responsibilities 17-6 Structural Special Inspector Duties and Responsibilities 17-7 Soil and Foundation Testing (CR 17-2) (CR 17-3)
10-15-07 (r) 04-07-08 (r) 11-03-08 11-03-08 11-03-08 11-03-08

X X X

X X N/A

N/A X N/A X N/A X N/A X

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DSA IR Manual - Table of Contents


# Title (previous/ supersedes) issued/ revised

Updated 10-07-10

2001 CBC

2007 CBC

Part 2, Chapter 19 - CONCRETE 19-1 Post Installed Anchors in Concrete 19-2 Requirements for Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete (GFRC) Panels 19-3 Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans Used in Concrete Part 2, Chapter 21 - MASONRY 21-1 Masonry Walls Non Structural 21-2 Concrete Masonry High Lift Grouting Method 21-3 Clay Brick Masonry High Lift Grouting Method 21-4 Concrete Masonry Units Standards Part 2, Chapter 22 - STEEL 22-1 Design Procedure for Steel Deck Diaphragms with Structural Concrete Fill 22-2 Anchor Bolts Connecting Steel to Concrete 22-3 Open Web Steel Joists and Joist Girders Part 2, Chapter 23 - WOOD 23-1 Pre-fabricated Wood Construction Connectors 23-2 Wood Diaphragms 23-3 Concrete Curbs in Wood Frame Buildings 23-4 Light Metal Plate Connected Wood Trusses 23-5 Bolts Used in Wood Construction 23-6 Wood Structural Panels Marking for Plywood and Oriented Strand Board (OSB) 23-7 Minimum Fastener Penetration in Framing Wood Diaphragms 23-8 Manufactured Wood-Chord-Metal-Web Trusses 23-9 Prefabricated Wood I-Joist 23-10 Structural (Certified) Glued Lumber (AC 23-1) (CR 23-1) (CR 23-2) (CR 23-3) (CR 22-1) (CR 21-1)

03-06-06 (r) 09-01-99 06-10-08

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

09-18-07 (r) 12-17-09 (r) 09-01-99 11-01-07 (r)

01-02-08 (r) 11-01-07 (r) 07-15-08

N/A X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X N/A X X N/A X N/A X X N/A X X N/A X X N/A

03-17-10 (r) 11-01-07 (r) 10-03-07 (r) 11-01-07 (r) 10-15-07 (r) 08-25-09 (r) 11-01-07 (r) 12-17-09 08-25-09 (r) 08-15-08

N/A X

23-11 Wood Structural Panels Oriented Strand Board (OSB)(AC 23-2) 12-17-09 (r) Part 2, Chapter 24 - GLASS AND GLAZING 24-1 Glass Panel Railings Part 2, Chapter 25 - GYPSUM BOARD AND PLASTER 25-1 Maximum Allowable Load for 10 Gage & 12 Gage Wires 25-2 Metal Suspension Systems for Lay-In Panel Ceilings 25-4 Self-Furring Lath 25-5 Metal Suspension Systems for Lay-In Panel Ceilings (CR 25-1)

03-17-10 (r)

09-23-10 (r) 07-21-05 (r)

25-3 Drywall Ceiling Suspension Conventional Construction: One Layer 07-21-05 (r)
01-02-08 (r) 06-22-09

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DSA IR Manual - Table of Contents


# Title (previous/ supersedes) issued/ revised

Updated 10-07-10

2001 CBC

2007 CBC

Part 2, Chapter 30 ELEVATORS AND CONVEYING SYSTEMS 30-1 Title 24 Elevators: Building Materials and Systems Part 3 - ELECTRICAL E-1 Grounding of Relocatable Buildings E-2 E-3 Ground Fault Circuit-Interrupter Reliable Power Supply for Electrical Fire Pumps (AC M-1)

08-25-09

X X X X X

X X X X X

10-03-07 (r) 09-23-10 (r) 04-27-10

Part 5 - PLUMBING P-1 Nonwater-Supplied Urinal Fixtures Part 6 - ENERGY N-1 Pre-Check (PC) Designs Energy Compliance Review

06-02-08 (r)

06-14-10 (r)

N/A X

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California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

TEMPORARY APPROVAL FOR SCHOOL USE OF HCD COMMERCIAL COACHES


References: California Building Code, Title 24, Pt.1, Sections 4-302B, 4-321 California Education Code, Sections 17280-17317, 81130-81149 California Government Code, Sections 4450-4461 Discipline: ALL

IR A-1
Issued 09-06-2007 EFFECTIVE: 10-01-07 Supersedes DSA Policy 97-10

This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose:

This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) was originally issued in 1997 as DSA Policy #97-10. The purpose of this IR is to provide a means for obtaining a temporary approval for the installation of Department of Housing & Community Development (HCD) commercial coaches as buildings on public school campuses. Temporary approval is valid for a maximum period of two years from the date of installation. If an unanticipated school use need for the building(s) exceeds two years, DSA shall be notified and may extend the temporary approval for one additional year. This IR provides for temporary approval to use HCD commercial coaches without DSA review and approval of the structural system of the HCD building itself. This revision eliminates the self certification features of the previous procedure.

when fully conforming relocatable buildings are not practical or available. In accordance with Section 4-302(b), Part 1, Title 24, California Code of Regulations, this DSA IR provides an expedited process for school districts to use for Division of the State Architect (DSA) approval of small relocatable buildings.

Background: HCD commercial coaches may be used as a building construction alternative

The school district is highly encouraged to contact DSA immediately if there is intent to install temporary buildings using this expedited process.

Emergency Use: In case of emergencies, including but not limited to damage to school

buildings as from earthquakes, fires and floods, or for health and safety issues such as mold or other contamination, or from unanticipated increase in students wherein educational facilities are immediately needed for displaced or unhoused pupils, the procedure detailed in this IR permits placement of the HCD temporary use building in advance of securing DSA temporary approval. This emergency use procedure may also be used for emergency installation of DSA Pre-Checked relocatable buildings. DSA must be notified immediately after the emergency of the districts intent to use this emergency use IR. Within 14 days following the installation of these emergency temporary use buildings, the school district will notify DSA of the extent of the damage to their permanent school
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DSA IR A-1 (iss 09-06-07) EFFECTIVE 10-01-07

Temporary Approval for School Use of HCD Commercial Coaches

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buildings and the number of temporary buildings installed to house displaced students. Within 60 days following installation of these emergency temporary use buildings, the design professional representing the school district shall provide DSA with a complete submittal package as described in this procedure.

Use During Modernization Projects: School use of HCD temporary approved

buildings during modernization projects would require DSA review and approval and receipt of a temporary approval per this procedure prior to placement. The emergency use procedures of this IR may be used when, during the modernization project, there is an unanticipated immediate need for a building for displaced or unhoused students.

Submittal: The school district shall provide the following to the Division of the State
Architect (DSA) Regional Office serving its area:

1. DSA-1 Application for Temporary Approval of Plans and Specifications: Fill in completely form DSA-1. To describe the project - on line 5 of form
DSA-1 write temporary approval for school use of __ HCD commercial coaches. For example line 5 would read Construction of: temporary approval for school use of 2 HCD commercial coaches if two buildings are being installed.

2. Fee: The school district will submit fees with the initial application per Fee Schedule II, Section 4-321, Part 1, Title 24 and per Section 5-104, Part 1, Title 24 for access compliance review. For purposes of calculating the fee, the construction cost should be based on the cost of any site work, improvements to the building and/or repairs and the costs for moving the building. 3. Letter: A letter from the school district (Superintendent) acknowledging that these buildings are only for temporary use and are limited to use for 24 months from the date of installation. 4.
following:

Plans, Specifications and Calculations: shall be provided, including the


Note: Plans, specifications and calculations for the HCD building are not required if the HCD building is certified per Section 5 and a letter is provided, from the architect/engineer in responsible charge, stating that the building has not had alterations, or suffered deterioration, that affect access compliance, structural safety or fire/life safety code regulated elements. For example; addition of wall supported casework is an alteration to the building. If altered, complete plans, specifications and calculations, as needed for the altered portion of the building, shall be submitted for review and approval. Maintenance work does not need to be included in the submittal. See the definition of maintenance in Section 4-314, Part 1 of Title 24, California Code of Regulations.

4.1

Cover Sheet of Plans: Add a note stating that these buildings are only for temporary use and are limited to use for 24 months from the date of installation.

4.2 Structural Safety (SS): Submitted plans, specifications and calculations shall indicate the following: 4.2.1 Floor Area: The building is one story and has a floor area of no more than 2,160 square feet. The floor area shall be shown on the drawings. A drawing showing the footprint of the building, except as noted in this IR, is generally adequate for the HCD building.

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Temporary Approval for School Use of HCD Commercial Coaches

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4.2.2

Foundation System: Complete plans specifications and calculations for the anchorage and bracing of the building in accordance with the current California Building Code (CBC) through December 31, 2007; after this date foundation designs shall be in accordance with the 2007 CBC. Foundation system plans could receive DSA pre-check (PC) approval (see DSA Policy 07-01), and be submitted over-the-counter (OTC), with DSA Regional Office coordination. Some foundation systems may require soils reports and/or soil testing and anchorage system testing. For first time foundation system submittals, presubmittal coordination with the local regional office is highly encouraged. Non Structural Elements: Plans and specifications shall detail the anchorage of all overhead non-structural elements, labeled as existing or new, as appropriate. Access Compliance (AC): The construction must comply with all Access Compliance regulations. No alternatives are available. A complete submittal shall include but is not limited to the following; For exterior construction: Complete plans and specifications of the disabled access features of the site placement for the HCD building, including: An accessible pedestrian route from the main entrance of the site to each commercial coach and linking accessibility elements. A code compliant ramp to the front door of the building; At least one hi-lo drinking fountain centrally located. At least one set of accessible separate sex toilet facilities centrally located and available for use. Van-accessible parking.

4.2.3 4.3

4.3.1

4.3.2

For interior construction: Code required accessibility features for the HCD building itself shall be provided. For example: Accessible lever door hardware and threshold provided at the entrance door of each commercial coach with allowable closer pressure. Toilets, or any other code regulated accessibility features inside the HCD building, must be fully detailed on the plans.

4.4

Fire and Life Safety (FLS): Complete and accurate plans, specifications and calculations shall be submitted as follows: A site plan must be submitted with the stamp and signature of the local fire authority indicating approval of the placement of the buildings, the fire apparatus access road and access gates and water flow and hydrants. Separation distances, and designated safe dispersal area or areas conform to Fire and Life Safety code requirements. The path or paths of egress to the public way or to the safe dispersal area(s) has/have been identified and shown on the site plans, and all gates in the path(s) of egress have been identified and equipped with panic hardware. Safe dispersal area(s) has/have been located, size and occupant loads identified, and the dimensions from buildings clearly indicated (minimum 50) on the site plan.

4.4.1

4.4.2

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4.4.3

Provide an evacuation fire alarm system consisting, as a minimum, of an approved manual pull-station and audible device(s) (with a minimum decibel rating of 95 at 10 feet) powered by the buildings electrical system (backup battery power) and building units more than twenty (20) feet apart are provided with additional audible devices to ensure fire alarm can be heard within adjacent buildings. Units more than 20 feet from other buildings, including other temporary buildings, with a stand alone fire alarm system must be provided with two-way communication with the main administration offices via an intercom system, permanently mounted telephone or walkie-talkie devises or other similar systems. Buildings that are less than twenty (20) feet from existing permanent buildings on the site shall be interconnected with the fire alarm system of the campus. Each HCD building must be equipped with at least one minimum rated 2A:10B: C fire extinguisher, mounted at 48 inches to the handle above the finished floor, near the main exist(s) and within 75 foot travel distance from any point within the building. (Note: Travel distance shall not include paths through normally locked doors.)

4.4.4

4.4.5

documents. The documents will be returned to the design professional noted on the application to respond to comments. The design professional shall contact DSA to schedule a backcheck appointment. Once all the comments have been addressed, DSA will initial and date the DSA stamp on the drawings and provide a letter by e-mail approving the design of the project for temporary two year use. In some circumstances the over-the-counter (OTC) process may be used (See Section 4.3.2 of this policy).

5.

DSA Approval of Plan and specifications: DSA will review the submitted

6. HCD Building Certification: Certification must be provided by a design professional licensed to practice in California and countersigned by the school district that each commercial coach to be utilized was built after Dec. 19, 1979. In lieu of the proceeding sentence, the owner of the HCD building may provide the school district with a letter that provides the HCD insignia numbers, serial numbers and dates of manufacture for each building. A copy of the letter will be submitted to DSA. The certification or letter must also indicate the design live load, snow load, and the wind load for the building. 7. Inspection Requirements: A DSA certified inspector must perform the required inspection and complete and sign a verified report (Form DSA-6) which indicates the serial numbers, insignia numbers, roof load, floor load, and wind load as shown on the building tag.
The inspector must make specific statements on the final verified report indicating that: Proper installation of the approved foundation system has been done per approved drawings. Anchorage of the nonstructural elements has been done per the approved drawings; Installation and testing of the approved fire alarm system, for each building has been done, Sound levels of fire alarm audible appliances have been measured at 15 dBA above ambient noise level.

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All Access Compliance provisions for the project on the final approved drawings and specifications have been completed. Any changes to the approved plans need DSA approval. If any deterioration of or damage to the HCD building is discovered that affect access compliance, structural safety, or fire/life safety code regulated elements, DSA and the design professional shall be notified immediately and the design professional will provide DSA with plans and calculations as needed for those portions of the building for DSA review and approval. Maintenance and/or repairs that are replacement to match original construction does not require a submittal to DSA. For a definition of maintenance see Section 4-314, Part 1 of Title 24, California Code of Regulations.

8.

DSA Certification of Construction: Upon receipt and acceptance by DSA of the inspectors final verified report and any other required documents, DSA will issue a temporary certification of compliance in accordance with Section 4-339, Part 1, Title 24, California Code of Regulations. Temporary buildings or structures shall be completely removed upon the expiration of the time limit stated in the temporary certification letter.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE WITHOUT RECEIPT OF ALL DOCUMENTS


Reference: California Administrative Code, Section 4-339 Education Code, Section 17315/81147

IR A-2
Issued 9-1-99 Supercedes IR 5-1 (3/90)

This interpretation is intended for use by the plan review and field engineers of DSA to indicate an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations. Its purpose is to promote more uniform statewide criteria for use in plan review and supervision of construction of public schools, community colleges and essential services buildings. Other methods proposed by design professionals to solve a particular problem may be considered by DSA and reviewed for code and regulation compliance.

Purpose: The purpose of this IR is to provide a procedure whereby a certificate of compliance may be issued when it is deemed impossible to collect all the required documents. This procedure may not be initiated until all efforts to obtain the required documents have failed. 1. Procedure. When all efforts to collect the required documents have failed, the school district may request in writing to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) that the provisions of Sections 17315 and 81147 of the Education Code be implemented. The request should include an explanation of how the district attempted to obtain the documents, and why the efforts were not successful. DSA reserves the right to insist upon further efforts by the district before initiating this procedure if, in the opinion of DSA, such efforts would be productive. 2. DSA Review. The architect or structural engineer will review the project with DSA. The architect or structural engineer will propose a method for satisfying the requirements for certification. The proposed method may consider, but is not limited to, the following items: 1. 2. 3. 4. Exposure of portions of the construction for inspection of concealed spaces. Re-inspection of portions of exposed work. Performance testing of materials and/or major components or assemblies. Reassignment of delegated responsibilities for field observation or inspection to other individuals who have personal knowledge of the construction within their area of responsibility.

3. Costs. The school district, at its own expense, will proceed with the examinations, tests, and/or inspections deemed necessary. The additional reports and documents will be submitted to DSA. All costs incurred by DSA in implementing this procedure will be billed to the district and will include time spent by DSA personnel. Payment must be received from the school district before DSA will issue a certificate of compliance for the project. 4. Correction of Deficiencies. Any deficiencies discovered or exposed during re-inspection or re-testing will be corrected at the direction of the school districts architect and/or structural engineer. The school district will be responsible for having this work done and completed in a timely manner. The correction work will be subject to the requirements of Title 24. 5. Certification of Compliance. The DSA Field Engineer will review the results of the examinations, tests and/or inspections. The Field Engineer will assemble all submitted documents and determine their acceptability for conformance with statutes and regulations governing public school construction. The Field Engineer will make a recommendation and the entire package will then be reviewed by the Regional Manager. A letter of certification written by the Regional Manager will indicate the basis for which it is issued.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL PROJECTS


Reference: Education Code Sections 17280-17311 and 81130-81147

IR A-3
Revised 11-03-08 Issued 9-1-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Publications/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this IR is to ensure that the construction management procedures comply with the requirements of the Education Code and the Division of the State Architect (DSA) regulations. Reference IR A-24 for further interpretations on the construction phase responsibilities of the school district, designers, and construction contractors. Also, Reference IR A-8 for further interpretations of the project inspectors responsibilities. Finally, reference IR A-23 for interpretations of construction cost reporting and final DSA fee computations. 1. GENERAL: The statutes and regulations contemplate the construction of a building by a general contractor who would either perform the construction work in its entirety, or employ one or more subcontractors under his/her responsible supervision to perform specified portions of the work. The general contractor attests to the compliance of the work of construction with the approved plans and specifications for the project as required by the statute.
The construction manager should not interfere with the professional or statutory responsibilities of the design professional for the project, nor restrict the activities of the project inspector, special inspector, testing laboratory representatives and the Field Engineers of DSA in the performance of their duties. The project inspector is an agent of the owner working under the direction of the architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge of the project for the purpose of achieving compliance with the approved plans and specifications, and shall not work under the construction manager. The project inspector works under the supervision of DSA to achieve compliance with the applicable building codes and regulations.

2.

PROCEDURES: A project using a construction manager in lieu of a general contractor to coordinate the work of the subcontractors requires special procedures.
2.1 A construction manager is employed by the owner to assist the owner in the management of the construction of the project. The construction manager may perform services in the areas of coordination of the work of the various contractors, scheduling the work of the project, monitoring the progress of the work, providing the owner with evaluations and recommendations concerning the quality of the work, recommending the approval of progress payments for the contractors, or other services. Without the presence of a general contractor, each subcontractor will enter into an individual contract directly with the owner to establish conditions for the performance and payment for his/her work.
Construction Management Procedures For Public School Projects Page 1 of 2

2.2

DSA (SS) IR A-3 (rev 11-03-08)

DSA (SS) IR A-3 (rev 11-03-08)

Construction Management Procedures For Public School Projects

Page 2 of 2

2.3

The construction manager will usually be employed to oversee the construction of a complete building, or group of buildings or the completion of one phase of a longrange construction program. Each contractor may be employed to start and complete his/her portion of the project at any time during the progress of the construction. Therefore, the completion of that portion of the construction is not synonymous with the completion of the entire project as is contemplated by the regulations. Each independent contractor who has a contract with the owner is required to submit a final verified report at the completion of his/her portion of the work. The submittal of verified progress reports by the individual contractors is a departure from normal procedures wherein the services of a general contractor are involved. The construction manager, who is not a builder by training or licensing, by law, cannot be held responsible for the compliance of the work of construction with the duly approved plans and specifications for the project. The Attorney General's Opinion No. CV 74-160, August 1974, is cited as follows: "A construction manager does not bind himself to construct a building. See Ops. Cal. Atty. Gen. 9322 (1934). The agreement to do these things is made by the owner with other parties and in case of the failure of any of those parties to perform as agreed, an action would lie against them and not against the construction manager. The agreement of the construction manager is to perform services only for the owner; that is, to supervise the work of the contractors who are doing the actual construction." Therefore, in accordance with DSA regulations, each independent contractor having contracts with the owner, is required to submit verified reports.

2.4

3. CONTRACT INFORMATION: When a project involves more than one construction contract the architect must submit a Contract Information Form (From DSA-102) for each contract. Alternatively, all contracts may be listed on an attachment to a single Form DSA102. For each contract the attachment must specify: 4.
The contract (or bid package) number, The name and address of the contractor, The contract amount, and The scope of the work included in the contract.

CONSTRUCTION COSTS. See IR A-23 for clarification of costs that are to be reported as construction costs on Form DSA-102.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

GEOLOGIC HAZARD REPORT REQUIREMENTS


Reference: California Building Standards Administrative Code, Section 4-317(e) 2001 California Building Code (CBC) Sections 1629A.4 and 1804A.1 2007 CBC, Sections 1613A and 1802A Education Code Section 17212.5 Discipline: Structural

IR A-4
Revised 06-25-10 Revised 06-17-09 Revised 11-01-07 Revised 07-21-05 Revised 02-03-04 Issued 09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to describe the


requirements for the submission of a geologic hazard report to the California Geological Survey (CGS) for acceptance and subsequently to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) for projects within the jurisdiction of DSA.

1.

GENERAL: A geologic hazard is any geologic condition that is a potential danger to

life or property. Geologic hazards include, but are not limited to, earthquake shaking, surface rupture, liquefaction, and landslides. The California Administrative Code (CAC), Section 4-317(e) includes requirements for the performance of soils investigation studies and geologic hazard studies for all construction, including additions and alterations. Note that Geotechnical Reports (or soils investigation reports) often include soils studies only and may not include complete geologic hazard studies. In addition, the California Building Code (CBC), Section 1802A, describes requirements for engineering geologic reports, supplemental ground-response reports, and geotechnical reports. Any of these reports may contain elements of the geologic hazard studies, and these reports should all be submitted as geologic hazards reports.

2. PROJECTS REQUIRING GEOLOGIC HAZARD REPORTS: Except as noted in Section 3, a geologic hazard report shall be submitted to the CGS for projects located in any of the areas described in Sections 2.1 and 2.2 below. 2.1
2.2 On any new site. Exemptions per Section 3.2 do not apply. Any project on existing sites if not exempted by Sections 3.1, 3.2, or 3.3 below.

PROJECTS NOT REQUIRING GEOLOGIC HAZARD REPORTS: A geologic hazard report will not be necessary for projects on existing sites in any of the situations described below: 3.1
Regardless of location, if the project includes only: non-structural alterations which do not cost more than 50% of the replacement cost of the structure, and/or
Geologic Hazard Report Requirements Page 1 of 2

3.

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Geologic Hazard Report Requirements

Page 2 of 2

alterations complying with Section 3403.2.3.2, where the alterations are not initiated for the purpose of increasing the strength or stiffness of the seismicforce-resisting system.

3.2

If the project is one or more onestory, wood-frame and light-steel frame buildings of Type II or V construction, 4,000 square feet or less in floor area, and not located within Earthquake Fault or Seismic Hazard Zones as shown on the most recently published maps from the CGS (see 2007 CBC, Section 1802A.6.1.1, Exception 1). A new geologic hazard report is not required if the project is located on a site for which adequate studies (refer to CGS Note 48 for guidance) have been already made, and a reevaluation is made and the report is found to be currently appropriate. This existing report for the site and the reevaluation must be submitted to the CGS for approval for each project at the site.

3.3

4.

SCOPE OF GEOLOGIC HAZARD STUDIES: For guidance in conducting a study and reporting evaluations and recommendations, refer to:
Special Publication 117, Guidelines for Evaluating and Mitigating Seismic Hazards in California (2008) Special Publication 42 Fault-Rupture Hazard Zones in California (1997 revised edition, including supplements 1 and 2 added in 1999)

both published by the Department of Conservation and available to order from http://www.consrv.ca.gov/CGS/information/publications/index.htm CGS Note 48 will be used as a guide for review. http://www.consrv.ca.gov/CGS/information/publications/cgs_notes/note_48/note_48.pdf

5.

REPORTING PROCEDURES: DSA prefers that a copy of a geologic hazard report accepted by the California Geological Survey (CGS) be submitted to DSA along with the initial project application. If a project is submitted to DSA without a CGS accepted geologic hazard report, DSA will start the plan review process, however final approval will be withheld pending receipt of the accepted report.
For any project that requires a geologic hazard report, that report must be accepted by CGS before DSA will stamp-out the plans and specifications. School districts are responsible for submittal of reports to CGS and for the cost of review by CGS. Requirements regarding contents of geologic hazard reports are addressed by CGS:

5.1 5.2 5.3

http://www.conservation.ca.gov/cgs/rghm/reviews/Pages/Default.aspx

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

ACCEPTANCE OF PRODUCTS, MATERIALS, AND EVALUATION REPORTS


References: 2007 California Building Code (CBC), Section 1605A.4 California Building Administrative Code, Section 4-304 Discipline: Structural

IR A-5
Revised 06-02-08 Revised 02-01-08 Revised in its entirety 07-21-05 Issued 9-1-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to describe the DSA Structural Safetys (DSA-SS) policy on the acceptance of structural products and to clarify DSA policy on the acceptability and use of product evaluation reports issued by other agencies and organizations, for projects submitted to DSA under the 2007 California Building Code (CBC). Background: Structural products were accepted to use on DSA projects either through compliance with DSA Product Acceptance (PA) Reports or ICC Evaluation Service (ICC-ES) Reports. Many products that had obtained DSA Acceptance Reports under the alternate materials and methods provision in the 2001 CBC are now prescribed or referenced in the 2007 CBC.
The 2007 CBC took effect on January 1, 2008. There are major changes from the previous 2001 CBC. This IR describes the DSA-SS acceptance of structural products and third-party evaluation reports, effective under the 2007 CBC.

Scope: This IR is applicable to DSA acceptance of alternate structural products and materials per Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-304 and structural products or materials that are regulated by those provisions in Title 24, Part 2, CBC Chapters 14 through 25 adopted by DSA-SS.
Product acceptance by the DSA Access Compliance (e.g. detectable warning products) and DSA Fire Life Safety (e.g. fire rating of assemblies), and energy efficiency is beyond the scope of this IR.

1. Acceptance of Structural Products: Structural products and materials, as described in the Scope section of this IR, may be accepted for use on DSA projects if they meet the following requirements:
1.1 1.2 Products, including alternate materials, must have a valid evaluation listing/report issued by a recognized evaluation agency. (See Section 3 below) In addition to valid listings, products that are prescribed in the CBC and its adopted standards, including DSA Interpretation of Regulations (IR), Circulars or Bulletins, shall comply with those prescribed requirements. DSA has the final determination on the acceptability of a product, and the valid listing (see Section 5 below).
Acceptance of Product Evaluation Reports

1.3

DSA (SS) IR A-5 (rev 06-02-08)

Page 1 of 3

DSA (SS) IR A-5 (rev 06-02-08)

Acceptance of Product Evaluation Reports

Page 2 of 3

2.

DSA PA Reports: Effective January 1, 2008, DSA PA reports will not be issued or renewed to show conformance with the 2007 CBC.
2.1. Existing PA Reports: Structural products used for projects submitted under the 2001 CBC may continue to use the applicable existing DSA PA reports for products designed to conform to the 2001 CBC.

3. VALID LISTINGS: DSA will accept evaluation reports that meet the eligibility criteria listed below and are used in accordance with Section 4 of this IR. The intent is to accept evaluation reports for products or materials that comply with the California Building Code (CBC) and DSA requirements, demonstrate satisfactory performance, and are manufactured under a quality assurance program.
For DSA to consider acceptance, evaluation reports issued by other agencies or organizations must meet the following criteria: 3.1 The product or material must comply with the California Building Code (CBC). Evaluation reports may not be acceptable if the product does not comply with applicable DSA amendments (to the model code) contained in the CBC and/or applicable DSA IR, Circulars or Bulletins. The evaluation report must be current and valid. Reports that are more than three years old are considered expired except as noted in Section 3.3 below. The evaluation report must be issued by one of the following DSA recognized agencies or organizations: International Code Council Evaluation Service. All reports that are currently posted on the ICC ES website are considered current and valid, including reports with prefix ESR and Legacy Reports. Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), OPA reports. City of Los Angeles (COLA), Research Report (RR). Miami-Dade County, Florida, Product Control Division, Notice of Acceptance (NOA), for reports relating to wind resistance. Other product certification bodies that are certified to be in compliance with ISO Guide 65, "General Requirements for Bodies Operating Product Certification Programs". Compliance with CBC adopted model code (e.g. 2006 IBC), DSA IR, Circulars, Bulletins, referenced standards, published consensus acceptance criteria, and/or industrial standards, e.g. ASTM specification. Successful completion of all required tests. The product manufacturer must maintain a required Quality Assurance and Control program including periodic independent third party audits.

3.2 3.3

3.4

The evaluation report must be issued on the following basis:

3.5

Products or materials listed in evaluation reports must have continued acceptable performance.

4.

USE OF REPORTS: Eligible evaluation reports, per Section 3 of this IR, may be accepted for use on projects under DSA jurisdiction, if used in accordance with the following:

DSA (SS) IR A-5 (rev 06-02-08)

Acceptance of Product Evaluation Reports

Page 3 of 3

4.1

The design, application and installation of the product shall comply with the requirements of the CBC, IR, Circulars, Bulletins, and the applicable evaluation reports. The

minimum required Seismic Design Category is D per the 2007 CBC, Section 1613A.5.6.
4.2 For products or materials used to resist lateral forces, use 80% of the listed values in the evaluation reports unless the listed values were established on the basis of cyclic test results. The applicable evaluation report and all the documents required by the evaluation report shall be submitted to DSA with the project application package. For certain types of products, the evaluation report may not be the sole basis for acceptance. DSA regional offices will review, on a project specific basis, those products or materials that require the following: Substantial project or site-specific design or engineering Custom assembly or construction on site Earth retaining systems such as segmental walls Foundation systems such as rammed aggregate piers Proprietary steel Special Moment Resisting Frame (SMRF) connections

4.3 4.4

The following are examples of these types of products:

5. CHANGES IN DSA ACCEPTANCE: DSA may reject, discontinue or impose conditions on the acceptance of a product or report in the following situations:
Documented structural safety problems such as failure, collapse, etc., When products are modified and become non-conforming with CBC, its adopted standards, and / or evaluation reports, Recalls by the manufacturer, evaluation agencies or other government agencies Documented inconsistencies with evaluation reports, or Method of justification of a products behavior not consistent with products condition of use (e.g. seismic force resisting product not dynamically or cyclically tested)

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CHANGE ORDER AND FIELD CHANGE APPROVAL PROCESSES


References: California Administrative Code, Sections 4-305 and 4-338 Discipline: All

IR A-6
Revised 11-16-09 Revised 09-18-07 Revised in its entirety 11-15-06 Issued 9-1-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The Code requires that all changes to the approved plans or specifications after a contract for the construction has been awarded shall be made only by means of change orders approved by the Division of the State Architect (DSA). This interpretation describes a process for obtaining approval of changes by DSA. Discussion: Section 4-338 (c) and (d), Part 1, Title 24, California Code of Regulations
(CCR), describes DSAs process for approval of change orders and preliminary change orders. DSA has determined that to provide timely, efficient and consistent approval of changes during construction, enforcing the strict letter of regulations may require flexibility. An alternate field change document approval process is described in this IR. This process focuses the designers and DSAs efforts on code compliance with the goal of timely review and approval.

Definitions. The following definitions apply to terms used in this document:


Approved Documents Plans, specifications, addenda, deferred approvals, field change documents, and change orders bearing a valid DSA approval stamp. A valid DSA approval stamp includes the DSA application number for the project, the initials of the plan reviewer(s) and the date of approval. Stamps without the initials of the plan reviewer(s) and the date are NOT indicative of approval. Change - Changes to the approved plans or specifications include revisions, deletions, additions, and substitutions to the work prescribed on the approved plans or specifications. Change Order A document defining changes to the DSA approved plans and/or specifications issued after a construction contract has been awarded. Change orders may also define changes to contractual requirements, including costs and time requirements that are not regulated by the California Building Code. Clarification - a statement from the architect or engineer in general responsible charge of the project that clarifies (but does not change) the requirements of the DSA approved plans and/or specifications. Contract A document that defines the cost or value of some or all of the construction work. When labor and/or materials are donated, or provided by the school district/owner, the value of the materials and/or work must be estimated and reported to DSA on Form DSA-102 as if there was an actual "contract" for that work. Also, contracts for construction management must be reported on Form DSA-102. Design Professional An individual listed on application Form DSA-1 Lines 22, 23, 24 or 25.
DSA IR A-6 (rev 11-16-09) Change Order and Field Change Approval Process Page 1 of 8

DSA IR A-6 (rev 11-16-09)

Change Order and Field Change Approval Process

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Field Change Document (FCD) A document defining changes to the Code regulated construction requirements of the DSA approved plans and/or specifications issued after a construction contract has been awarded. FCDs may include Architects Supplemental Instructions (ASI), Instruction Bulletins (IB), Field Orders (FO), Construction Change Directives (CCD), etc. Drawing an illustration on paper larger than 8 1/2 x 14. Interpretation a statement from the architect or engineer in general responsible charge of the project that interprets (but does not change) the requirements of the DSA approved plans and/or specifications. Sketch an illustration on 8 1/2 x 11 or 8 1/2 x 14 paper.

1. Scope. After a contract for construction has been awarded, DSA approval of changes to approved documents shall be obtained in accordance with the following:
1.1 Changes That Require DSA Approval Prior to Construction. DSA approval shall be obtained for changes to all Code-regulated construction and inspection/testing functions prior to commencement of the affected work. Changes can be approved through the field change document (FCD) approval process described in Section 3.1 below or the change order process described in Section 3.2. DSA-approved FCD, or change order, documents shall be in the possession of the contractor and the inspector prior to construction of the work shown thereon. Code-regulated refers to work that is regulated by the provisions of Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations applicable to the construction, including those amendments to the Code adopted by DSA-SS (Structural Safety), DSA-AC (Access Compliance), and the SFM (State Fire Marshal). For projects submitted under the 2001 CBC, refer to 2001 CBC, Part 2, Sections 101.17.11 (DSA/AC), 101.17.12 (DSA/SS), and 101.17.14 (SFM). [For projects submitted under the 2007 CBC, refer to 2007 CBC, Part 2 Section 101.3.2 items 4, 10 (DSA/AC), 11 (DSA/SS) and 14 (SFM)]. Note that although DSA does not currently conduct a specific review of certain aspects of construction (including mechanical, electrical, etc) these aspects are considered to be Code regulated and must be submitted as part of an FCD or change order. DSA approval is also required for all change orders. 1.2 Changes That Do Not Require DSA Approval. DSA approval is not required for FCDs if the scope of the change does not pertain to Code-regulated construction (refer to Section 1.1 above). For example: Color of finishes, and Administrative changes to the contract (e.g. contract time extension).

1.3 Interpretations and Clarifications. Responses to request for information, interpretations, clarifications, and other communications that do not change the requirements of the DSA stamped approved documents may be issued by the architect or engineer in general responsible charge. These documents do not require DSA approval.

2. General Requirements. All change orders and field change documents must conform to the following general requirements (see sample change order, which includes a sample FCD, in the appendix):
2.1 2.2 The project name and the name of the facility must be indicated. The DSA file and application numbers must be shown in the upper right hand corner.

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Change Order and Field Change Approval Process

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2.3 2.4

All FCDs and change orders shall be numbered in sequence in a logical and consistent manner. The number must be shown in the upper left corner. All changes must be described clearly and completely by the architect in general responsible charge of the project and/or architects or engineers with delegated responsibility for portions of the project as defined on Form DSA-1 Application for Approval of Plans and Specifications. Reference to the specific portions of the drawings and/or specifications that are being changed must be included. All details and specification sections affected by the change shall be coordinated. If a change to a detail is only applicable in some of the locations for which the detail applies, those locations must be clearly described. Changes to any testing or inspection requirements associated with the proposed change must be clearly described. The number of pages in the FCD or change order, including the number of pages in each attachment, shall be clearly indicated. All sketches and drawings attached to describe the changes shall be clearly labeled and referenced. When approved drawings are revised and reissued as part of an FCD or change order all of the following requirements must be met: Images of all DSA approval stamps must be removed from the drawing (or crossed out) prior to making any changes. Each change shall be highlighted on the drawing and identified (see example change order attached in appendix). Each change shall be dated. All drawings shall be stamped and signed by the design professional in general responsible charge. When preparation of a drawing has been delegated to another design professional that individual shall also stamp and sign the drawing. FCDs and change orders should include only clear instructions on specific changes to details on the DSA approved drawings or sections of the DSA approved specifications. When circumstances make it necessary to submit additional back up information the following requirements shall be met: Calculations, product cut-sheets and other back-up information necessary to demonstrate that the changes are Code compliant shall be submitted along with (but not as part of) the FCD or change order. Calculations or other information that is not necessary to define the work required shall not be placed on sketches or drawings included in an FCD or change order. Cost estimates, cost justifications, or other back-up documents that are not necessary to define the changes to the DSA approved drawings or specifications need not be submitted to DSA. If back-up information is submitted for any reason, it must be separate from the FCD or change order. For work involving alterations to existing buildings it is sometimes expedient to submit drawings of the existing building as back-up information to clarify or justify the acceptability of proposed changes. DSA will return existing building drawings when the architect or engineer clearly requests the return of such drawings in advance. A reason shall be provided for each change. The appropriate design professional (listed on application Form DSA-1) must sign the FCD or change order (change orders must also be stamped).

2.5

2.6 2.7

2.8 2.8.1 2.8.2 2.8.3 2.8.4

2.9

2.9.1

2.9.2

2.9.3

2.10 2.11

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2.12

All engineers or architects for whom responsibility for portions of the work has been delegated must sign the FCD or change order when their portion of the work may be affected by the changes (change orders must also be stamped). Space (2 in. x 3 in.) for a DSA approval stamp must be provided.

2.13

3.

Approval Process. The design professional shall obtain DSA approval for changes to the approved plans or specifications in accordance with Section 3.1 or 3.2. DSA shall direct all communications (review comments and/or approved documents) to the responsible design professional.
3.1 Field Change Document Approval (FCD) Process. This process can provide responsive processing of documentation for changes that require DSA approval prior to construction of the work shown thereon (refer to 1.1). FCDs do not require documentation of school board approval. Change documents can be transmitted via fax or other expedient means for review by DSA (recommend faxable format of 8-1/2 x 11, with design professional's phone/fax number noted). DSA can communicate review comments and approved FCDs to the responsible design professional via fax or mail. Information required to be provided with an FCD submittal is listed in Section 2 above. 3.2 Change Order (CO) Approval Process. DSA approved FCDs are not required to be included in a formal change order. DSA stamped approved FCDs may be included in formal change orders and are not subject to further technical review. If an approved FCD is incorporated into a change order, the complete FCD bearing the approval stamp of DSA shall be attached and referenced in the change order. All documents included which do not bear a DSA approval stamp will be reviewed for Code compliance. The design professional shall submit two copies of each change order to DSA for review and approval; one copy of the approved change order shall be retained by DSA and one returned to the design professional. Back-up information and extra copies of change orders will NOT be returned (exception: see 2.9.3 above). General information required to be provided with the change order submittal is listed in Section 2 above; additional information required for change orders includes: Stamp (in addition to signature) of the architect or engineer in general responsible charge and of each consultant delegated responsibility for work affected by the change order. Contract number when more than one contract is awarded for the project, Cost information, and Signature of the School District (owner).

4. Design Professionals' Duties. The design professionals have specific Codeprescribed duties with regard to changes to the approved plans and/or specifications. (See Sections 3-341, Part 1, Title 24, CCR.)
4.1 Documentation/Processing. The design professional shall prepare FCDs and change orders as required by conditions on the project and shall make corrections as required to comply with the regulations. Signing/Stamping. The design professional shall stamp and sign all documents (note that all drawings must be stamped and signed; all sketches must be signed).

4.2

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4.3

Communications. The design professional shall provide the contractor, testing laboratory, and the inspector with DSA stamped approved documents prior to commencement of Code-regulated work shown thereon. Final Verified Report. The design professionals final verified report (Form DSA-6A/E) shall indicate the total number of change orders issued. Cost Summary. The design professional shall report the total final construction cost of the project on Form DSA-6A/E. The construction cost shall include the final amount of all construction contracts, construction management agreements, and estimated value of all construction work performed by volunteers or school district employees.

4.4 4.5

5.

Inspector's Duties. The project inspector has specific Code-prescribed duties with regard to changes to the approved plans and/or specifications issued in the field. (See Section 4-342. Part 1, Title 24, CCR.)
5.1 Record-keeping. The inspector shall maintain a file of approved FCDs and change orders on the job at all times. The inspector is required to maintain complete records of these documents. These documents shall be maintained in an organized manner so that they are readily available. Communications. If the inspector determines that unapproved documents appear to require DSA approval (the document directs a change to Code-regulated construction), the inspector shall notify the design professional and DSA immediately. Any work performed that is not in accordance with DSA approved documents must be reported as a deviation. Final Verified Report. The inspector's Final Verified Report (form DSA-6) shall indicate the total number of change orders received and implemented.

5.2

5.3

APPENDIX Sample Change Order Sample Field Change Document (FCD)

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Change Order #: 2 Contract #: 1


Project: Perfectly Designed Elementary School 123 School Drive Smallville, CA 91020

DSA File #: 99-123 Application #: 02-123456

Really Smart Architects 432 Professional Drive Emerald City, CA 90210 Phone #: 916-445-8100 Fax #: 916-445-8100

To: Excellent Contractors 654 Concrete Road City of Industry, CA 92010 The contract is changed as follows: 1. Revise specification section 12512 to eliminate all reference to horizontal louver blinds. Requested by: Owner Reason: Window coverings will be provided in another contract Credit $ <960.00> 2. Refer to detail 17 on sheet A57. Add treated wood buck, 7/8" thick x width of CMU wall, at each jamb of door 710. Secure to masonry with 1/4" diameter expansion anchors with 1-1/4"embedment at 24" on center. Requested by: Architect Reason: To allow for proper installation of door. Add 3. $ 760.00

Refer to attached FCD #1 (1 page). Change maximum non-shrink grout thickness from " to 1". Requested by: Contractor Reason: Elevator was installed on 1" of grout; owner will accept this deviation for a credit. Credit $ <100.00>

4.

Increase contract time by seven working days. Requested by: Contractor Reason: Rain delays

DSA IR A-6 (rev 11-16-09)

Change Order and Field Change Approval Process APPENDIX SAMPLE CHANGE ORDER

Page 7 of 8

Total Cost of This Change Order:

Credit $ <300.00>

The original Contract Sum was .. Net change by previously authorized change orders . The contract sum prior to this change order was The contract sum will be (decreased) by this change order by The new contract sum including this change order will be

$900,000.00 $ 0.00 $900,000.00 $ <300.00> $899,700.00

The contract time will be (increased) by .. (7) working days The date of substantial completion as of the date of this change order is May 1, 2006

Architect: Frank L. Wright, Architect Really Smart Architects


(affix stamp here)

Date:

Structural Engineer: Joe Excellent, President Excellent Engineering, Inc.


(affix stamp here)

Date:

Owner: Hal T. Computer, Director of Facilities Smallville Unified School District

Date:

(space for DSA approval stamp)

DSA IR A-6 (rev 11-16-09)

Change Order and Field Change Approval Process APPENDIX SAMPLE CHANGE ORDER

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FIELD CHANGE DOCUMENT #: 1

DSA File #: 99-23 Application #: 02-123456

Revise Detail E on sheet S2 as shown below. Change maximum non-shrink grout thickness from to 1.

Division of the State Architect Approval Stamp

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

PROJECT INSPECTOR CERTIFICATION AND APPROVAL


Reference: California Building Standards Administrative Code (Title 24, Part 1) Sections 4-211, 4-333, & 4-341 California Education Code, Sections 17309, 17311 & 81141

IR A-7
Revised 09-18-07 Revised 06-01-06 Revised 09-10-02 Issued 9-1-99

This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This IR describes the requirements for the certification and approval of school

construction project inspectors. All project inspectors must complete this two-step process of certification and approval by DSA before they are permitted to work on school construction projects.

Section 1 of this IR explains the requirements for DSA Certification of project inspectors. Section 2 specifies the requirements for DSA Approval of the project inspector. Duties of Inspectors are described in DSA IR A-8. The acceptance and approval of assistant inspectors is described in DSA IR A-12.

Certification & Approval a Two-Step Process


Certification is the first step in becoming a school construction project inspector. This step occurs only once. An inspector may become DSA-Certified by successfully completing the DSA Project Inspector Examination. There are four classes of certification. These classes correspond to a project class assigned to each project by DSA. See Section 1 below. Certification is only one of several factors involved in the approval process. Approval is the second step. This step occurs on every project. Approval of the project inspector by the DSA Regional Office must be obtained before the inspector is permitted to work on a project. DSA Approval is based on several factors, one of which is DSA Certification in the proper class. See Section 2 below.

Section 1 CERTIFICATION of the INSPECTOR


As required by law, all project inspectors must be certified through the DSA Project Inspector Examination Program. Examinations are given in each of four project classes. The examinations measure the applicants ability to read and comprehend construction plans and the California Building Standards Code. The DSA Project Inspector Examination Program does not qualify an applicant as a special inspector.

The Class 1 Project and the Class 1 Examination


Projects that are designated as Class 1 must contain one or more Class 1 structures (as defined below) but may also contain Class 2, Class 3, or Class 4 structures. The Class 1
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examination is comprehensive; it tests the applicants knowledge of Class 1, Class 2, Class 3, and Class 4 structures and related code requirements. Class 1 structures include: Buildings or additions of 2,000 square feet or greater that utilize materials other than wood-frame shear walls (masonry/concrete shear walls, steel brace frames, concrete, or steel moment-resisting frames) as the primary lateral-load resistive system. Substantial structural alterations to the gravity and/or lateral load-resisting system of the building types described above.

The Class 2 Project and the Class 2 Examination


Projects that are designated as Class 2 must contain one or more Class 2 structures (as defined below) but may also contain Class 3 or Class 4 structures. The Class 2 examination tests the applicants knowledge of Class 2, Class 3, and Class 4 structures and related code requirements. Class 2 structures include: Buildings or additions over 2,000 square feet in floor area that utilize wood-frame shear walls as the primary lateral load-resistive system. Projects may be single or multi-level, with no upper limit in floor area. The project may contain incidental masonry, concrete and/or structural steel construction (e.g. gravity load carrying columns and beams). Buildings may have isolated exceptions to the lateral load resistive system, such as a steel brace frame at one location in the structure. Buildings or additions of less than 2,000 square feet in floor area that have primary lateral load-resistive systems utilizing concrete, masonry or steel construction. A singlestory masonry building with a regular configuration a floor area of less than 7,000 square feet, and a wood-frame roof structure may be considered to be a Class 2 structure. For a definition of regular configuration see 2001 CBC, Section 1629A.5.2 for projects regulated by the 2001 CBC (or see ASCE 7, Section 12.3.2 for projects regulated by the 2007 CBC). On-site construction of two-story modular buildings. Alteration, modernization, and reconstruction projects that exceed the limitations of the Class 3 scope of work, and do not include substantial alterations to structural systems of concrete, steel or masonry. Non-building structures that exceed the limitations of the Class 3 scope of work.

The Class 3 Project and the Class 3 Examination


Projects that are designated as Class 3 must contain one or more Class 3 structures (small buildings of wood-frame construction and/or modernization/alteration projects) but may also contain Class 4 structures. The Class 3 examination tests the applicants knowledge of both Class 3 and Class 4 structures and related code requirements.

Class 3 structures include:


Buildings or additions of wood frame, single-story construction, with conventional (spread footing) concrete foundations and a total floor area less than 2,000 square feet. Structures must utilize wood-frame shear walls as the primary lateral load-resistive system. The project may include isolated steel or concrete elements (e.g. steel or concrete columns).

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Structural alteration projects limited to wood-frame, single story construction. When deemed appropriate by DSA, alterations to (or addition of) isolated steel, masonry or concrete elements may be included in Class 3 projects. Alteration projects involving significant changes to the lateral load-resisting system may be classified as Class 2 projects. Alteration and modernization projects that are primarily non-structural, such as electrical, mechanical, plumbing, disabled access features, and site improvement work. Non-building structures, such as signs and poles less than 35' in height, bleachers with a maximum of 5 rows of seats, walls less than 10' in height above grade, and single-story canopies less than 200 square feet in horizontal projected area.

The Class 4 Project and the Class 4 Examination


Projects that are designated as Class 4 only include Class 4 structures (building placement and related site work for premanufactured single-story relocatable buildings). The Class 4 examination tests the applicants knowledge of Class 4 structures and related code requirements. Class 4 structures include only site installation of premanufactured, singlestory relocatable buildings.

Relocatable Building Inspector - In Plant (RBIP Inspectors)


Inspectors of factory-built relocatable buildings must be certified through either the DSA RBIP examination or the Class 1 project inspector examination. The RBIP examination is scheduled through the DSA Headquarters Office (contact DSA Headquarters at 916/5547019).

Expiration and Recertification


An inspectors certification expires four years from the date of issue. To renew the certification, each inspector must complete the requirements of the DSA Inspector ReCertification Program every four years. The re-certification program consists of the DSA Academy Project Inspector Overview Class and a re-certification class conducted by DSA. Further information regarding the requirements of re-certification may be obtained on-line at www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov (click on Inspector Program). For information on the Project Inspector Overview Class, refer to http://www.dsaacademy.dgs.ca.gov/.

For Specific Examination Information

The DSA Project Inspector Examination Program is administered by the DSA Headquarters office. For information regarding the examination schedule, locations, examination fees, or to obtain an application, contact DSA Headquarters, by phone at 916/554-7019, or on-line at www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov (click on Inspector Program).

Section 2 - APPROVAL of the PROJECT INSPECTOR


As required by law, all project inspectors must be DSA approved for work on each individual project. To apply for approval, the design professional in general responsible charge must submit an Inspectors Qualification Record form (Form DSA-5) to the appropriate DSA Regional Office at least ten days prior to the start of construction. The inspector must complete the form. The form must be signed by the inspector, the school district representative, the design professional in general responsible charge, and the structural engineer delegated responsibility for observation of construction. For Approval on Class 1 and Class 2 projects: Before submitting a Form DSA-5 for Class 1 or Class 2 projects, the design professional in general responsible charge must consult the DSA

DSA IR A-7 (rev 09-18-07)

Project Inspector Certification and Approval

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field engineer assigned to the project by the DSA Regional Office. The design professional and the DSA field engineer must review the inspectors qualifications for the project with regard to DSA approval criteria (see DSA Approval of the Project Inspector on page 6 of this IR). The use of assistant inspectors must also be considered at this time (see DSA IR A-12).

Review of the Inspectors Qualifications by the School District and Responsible Design Professionals
The following five items must be reviewed by the design professional in general responsible charge, the structural engineer delegated responsibility for observation of construction, and the school district prior to submitting the Form DSA-5 to the DSA Regional Office for Inspector Approval:

1. The Class of the Inspectors Certification and the Project Class


The project inspector's DSA certificate number and class designation must be provided on the Form DSA-5. The project classification must also be provided on the Form DSA-5. The projects classification is determined by DSA during plan review, and is indicated on the Approval of Plans notification (issued after approval of plans and specifications). The project classification can also be checked on line at the DSA Tracker web site at http://www.applications.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/eTrackerWeb/Input_App.asp Project inspectors with Class 1 certification may apply for DSA Approval to inspect any project. Project inspectors with Class 2 certification may apply for approval to inspect projects that are designated as Class 2, 3, or 4. Project inspectors with Class 3 certification may apply for approval to inspect projects that are designated as Class 3 or 4. Project inspectors with Class 4 certification may only apply for approval on Class 4 projects.

2. Inspectors Work Experience


DSA approval is contingent upon the inspectors experience in inspection or construction work on building project(s) of a type similar to that of the individual project for which the inspector is applying. The inspector must describe qualifying experience from three building construction projects on the Form DSA-5. Qualifying experience is defined by the types of duties performed and the types of projects on which those duties were performed.

Types of Duties: Prior job positions and responsibilities are the primary considerations of qualifying experience. The inspectors prior responsibilities for either inspection or construction should include experience with the trades that will be utilized on the project for which the inspector is applying. Job positions that may provide qualifying experience include:
Project Inspector (providing continuous inspection of an entire project). Prior experience as a project inspector is required for Class 1 and large Class 2 projects. DSA-approved Assistant Inspector. General Contractors Field Superintendent. Special Inspector or Construction Trade Foreman. These positions provide qualifying experience only in the specific trade(s) in which the individual worked. Other job positions are unlikely to provide sufficient experience for approval by DSA as a project inspector. relevant to the type of project for which the inspector is applying. Project aspects (both

Types of Projects: The types of projects that provide qualifying experience must be

DSA IR A-7 (rev 09-18-07)

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for prior projects and the project for which the inspector is applying) that must be considered include: Materials of the Structural System (wood-frame, concrete, masonry, steel). Complexity of the Structural System (configuration of buildings, number of floors, unusual design features). Size (square footage of new construction, total construction cost).

3. On-Site Presence of the Project Inspector


Two important aspects must be considered:

a. The inspector must be present on the job-site when there is construction activity.

The inspectors schedule must allocate sufficient time to perform all required duties on the project for which the inspector is applying. The inspector must indicate on the Form DSA-5 whether presence on the job-site will be full-time (40 hours per week or more) or part-time (less than 40 hours per week). Large projects usually require a full-time commitment from the inspector. the inspector is applying, each school project, each non-school project, and/or other employment commitments must be described on the Form DSA-5. For each concurrent project the following information must be provided: Project name and location DSA Application Number (if school project) Scope of the project (new construction, building size, number of buildings, construction cost) Current status of project (% complete)

b. If the inspector has other work commitments concurrent with the project for which

The responsible design professionals, the school district, and DSA must conclude that the inspectors schedule will allow for an adequate presence on the job-site. In the event that the school district, the responsible design professional(s), or DSA conclude that the inspectors schedule as described on the Form DSA-5 will not allow for sufficient presence on the job-site, the inspector will be afforded an opportunity to provide additional information for re-evaluation. The inspector must obtain prior written approval from the school district, the responsible design professional(s), and DSA for any changes to the time commitment or workload from that indicated on the approved Form DSA-5.

4. School District and Design Professionals Interview of the Inspector


DSA recommends that the school district and the responsible design professional(s) conduct a personal interview with the inspector before signing the Form DSA-5. The following points should be considered: The inspectors knowledge of his/her role and responsibilities, job duties, and limits of authority. Characteristics of the inspector necessary to develop and maintain satisfactory working relationships. Such characteristics include effective communication skills, patience, determination, consistency and the ability to exercise sound judgment. Inspectors physical ability and stamina to inspect all construction and to maintain a responsive presence on the job.

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Inspectors knowledge of construction methods, building materials, material testing/special inspection procedures and building codes applicable to the project. The inspector must be able to read and readily comprehend the requirements of the project plans and specifications.

5.

DSA Approval of the Project Inspector

The project inspector must be DSA approved for each individual project. The DSA field engineers approval of the proposed inspector is based on the following criteria: The proper relationship between the class of the inspectors certification and the projects classification, as described in item number 1 on page 4. The inspectors work experience, as described in item number 2 on page 4. The inspectors workload and time commitment to the project, as described in item number 3 on page 5. The utilization of assistant inspector(s) as described in DSA IR A-12. Satisfactory DSA performance ratings on previous school construction projects (refer to DSA IR A-8). Verification that the inspector is employed by the school district. If the inspector meets the requirements for approval, the DSA field engineer will sign the Form DSA-5, which indicates DSA approval. A copy of the signed Form DSA-5 will be promptly returned to the inspector and the design professional in general responsible charge. If DSA is unable to grant approval, the Form DSA-5 will be promptly returned to the design professional in general responsible charge, with documentation of the reason(s) why approval was not granted. The proposed inspector may be reconsidered for approval if these documented reasons are satisfactorily addressed on the resubmitted Form DSA-5.

6.

Withdrawal of Approval and/or Certification


engineer observes the project inspectors performance of code-prescribed the course of construction. IR A-8 describes the required duties and of the project inspector. Failure to perform duties as required may result in of approval and/or certification of the project inspector.

The DSA field duties during responsibilities the withdrawal

The DSA field engineer completes an Inspectors Performance Rating for the project inspector (Form DSA-180-5.1) and for the assistant inspector (Form DSA-180-5.1a) at the final site visit (refer to IR A-8, Section 2). The performance rating is used by DSA as a basis for approval of the project inspector and the assistant inspector on future projects.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

PROJECT INSPECTOR & ASSISTANT INSPECTOR DUTIES AND PERFORMANCE


References: California Code of Regulations (CCR), Title 24 Part 1: California Administrative Code Sections 4-211, 4-333, 4-334, 4-336, 4-337, 4-342, & 4-343 California Education Code, Sections 17309 & 81141 Discipline: Structural

IR A-8
Revised 10-07-10 Revised 00-03-08 Revised 10-03-07 Revised 05-16-07 Revised 06-01-06 Revised 01-25-02 Issued 09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/Resources/IRManual.aspx at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) provides clarification of the duties of school construction project inspectors and assistant inspectors as required by the California Building Standards Administrative Code (Title 24, Part 1). The IR also describes the performance rating process utilized by DSA to evaluate inspectors for approval on future school construction projects.

Section 1 - REQUIRED DUTIES of the PROJECT INSPECTOR


The project inspector must perform specific duties in accordance with Title 24, Part 1 (Sections 4-333, and 4-342). The project inspector acts under the direction of the design professional in general responsible charge and is subject to supervision by DSA. The project inspector does not have the authority under Title 24 to direct the contractor in the execution of the work, nor to stop the work of construction. The project inspectors responsibilities include: A thorough understanding of all requirements of the construction documents. Inspection of all portions of the construction for compliance with the requirements of the DSA approved construction documents. Identification, documentation, and reporting of deviations in the construction from the requirements of the DSA approved construction documents. Submittal of verified reports (Form DSA-6). At the conclusion of the project any outstanding deviations must be noted on the Form DSA-6. For projects approved under the 2007 CBC the project inspector is responsible for providing special inspection of aspects of the construction allocated to the project inspector on the Tests and Inspections List (Form DSA-103). The project inspector is also responsible for providing special inspection of aspects of construction requiring special inspection by Title 24, Part 2, Sections 1707A.3 through 1707A.9. Any changes to the special/project inspector responsibilities shown on the DSA approved plans and specifications (including Form DSA-103) must be approved by change order, or field change document (see IR A-6), prior to proceeding with the related construction work.

DSA IR A-8 (rev 10-07-10)

Project Inspector & Assistant Inspector Duties and Performance

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DSA IR A-8 (rev 10-07-10)

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The project inspector is prohibited from performing functions associated with actual construction work such as:

Performing construction work, Ordering or purchasing materials, Directing the work of the contractor, subcontractor(s), volunteer labor or any entity
performing construction work,

Coordinating or scheduling the construction work, Performing quality control of construction; quality control is the responsibility of
the contractor, quality assurance is the responsibility of the inspector. The project inspector may perform duties for the school district that are not code-prescribed as long as such duties do not interfere with inspection duties. It is the inspectors responsibility to report all ancillary duties to DSA, the project architect and the structural engineer. The inspector shall also report unforeseen time demands that are impacting, or will impact, his or her ability to perform his code-prescribed duties. DSA may approve a project inspector when in the opinion of DSA these ancillary duties should not create a conflict of interest. DSA may withhold approval of a project inspector or withdraw approval at any time if the appearance of a conflict arises.

Seven Categories of Code-Prescribed Duties of the Project Inspector


The code-prescribed duties of the project inspector have been organized into the following seven categories. The inspectors performance in each of these categories serves as the basis for the DSA field engineers rating of the inspector (see Section 2 on page 5 of this IR).

1. Inspectors Job File


The inspector must maintain approved (DSA-stamped and initialed) construction documents at the job-site in an organized, readily accessible manner. The inspector must also maintain any other construction documents or directives received from the responsible design professional(s). The following list of documents and codes must be maintained at the job-site, and available for review by DSA representatives, during construction: Building Codes: Title 24, Part 1 (Administrative Code); Title 24, Part 2, Volumes 1 and 2 (Building Code); Title 24, Part 3 (Electrical Code); Title 24, Part 4 (Mechanical Code); Title 24, Part 5 (Plumbing Code) and Title 24, Part 6 (Energy Code). The code edition must be as referenced on the DSA approved plans and specifications. For projects approved under the 2001 CBC, Volume 3 of Title 24, Part 2 is also required. Applicable referenced standards: ASCE 7-05, ACI 318-05, ACI 530-05 & 530.1-05, AISC 360 & 341, ANSI/NF&PA NDS-2005, various ASTM standards, etc. DSA approved plans and specifications. DSA approved addenda. DSA approved deferred approval documents. DSA approved Field Change Documents. DSA approved change orders. A copy of shop drawings, samples, and approved submittals.

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Contractors Statement of Responsibility from each contractor per Section 1706A of Title 24, Part 2 (not required for projects under the 2001 CBC). Labels, materials certificates, mill certificates, concrete batch tickets, etc. for construction materials or assemblies as required by the DSA approved documents. Test and Inspection List (Form DSA-103). Form DSA-103 may be incorporated into drawings or specifications. Test and special inspection reports. Deviation reports and deviation logs. Daily inspection reports. Semi-monthly reports. Any other documents or directives received from the responsible design professional(s).

2. Inspectors Comprehension of the Construction Documents


The inspector must study and fully comprehend the requirements of the construction documents in order to provide competent inspection of the work. It is necessary for the inspector to possess a thorough understanding of the requirements of the plans and specifications before that portion of the work is performed. The inspector must: Consult the responsible design professional(s) to resolve any uncertainties in the inspectors comprehension of the plans and specifications prior to construction of that portion of the work. Review requirements for each phase of the construction with the contractor prior to commencing that phase of the work. Good communications will prevent construction errors from occurring. Readily identify non-compliant work as the construction progresses, to facilitate prompt corrective action. Verify code-compliant implementation of the materials testing and special inspection program.

Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-343, specifies that the contractor must direct inquiries regarding document interpretation (including Requests for Information or RFIs) to the design professional in general responsible charge, through the inspector. This code provision requires the contractor to involve the inspector in the interpretation and clarification of the construction documents.

3. Continuous Inspection of the Work


Continuous inspection means complete and timely inspection of every part of the work. Title 24, Part 1 requires prompt inspection of the work as it progresses. Title 24, Part 1 also requires that prompt verbal notification be made to the contractor of any deviation, so that the deviation can be immediately corrected. Work such as concrete work or masonry work which can be inspected only as it is placed requires the constant presence of the inspector. Certain types of work which can be completely inspected after the work is installed may be carried out while the inspector is not present, provided that the inspector promptly identifies and reports all deviations.

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The project inspector must have personal knowledge of the construction, obtained through the project inspectors own physical inspection of the work in all stages of its progress. When special inspectors or approved assistant inspectors are used on a project, the project inspectors personal knowledge may include that knowledge obtained from these individuals. The project inspector must keep a log of time spent on site.

4. Records of Inspections
The inspector must maintain detailed records of all inspections. The inspectors records must provide a comprehensive and timely documentation of the inspected work, promptly identifying all compliant and non-compliant construction. These records must be readily accessible and maintained in an organized manner. The following is a list of the inspection records that must be maintained at the job-site: A systematic record of all materials and assemblies delivered to the project site. A systematic record of the inspection of all work required by the construction documents. Marking properly completed work on a set of construction documents is a recommended method to verify that the requirements of the plans and specifications have been met. The inspector must also record the resolution of reported deviations. Construction Procedure Records per Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-342(6), including but not limited to concrete placement operations, welding operations, pile penetration blow counts, and other records specified on the approved construction documents. Log of project inspectors and assistant inspectors time spent on-site. DSA may require verification from the inspector of time spent at the job-site during all phases of the work.

5. Communications Required of the Inspector


The inspector must, during the course of construction, provide specific code-prescribed notices and reports to the responsible design professional(s), DSA, the school district, and the contractor. The inspector must maintain records of all communications. These records must be readily accessible and maintained in an organized manner. The date and recipients of all communications must be clearly indicated. The inspector is required to provide the following communications during the course of a construction project: Notifications to DSA as required by Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-342 (b) 5; including start of work, minimum 48 hours prior to completion of foundation trenches, minimum 48 hours prior to first concrete placement, and when work is suspended for more than two weeks. Notifications shall be made by telephone or e-mail. Inspectors Semi-Monthly Reports (see Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-337). The project inspector must make semi-monthly reports (on the 1st and 15th of every month) on the progress of construction. The semi-monthly report must be submitted to the design professional in general responsible charge and the structural engineer; a copy must be sent to DSA and the school district. A semi-monthly report must be prepared in accordance with DSAs Guidelines for Format of Project Inspector's Semi-Monthly Report for School Construction Projects . The guideline is available on-line at www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov (click on Publications and scroll down to Inspector Program Publications), or at DSA regional offices.

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Note for single-story relocatable building projects: At the discretion of the responsible design professional(s), the inspector may submit the DSA standard form DSA-121:Checklist for Site Inspection of Relocatable Buildings in lieu of semi-monthly reports. The checklist is to be submitted at the completion of the work. The checklist is available on-line at www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov (click on Forms), or at DSA regional offices. Deviation Notices (see Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-342 (b) 7). When the inspector identifies deviations from the DSA-approved plans and specifications, the inspector must verbally notify the contractor. If the deviation is not immediately corrected, the inspector is required to promptly issue a written notice of deviation to the contractor, with a copy sent to the responsible design professional(s), and DSA. The status and resolution of all deviations must be documented on semi-monthly reports. Record of Communications to the Responsible Design Professional(s) All uncertainties in the inspectors or contractors comprehension of the documents must be reported in writing to the responsible design professional(s). Verified Reports (Form DSA-6) (refer to Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-336). The project inspector shall submit verified reports directly to DSA (with copies to the responsible design professional(s) and the school district) within seven days of any of the following: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) Work on the project is suspended for a period of more than one month. The services of the inspector are terminated for any reason. DSA requests a verified report. At the time of occupancy of any building involved in a project (including alterations work). The entire project is complete. The verified reports shall clearly describe all non-compliant work including work done in accordance with change orders that are pending DSA approval.

6. Inspectors Monitoring of the Materials Testing & Special Inspection Program


The inspector is responsible, under the direction of the design professional in general responsible charge, for monitoring the work of any special inspectors and materials testing laboratories to ensure that all materials testing and special inspections required for the project are satisfactorily completed in accordance with the DSA approved documents. The project inspector must monitor the following aspects of the Materials Testing & Special Inspection Program: When DSA approval for special inspectors is required, the project inspector must identify and report any special inspectors on the job-site that are not DSA-approved. Verify that the materials testing laboratory is included on the List of DSA Accepted Testing Laboratories on the DSA website and that all sampling and testing is performed by the testing laboratory. The project inspector must verify that the materials testing lab and special inspectors have received sufficient advance notification to perform the required material sampling or special inspection.

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The project inspector is responsible for verifying that all required material sampling and special inspections have been performed. The project inspector is also responsible to observe any special inspectors on-site presence and performance of duties, the special inspectors documentation of complying and non-complying work, and issuance of deviation notices. The project inspector is responsible for reviewing all materials test and special inspection reports. The project inspector must report the status and resolution of deviations reported by any materials testing lab or special inspector on semi-monthly reports.

7. Monitoring of Assistant Inspector(s)


The project inspector must provide technical guidance to assistant inspector(s) and must verify the assistant inspectors comprehension of the construction documents. The project inspector must also monitor the assistant inspectors performance, verifying that the assistant inspector is properly checking the construction, recording inspections, and performing other assigned duties. The project inspector must ensure that any assistant inspector is performing the duties indicated on the assistant inspectors approved Form DSA-5A. See IR A-12. The project inspector must provide continuous on site supervision of all assistant inspectors.

Section 2 - DSAs RATING of the INSPECTORS PERFORMANCE DSA administrative policy on rating inspectors performance is undergoing review and has been temporarily removed from this IR.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

SCHOOL SITE IMPROVEMENTS FOR SCHOOL BUILDING PROJECTS


References: Education Code, Section 17283 Discipline: Structural

IR A-9
Revised 04-27-10 Revised 04-21-05 Issued 9-1-99 Supersedes IR M-6 (9/99)

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This IR outlines the Division of the State Architect (DSA) policy regarding site
improvements for school building projects.

Site Work Not Involving Structures or Their Utilities: For school site improvement projects that involve only grading, landscaping, fill placement, paving, storm drains or other work that does not support structures or involve their utilities, the school district is not required to file an application for DSA Structural Safety approval, although it has the option to do so if it chooses. DSA Access Compliance approval is required, however, for all school projects, whether they are site improvements, new construction, or alterations to existing construction.
In any case, in addition to the Education Code, the district is subject to compliance with local, city or county ordinances as required by law, (e.g. local ordinances governing drainage, waste, fire protection, the Health and Safety Code, the Government Code, etc.). It is the school district's responsibility to identify and comply with all such applicable statutes and regulations.

1.

2. Existing Site Work with Engineered Fill Involving New School Buildings and Their Utilities:
For projects involving school buildings and their utilities erected on an existing site with previously placed engineered fill, the architect shall show "existing fill" on his plans. Adequate data concerning the existing fill is required. The site soil investigation, compacted fill requirements, inspection and testing records of the original fill placement which has been verified by a geotechnical engineer's affidavit shall be provided. If this documentation is not available or adequate, an investigation of the existing fill shall be made by a geotechnical engineer who shall prepare a report making recommendations regarding fill adequacy and allowable soil bearing pressures for the footings of the proposed buildings. This report shall be submitted to DSA with the plans and specifications for the project.

3.

Site Work Involving New School Buildings or Site Utilities: All site improvement plans and specifications involving engineered fill designed to support structures or involving retaining walls, underground structures, utility systems or other items as required shall be submitted to DSA for approval prior to start of construction.
Options for submitting school building project plans and specifications for site improvement are as follows:

DSA IR A-9 (rev 04-27-10)

School Site Improvements For School Building Projects

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DSA IR A-9 (rev 04-27-10)

School Site Improvements For School Building Projects

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Option A - Single Application. The entire project may be submitted for approval at one time under a single application, or site improvements may be listed as phase I of a multi-phase project submitted under a single application. The plan review fee for either of the above shall be based on the estimated cost of construction of the entire project. If the Site improvements are submitted as phase I of the project the remainder of the project may be submitted under one or more subsequent phases under the same application. Option B - Multiple Applications. Plans and specifications for site improvement work may be submitted under one application, and the school buildings for this site may be submitted under another application. The estimated cost and plan check fees for each application shall be based on the scope of work designated to each application. This option is intended for special circumstances and requires pre-approval by DSA.

4. Engineered Fill: In all cases the geotechnical engineer making the investigation of the engineered fill and certifying to its adequacy for supporting school buildings is to be employed by the school district. The geotechnical engineer is prohibited from having an employment relationship with the contractor or developer for the existing site work during the placement of the fill material.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

RECONSTRUCTION AND ALTERATION PROJECTS EXEMPTION FROM DSA APPROVAL


References: California Building Standards Administrative Code, Sections 4-306, 4-308, 4-309, 4-315, 4-336 & 5-102 California Education Code, Sections 17295 and 81133 Discipline: Structural, Fire and Life Safety, and Access Compliance

IR A-10
Revised 07-02-09 Revised 12-08-08 Revised 03-17-08 Revised 05-29-07 Issued 11-16-09

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this interpretation is to clarify when plans and specifications for

reconstruction or alteration projects governed by the California Education Code, Sections 17280-17317, 17365-17374, and 81130-81149, collectively known as the Field Act, are required to be submitted to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) for review and approval. Construction projects governed by the Field Act are those projects which occur at public elementary schools, public secondary schools, and public community colleges.

Resolution: Per California Education Code, Sections 17295 and 81133, all reconstruction and alteration projects governed by the Field Act shall be submitted to the DSA. 1.
1.1

EXCEPTIONS:
DSA review and approval is not required for alteration projects to school buildings governed by the Field Act with an estimated construction cost of $35,623.28 for 2009, or less. DSA review and approval is not required for reconstruction or alteration projects to school buildings governed by the Field Act with an estimated construction cost of greater than $35,623.28 but not in excess of $142,493.12 for 2009, when all of the following conditions are met: A structural engineer, licensed to practice in California, shall examine the project and prepare a written statement certifying that the project does not contain any work of a structural nature (a non-structural alteration). This statement shall bear the signature and stamp or seal of the structural engineer and shall be filed with the appropriate DSA regional office. The design professional in responsible charge of the project shall prepare a statement certifying that the plans and specifications (1) contain no work that is regulated by the accessibility standards of Title 24, (2) contain no work that triggers accessibility upgrades to existing buildings or facilities, and (3) meet any applicable fire and life safety standards. This statement shall bear the signature and stamp or seal of the design professional and shall be filed with the appropriate DSA regional office.

1.2

1.2.1

1.2.2

DSA IR A-10 (rev 07-02-09)

Reconstruction and Alteration Projects Exemption from DSA Approval

Page 1 of 2

DSA IR A-10 (rev 07-02-09)

Reconstruction and Alteration Projects Exemption from DSA Approval

Page 2 of 2

1.2.3

Within 10 days of the project completion, a DSA-certified project inspector shall sign and submit a verified report to DSA, indicating the completed project is in conformance with the plans and specifications. Form DSA-999 "Inspection Verified Report for Projects Exempt from DSA Approval" is available from the DSA web site at http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/forms/DSA-999_11-16-05.pdf

This interpretation does not preclude a design professional from choosing to submit plans and specifications, with the appropriate fee to DSA for review, even when the project is exempted from DSA plan review requirements as outlined herein.

2.

3. Projects not requiring DSA approval shall comply with all currently effective design, construction, and inspection provisions of the California Code of Regulations, Title 24. When authorizing construction of projects described in this interpretation, the school district assumes responsibility to assure compliance with all code provisions. 4.
For this interpretation only, design professional in responsible charge or design professional shall be the architect, structural engineer, or professional engineer (e.g. mechanical engineer for mechanical-only projects, electrical engineer for electrical-only projects), licensed to practice in California, who is responsible for the completion of the project design work. Construction cost thresholds cited in this interpretation are based on January, 1999 figures of $25,000 and $100,000 and are adjusted annually per the California Education Code. Annual adjustments are calculated using the first January issue of Engineering NewsRecords U.S. 20 City Construction Cost Index. Construction projects shall not be subdivided for the purposes of obtaining exemption from DSA review and approval.

5.

6.

California Department of General Services Division of the State Architect Interpretation of Regulations Document

INCREMENTAL SUBMITTALS
Reference: Title 24, Part 1, CCR - Sections 4-316, 4-318, 4-324 Discipline: All

IR A-11
Revised 03-11-08 Issued 12-08-05

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) provides clarification on dividing projects into increments, procedures for submitting increments for plan review, and guidance in handling incremental projects throughout the plan review process. General: With the concurrence of the Division of the State Architect (DSA), projects may be submitted in increments so that portions of the total project may be reviewed in advance of other portions to expedite start of construction. 1. DSA POLICY ON INCREMENTAL SUBMITTALS:
This process is acceptable under the following conditions: 1.1 An increment is a clearly defined building or similar distinct unit (examples: site work, relocatable buildings, grandstands, marquees, scoreboards, etc). Increments should be defined so that the scope of work included in the increment will be complete and code compliant even if other increments are not constructed. In general, portions of buildings such as "foundations" or "walls" may not be defined as separate increments. The total number of increments and scope of each increment shall be defined using the form DSA-1.INC - Definition of Scope of Increments - at the time of the initial project submittal. This form is available from the DSA web site, forms page at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Forms/default.htm under DSAs Frequently Used Forms, or from your DSA Regional Office. Prior to submittal, a preliminary meeting shall be scheduled between the applicant and both the DSA Intake Architect and Supervisor regarding the number and scope of increments. This preliminary meeting is required for all projects, including Overthe-Counter submittals, in order to obtain concurrence with DSA. The number of increments shall be reasonable for DSA to review and process. The plan review fee for all increments shall accompany the initial submittal. No more than six months may elapse between the approval of one increment and the submittal of a subsequent increment. Any remaining unapproved portion of the application will be void in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-318 (c). Additional increments can not be added to an application once review is under way. Increments cannot be combined once review is under way. The Architect or Engineer in General Responsible Charge must be the same person for all increments. Separate assignments of Architect or Engineer in General ResponIncremental Submittals Page 1 of 4

1.2

1.3

1.4 1.5

1.6 1.7 1.8

DSA IR A-11 (rev 03-11-08)

DSA IR A-11 (rev 03-11-08)

Incremental Submittals

Page 2 of 4

sible Charge may not be made for parts of a project when the project is an incremental submittal.

2.
2.1

Submittal Procedures for Incremental Plan Review


Application and Subsequent Submittals: The initial increment shall be submitted with the original forms DSA-1, DSA1.INC, and DSA-3, the Project Submittal Checklist. Provide the entire proposed scope on Form DSA-1 and the breakdown of increment scope and cost on Form DSA-1.INC. For each subsequent increment submit a new Project Submittal Checklist and copies of the original DSA-1 and DSA-1.INC. Indicate which increment is being submitted with each submittal.

2.2

Completeness: All materials for a complete submittal shall be included with each increment. Contact the DSA Intake Architect or Supervisor with any questions prior to submittal.

2.3

Title Sheet: Identify which increment is being submitted. The Title Sheet of each increment shall include a clear description of the scope of work in each increment. The final increment shall use a Title Sheet listing all sheets in the project; clearly identify sheets used in each increment.

2.4 2.5

Sheet Numbering: Drawing sheet numbers in all increments must be unique. Drawing numbers among the increments shall not be duplicated or repeated. For Reference Only: Sheets or details previously reviewed and approved in one increment and included in subsequent increments for reference, shall be identified For Reference Only to avoid duplication of review. Identify increment number where review and approval occurred. Site Plan: Each incremental submittal shall include a Site Plan. Submittal Checklist for minimum content required for review. See the Project When

2.6 2.7

Continuity of Review: Identify plan reviewers of previous increments. possible and appropriate, DSA will maintain continuity of plan reviewers.

3.
3.1 3.1.1

Revisions, Addenda, and Deferred Approvals


Policies and Conditions Previously submitted increments can not be modified by subsequent increments. Minor modifications may be made by revision or addendum to the affected increment only. Extensive revisions require a new application and new fee. Procedures Revisions will be processed the same as a non-increment projects. Additional fees may be required for review. The revision submittal will return to the bin and be placed in line for review based on the date of receipt. Revisions, addenda, and deferred approvals shall clearly indicate the associated increment.

3.1.2 3.2 3.2.1

3.2.2

DSA IR A-11 (rev 03-11-08)

Incremental Submittals

Page 3 of 4

3.2.3

Each item in revisions and addenda shall clearly indicate the detail, sheet number, and increment being modified. To simplify review, it is recommended that modifications associated with one increment be grouped together when possible. Deferred approvals shall be identified on the Title Sheet of each increment.

3.2.4

4.

Mixed use of different editions of CBC on an incremental project is not permitted. If a subsequent increment is submitted after a new edition of CBC becomes effective, the applicable edition of CBC will be determined as follow: 4.1 When no more than six months have elapsed between the approval of one increment and the submittal of a subsequent increment, the subsequent increment shall be designed to meet all the requirements of the edition of CBC that was in effect when the project application was first filed with DSA. When six months or more have elapsed, a new application and fees will be required for the remaining unapproved increment(s), which shall be designed to meet the requirements of the current edition of CBC.

Implementation of New Editions of the California Building Code:

4.2

5.

Examples of Increments See Appendix A.


For additional information on appropriate increments, design professionals should consult with the Intake Architect at a DSA Regional Office.

DSA IR A-11 (rev 03-11-08)

Incremental Submittals

Page 4 of 4

Appendix A - Examples of Incremental Projects


The following examples are provided to assist in defining the scope of increments and in completing form DSA-1.INC. Two projects are defined below along with suggestions for alternative ways to divide the scope of work for each project into increments.

Project 1:

The scope of work for Project 1 consists of the Construction of two classroom buildings (simple wood-frame buildings), Addition to and Alteration to a multi-purpose building (complex masonry buildings), and Relocation of four relocatable buildings. Project 1 may be divided into increments as follow: Scenario A Increment 1 - Construction of: site development, Increment 2 - Relocation of: four relocatable buildings, Increment 3 - Construction of: two classroom buildings, Increment 4 - Addition to: multi-purpose building, and Alteration to: multi-purpose building. - OR Scenario B Increment 1 - Construction of: site development and Relocation of: four relocatable buildings, Increment 2 - Construction of: two classroom buildings, Increment 3 - Addition to: multi-purpose building, and Alteration to: multi-purpose building - OR Scenario C Increment 1 - Construction of: site development and Relocation of: four relocatable buildings, Increment 2 - Construction of: two classroom buildings and Addition to: multi-purpose building, and Alteration to: multi-purpose building The scope of work for Project 2 consists of Construction of field buildings (a restroom building, a press box and a concession building), Construction of outdoor bleachers and a score board, and site work. Project 2 may be divided into increments as follow: Scenario A Increment 1 - Construction of: restroom building, concession building, scoreboard and site work, Increment 2 - Construction of: bleachers, and Increment 3 - Construction of: press box. - OR Scenario B Increment 1 - Construction of: restroom building, scoreboard and site work, Increment 2 - Construction of: concession building, and Increment 3 - Construction of: bleachers, and press box.

Project 2:

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

ASSISTANT INSPECTOR APPROVAL


References: California Building Standards Administrative Code, (Title 24, Part 1) Sections 4-211, 4-333, and 4-341 California Education Code, Sections 17309, 17311 and 81141 Discipline: Structural

IR A-12
Revised 02-27-09 Revised 10-03-07 Issued 06-01-06 See IR A-7

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12), Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose:

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) describes the requirements for the approval of assistant inspectors. All assistant inspectors must complete a two-step process of (1) certification and (2) approval by DSA before they are permitted to work on a school construction project.

IR A-7 explains the requirements for DSA certification for both assistant and project inspectors. IR A-7 also explains the requirements for project approval of project inspectors. IR A-12 specifies requirements for project approval of assistant inspectors.

Background: There are three types of inspectors who may perform code-required inspections on school construction projects:
Project Inspector - is responsible for ensuring that all code-prescribed inspection and administrative duties are completed, including supervision of assistant inspectors and monitoring of special inspectors. The Class 1 project inspector may utilize one or more assistant inspector(s) to assist in performing inspection and administrative duties on a project. Assistant Inspector - may be utilized, or may be required, to assist a Class 1 project inspector. Assistant inspectors provide inspection and administrative assistance to the project inspector on a project. An assistant inspector must be qualified by obtaining DSA Certification as a project inspector. Qualified assistants must be approved by DSA for each project as explained in Section 3.3 and 3.4 below. Special Inspector - a specially qualified person utilized, where required by code, to inspect specific aspects of the work, such as structural steel welding or masonry construction.

1.

Utilization of Assistant Inspectors: On larger, more complex, or fast-paced projects the necessity to utilize assistant inspector(s) must be assessed. For example, the need for an assistant inspector should be discussed with the DSA field engineer when construction cost exceeds $15,000,000. DSAs approval of the project inspector may be contingent upon adequate provision for assistant inspector(s).
The scope of all construction work that the assistant will inspect and any other codeprescribed duties that the assistant will perform must be described on Form DSA-5A.

DSA IR A-12 (rev 02-27-09)

Assistant Inspector Approval

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DSA IR A-12 (rev 02-27-09)

Assistant Inspector Approval

Page 2 of 3

2.

Requirements for the Use of an Assistant Inspector: DSA has established the following requirements for the certification, approval, and use of any assistant inspector on a public school construction project.
Only DSA-Certified Class 1 project inspectors may utilize assistant inspectors. A project inspector may not utilize more than three simultaneously without the express written approval of DSA. assistant inspectors

2.1 2.2 2.3

The project inspector must provide continuous on-site supervision of all assistant inspectors. The project inspector shall not assign the assistant inspector to inspect work at a project site when the project inspector will not be present unless special written DSA approval is obtained in advance. Upon request, the project inspector must submit a written plan indicating the project inspectors proposed presence at all concurrent projects. The plan must provide for continuous on-site supervision of all assistant inspectors. Both the project and assistant inspector must keep a log of time spent on-site, and must indicate this information on each semi-monthly report. All assistant inspectors must be qualified by DSA Certification as a project inspector, Class 1, 2, 3, or 4. See IR A-7 and the DSA website for more information regarding DSA inspector certification Once certified, assistant inspectors must be approved by the appropriate DSA Regional Office for each project on which the assistant inspector works.

2.4

2.5 2.6

2.7

3.

Certification and Approval of an Assistant Inspector A Two-Step Process


DSA Certification as a project inspector, Class 1, 2, 3 or 4, is the first step in becoming an assistant inspector. See IR A-7 for certification requirements. Approval is the second step. This step occurs for each construction project. DSA Approval of an assistant inspector must be obtained from the appropriate DSA Regional Office before the assistant inspector can work on a project.

3.1

Approval of the Assistant Inspector for a Project An assistant inspector must be approved by DSA for each specific project. An Assistant Inspector Qualification Record (Form DSA-5A) must be submitted to the appropriate DSA Regional Office for approval at least 10 working days prior to use of the assistant inspector on the project. The design professional in general responsible charge is advised to consult the DSA field engineer prior to submittal of the Form DSA-5A to DSA, in order to verify that the assistant inspector meets the criteria for approval by DSA.

3.2 3.2.1 3.2.2 3.2.3

Criteria for DSA Approval of an Assistant Inspector An assistant inspector must: Be DSA Certified as a project inspector, Class 1, 2, 3 or 4, Have work experience in inspection or construction (refer to IR A-7, Section 2, item 2) with the trades that the assistant inspector will be inspecting, Demonstrate that his or her current workload and time commitment to the project are acceptable (refer to IR A-7, Section 2, item 3),

DSA IR A-12 (rev 02-27-09)

Assistant Inspector Approval

Page 3 of 3

3.2.4 Have satisfactory DSA performance ratings on previous school construction projects (refer to DSA IR A-8), and 3.2.5 Be employed directly by the school district.

4.

Project and Assistant Inspectors Responsibilities

A project inspector is responsible for ensuring that all code-prescribed inspection and administrative duties are completed per IR A-7 and IR A-8. The assistant inspector is responsible for performing assigned inspections in a similar manner. When an assistant inspector is utilized on a project the project inspector and assistant inspector must both sign each semi-monthly report.

5.

Inspector Performance Rating

The DSA field engineer observes the project inspectors and assistant inspectors performance of code-prescribed duties during the course of construction, including the project inspectors monitoring of the assistant inspectors performance (IR A-8, Section 1, item 7). The DSA field engineer completes an Inspectors Performance Rating for the project inspector and for the assistant inspector (refer to IR A-8, Section 2). The performance rating is used by DSA as a basis for approval of the project inspector and the assistant inspector on future projects.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

STOP WORK AND ORDER TO COMPLY


References: California Building Standards Administrative Code (Title 24, Part 1) Section 4-334.1 California Education Code, Section 17307.5 and 81133.5 California Health and Safety Code, Section 16017.5

IR A-13
Issued 04-05-07

This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff to promote more uniform statewide criteria for implementation of the Stop Work authority. This IR is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm for currently effective IR's (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual).

State Architect (DSA) may issue an Order to Comply or a Stop Work Order when construction work is not being performed in conformance with existing law and/or project plans and specifications and which failure could compromise the structural integrity of the building creating a danger to public safety. Examples of situations when the public safety may be endangered include but are not limited to the following: construction starts without first obtaining DSA approval of plans and specifications, unapproved or defective construction work is proceeding, unapproved or non-complying materials of construction are used, applicable building codes or standards are not being met, required tests or inspections are not being performed, or any other circumstances where DSA determines that the public safety could be endangered.

Background: The Department of General Services by delegation to the Division of the

1. Implementation: DSA may issue an Order to Comply or a Stop Work Order when work is proceeding that, in the sole opinion of DSA which is not subject to challenge, may result in construction that could endanger the public safety. Generally, an Order to Comply will be issued prior to a Stop Work Order 2. Order to Comply: DSA may issue an Order to Comply (Order). The Order shall describe the deviation(s) that need to be resolved and a deadline for response. A sample Order is attached. The DSA Regional Manager and the Field Supervisor will review the Order prior to issuance. The Order shall be signed by the State Architect or a designated representative. The Order shall be sent to the owner of the project by regular and registered mail. The order shall be effective at the time it is first deposited in the mail. The owner of the project shall be responsible for enforcing the Order.
2.1 Resolution of Orders to Comply: When in the sole opinion of DSA the deviations described in the Order to Comply have been satisfactorily corrected, the DSA Field Engineer will acknowledge in his or her Field Trip Notes that the Order has been satisfactorily addressed and a letter will be sent to the owner of the project acknowledging that the issue has been resolved. Stop Work Order: A Stop Work Order may be issued when construction work is not being performed in conformance with existing law and or DSA approved plans and specifications and could compromise the structural integrity of the building creating a danger to public safety. A Stop Work Order may be issued without first issuing an
Stop Work and Order to Comply Page 1 of 5

2.2

DSA IR A-13 (iss 04-05-07)

DSA IR A-13 (iss 04-05-07)

Stop Work and Order to Comply

Page 2 of 5

Order to Comply based on the circumstances and at DSAs sole discretion. The DSA Regional Manager and the Field Supervisor will review the information provided and determine whether or not a Stop Work Order should be issued. The Stop Work Order will be signed by the State Architect or a designated representative and delivered to the owner of the project by certified mail with return receipt requested. A sample Stop Work Order is attached. Copies will be sent to the project contractor, inspector, architect, and structural engineer. No further work will be permitted in the affected areas until authorized by DSA in writing. The project owner shall be responsible for stopping the construction work. Once a Stop Work Order has been issued, no construction work, except that work necessary to correct deviation(s) addressed in the Stop Work Order may be performed on the project. When corrective work requires approval of change orders or construction change directives by DSA such approvals shall be obtained prior to performing corrective work. Exception: The Stop Work Order may describe a specific area of the project or a specific aspect of the work which shall be stopped; in this case work may proceed in areas, or aspects, of the project that are not affected by the Stop Work Order. The Owner of the project shall be responsible for enforcing the stop work order or order to comply and making sure that the work is corrected in accordance with applicable laws, codes, plans and specifications, and any other applicable project documents. 2.3 Resolution of Stop Work Order: The project inspector shall notify DSA when the contractor has completed the corrective work. A DSA Field Engineer shall verify that the required work has been completely and properly performed in accordance with DSA approved documents. When the DSA Field Engineer has accepted the corrective work in a Field Trip Note, the State Architect or a designated representative will rescind the Stop Work Order by regular and registered mail and work may resume. Enforcement: If work does not stop immediately upon issuance of a Stop Work Order the matter will be referred to the Office of the Attorney General for enforcement.

2.4

to comply however, DSA will not issue any such order invoking its stop work/order to comply authority for incidental, or minor nonstructural additions, or nonstructural alterations.

3.

Limitations: It is in the sole discretion of DSA to issue a stop work order or order

4. Delay Claims: As a result of any contractors or any subcontractors failure (and which failures are not due to the failure of the project owner) to comply with the laws, plans and specifications or other project documents which results in the issuance of a stop work order or order to comply, any delay which occurs in the affected project work until correction of the work has been completed, and a recission of the stop work order (or order to comply) has been issued to allow resumption of work, any such delay should not constitute a basis for any delay claim by the contractor or any subcontractor.

APPENDICES Sample Order to Comply letter Sample Stop Work Order letter Sample Stop Work notice

State of California Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor State and Consumer Services Agency

DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES


Division of the State Architect
Headquarters 1102 Q Street, Suite 5100 Sacramento, CA 95811 (916) 445-8100 Fax (916) 445-3521 www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov

(Month Day, Year)


(Superintendent of Schools c/o School Board Facility Name and Address) RE: ORDER TO COMPLY (Project Description) Dear (Mr./Ms. name):

SAMPLE

DSA File #: (??-??) Application #: (??-??????)

Sent by regular mail and certified mail

This letter is to inform you that construction work on the referenced project is not being performed in accordance with existing law and may compromise the integrity of the building and endanger the public safety. You are strongly encouraged to take action to resolve the problems described below. It is suggested that the School District order further construction to be stopped until the problems described below are resolved to the satisfaction of the Division of the State Architect (DSA). Failure to comply with this order could result in the issuance of a Stop Work Order by DSA pursuant to California Education Code Section (choose one: 17307.5 for k-12 schools, 81133.5 for community colleges, or Health and Safety Code Section 16017.5 for essential services buildings) and California Building Standards Administrative Code (Title 24, Part 1) Section (choose 4-334.1 for schools or 4-237.1 for essential services buildings). Description of Problems: (Describe construction deviations. Refer to DSA approved details and/or Code sections as applicable. Suggestions for corrections or other appropriate actions may be included when appropriate. Explain why the problem may endanger the public safety). Please notify DSA no later than (date, ten working days from the date of this letter is suggested) of the measures that will be taken to correct the problems. A schedule for implementation of the proposed corrective measures is also requested. This Order to Comply will be rescinded when corrections are satisfactorily completed in accordance with DSA approved documents under the inspection of a DSA approved project inspector. If you have any questions regarding this matter, please contact me at (telephone number). Sincerely,

(name), Regional Manager cc: (name) Project Contractor (name) Project Inspector (name) Project Architect (name) State Architect (name) Policy Deputy - DSA (name) Operations Deputy - DSA (name) DSA Legal Counsel (name) Attorney General

State of California Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor State and Consumer Services Agency

DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES


Division of the State Architect
Headquarters 1102 Q Street, Suite 5100 Sacramento, CA 95811 (916) 445-8100 Fax (916) 445-3521 www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov

(Month Day, Year)


(Superintendent of Schools c/o School Board Facility Name and Address) RE: STOP WORK ORDER (Project Description) Dear (Mr./Ms. name):

SAMPLE

DSA File #: (??-??) Application #: (??-??????)

Sent by regular mail and certified mail

You are hereby ordered to stop all construction work on the referenced project because (state reasons such as: work is proceeding without benefit of Division of the State Architect (DSA) approved plans and specifications, a project inspector approved by DSA, and/or construction is proceeding that will compromise the structural integrity of the structure and could endanger the pubic safety). (When work is non-compliant provide a description of the portions of the work and how they are non-compliant. include reference to appropriate, details on drawings, sections in the specifications and/or sections in Codes or Standards when applicable to clarify how the construction is non-compliant and unsafe.) Enclosed are STOP WORK NOTICES that you are required to post in prominent locations on the construction project site. Pursuant to California Education Code Section (choose one: 17307.5 for k-12 schools, 81133.5 for community colleges, or Health and Safety Code Section 16017.5 for essential services buildings) and California Building Standards Administrative Code (Title 24, Part 1) Section (choose 4-334.1 for schools or 4-237.1 for essential services buildings), all construction work, except for work necessary to repair or mitigate deficient construction described herein, (preceding exception must be deleted when work is proceeding without DSA approval or without an approved project inspector) on the above described project shall immediately cease until a written authorization to rescind this order is issued by this Office. If work does not stop immediately the matter will be referred to the Office of the Attorney General for enforcement action. This Stop Work Order will be rescinded when corrections are satisfactorily completed in accordance with DSA approved documents and under the inspection of a DSA approved project inspector. If you have any questions regarding this matter, please contact me at (telephone number). Sincerely,

(name), State Architect cc: (name) Project Contractor (name) Project Inspector (name) Project Architect (name) Regional Manager (name) Policy Deputy DSA (name) Operations Deputy - DSA (name) DSA Legal Counsel (name) Attorney General

Enclosure

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES

DIVISION OF THE STATE ARCHITECT


Pursuant to Section 4-334.1 of the 2001 California Building Standards Administrative Code, CCR Title 24, Part 1

STOP WORK ORDER


Appl. # ____________ File # ___________
School District: Date of Inspection:

STOP WORK ORDER


TAKE NOTICE THAT THIS BUILDING/STRUCTURE IS IN CONTRAVENTION OF THE CALIFORNIA BUILDING CODE.

Project: ________________________________________________ Project Location: _________________________________________ _______________________________________________________

Stop Work Order issued by:

State Architect

ALL WORK (AS NOTED BELOW) WILL CEASE IMMEDIATELY.


Any person who continues to work on this building/structure or area after having been served this stop work order, shall be subject to penalties prescribed by law, unless that person is directed to remove a violation or unsafe condition. Contact DSA Sacramento Regional Office at (916) 445-8730 if any questions

DESCRIPTION OF AFFECTED WORK: ___________________________________________________________________________


____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

No person shall remove, or obstruct the visibility of any DSA order posted unless authorized by DSA

DSA-351 (04-05-07)

STOP WORK ORDER NOTICE

California Department of General Services

Division of the State Architect

Interpretation of Regulations Document

WALK-IN FREEZERS AND COLD STORAGE BOXES


Reference: 2001 and 2007 Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317 Discipline: All

IR A-14
Issued: 08-28-07

This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations clarifies the Division of the State Architect
(DSA) review and acceptance of walk-in freezers and cold storage boxes (WIF/CSB).

Background:

DSA does not review the design and fabrication of pre-manufactured equipment, but does check anchorage of equipment to resist gravity and lateral loads. Walk-in freezers and cold storage boxes are typically constructed from prefabricated wall and roof panels interconnected with cam-locks. The strength of the cam-locks is determined by static tests. Some WIF/CSB may be designed with different interconnection systems for the panels.

Policy:

DSA will accept WIF/CSB as pre-manufactured equipment for public school construction projects if the construction meets the indoor or outdoor installation requirements of this policy. Otherwise, WIF/CSB shall be designed to meet the requirements of California Building Code (CBC) for new buildings.

1. Requirements for Indoor Installation: The WIF/CSB units must be confined on three sides by walls capable of resisting seismic forces from the WIF/CSB units as prescribed by CBC Section 1632A (2007 CBC Section 1613A). Mechanical anchorage is not required, and restraint may be provided by bearing on walls or floor curbs. On the fourth side, with door, supplemental lateral bracing must be provided per Section 2.3.2 below. Supplementary bracing shall not block or interfere with doorways or means of egress. Requirements for Outdoor Installation: Outdoor installation may be accepted as pre-manufactured equipment if the WIF/CSB unit meets the limitations and requirements of Sections 2.1 to 2.6 below.
2.1 2.2 2.3 Dimensional Limitation: WIF/CSB units are limited to 250 square foot of enclosed areas and ten feet in height. Snow Load Limitation: Snow load shall be limited to the lesser of 20 psf or the manufacturers recommendation. Installation Options: Provide either fencing or supplemental lateral bracing around the perimeters as follow:

2.

DSA IR A-14 (iss 08-28-07)

Walk-in Freezers and Cold Storage Boxes

Page 1 of 2

DSA IR A-14 (iss 08-28-07)

Walk-in Freezers and Cold Storage Boxes

Page 2 of 2

2.3.1 2.3.2

Fencing Option: Enclose the WIF/CSB unit by a fence with a clear space between the fence and the unit equal to the height of the unit, or Supplementary Bracing Option: Provide supplemental lateral bracing around the perimeters of the WIF/CSB units, i.e. steel lateral frames, steel columns or bollards, etc. Supplementary bracing shall be designed to resist the required seismic and/or wind forces for new buildings per the California Building Code (CBC), Chapter 16A, Divisions III and IV respectively (2007 CBC Sections 1609A and 1613A respectively). Anchorage: WIF/CSB units installed outside of building shall be anchored to resist the required wind and seismic forces required for new buildings per the California Building Code (CBC), Chapter 16A, Divisions III and IV respectively. DSA Review: DSA will check the foundation and anchorage capacities per Section 2.4 above, and the supplemental lateral bracing per Section 2.3.2 above. Provide plans, details, specifications, calculations, and any other information that are necessary to complete the DSA reviews. Abutting a Building: When a WIF/CSB unit is located adjacent to another building, the WIF/CSB, if recommended by the manufacturer, may be attached to, and laterally supported by the building. A California registered architect or structural engineer shall provide calculations to verify the adequacy of the existing building to support the design forces imposed by the adjacent WIF/CSB unit. Alternatively, the WIF/CSB may be separated from the adjacent building by a structural joint at least two inches clear and provided with supplementary lateral bracing on four sides in accordance with Section 2.3.2 above.

2.4

2.5

2.6

4. Fire Life Safety Requirements: An automatic fire sprinkler system is required for WIF/CSB units that are housed in or adjacent to a building protected or required to be protected by an automatic fire sprinkler system. DSA will check WIF/CSB units installed indoors.
4.1 When WIF/CSB are installed outdoors or adjacent to buildings, site plans showing all approved fire lanes shall be submitted. DSA will check the site plan to ensure no fire access lanes are obstructed by the WIF/CSB units.

5.

Access Compliance Requirements: Commercial kitchens used only by employees are generally considered to be work stations requiring compliance with CBC Section 1123B.2 (32 clear entry opening, aisles, and floors and levels). Pre-manufactured walk-in coolers and freezers used only by employees within a commercial kitchen (work station) are considered to be kitchen equipment not requiring compliance with accessibility provisions.

However, if pre-manufactured walk-in freezers or cold storage boxes are used by students as a part of their education curriculum, or they are used by the general public, they are not considered to be a part of an employee only work station and therefore must meet all accessibility requirements of the California Building Code.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

TESTING AND INSPECTION OF REMOTELY FABRICATED STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS


References: California Administrative Code (CAC), Title 24, Part 1, Sections 4-330 through 4-339 Discipline: Structural

IR A-15
Revised 12-17-09 Revised 10-15-07 Issued 08-13-03 as CR A-1

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose:

The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify the requirements for testing of materials and inspection of the construction that takes place offsite. Examples of construction that may take place off-site include, but are not limited to: modular buildings, bleachers, light poles, elevators, and structural elements of buildings.

This IR is pertinent to project inspectors, testing laboratories, laboratory technicians, and special inspectors working on projects under DSA jurisdiction.

1.

General: In general all aspects of construction shown on DSA approved documents require personal inspection by an inspector approved by DSA. However, packaged equipment such as HVAC units, motors, transformers, etc need not be inspected during fabrication. Structural components such as poles for lights, platforms for HVAC units, prefabricated ramps, elevator guide rails, wood and/or steel open-web joists, wood trusses, etc. require inspection. Many building components are not constructed at the site where they will be used. The requirements for testing of materials and inspection are the same independent of the location where the construction takes place. Supervision is provided by DSA for proper enforcement of the Field Act during the construction of a building, structures, or elements of a structure.

See IR 17-4 for further information on the basics of testing and special inspection as well as a clarification of specific procedures considered to be tests vs. special inspections.

2. Exceptions: Inspection and testing of factory built relocatable buildings and bleachers (grandstands) are exceptions to this interpretation:
2.1 DSA has a program for the inspection of factory-built buildings constructed at a location remote from the project site. DSA offers a (factory built) Relocatable Building In-Plant (RBIP) inspector examination to qualify individuals to perform this type of multi-disciplinary inspection. Details and an application for the RBIP examination are available from the DSA Headquarters Office. The fabrication of bleachers is addressed in DSAs Interpretations of Regulations Manual; see IR 16-5 for the 2001 CBC or IR 16-10 for the 2007 CBC. The Interpretation of Regulations Manual may be downloaded at: http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov, click on Publications.

2.2

DSA IR A-15 (rev 12-17-09) (corrected 03-17-10)

Testing and Inspection of Remotely Fabricated Structural Elements

Page 1 of 3

DSA IR A-15 (rev 12-17-09) (corrected 03-17-10)

Testing and Inspection of Remotely Fabricated Structural Elements

Page 2 of 3

3.

Definitions:

Assistant inspector - An individual approved by DSA to assist the project inspector on the project site. See IR A-8 and IR A-12 for further information. Project Inspector An individual approved by DSA to inspect all aspects of construction for a project. The project inspector may utilize assistant or special inspectors for some aspects of the construction. Relocatable Building In-plant (RBIP) inspector An individual approved to inspect the fabrication of modular buildings in the factory. For an application to become certified by DSA as a Relocatable Building In-Plant Inspector by DSA see the DSA website at: http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/other/RBIP_Examination_Application_2-24-04.pdf. Special inspector An individual acceptable to DSA to provide inspection of a specific aspect of construction (such as welding or masonry) either on or off the project site. See IR 17-6 for further information on special inspection. Testing The testing of structural materials or completed elements of a structure. See IR 17-5 for further information on testing.

4.
4.1

Testing:
Material testing requirements will be listed on the Test and Inspection List (Form DSA-103) and in the plans and/or specifications for each project. Materials must be sampled, handled, transported, and tested by a testing facility accepted in DSAs Laboratory Evaluation and Acceptance (LEA) program. When approved by the DSA field engineer, an LEA accepted laboratory may subcontract testing of materials to a facility that is not LEA accepted when all of the conditions of Section 4.1.1 through 4.1.4 are met.

4.1.1 An LEA accepted facility does not exist within 300 miles of both the material supplier location and the material fabrication location. 4.1.2 The material tests to be performed are routine and the materials to be tested are used in an ordinary manner. Unusual materials and/or applications may require testing by an LEA accepted facility at the discretion of the DSA field engineer for the project. 4.1.3 The facility to which services are subcontracted operates under the supervision of the engineer in charge of the LEA accepted facility for the project. The LEA laboratory engineer must evaluate the subcontract facilitys management, personnel, equipment, operations, practices, etc. to verify that: All personnel involved in the sampling, handling, and testing of material are fully aware of all applicable codes, and standards (including special Title 24 code requirements) for the sampling, testing, and reporting of materials tests required for the project. The subcontract facility has been evaluated by recognized agencies as required by the applicable ASTM standards (including ASTM E329, ASTM C1077, etc.) for the specific tests that are required for the project. The subcontract facility participates in proficiency sampling programs as required by the applicable ASTM standards (including ASTM E329, ASTM C1077, etc.) for the specific tests that are required for the project.

4.1.4 The LEA laboratory engineer shall include all tests performed by the subcontract laboratory on his laboratory final verified report.

DSA IR A-15 (rev 12-17-09) (corrected 03-17-10)

Testing and Inspection of Remotely Fabricated Structural Elements

Page 3 of 3

5.

Inspection. Certain aspects of construction require inspection by an inspector approved by DSA. In general, only Special Inspectors and Relocatable Building In-Plant inspectors are approved by DSA to inspect construction that occurs off-site. A special inspector must be provided for welding, precast concrete, or other aspects of construction requiring special inspection (see Appendix A of IR 17-4 and the Structural Testing and Inspection List, Form DSA-103 for aspects of construction that require special inspectors). Aspects of construction that usually require inspection by the project inspector when performed on site shall be inspected by a Relocatable Building In-Plant Inspector when performed off-site. Such aspects of construction include but are not limited to plywood shear wall nailing, gypsum wall board installation, roofing, electrical or mechanical work, etc.
5.1 Relocatable Building In-Plant Inspection. In-plant inspectors are responsible for all aspects of inspection of construction that occurs in the fabrication plant. Inspection, reporting, employment, and all other aspects of inspection are identical to those defined for project inspectors except that the scope of work for which the in-plant inspector is responsible will not be the entire scope of the project. The portions of the construction that will occur in the fabrication plant and the portions that will occur at the project site must be clearly defined as part of the DSA approved documents or on the Forms DSA-5 for the in-plant inspector as well as the project inspector (Note: for relocatable building projects the project inspector is often referred to as the site inspector). In-plant inspectors are required to be certified as Class 1 inspectors or as RBIP inspectors (see Section 3.1) by DSA. Special Inspection. Special inspection requirements for certain aspects of the construction will be identified on the Tests and Inspections List as well as the DSA approved plans and/or specifications. Construction processes requiring special inspection (including welding, precast concrete, fabrication of glued-laminated lumber, wood trusses, etc.) must be inspected by an appropriately qualified special inspector. Special inspectors must either be employed by an LEA approved testing facility or directly by the school district. Exception: When approved by DSA the special inspector may be employed by a non-LEA approved testing facility when the conditions of Section 4.1.1 through 4.1.3 above are satisfied.

5.2

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CHARTER SCHOOLS ENFORCEMENT JURISDICTION


References: California Building Code: Section 1134B California Education Code: Sections 17078.52-17078.66, 47610. Discipline: Structural Safety, Fire Life Safety, Access Compliance

IR A-16
Issued 11-01-07 Supersedes DSA Policy # 94-19

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies the enforcement agency jurisdictional authority for Charter School construction projects, such as new building and facility construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation, alterations, and additions. 1.
must be submitted to DSA for plan review and construction oversight.

State Funded Charter School facilities construction projects: Such projects

2. Non-State Funded Charter School facilities construction projects: If the Charter School facility construction project does not use State funds, independent of land ownership, the project must be submitted to either:
2.1 2.2 DSA for plan review and construction oversight. The local building enforcement agency with jurisdiction over the area in which the charter school is located.

3.

Additional Accessibility Requirements: Additional accessibility related alterations may be required to existing buildings or facilities (regardless of funding source) depending on existing conditions. As part of the project submittal to the enforcing agency (per Sections 1 or 2 above), documentation of the accessibility features of the existing facilities must be included for review and approval demonstrating that the completed project will be in full compliance with the accessibility provisions of Title 24.

DSA IR A-F (iss 11-01-07)

Charter Schools Enforcement Jurisdiction

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

VOIDANCE OF APPLICATIONS AND PROJECT RE-SUBMITTAL


References: California Building Code (CBC), Part 1 Section 4-318. (c)

IR A-17
Issued 02-01-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for School District Officials and Design Professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for Voiding Applications during the plan review phase of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose:

The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to provide clear consistent criteria under which an application becomes void during the plan check phase of a project.

Background: The California Building Standards Administrative Code, Title 24 Part 1, Section 4-318, Item (c), defines criteria under which an application may be voided. The voidance is at the discretion of DSA. This IR clarifies two of the voidance criteria under which DSA will void the application. The reason DSA has determined to exercise the discretion to void the applications is because inappropriate elapsed time from a submittal to subsequent submittals causes ineffective and improper use of DSA staffing resources. Some examples are:
Projects are placed in our filing system for an undefined time, causing a backlog of projects with unknown status. Staff hours spent on obtaining full intimate project knowledge and understanding is lost as time elapses. The contract for DSA contract plan checkers, when used, expires in the elapsed time causing contractual issues. This sometimes results is DSA staff assuming the remaining work and always requires DSA staff time to resolve. Original plan comments become potentially archaic as new codes, standards and regulations become effective.

1.

Implementation: DSA will implement discretionary authority to void projects.

The following criteria under which a project will be voided during the plan check phase are herein clarified: 1.1 Prints from the corrected plans or corrected original plans must be filed for backcheck within 6 months after the date of return of checked plans to the architect or engineer. DSA may, upon request, grant one 6 month extension. The backcheck must be completed within 2 months after being initiated. For incremental projects, subsequent incremental plans and specifications must be submitted to DSA for checking within 6 months after the approval of the previous increment has been issued.

1.1.1 1.1.2 1.2

2. Re-submittal of Voided Projects: Any project application or approval that has been voided by DSA can be re-submitted as a new project by filing a new application and fee in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-315 (b). Plans, specifications and design shall comply with the requirements of the current California Building Standard Code.
DSA (SS) IR A-17(iss 02-01-08) (errata 5-20-10) Voidance of Applications and Project Re-Submittal Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

USE OF CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS PREPARED BY OTHER PROFESSIONALS


References: California Administrative Code, Title 24, Part 1, Sections 4-316, 4-317 Professional and Vocational Regulations, Title 16, Division 5, Section 415 California Business and Professions Code, Sections 5536.1, 6735 Discipline: Structural

IR A-18
Revised 04-27-10 Revised 07-01-09 Issued 02-01-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies situations where the use of a
statement of general conformance is acceptable in lieu of over-stamping on projects under the jurisdiction of the Division of the State Architect (DSA).

Background: Business and Professions Code Sections 5536.1 and 6735 and Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317(h), requires signature and seal (or stamp) of the architect or engineer in general responsible charge to be shown on the basic construction documents that include plans, specifications, calculations, reports, etc.
In certain situations, such as listed in Section 1.2 below, when the architect or engineer in general responsible charge utilizes construction documents prepared, signed, and stamped by other California Licensed professionals, DSA would accept the Statement of General Conformance, shown in Appendix A, in lieu of the signature and seal (or stamp) from the architect or engineer in general responsible charge (Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317(g)).

Policy:

When the following requirements are met, DSA will accept a Statement of General Conformance (Appendix A) from the architect or engineer in general responsible charge when he or she utilizes construction documents prepared, signed, and stamped by other professionals, in lieu of his or her own signature and stamp on those construction documents.

1.

Statement of General Conformance: The use of the Statement of General Conformance is subject to the limitations and conditions set forth in Sections 1.1 and 1.2 below:
Limitations and Conditions: DSA will have the final determination if the Statement of General Conformance is applicable or not. The architect or engineer in general responsible charge and the architect or engineer who has been delegated responsibility for a portion of a project shall prepare a Statement of General Conformance and a signature block, and provide his/her signature. The Statement shall indicate that he/she personally reviewed and coordinated the document(s) prepared by others and found it to be in general conformance. Languages such as reviewed by X/Y/Z Company, and found to be will not be acceptable. Acceptable examples of the Statement of General Conformance and signature block are shown in Appendix A and B respectively.
Use of Construction Documents Prepared by Other Professionals

1.1 1.1.1 1.1.2

DSA IR A-18 (rev 04-27-10)

Page 1 of 4

DSA IR A-18 (rev 04-27-10)

Use of Construction Documents Prepared by Other Professionals

Page 2 of 4

1.1.3

The Statement of General Conformance shall not be construed as relieving the architect or the structural engineer in general responsible charge of his or her rights, duties, and responsibilities under Sections 17302 and 81138 of the Education Code and Sections 4-336, 4-341 and 4-344 of Title 24, Part 1. (Quoted from Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-316 (b)) California registered professional engineers or licensed specialists who perform the engineering designs and prepare the construction documents, which are considered to be in general conformance by the architect or engineer in general responsible charge, must be competent in the subject area in accordance with Title 16, Division 5, Section 415. Applicability: The Statement of General Conformance may be used for the following: Deferred approvals, When previously approved pre-Check (PC) documents are utilized as part of a project and there are no changes from the DSA approved PC documents, The Statement of General Conformance may be used for the basic construction documents in lieu of stamps and signatures required per Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317(h).

1.1.4

1.2 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3

2.

Changes to Documents Prepared by Other Professionals: This section


also applies to DSA approved PC documents. If the architect or engineer in general responsible charge makes any change to the construction documents prepared by other professionals, DSA would accept the changes under either of the following conditions: The signature and stamp of the original professional appears on the change and the architect or engineer in general responsible charge provides a Statement of General Conformance, or The architect or engineer in general responsible charge assumes responsibility for the changed portion in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-316(c) and subject to the approval of DSA. If the changes significantly affect the safety of the entire structure, the architect or engineer in general responsible changes shall assume responsibility for the entire design.

3.

Documents Signed and Stamped by Out-of-State Professionals: Only


documents signed and stamped by California licensed design professionals are acceptable to DSA.

4.

Use of the Statement of General Conformance: The Statement and the signature block shall be prepared and signed per Section 1.1.2 above, and shown on the documents prepared by others and/or the project construction documents as follows:
Statement of General Conformance shall be shown on the cover sheet, the index sheet, or as directed by DSA. Signature Block shall be shown together with the Statement Conformance and as directed by DSA. of General

4.1 4.2

APPENDICES:
Appendix A Example of Statement of General Conformance Appendix B Example of Signature Block

DSA IR A-18 (rev 04-27-10)

Use of Construction Documents Prepared by Other Professionals

Page 3 of 4

APPENDIX A:
Example of Statement of General Conformance

Statement of General Conformance


FOR ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS WHO UTILIZE PLANS,
INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO SHOP DRAWINGS, PREPARED BY OTHER LICENSED DESIGN PROFESSIONALS AND/OR CONSULTANTS (Application No. ______________________ File No. ______________)
Th e drawings or sheet s listed on th e cover or index sh eet This d rawing, page of specifications/calculations have been prepared by oth er d esign professionals or consultants who are licensed and/or auth orized t o p repare su ch drawings in this state. It has been examined by me for: 1) design intent and appears t o meet th e ap prop riate requirements of Title 24, California Code of Regulations and the proj ect specifications prepared by me, and 2) coordination with my plans and specifications and is acceptable for incorporation into the construction of this project. The Statement of General Conformance shall not be construed as relieving me of my rights, duties, and responsibilities under Sections 17302 and 81138 of the Education Code and Sections 4-336, 4-341 and 4-344 of Title 24, Part 1. (Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317 (b))

DSA IR A-18 (rev 04-27-10)

Use of Construction Documents Prepared by Other Professionals

Page 4 of 4

APPENDIX B:
Example of Signature Block

I find that:

All drawings or sheets listed on the cover or index sheet

This drawing or page


is/are in general conformance with the project design intent, and has/have been coordinated with the project plans and specifications.

is/are in general conformance with the project design, and has/have been coordinated with the project plans and specifications.

Signature

Date

Signature

Date

Architect or Engineer designated to be in general responsible charge

Architect or Engineer delegated responsibility for this portion of the work

Print Name

Print Name

License Number

Expiration Date

License Number

Expiration Date

California Department of General Services

Division of the State Architect

. Interpretation of Regulations Document

DESIGN PROFESSIONALS SIGNATURE AND SEAL (STAMP) ON CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS


Reference: Title 24, Part 1, Sections 4-316, 4-317, and 4-318 Business and Professions Code Sections 5536.1 and 6735 Discipline: ALL

IR A-19
Revised: 04-07-08 Issued: 02-01-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose:

The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify when signatures and seals/stamps are required and where they shall be shown on construction documents for projects under DSA jurisdiction.

Background: Title 24, Part 1, requires the architect or engineer in responsible charge of a project to assume responsibility for the safety of design of the project. The stamp and signature of the architect or engineer on a plan, specification, or other document shall be deemed evidence that full responsibility is assumed by the signatory for work shown (Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-316 (e)). Policy: The architect or the engineer in general responsible charge, and other
professionals delegated for preparation of portions of the project must be licensed or registered by the state of California, and shall provide his/her signature, stamp and registration number on plans, specification, calculations and other documents in accordance with Business and Professions Code and Title 24, Part 1.

For plans and specifications, seals (stamps) and signatures may be applied manually or electronically and may be in original or reproduced form. For documents submitted electronically for approval through DSAs electronic plan review program, Architects and Engineers must apply digital signatures with Public Key Cryptography to the final construction documents (record set, see Section 2). Refer to DSA Procedure PR 08-01 for more information.

1.

Plan Check Documents: The licensed architect or the registered engineer in general responsible charge shall provide his/her stamp, and a notation as to the intent of the document, such as For Plan Check Only. (Business and Professions Code, Sections 5536.1 and 6735)
1.1 Structural Calculations and Reports: Signature, seal or stamp, date of signing and sealing, license number and expiration date shall be shown on the cover sheet of the calculations and reports at the time of submittal.

2. Construction Documents: In accordance with Business and Professions Code, Sections 5536.1 and 6735, the architect or the engineer in general responsible charge, and other professionals delegated for preparation of portions of the project (Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317 (g)), shall provide, on their respective plans and specifications that are permitted or to be released for construction (i.e., record set), the following:

DSA IR A-19 (rev 04-07-08)

Design Professional Signature and Seal (Stamp) on Construction Documents

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DSA IR A-19 (rev 04-07-08)

Design Professional Signature and Seal (Stamp) on Construction Documents

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2.1

Plans: Signature, seal or stamp, date of signing and sealing, license number and expiration date shall be shown on each drawing sheet. Signature must be provided before plans are approved by DSA. Specifications: Signature, seal or stamp, date of signing and sealing, license number and expiration date shall be shown on the cover sheet or signature sheet as the minimum. Signature must be provided before the specifications are approved by DSA. Documents by Others: When using construction documents prepared by other professionals, the architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge, in lieu of overstamping, may provide a statement of general conformance in accordance with IR A-18. Also see Section 3 below.

2.2

2.3

3. Deferred Approvals: A California licensed architect or registered engineer stamps and signs the plans and specifications for the deferred approval item. The architect or the engineer in general responsible charge of the design of the project shall submit the plans and specifications for the deferred approval item, with the notation indicating that the deferred approval documents have been found to be in general conformance with the design of the building (Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317 (g)). See DSA IR A-18 for more details on the Statement of General Conformance.
The Statement of General Conformance shall not be construed as relieving the architect (in general responsible control) or structural engineer in general responsible charge of his or her rights, duties, and responsibilities under Sections 17302 and 81138 of the Education Code and Sections 4-336, 4-341 and 4-344 of Title 24, Part 1. (Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317 (b)) 3.1 Overstamping: If the architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge had exercised responsible charge (per Business and Professions Code, Section 6703) in the preparation of the deferred approval documents, he or she may overstamp and sign those documents.

4. Pre-Check (PC) Documents: The requirements of Section 2 above shall apply. See also Section 6.1 of DSA Procedure PR 07-01, Pre-Check (PC) Approval Procedure, for additional requirements. For changes to an approved PC document, see Section 2 of IR A18, and Sections 7 and 8 of this IR. 5. Site or Landscape Work: The architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge of a project may delegate the portions of the site work or landscape work containing access compliance and fire life safety features. Documents for these portions of a project may be prepared, stamped and signed by a competent (see Title 16, Division 5, Section 6731) civil engineer or landscape architect, as permitted by the Business and Professions Code Sections 6731 and 5615, respectively.
5.1 Civil Engineers: If the entire project consists of only site work and/or non-school buildings (Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-314), a California registered civil engineer may assume general responsible charge for the project. Landscape Architect: If the entire project consists of only landscape work and/or non-school buildings, a California registered landscape architect may assume general responsible charge for the project.

5.2

6. Assumption of Responsibility for Incomplete Documents: If construction documents, deferred approval documents, PC documents, etc. bear the signature and stamp of an architect or engineer who has left the project, deceased, or whose license or registration has been revoked, cancelled, or retired before his/her design or construction

DSA IR A-19 (rev 04-07-08)

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was completed, another licensed architect or registered engineer shall assume responsibility for the project or the portion of the project for which the original architect or engineer was delegated responsibility, in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Sections 4-316(c) and (d).

7.

Re-Stamping/Re-Signing of Completed Documents:

7.1 When Re-Stamping/Re-signing not required: Once a set of documents is properly stamped and signed by an architect or engineer whose license or registration was current at the time of signing, it is considered valid. Re-stamping and re-signing of valid documents are not required except as listed in Section 7.2 below. DSA shall have the final decision on whether re-stamping/re-signing is required or not. Death of the Architect or Engineer: If an architect or engineer dies, any valid documents that were signed while he/she was alive and his/her license was current at the time of signing should be considered valid after death unless there is cause. Expired, Suspended, or Revoked Licenses: similar to Section 7.1 above. 7.2 When Re-Stamping/Re-signing Is Required: Re-stamping and re-signing of valid documents are generally not required unless there are probable causes. Some of the probable causes for re-stamping and re-signing are, but not limited to, the following: The architect or engineer of record exercises his/her right to assume responsibility in accordance with Section 7 of this IR. The stamps and signatures were improperly or fraudulently placed on the documents. The documents have become expired or void. 7.3 Changes to Valid Documents: See IR A-18, Section 2.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

NEW PROJECTS ASSOCIATED WITH EXISTING UNCERTIFIED PROJECTS


References: Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-339 California Education Code, Sections 17280-17316 and 81130-81147 Discipline: All

IR A-20
Revised 08-06-09 Issued 04-15-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies the Division of the State Architect
(DSA) review and approval of projects associated with uncertified school buildings.

Background: A certification of compliance is issued by DSA for a public school building


project when the work of construction has been completed in accordance with the requirements of the Field Act, Education Code Sections 17280-17316 and Sections 8113081147. Any building project that has not received a certification of compliance in accordance with Section 4-339, Part 1, Title 24, California Code of Regulations is considered uncertified.

New work involving uncertified projects cannot be approved by DSA until the issue of certification is resolved. DSA will not approve (stampout) plans and specifications for alteration and/or addition projects on, or utilizing portions of, uncertified projects except when the new project is solely for the purpose of upgrading fire-life safety (FLS) aspects of the building/campus as indicated below.

Policy:

1.

EXCEPTIONS:

1.1 Scopes: The scopes of the projects accepted for DSA approval under this policy shall be limited to FLS alterations of the following types: 1.2 Campus or system-wide fire alarm upgrade, or Upgrade or replacement of the uncertified buildings fire alarm system.

Implementation: DSA will review and approve the FLS only alteration projects on uncertified buildings as described in Section 1.1 above. DSA written approval of the alteration plans and specifications issued to the school district will specify: The approval is only for the FLS alterations, and The building itself remains uncertified.

1.3

Disclosure: The scopes of the projects and the uncertified buildings on the alteration project must be clearly identified in the following manner: The scope of the alteration project shall be clearly shown on the cover sheet or index sheet of the plans,

DSA IR A-20 (rev 08-06-09)

New Projects Associated with Existing Uncertified Projects

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DSA IR A-20 (rev 08-06-09)

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The following disclosure statement shall also be shown on the cover sheet or index sheet: DSA approval of these plans shall not be construed as the Certification of Compliance for the following building(s) as required by the Field Act, Education Code Section 17280-17316 and Sections 81130-81147: and

Immediately after the disclosure statement, list all the uncertified buildings on the alteration project.

2.0 Other Projects: DSA may begin review of other projects not identified in Section 1 above, associated with uncertified projects. However, DSA approval (stamp out) of the plans and specifications shall be withheld until the issue of certification is resolved.
Appendix Clarifying Situations: Many situations occur that may or may not involve uncertified buildings/projects to the extent that a proposed new project may be affected. This appendix lists some of those situations in an attempt to provide clarity, uniformity and consistency in the application of this IR. #1: Q. The district submits a project for a fire alarm upgrade and/or fire alarm addition. The project requires connecting the new fire alarm system/components into a fire alarm panel that resides in an uncertified building. A. See 1.2 Implementation above except: The new project submittal must include the following two documents from NFPA 72 to be completed and submitted with the project. 1. Fire alarm system record of completion. 2. Fire alarm inspection and testing form. #2: Q. A school building is not certified and the district submits an application to DSA for an alteration or addition to that building. A. DSA will accept the new application and provide plan review but will not issue project approval (stampout) until and unless the issue of certification is resolved. #3: Q. The district submits an application to DSA for a new building but the new building depends on portions of an uncertified project to be minimum code compliant (e.g. accessible restrooms located in uncertified buildings, path-of-travel part of an uncertified project, parking part of an uncertified project, etc.). A. DSA will accept the new application and provide plan review but will not issue final approval (stamp out) until and unless the associated project certification is resolved. (See also Project Certification Guide on DSA website for potential alternatives.)

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New Projects Associated with Existing Uncertified Projects

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#4: Q. The district submits an application to DSA for a new project on a campus but the entire campus (or portions of the campus) is not certified. A. As long as the new project does not depend on uncertified construction to satisfy minimum code requirement (accessible restrooms, path-of-travel, parking, etc.) DSA will accept the new project as a viable, approvable project. #5: Q. The district submits an application to DSA for a new classroom building but another ancillary building (gymnasium, administration building, shade structure, library etc.) is not certified. A. As long as the new project does not depend on uncertified construction to satisfy minimum code requirement (accessible restrooms, path-of-travel, parking, etc.) DSA will accept the new project as a viable, approvable project.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

DESIGN, INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE OF FIRE ALARM (F/A) SYSTEMS


References: California Building Standards Code (CBSC) Title 24 Part 1, Sections 4-225(c) and 4-316 (e) California Business and Professions Code, Sections 7026.12 & 7058 C.C.R., Title 16, Professional and Vocational Regulations, Division 8, Article 3, Classifications and Section 832.16 Health & Safety Code 13195 & 13196.5 2002 or Current National Fire Alarm Code - NFPA 72 Discipline: Structural

IR A-21
Revised 08-25-09 Issued 04-15-09

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies who is qualified in California to

design, install, and maintain fire alarm systems (F/A) for projects under the jurisdiction of the Division of the State Architect (DSA), according to the requirements of the California State Licensing Board (CSLB) and applicable referenced standards for all F/A installations in public schools, community colleges, and state essential services buildings.

1.
1.1

Who Can Design F/A Systems:


All system design and installation must comply with 2002 NFPA 72 Section 4.3.2. An Electrical Engineer or a C-10 licensed electrical contractor is authorized to design the system within the parameters of their license. When the architect or engineer in general responsible charge utilizes construction documents prepared, signed, and/or stamped by other professionals, such as a Fire Protection Engineer or a National Institute of Certification in Engineering Technologies (NICET) III and/or IV certified person, the architect or engineer in general responsible charge must stamp and sign those documents. DSA will accept the Statement of General Conformance, shown in Appendix A, of DSA IR A-18 (see http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm) in lieu of the signature and seal (or stamp) from the architect or engineer in general responsible charge (Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-225(c) or 4-316(e)).

1.2

2.
2.1

Who Can Install F/A Systems?:


The installation of F/A systems designed by an Electrical Engineer or other individuals as noted in Section 1.2 above, may be contracted out to other firms qualified to install F/A systems. Any system designed by a C-10 licensed electrical contractor must be installed by that contractor with his/her own employees and under the supervision of the licenseholder. Such systems may not be installed by another company or individual not professionally associated with the licensed installation contractor.

2.2

DSA IR A-21 (rev 08-25-09)

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DSA IR A-21 (iss 08-25-09)

Design, Installation and Maintenance of Fire Alarm (F/A) Systems

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2.2.1

Sub-contracting of either the design or installation by the contracted C-10 licensed electrical contractor is allowed within the parameters of contract law. However the original C-10 licensed electrical contractor will remain the supervisor and must retain liability and insurance responsibility for both design and construction. AB 931 (Electricians Certification Program) is a law passed in 1999, along with other bills AB 1078, and AB 1719, which amends Section 3099 of the California Labor Code. This section of the Labor Code now requires ALL Electrician Employees of C-10 licensed electrical contractors working on circuits that exceed 100 VA in the State of California to be tested, and "certified" by the State to perform work under an Electrical Contractors (C10) license. Effective January 1, 2006, General Journeyman and Fire/Life Safety Technicians must carry cards, issued by the Division of Apprenticeship Standards (DAS), that prove they are certified, and which must be presented to the authority having jurisdiction, upon request of the code enforcement official. As per 2002 NFPA 72: Section 4.3.3, F/A system installation personnel shall be supervised by persons who are qualified and experienced in the installation, inspection, and testing of fire alarm systems. Examples of qualified personnel shall include, but not be limited to, the following: Electrical Engineer; Factory trained and certified personnel, working under the supervision of a C10 licensed electrical contractor; National Institute of Certification in Engineering Technologies (NICET) fire alarm level II certified personnel working under the supervision of a C-10 licensed electrical contractor; and Personnel licensed or certified by state or local authority.

2.2.2

2.2.3

2.3

Systems designed and submitted utilizing one manufacturers equipment may be substituted for a different manufacturers equipment provided the substitution is accomplished via the DSA Change Order process, and must include the following: New Manufacturers applicable product data sheets; and Battery and Voltage Drop calculations to match the new product data sheets; and Any location changes, additions or deletions of devices or appliances must be shown on updated floor plans. NICET certification is a recommended, but not a minimum requirement in California for California State Agencies. Local Ordinances requiring less or additional measures, devices, or appliances shall not apply to public school facilities and may not be required by the Local Fire Authority or any other local entity (Hall vs City of Taft).

2.3.1 2.3.2 2.3.3 2.4 2.5

3.
3.1

Who Can Maintain F/A Systems?:


Fire Alarm Systems shall be maintained by qualified persons, such as a person trained by the manufacturer to maintain the system. See NFPA 72, Chapter 10, 10.2.2.5; examples of qualified persons.

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3.2

Programming of Fire Alarm Control Panels shall be done by factory authorized and trained personnel. Warranties may be compromised if systems are not maintained according to recognized standards and manufacturers guidelines.

3.3

4. 4.1

Testing of Fire Alarm Systems: Acceptance Testing: Acceptance testing of projects under DSA construction oversight shall be performed by the C-10 licensed electrical contractors qualified supervisory personnel or their installing technicians and witnessed by the Project Inspector. The Local Fire Authority may be invited, as a courtesy, to witness the final acceptance test of the DSA approved system so the Local Fire Authority can become familiar with the workings of the system and the systems configurations. The Local Fire Authority is not obligated to witness the test nor authorized to delay the testing until witnessing can be scheduled. The Local Fire Authority may not require but may ask for or recommend changes to the DSA approved system. A Change Order shall be generated and processed through DSA. Initiation of any change shall not be performed without prior approval of DSA. Annual Testing: The fire alarm systems shall be tested in compliance with 2002 NFPA 72: Chapter 10, Table 10.4.3. In addition, the Local Authority is charged with inspecting all schools within their jurisdiction at least annually. During the inspection of the facility, a functional test of the fire alarm system and evacuation drill shall be performed to ensure that the system performs as originally approved by DSA. The testing can be done by qualified individuals trained by the installer, or by individuals employed and qualified by the installing C-10 licensed electrical contractor or by individuals employed by a qualified C-10 licensed electrical testing company. Witnessing of the Test and Evacuation Drill shall be performed by the Local Fire Authority. Testing after maintenance or repair: Testing performed after maintenance or repairs have been performed shall be made by repair/maintenance technicians trained and/or qualified by the manufacturer or as noted in NFPA 72, Chapter 10, 10.2.2. Systems that require extensive replacement, modernization, or upgrade shall be submitted to DSA for review and approval (see IR A-10). Witnessing of tests after routine maintenance or minor repair shall be done by the Local Fire Authority. The responsibility of the Local Fire Authority is to ensure that the system operates as originally installed and approved by DSA.

4.1.1

4.1.2

4.2

4.3

4.3.1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

SMALL PROJECTS EXEMPT FROM DSA REVIEW


References: California Building Code, Part 1, Section 4-314, Part 2, Section 1134B Discipline: Structural, Fire-Life Safety, Access Compliance

IR A-22
Issued 08-15-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify when plans

and specifications for small construction projects on existing public school sites are required to be submitted to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) for review, approval and construction oversight. Field Act (Education Code Sections 17280-17317, 17365-17374, and 81130-81149) are required to be submitted to DSA for review and approval by the Access Compliance Section of DSA. See Government Code Sections 4450-4461. Also see Appendix A of this IR for projects that fall into this category.

1.

Access Compliance Requirements: Some projects that are exempt from the

Field Act but not requiring DSA approval shall comply with all currently effective design, construction and inspection provisions of the California Code of Regulations, Title 24. When authorizing construction of projects described in this interpretation, the school district assumes responsibility to assure compliance with all code provisions. Architects and engineers providing project design must be licensed as required by the rules governing the licensing of architects and engineers. See Business and Profession Code Sections 6735 and 5535 through 5538. All projects, whether governed by the Field Act or not, shall comply with all applicable accessibility provisions of the California Code of Regulations, Title 24.

2.

California Building Standards Code Compliance: Projects subject to the

3.

Exempt Small Projects: See Appendix A for a list of small projects and the review requirements for Structural Safety (SS), Fire-Life Safety (FLS) and/or Access Compliance (AC). Items listed in the Appendix are exempt only when they constitute the entire scope of a project. Exempt Reconstruction and Alterations: In addition to projects listed in Appendix A, projects involving alterations, repairs or additions to existing school buildings may be exempt from DSA review and approval based on the estimated construction costs. Refer to IR A-10, Reconstruction and Alteration Projects Exemption from DSA Approval.

4.

5.

Voluntary Submittal: This interpretation does not preclude a school district from choosing to submit plans and specifications for exempt projects, with the appropriate fee to DSA for review. Voluntary submittal of an exempt project will trigger full DSA plan review for code conformance and construction oversight including inspections and materials testing.
Small Projects Exempt From DSA Review

DSA (SS) IR A-22 (iss 08-15-08) corrected 12-17-09

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DSA (SS) IR A-22 (iss 08-15-08) corrected 12-17-09

Small Projects Exempt From DSA Review

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Appendix A Review of Small Projects


Those items eligible for exemption listed below are exempt from DSA review and approval only when they constitute the entire scope of a project.

Project Description 1. Poles less than 35 feet tall (lighting poles, flag poles, poles supporting open mesh fences, etc.) 2. Poles less than 25 feet above the roof line when attached to an existing school building (antennas, flag poles, etc.) 3. Cell or antenna towers 4. Soil retaining walls less than 4 feet tall without surcharge or a sloping backfill 5. Baseball dugouts less than 250 sq. ft. of floor area with lightweight roof construction and walls less than 4 feet tall resisting (active, passive or at rest) soil pressure with no sloping backfills or surcharge. 6. Ball walls or yard walls less than 6 feet above grade 7. Free standing signs, scrolling message signs, scoreboards, or solid clad fences less than 8 feet above grade 8. Bleachers and grandstands five rows of seats or less 9. Ancillary accessory facilities to athletic fields with light metal or wood frame construction (one-story, not over 250 square feet, used for equipment storage, toilets, snack bars, ticket booths, etc.) 10. Playground equipment 11. Large playground equipment resembling buildings and over 250 square feet 12. Open-mesh baseball backstops 13. Open-mesh fences 14. New or replacement of sidewalks 15. Landscaping 16. Replacement in kind of mechanical, electrical, or plumbing units when the cost does not exceed the thresholds in IR A-10 17. Cosmetic maintenance work such as painting, re-carpeting, wallpapering, reroofing, etc., as defined in Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-314.

SS/FLS Review Required? Yes No

Access Compliance Review Required? Yes No

2 2 3 3 3 2

1 1 1

1 1,4

4 4

DSA (SS) IR A-22 (iss 08-15-08) corrected 12-17-09

Small Projects Exempt From DSA Review

Page 3 of 3

18. Installation of synthetic (artificial turf) play fields or running tracks 19. Installation of new parking areas 20. Installation of new surfacing over existing parking areas (such as asphalt overlays) 21. Removal and replacement of existing parking area surfacing 22. Installation of seal-coating at existing parking areas (including new striping), or normal maintenance such as restriping or the filling of potholes and cracks

5 5

Notes: 1. No height limit for Access Compliance exemption 2. Required for all, no exception. 3. Access Compliance will review the accessible path of travel to the playground/facility 4. Required if accessible path of travel is impacted 5. If accessible parking spaces are impacted

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CONSTRUCTION COST REPORTING AND DSA FEES


Reference: Title 24, Part 1 Sections 4-322, 4-331, 4-343

IR A-23
Issued 11-03-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify tasks that are
considered to be construction tasks subject to DSA fee calculation.

Background: Alternative project delivery systems have been developed in recent years
that assign certain construction related responsibilities to construction managers or other entities. Some of these duties were traditionally performed by the construction contractor. Such duties must be included in calculating construction costs which are used to determine final fees due to DSA.

Note: Although certain portions of the Construction Management fees will be considered construction related costs and utilized in determining DSA fees, please be aware that the Office of Public School Construction (OPSC) does not consider these costs to be construction related for purposes of having funds released in the School Facility Program with certain exceptions. Please consult with the OPSC for further clarification of these Construction Management exception areas. 1. DSA Fees: Final DSA fees are based on the total final construction cost for the project. The initial contract amount is reported to DSA on a Contract Information Form (Form DSA-102). All changes to construction cost are tracked via change orders during the course of construction to arrive at a final construction cost. Construction management costs for the project are subject to DSA fees when such management fees constitute a portion of the construction cost. See Section 3 below for clarification of services that are considered to be part of the construction cost. Construction management fees paid for services that are not related to construction are not subject to DSA fees except per Section 1.2 below.
1.1 If school district employees, or volunteers, perform substantial construction work, the estimated value of the work shall be reported on Form DSA-102. The name of the person responsible for the construction shall also be specified on Form DSA-102. At the conclusion of construction, the person responsible shall file a final verified report as the designated contractor on Form DSA-6, certifying that all construction was performed in accordance with DSA approved documents. When an entity is contracted to perform any of the services described in Section 2. below then the entire contract amount shall be reported to DSA on Form DSA-102 and shall be subject to DSA fees, even if part of the services included in the contract would not otherwise be subject to fees.

1.2

DSA IR A-23 (iss 11-03-08)

Construction Cost Reporting and DSA Fees

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DSA (SS) IR A-23 (iss 11-03-08)

Construction Cost Reporting and DSA Fees

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Exceptions: 1. If non-construction costs are segregated by separate contract payment items, by separately priced items of change orders, or by a certified copy of a subcontractors bid, or by an entitys proposal in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-322 then the non-construction costs shall not be subject to DSA fees. 2. DSA fees for entities (e.g.: Construction Managers, Program Managers, etc.) may be prorated based on percentage of time spent on construction tasks. 1.3 1.4 The value of donated materials and/or materials provided by the school district must be reported on Form DSA-102. Each submittal of contract information is to be made on Form DSA-102. Each contract must be identified by a contract number in consecutive order to assist in record keeping and future reference. Such identification must be noted on change orders which affect that contract. Change orders for each contract shall be numbered in sequence starting with number one (see IR A-6 for further information on change orders). When a single contract covers work described in more than one DSA application the cost relevant to each application shall be clearly broken out and a separate Form DSA-102 shall be submitted for each application. Also, change order costs shall be broken out for each application and clearly described on each change order.

1.5

2. Definition of Construction: Any entity, including construction managers, that performs construction tasks as defined in Section 3 below shall be subject to all the rules and requirements applicable to construction contractors including but not limited to:
Entities contracted to perform construction are not permitted to be involved in hiring, supervising or performing testing or inspection services. Shall be identified on a Contract Information Form (Form DSA-102) which shall be submitted to DSA prior to start of construction. Shall be subject to all inspection and testing requirements applicable to construction contractors including deviation notices per Section 4-342(b)7 of Title 24, Part 1. Shall be subject to requirements of Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-343.

3.

Construction Tasks: Contracts to perform construction tasks shall be deemed by DSA to be construction contracts, and shall therefore be reported (on a Contract Information Form DSA-102). Costs of such contracts shall be included in final DSA fee calculations. Construction tasks include, but are not limited to, the following:
Performing, hiring, contracting, or subcontracting for construction work. (Note: assisting the school district with the preparation, advertising and bidding of prime contracts between the school district and a construction contractor shall not be considered a construction cost by DSA); Purchasing construction materials; Coordinating, scheduling, supervising or controlling multiple-prime contractors; Directing or coordinating day-to-day contractors or subcontractors; activities of construction workers,

DSA (SS) IR A-23 (iss 11-03-08)

Construction Cost Reporting and DSA Fees

Page 3 of 3

Providing temporary facilities including but not limited to site trailers, furnishings, equipment, utilities, etc. for contractors, inspectors or other personnel; Obtaining and/or paying for local permits and/or arranging for the delivery of power, telephone, water and other temporary utilities required for construction; Providing construction site security; Developing detailed construction schedule(s); Providing quality control and/or safety audits of contractors; Arranging for permanent utility hook-ups for the new construction; Requesting, directing or arranging for inspections of fire alarm systems, food service systems, elevators, or other similar construction; Arranging for a fire watch during construction for the construction site and/or for existing buildings while fire safety systems are non-functional for any reason as a result of the construction; Providing clean-up work including the removal of trash and/or construction debris.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CONSTRUCTION PHASE DUTIES OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT, CONTRACTOR, AND DESIGNER


Reference: Education Code Sections 17280-17311 and 81130-81147 Title 24, Part 1 Sections 4-315, 4-316, 4-333, 4-335, 4-336, 4-338, 4-341, 4-342, and 4-343

IR A-24
Issued 11-03-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Publications/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to provide background


for school districts so that contracts for construction management, project administration or other alternate delivery methods are properly written. Specifically, this interpretation will:

clarify the duties of the school district, designer and the construction contractor with regard to the construction phase of the project, and clarify potential conflicts of interest with regard to construction, inspection and construction oversight.

General: The school district may contract with construction managers or other entities for assistance with monitoring the design and/or construction process. Construction phase duties that must be performed by specific entities per Title 24, Part 1 are listed in this IR. These duties may not be re-assigned to other entities. (Exception: Some of the duties of the construction contractor may be performed by a construction manager however; DSA might then consider the construction manager contract as a construction contract. See Section 5.3 below.) See IR A-23 for definitions of activities that are considered construction tasks.

1.
1.1

DUTIES OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT:


Design: The school board shall employ (or contract to) a qualified architect or structural engineer to be in general responsible charge of the design of the project. The designer shall not perform construction nor share any interest with any entity performing construction. Exceptions: 1. When the project involves no structural or architectural construction a qualified engineer registered in that branch of engineering applicable to the work may be in general responsible charge of the project; see Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-316. 2. The designer need not be independent of the builder when the design/build requirements of Education Code Sections 17250.10 through 17250.50 are met.

1.2

Inspection: The school board shall provide for the cost of inspections by the project inspector and, when required, all assistant and/or special inspectors. In general, the project inspector and any assistant inspectors must be contracted directly to (or
Construction Phase Duties of the School District, Contractor, and Designer Page 1 of 4

DSA (SS) IR A-24 (iss 11-03-08)

DSA (SS) IR A-24 (iss 11-03-08)

Construction Phase Duties of the School District, Contractor, and Designer

Page 2 of 4

directly employed by) the school board. The school board may contract to a third party for the project or assistant inspectors employment only under the condition that the inspectors employer shall not perform, nor offer to perform, any design or construction related tasks (see IR A-23, Section 2). Special inspectors may only be contracted directly to (or employed by) the school board or the testing laboratory. 1.3 Testing: The school board shall contract directly to a testing laboratory for the performance of structural tests as defined by the DSA approved plans and specifications and summarized on Form DSA-103. The testing laboratory must be accepted in the DSA Laboratory Evaluation and Acceptance (LEA) program, see IR 17-5. Note that the school board may collect the cost of certain tests from the contractor in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-335(c). Soils Investigations and Testing: The school board shall contract directly with a California registered geotechnical engineer for the performance of soils and geologic investigations (for design) when required. During construction the school board shall contract directly with an LEA accepted testing laboratory which employs or contracts with a registered geotechnical engineer for soils testing, see IR 17-7. Notice of Completion: The school board shall submit a notice of completion to DSA for each contract upon satisfactory completion of construction shown on the DSA approved documents.

1.4

1.5

The architect or engineer in general responsible charge of the project is responsible to see that completed construction conforms to plans and specifications approved by DSA and shall perform the following duties: 2.1 Prior to Start of Construction: Prepare drawings and specifications for construction. Prepare a Statement of Tests and Special Inspection (Form DSA-103). Obtain DSA approval of drawings, specifications, and Form DSA-103 prior to the issuance of any contracts for construction. Review and evaluate the qualifications and experience of the testing laboratory and all project, assistant and special inspectors prior to employment. Advise the school district on the selection of the inspectors and testing laboratory for the project. Submit an Inspectors Qualification Record (Form DSA-5 and/or DSA-5A) for all project, assistant, and (when required) special inspectors to DSA at least 10 days prior to start of work. Submit a Contract Information Form (Form DSA-102) for all construction contracts. See IR A-23 for definitions of construction costs. Provide a complete set of all DSA approved documents including the T&I List (Form DSA-103), addenda, deferred approvals, change orders and field change documents (see IR A-6) to the inspector and the testing laboratory. During Construction: Make observations of construction as required by Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-333(a). Also, see Section 4-316(b) regarding delegation of responsibility.

2.

DUTIES OF THE DESIGNER(S):

2.2

2.2.1 Observe Construction:

DSA (SS) IR A-24 (iss 11-03-08)

Construction Phase Duties of the School District, Contractor, and Designer

Page 3 of 4

Verify that the DSA approved documents are being properly interpreted and implemented by all parties and that construction is proceeding in accordance with DSA approved documents. Review shop drawings and submittals and respond in a timely manner; verify that shop drawings and submittals conform to the requirements of the DSA approved drawings. Review and respond in a timely manner to all requests for information (RFIs) from the contractors, inspectors, and testing laboratories. Verify that all RFIs from contractors are passed through the project inspector in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-343(b). Evaluate non-conforming construction and/or materials and make decisions regarding acceptability and/or corrections required; notify DSA as to the disposition of all non-conforming construction and/or materials. Provide general direction to the project inspector and notify the school board and DSA by letter if the project inspector is found unable or unwilling to perform his or her duties. Issue clarifications and/or interpretations of DSA approved documents as required. Create and submit all addenda, deferred approvals, change orders, and FCDs to DSA for approval. Issue change orders or Field Change Documents (FCDs), in accordance with IR A-6, as required to correct any errors or omissions in the DSA approved documents. At the conclusion of Construction: Submit a final verified report on Form DSA-6A/E. Administer the closing process by verifying that all required documents are submitted to DSA, responding to DSA 90-day letters, and taking such actions that may be necessary to make sure that all required documents are submitted to DSA in a timely manner.

2.2.2 Construction Administration:

2.2.3 Interpretations, Clarifications and Changes: 2.3

3.

3.1

DUTIES OF THE CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTOR:


Preparation for Construction: Submit a Statement of Responsibility to the project inspector in accordance with Title 24, Part 2, Section 1706A. Carefully review the DSA approved construction documents well in advance of construction and request clarification, interpretation or correction for any items that appear unclear, inconsistent, missing, or in error. All such requests shall be made to the architect or engineer in general responsible charge through the project inspector. Provide a written construction schedule to the project inspector well in advance of performing the work and keep the inspector up-to-date with all changes to the schedule. Performance of Construction: Perform all construction in accordance with DSA approved documents. Provide quality control of all work including the work of all subcontractors.

3.2

DSA (SS) IR A-24 (iss 11-03-08)

Construction Phase Duties of the School District, Contractor, and Designer

Page 4 of 4

Immediately correct any construction that is not in accordance with DSA approved documents. Note: the contractor may elect to request changes to the requirements of the DSA approved documents from the architect rather than replace noncompliant work when it is in the best interest of the school district and the public safety to do so. See Section 2.2.3 above for changes to DSA approved documents. Notify the project inspector, special inspectors, and the testing laboratory of the start of each and every aspect of the construction. Provide access to the construction for all inspectors, testing laboratory personnel and DSA representatives. Submit a final verified report on Form DSA-6.

Section 4-342 for the duties of the project inspector.

4.

DUTIES OF THE PROJECT INSPECTOR:

See IR A-8 and Title 24, Part 1,

CONSTRUCTION MANAGERS: The term construction manager as used in this interpretation is intended to apply to any consultant to the school district contracted to assist with project planning, monitoring of design and/or monitoring of construction. Construction managers do not have Code required duties; all duties assigned to construction managers are contractual.
5.1 Construction management contracts vary in scope from project to project. Tasks that may be included in a construction management contract include but are not limited to: Monitoring the progress of construction; Monitoring pay requests; Monitoring the Request for Information (RFI) process; Facilitating communications; Advising the school district on various aspects of the construction process.

5.

5.2 Construction managers are not permitted to perform duties that are assigned by Code to the school district, designers, testing laboratory or the inspectors (see paragraph 1, 2, and 4 above). 5.3 When construction managers contract to perform construction tasks (as defined in IR A-23) the construction manager will be considered to be a construction contractor and will be subject to all the duties and responsibilities of a construction contractor (see paragraph 3 above). Also, the cost of the construction management contract shall be considered to be part of the total construction cost used to calculate the final DSA fee (see IR A-23).

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

DESIGN, INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE OF AUTOMATIC FIRE SPRINKLER SYSTEMS (AFSS)

IR A-25
Issued 05-26-09

References: 2007 CBSC Title 24 Part 1, Sections 4-209, 4-225 (c) and 4-316(e) 2002 NFPA 13 and 24 California Business and Professions Code, Sections 6737.1, 7026.12, 7057 & 7058 C.C.R., Title 16, Professional and Vocational Regulations, Section 832.16 Health & Safety Code 13195 & 13196.5 Discipline: Fire and Life Safety

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies who is qualified in California to

design, install, and maintain automatic fire sprinkler systems (AFSS) for projects under the jurisdiction of the Division of the State Architect (DSA), according to the requirements of the Contractors State Licensing Board (CSLB) and applicable referenced standards.

1. General Requirements: Any AFSS, both underground and overhead portions, submitted to DSA for approval shall meet the following requirements.
1.1 Design Professional (DP): For the purpose of this IR, the architect or engineer in general responsible charge [sometimes called the Architect Of Record (AOR) or the Engineer Of Record (EOR)] shall be referred to as the design professional (DP). The DP is at all times responsible for the design and construction oversight and must coordinate the pipe sizes and designs with hydrant requirements and the anticipated demand of the fire sprinkler system(s) that will be fed by the underground piping. 1.1.1 1.1.2 Fire Protection Engineer (FPE): An FPE is an individual licensed in the state of California and able to design underground or overhead portions of an AFSS. Contractors: A Class A (General Engineering Contractor), Class C-16 (Fire Protection Contractor), Class C-34 (Underground Piping Contractor) Class C-36 (Plumbing Contractor) contractors may design and install systems, within the parameters of their license, as long as the systems designed are installed by that contractor or employees under the supervision of the license-holder. Such systems may not be installed by another company or individual not professionally associated with the licensed design/build contractor. Subcontracting of Design or Installation: Sub-contracting of either the design or installation portion of the AFSS by the contracted General A, C-16, C34, or C-36 licensed contractor must follow the parameters of Contract Law. However the original licensed General A, C-16, C-34 or C-36 contractor shall remain the supervisor and must retain liability and insurance responsibility for both design and construction. Design/Build Contractor: For the purposes of this IR, a design/build contractor is a contractor with a General A, C-16, C-34 or a C-36 contractors
Design, Installation and Maintenance of Automatic Fire Sprinkler Systems (AFSS)

1.1.3

1.1.4

DSA IR A-25 (iss 05-26-09)

Page 1 of 4

DSA IR A-25 (iss 05-26-09)

Design, Installation and Maintenance of Automatic Fire Sprinkler Systems (AFSS)

Page 2 of 4

license who submits a bid for a contract, is subsequently awarded a contract to design, and then builds to that design a portion or portions of an AFSS. A C-16 contractor may design/build underground, Backflow Preventers, Double Detector Check Valves, Gate Valves, Hydrants, Fire Pumps and/or other pressure reducing or increasing devices, and overhead portions of the AFSS. A General A and a C34 contractor may design/build the underground portion, including exterior (outside of the building) Backflow Preventers, Double Detector Check Valves, Gate Valves, Hydrants, Fire Pumps, and/or other pressure reducing or increasing devices of the AFSS,. A C-36 may design/build the underground portion, from the property owners side of the utility meter to the structure or fixed work, (outside of the building) including Backflow Preventers, Double Detector Check Valves, Gate Valves, Hydrants, Fire Pumps, and/or other pressure reducing or increasing devices of the AFSS 1.2 Construction Documents: When the DP utilizes construction documents prepared by other professionals, such as a Fire Protection Engineer, a Class A (general Engineering Contractor), C-16 (Fire Protection Contractor), Class C-34 (Underground Piping Contractor), or a C- 36 (Plumbing Contractor) the DP must stamp and sign those documents. In lieu of the signature and seal (or stamp) of the DP, DSA will accept the Statement of General Conformance from the DP. See Appendix A and B of DSA IR A-18. Water Supply Data: Water supply data must be included with the initial plans and specification submittal per current edition of the NFPA 13. Systems that require fire pumps, water tanks, or other measures to provide required water flow and or pressures must be pre-approved by DSA and submitted with the AFSS plans. Water flow testing data must indicate the volume and pressure available for the AFSS design. Testing data must be dated and may not be older than 6 months from the date of submittal of documents to DSA. Submittal of test data to DSA shall be wet signed by the Water Purveyor, or by the Local Fire Authority that conducted or witnessed the test. If the AFSS is to be a deferred submittal, water supply data must be included with the deferred submittal. The original water supply documentation may be duplicated and included with the deferred AFSS package if the date of the water flow test is equal to or less than 6 months old at the time of the deferred submittal. Submittals that exceed the 6 month time frame will require additional tests and documentation. The time frame will be based upon the actual date the deferred submittal was received by DSA. 1.4 Plans: The following information shall appear on all plans. (For a more detailed guideline, and additional required information see Fire and Life-Safety Plan Review Submittal Guidelines AFSS on the DSA Web Site.) Note The term elevation in the following is used to mean the depth or height of equipment or features noted on plans as a point above or below grade where the underground piping supplies the AFSS riser or risers. 1.4.1 1.4.2 Test Hydrants: Test hydrants, static and residual, must be located and identified, including the hydrant elevations. Water Supply: Location and elevation of main feeds at point of connection with public water supplies, water tanks, or other water supplies approved by DSA. Hydraulic calculations must include all points of connection, devices, valves or other equipment that affects the water flow and pressure. Devices and Valves: The locations and identification (by type, model and manufacturer) of all Backflow Preventers, Double Detector Check Valves, Gate

1.3

1.4.3

DSA IR A-25 (iss 05-26-09)

Design, Installation and Maintenance of Automatic Fire Sprinkler Systems (AFSS)

Page 3 of 4

Valves, Hydrants, Fire Pumps and/or other pressure reducing or increasing devices shall be noted on the plans. Manufacturers product data sheets shall be provided with the submittal. Pressure reducing or increasing component manufacturers product data sheets shall include the GPM/PSI flow charts, curves, and any other documentation to confirm the reduction or increase of pressures. Provide dimensioned details of all components, including elevations, methods of support, supervision (monitoring), securing, freeze protection and working clearances for firefighters. 1.4.4 Piping: Indicate all elevation changes, turns, and pipe size or type changes for underground piping, and indicate the type of fittings (long elbow, Tee, etc.) used in the underground piping plans. Changes to the proposed piping plans, due to unknown site conditions or other reasons, must be submitted to DSA via the DSA Change Order process (see IR A6). Additional or supporting documentation may be required before approval is granted. 1.4.5 Anchoring of Piping: Methods of securing piping (thrust blocks, restraining rods, etc.) must be per NFPA 13 and/or NFPA 24. Details of all types utilized shall be provided on the plans. Thrust block calculations shall be based upon a soil bearing capacity of 1500 pounds per square foot (PSF). Submitted soils reports that certify undisturbed soil bearing capacity with a higher value may be used to calculate the thrust blocks. The report must graphically identify the areas where the test data was taken and must include the location(s) of the proposed piping. 1.4.6 1.4.7 Risers: Riser locations shall be identified for all AFSS systems. Building Identification: All buildings shall be identified and given numerical or alphabetical designations. These building designations shall be carried forward on all documents for the life of the construction project for continuity and ease of identification.

2.
2.1

Underground Portion:
Who May Design?: A California registered civil engineer, a registered mechanical engineer, or a Class General A, Class C-34 or C-16 Licensed Contractor may design underground piping plans for submittal to DSA, including exterior (outside of the building) Backflow Preventers, Double Detector Check Valves, Gate Valves, Hydrants, Fire Pumps, and/or other pressure reducing or increasing device, with in the parameters of their license. A C-36 licensed contractor may design/build the underground portion, from the property owners side of the utility meter to the structure or fixed work, (outside of the building) including Backflow Preventers, Double Detector Check Valves, Gate Valves, Hydrants, Fire Pumps, and/or other pressure reducing or increasing devices of the AFSS. Designs prepared by registered civil or registered mechanical engineers must be stamped and signed. All systems must comply with 2002 NFPA 13 and/or NFPA 24 (See Section 1.2 above). Who May Install?: A Civil Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, Class General A or Class C-34 or C-16 licensed contractor, is authorized to install the underground portion of the system, including exterior (outside of the building) Backflow

2.2

DSA IR A-25 (iss 05-26-09)

Design, Installation and Maintenance of Automatic Fire Sprinkler Systems (AFSS)

Page 4 of 4

Preventers, Double Detector Check Valves, Gate Valves, Hydrants, Fire Pumps, and/or other pressure reducing or increasing device within parameters of their license. A C-36 may install the underground portion, from the property owners side of the utility meter to the structure or fixed work, (outside of the building) including Backflow Preventers, Double Detector Check Valves, Gate Valves, Hydrants, Fire Pumps, and/or other pressure reducing or increasing devices of the AFSS, with in the parameters of their license. California registered civil engineers or registered mechanical engineers may cause underground piping to be installed under their direction and supervision.

3.
3.1

Overhead Portion:
Who May Design?: The above ground portion of the system may be designed by a Mechanical Engineer or Fire Protection Engineer, or a design/build C-16 licensed Fire Protection Contractor, per Title 16, C.C.R., Section 832.16, and California Business and Professions Code, Sections 7057 & 7058. Who May Install?: All systems must comply with 2002 NFPA 13 Section 3.2.1. and/or NFPA 24. Installation overhead portions of Automatic Fire Sprinkler Systems shall be as follows: If an above ground system is designed by a Mechanical Engineer or Fire Protection Engineer, any C-16 licensed Fire Protection Contractor can install the system, per Title 16, C.C.R., Section 832.16 and California Business and Professions Code, Sections 7057 & 7058.

3.2

Note: Piping installers need not be certified if employed by and working under the supervision of the contracted C-16 licensed Fire Protection Contractor.

4.

Maintenance of the System: Pursuant to the Business and Professions Code Section 7048, and 2006 California edition of NFPA 25, the State Fire Marshal requires a class A Licensed company (Automatic Extinguishing Systems Concern) to repair or replace those system components up to $500 limit (for labor, materials, and all other items) as specified by the CSLB. Individuals performing maintenance must have a C-16 license to perform the required five (5) year maintenance.
4.1 Acceptance or performance testing of an electric fire pump requires the individual performing the testing to have a C-16 or a C-10 License. Owners may perform the monthly inspections. Warranties may be compromised if systems are not maintained according to recognized standards and manufacturers guidelines.

4.2 4.3

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CARGO CONTAINERS USED AS STORAGE


References: 2001, 2007 California Administrative Code (CAC), Title 24, Part 1, Sections 4-314 Discipline: Structural, Fire-Life Safety, and Access

IR A-27
Issued 04-19-10

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify the Division of
the State Architect (DSA) definition of school building as it applies to cargo containers used as storage facilities.

Background: Many California school districts use cargo containers (also known as cargo
boxes, sea vans, or shipping containers) on school campuses to store materials and emergency supplies. A cargo container is an industrial, standardized, reusable portable vessel that was originally, specifically or formally designed for use in the packing, shipping or transportation of goods or commodities, and designed to be mounted on rail car, truck or ship.

Policy:

The Cargo containers used as storage units are not considered by DSA to be school buildings. The definition of school building is found in Title 24, Part 1, Section 4314.

1.

Limitations: School districts may install cargo containers as storage units on school campuses under their own authority and are not required to submit the design to DSA for review and approval. Cargo containers can only be installed subject to the following limitations:
1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 The maximum size is no greater than 10 by 60. The height is no greater than 10. It is not used to store hazardous material that would trigger Group H occupancy. They are not stacked upon each other or elevated by a substructure. They are placed directly on even grade (not sloping more than 1:12) and at a distance of five feet or more away from the top of any descending inclination having slope greater than 1:12. The container is not placed in fire access lanes. The container is maintained so that its structural integrity is not compromised. The container is not modified by the addition of doors or windows that would compromise its structural integrity. The local fire authority has approved the location.

1.5

1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9

DSA IR A-27 (iss 04-19-10)

Cargo Containers Used as Storage

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

FIRE ALARM SYSTEM CHANGES IN EXISTING BUILDINGS


References: 2007 California Administrative Code (CBC), 4-215 2007 National Fire Protection Pamphlet 72
SFM Information Bulletin, Fire Alarm Control Unit Replacement in Existing Buildings Discipline: Fire-Life Safety

IR A-28
Issued 04-27-10

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) describes the Division of the State
Architect (DSA) requirements for the complete or partial change of a fire alarm (F/A) system in an existing building due to obsolescence, catastrophic failure, voluntary upgrading, or as part of the change order process.

Background: Typical fire alarm submittals consist of both the drawings and specifications
of the various devices intended for installation. At times the fire alarm submittal will include a totally new system and at other times it will include only a portion of an existing system.

1. PROCESS: All changes to a fire alarm system (excluding maintenance and some repairs, as explained in Section 4) require DSA review. Upon completion of the changed, (added, deleted, etc.) appliances, devices or system, that portion of the Fire Alarm system in the scope of work shall be inspected and tested as required by NFPA 72. Upon successful completion of the acceptance or reacceptance inspection and testing, an NFPA 72 Inspection and Testing form shall be completed by the repairer/installer. A copy of the form, with signatures, shall be given to the Architect or Engineer of Record, the DSA Project Inspector, the Owner (School District) and the Local Fire Authority.
1.1 Total F/A System Exchange: Totally exchanging one system for another in existing buildings requires meeting current code requirements and extending the system to all areas within the existing structure(s). A full DSA project submittal would be required. Partial System Exchange: It is not required to upgrade the entire building or campus system (add in other devices or extend current system) when not totally replacing a system, but the basic submittal package must provide assurance, in the form of a letter from the fire alarm design professional, certifying that all portions of the system are compatible. Any new or added components and devices would still need to meet ADA requirements. The system would not require expansion to all areas in the building(s) or campus. A DSA submittal package would be needed for the portion of the system(s) being changed.

1.2

2.

Design Requirements: All areas undergoing modernization shall be required to meet current code requirements with additional appliances added to those areas as needed.

For example:
IR A-28 Iss (04-27-10) Fire Alarm System Changes In Existing Buildings

Page 1 of 3

IR A-28 Iss (04-27-10)

Fire Alarm System Changes In Existing Buildings

Page 2 of 3

2.1

An ADA upgrade to a restroom will require the extension of the fire alarm system into that restroom. Other portions of the building or campus F/A system would not need to be included in the project. Conversion of an academic classroom to a science laboratory or other hazardous use area, will require the room or area to meet current code, but would not trigger a complete upgrade of the fire alarm system for the entire building or campus. Five of the six classrooms in a building are being modernized. A new power extender panel is also being added. Only the areas affected by the scope of work will be required to have an upgrade to the fire alarm system.

2.2

2.3

3.

Changes to Submitted and DSA Approved documents: Where construction plans and documents have been submitted and approved by DSA but the accepted fire alarm bid package includes a different manufacturer and/or model for the FACP, Power Extenders, appliances and devices, etc. then the following shall apply:
Where the design has not changed (locations of appliances, routing of wire runs, etc.) and the voltage draws of the substituted appliances and devices is the same or less than those approved a change order shall be issued. The Architect or Engineer of Record shall provide a letter from the fire alarm design professional certifying that the design has not significantly changed and the appliances and devices have equal or less voltage draws than those originally submitted, and Provide the new manufacturers product data sheets (cut sheets) and associated State Fire Marshal listings for each appliance, device, etc. Where substantial changes are made to the design or the voltage draws of the new manufacturers equipment are higher than those originally approved, then a revision or an addendum must be submitted to DSA for review and approval.

3.1

3.1.1

3.1.2 3.2

4.
4.1 4.1.1 4.1.2

Repair and Maintenance:


Repair: Repair of an existing fire alarm system does not require submittal of plans, specifications or other documents to DSA, except as noted below: Replacement of all appliances: If all appliances are to be replaced, Section 1.1 above would apply. Replacement of the Fire Alarm Control Panel (FACP) compatible with existing appliances: A replacement FACP from a different manufacturer may be installed if compatible with existing appliances and devices. If not compatible then Section 1.1 above would apply since all associated appliances would also need replacement. Maintenance: Maintenance of an existing F/A System (removal and replacement of one appliance or the repair of a shorted wire) does not require submittal of plans to DSA.

4.2.

5.

Resources: Several helpful documents have been provided on the DSA web site.
DSA Plan Submittal Requirements Fire Alarm and Detection Systems is available on the DSA web site, FLS page.

IR A-28 Iss (04-27-10)

Fire Alarm System Changes In Existing Buildings

Page 3 of 3

DSA IR A-6: Change Order & Field Change Approval Process and IR A-18: Use of Construction Documents Prepared by Other Professionals are available on the DSA FLS page and in IR Manual. Also see State Fire Marshal (SMF) Information Bulletin, Fire Alarm Control Unit Replacement in Existing Buildings at

http://osfm.fire.ca.gov/informationbulletin/pdf/2008/IB_WUI-FAC_FINAL_20080910.pdf

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

STORAGE ROOM OCCUPANCY SEPARATION


References:
2001 California Building Code (Title 24, Part2), Sections 302, 504.3, and Table 3-B

IR 3-1
Revised 09-23-10 Revised 09-18-07 Issued 02-20-07

Discipline: Structural

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/Resources/IRManual.aspx at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this IR is to clarify the 2001 CBC requirements, and provide guidance for
storage room occupancy separations. For projects submitted to DSA under the 2007 CBC this issue is addressed in Table 508.2 (Table 508.2.5 in the 2010 CBC).

Background: The 2001 California Building Code is not specifically clear in excluding small areas
that do not pose a significant hazard from the need of an occupancy separation in a number of cases. 2001 CBC Section 302.4 requires occupancy separations Be provided between the various Groups and Divisions as set forth in Table 3-B. Certain exceptions apply. The occupancy separations are based on the real and potential hazards associated with each. 2001 CBC Section 504.3 addresses the Allowable Floor Area of Mixed Occupancies and does not address the separation of occupancies, therefore the exceptions listed do not apply to occupancy separations. This is a common misconception by design professionals and plan reviewers alike. DSA recognizes that hazardous materials in quantities less than those listed in 2001 CBC, Table 3-D are able to be stored in smaller spaces and not present a high risk to the building. The hazards presented by materials in small storage rooms are significantly curtailed due to the reduced quantities of materials physically able to be stored.

Interpretation: If a Storage Area (S-1 & S-2) is found within or adjoining the following
occupancies: E, A-1, A-2, or A2.1, and the Storage Area is 100 square feet or more in size, then the storage area is required to have the occupancy separation required in 2001 CBC Table 3-B. If the area is 99 square feet or less, then it will be considered an accessory closet and the occupancy separation will not be required. Storage Areas or closets designated for storage of materials in quantities in excess of those listed in 2001 CBC, Table 3-D will be classified as the appropriate H Occupancy, and will be required to have the appropriate Occupancy Separations regardless of size, per 2001 CBC, Table 3-B. Mechanical and Electrical rooms are not required to have a one-hour occupancy separation except as noted in 2001 CBC, Section 302.5.

DSA IR 3-1 (rev 09-23-10)

Storage Room Occupancy Separation

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

AUTOMATIC FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEM COVERAGE IN CONCEALED INTERSTITIAL SPACES


References: 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Section 904, CCR. 2007 CBC, Section 903 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 13, Section 5 .13.1.1 (1999 edition) NFPA 13, Section 8.14.1.1 (2002 edition) SFM Code Interpretation 03-030 Discipline: Fire and Life Safety

IR 9-1
Issued 10-15-07

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to state the minimum

requirements of and provide guidance for applying NFPA 13 (Section 5-13.1.1 - 1999 Edition, and Section 8.14.1.1 2002 Edition) as it relates to fire sprinklers coverage in concealed interstitial spaces and as specified by State Fire Marshal (SFM) Code Interpretation 03-030.

1.
1.1 1.2

GENERAL:
NFPA 13 5.13.1.1(1999 Edition) All concealed spaces enclosed wholly or partly by exposed combustible construction shall be protected by sprinklers (see Exceptions 1 through 12). NFPA 13 8.14.1.1 (2002 Edition) All concealed spaces enclosed wholly or partly by exposed combustible construction shall be protected by sprinklers except in non-combustible concealed spaces where sprinklers are not required to be installed by NFPA 13, Sections 8.14.1.2.1 through 8.14.1.2.15.

2. FIRE SPRINKLER REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERSTITIAL SPACES: Noncombustible materials for these spaces must meet the 25 flame spread, 50 smoke development ratings. Data cables must meet CEC Section 800-49 and 800-50 as resistant to the spread of fire.
2.1 Fire Sprinklers Required: Unless specifically noted in the exceptions shown in the NFPA 13 1999 Edition or listed in the NFPA 13 2002 Edition, all areas not meeting the NFPA 13 criteria, shall have fire sprinklers installed. Any amount of combustible materials or exposed combustible construction will require the installation of fire sprinklers. 2.2 Sprinklers Used in Lieu of One-Hour Fire Resistive Construction: When automatic fire sprinklers are used in lieu of one-hour fire resistive construction, the entire building, including non-combustible interstitial spaces, must have sprinklers installed, to provide equivalent protection. Sprinkler omissions allowed by NFPA 13 are not permitted (see SFM Code Interpretation 03-030). Building plans submitted prior to October 1, 2005 will not be required to have the interstitial spaces sprinklered when fire sprinklers are used in lieu of one-hour fire-resistive construction. 2.3 Sprinklers not required: Interstitial spaces need not have the fire sprinklers (as noted in NFPA 13) if all the following conditions are met: All items within an interstitial space meet the definition of non-combustible, and the space itself is of non-combustible construction, and the fire sprinkler system is not used in lieu of one-hour fire resistive construction.

DSA (SS) IR 9-1 (iss 10-15-07)

Automatic Fire Suppression System Coverage in Combustible Interstitial Spaces

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

ILLUMINATION REQUIRED FOR MEANS OF EGRESS


References: Title 24, California Code of Regulations (CCR), Part 2, California Building Code (CBC) 2007 CBC, Sections 1002, 1006.1, 1006.3, and 1024.6 and Exceptions 2010 CBC, Sections 1002, 1006.1, 1006.3, and 1027.6 and Exceptions Discipline: Fire & Life Safety

IR 10-1
Revised 09-23-10 Issued 06-22-09

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/Resources/IRManual.aspx at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies code requirements, based on the 2007 and 2010 California Building Code (CBC), for illumination of means of egress as it relates to exit discharge to a public way or safe dispersal area. General: The 2007 and 2010 CBC, Section 1006.1 states, Illumination required. The
means of egress, including the exit discharge, shall be illuminated at all times the building space served by the means of egress is occupied. The 2007 and 2010 CBC, Section 1002 defines EXIT DISCHARGE as That portion of a means of egress system between the termination of an exit and a public way. The 2010 CBC, Section 1027.6 (Section 1024.6 in the 2007 CBC) states, Access to a public way. The exit discharge shall provide a direct and unobstructed access to a public way. Exception: Where access to a public way cannot be provided, a safe dispersal area shall be provided

Interpretation: 1. PUBLIC WAY: Public streets, alleys, parks, parking lots, and other similar public areas are public ways. The exit discharge capacity shall not be less than the required discharge capacity of the exits being served. It must have a clear width and height of not less than 10 feet.

2. EGRESS ILLUMINATION: The entire exit discharge to the public way is required to be illuminated at any time the building space being served is occupied. 3. SAFE DISPERSAL AREAS: Where safe dispersal area or areas are provided, the
entire path to a safe dispersal area need not be illuminated. Illumination of a minimum of 20 feet shall be provided from the building or building complex or 20 feet beyond reaching grade level when exiting from bleachers, grandstands or other stadium seating. Emergency and egress illumination of the exit discharge to a safe dispersal area can be accomplished by providing:
DSA (FLS) IR 10-1 (rev 09-23-10) Illumination Required for Means of Egress

Page 1 of 2

DSA (FLS) IR 10-1 (rev 09-23-10)

Illumination Required for Means of Egress

Page 2 of 2

Lighting at exterior landings. Exterior lighting to provide minimum illumination for 20 feet from a building. Lighting of grandstands or bleachers aisles to grade and 20 feet beyond where practical. The illumination shall provide a minimum of not less than 1 foot-candle at the walking surface.

4.

EMERGENCY POWER SUPPLY REQUIREMENTS: See 2007 and 2010 CBC,

Section 1006.3. Emergency Power shall supply lighting of the exit discharge for a minimum of 90 minutes.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

VISUAL ALARMS IN CLASSROOMS


References: 2001 California Building Code: Sections 1114B.2.4 and 3505.1 Sec. 4-4.5 Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design 4.1.1(1) and 4.1.3(14) California Government Code Section 4451(d) Discipline: Access Compliance

IR 11B-1
Revised 11-01-07 Issued 01-26-05

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This interpretation clarifies acceptable design and installation requirements for

fire alarm systems installed in new buildings containing classrooms for projects under Division of the State Architect (DSA) jurisdiction, which includes state-funded buildings and facilities, State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and universities. (In the 2007 CBC this issue is addressed in Section 907.9.1.1.)

General: Unlike audible alarms, visual alarms are typically located within the space they

serve so the signal is visible to the occupants of the space. the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design, Section 4.1.3(14) indicates that when emergency warning systems are provided, they shall include both audible and visual alarms. Since classrooms in newly constructed buildings are required to be accessible by Section 4.1.1(1), where audible alarm coverage is provided, the emergency warning system shall also provide visual alarm coverage.

standards are published in the California Building Standards Code that meet or exceed the requirements of the Federal Americans with Disabilities Act, specifically in this case the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design, Section 4.1.3(14), effective March 1, 2005, DSA will accept construction documents for new construction (new buildings) that indicate visual fire alarm coverage for all classrooms1 that are provided with audible fire alarm coverage.
1 United States Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board: ADAAG Manual, A guide to the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines, July 1998, p. 98, Visual Alarms (4.28.3); Technical Bulletin: Visual Alarms, August, 2003, http://www.access-board.gov/adaag/about/bulletins/alarms.htm or http://www.access-board.gov/adaag/about/bulletins/pdf/alarms.pdf

Design Requirements: Per California Government Code 4451(d), until such building

DSA (AC) IR 11B-1 (rev 11-01-07)

Visual Alarms in Classrooms Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

BEVELED LIP AT CURB RAMPS

IR 11B-2
Revised 11-01-07 Issued 01-26-05 See IR 11B-3

References: 2001 California Building Code: Sections 1117A.4.5 (prior to the 10/12/06 Supplement, effective 5/2/07), and 1127B.5 Items 3 & 5 California Government Code: Sections 4451(d) & (f) Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design, Section 4.7.2 Discipline: Access Compliance

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This interpretation clarifies acceptable design and installation requirements for

curb ramps under Division of the State Architect (DSA) jurisdiction, which includes statefunded buildings and facilities, State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and universities. (In the 2007 CBC this issue has been addressed by removing the requirement for a beveled lip at curb ramps.)

General: California Building Code (CBC) Section 1127B.5 Item 3 states: "Transitions from ramps to walks, gutters, or streets shall be flush and free of abrupt changes, except that curb ramps shall comply with Item 5." CBC Section 1127B.5 Item 5 states: "The lower end of each curb ramp shall have a 1/2 inch (13 mm) lip beveled at 45 degrees as a detectable way-finding edge for persons with visual impairment."
However, the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design Section 4.7.2 does not allow a beveled lip at the lower end of a curb ramp and states: "Transitions from ramps to walks, gutters, or streets shall be flush and free of abrupt changes."

Design Requirements: Per California Government Code 4451(d), until such building standards are published in the California Building Standards Code that meet or exceed the requirements of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, and specifically in this case the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design Section 4.7.2, the DSA will accept curb ramp designs which indicate that the lower end of each curb ramp is flush and free of abrupt changes, without a beveled lip. All such curb ramp designs shall incorporate a detectable warning surface (truncated domes) as indicated in other sections of the CBC, and Access Compliance IR 11B-3. Note: The October 12, 2006 Supplement to the 2001 CBC removed from Chapter 11A the
requirement for a beveled lip at curb ramps.

DSA (AC) IR 11B-2 (rev 11-01-07)

Beveled Lip at Curb Ramps Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

DETECTABLE WARNINGS AT CURB RAMPS


References: 2001 California Building Code: Sections 1117A.4.7 (prior to the 10/112/06 Supplement, effective 5/2/07), and 1127B.5 Items 8 California Government Code: Section 4451(d) Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design, Section 4.7.7 Discipline: Access Compliance

IR 11B-3
Revised 11-01-07 Issued 01-26-05 See IR 11B-2 and 11B-4

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This interpretation clarifies acceptable design and installation requirements of detectable warnings at curb ramps under Division of the State Architect (DSA) jurisdiction, which includes state funded buildings and facilities, State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and universities. (In the 2007 CBC this issue has been addressed in Section 1127B.5 Item 7). General: California Building Code Sections 1127B.5 Item 8 and 1117A.4.7 state a curb ramp shall have a detectable warning.when the ramp slope is less than 1 unit vertical to 15 units horizontal (6.7% slope).
However, the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design Section 4.7.7 indicates that curb ramps shall have a detectable warning surface without regard to the slope of the ramp.

Design Requirements: Per California Government Code 4451(d), until such building

standards are published in the California Building Standards Code that meet or exceed the requirements of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, and specifically in this case the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design Section 4.7.7, the DSA will accept curb ramp designs which indicate detectable warnings at curb ramps regardless of slope.

DSA (AC) IR 11B-3 (rev 11-01-07)

Detectable Warnings at Curb Ramps Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

DETECTABLE WARNINGS

IR 11B-4
Revised 11-01-07 Issued 01-26-05 See IR 11B-3

References: 2001 California Building Code: Sections 1117A.4.5, 1127B.5 Item 8, 1133B.8.3, and 1133B.8.5 2007 California Building Code: Sections 1112A.9, 1121B.3.1 Item 8(a), 1127B.5 Item 7, and 1133B.8.5 California Government Code: Section 4451(d) & (f) Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design, Section 4.7.2 Discipline: Access Compliance

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This interpretation clarifies acceptable alternative design and installation

requirements for detectable warnings under Division of the State Architect (DSA) jurisdiction, which includes state funded buildings and facilities, State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and universities.

General: The California Building Code indicates technical criteria for detectable warning surfaces (truncated domes). The technical criteria include dome pattern, dome spacing and dimensional placement.
The U.S. Access Board develops the minimum design standards for complying with the ADA, and has also developed and considered detailed research studies regarding pedestrians and the use of detectable warning surfaces. Under the Access Board, the Public Rights-of-Way Access Advisory Committee was established in 1999 to develop additional ADAAG provisions. The advisory committee reached agreement on recommended accessibility standards for new and altered public rights-of-way covered by the ADA. The standards proposed by the committee were presented in a report titled Building a True Community. The draft guidelines issued by the Access Board, consistent with the advisory committees recommendations, include revised technical criteria for detectable warnings. The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) is a designated agency responsible for enforcing the standards and implementing regulations of the ADA Title II (State and Local Government Services). The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), under the USDOT, is the enforcement authority for overseeing pedestrian discrimination issues under the Title II implementing regulations. Both FHWA and the Access Board are encouraging the use of the new technical criteria for detectable warnings over the original ADA design standard.

Acceptable Alternative Designs: The Division of the State Architect (DSA) recognizes the federal research effort and that the new technical criteria provide substantially equivalent or greater access and usability as modified and specifically indicated below.
Regarding the dome pattern and dome spacing for detectable warnings, the DSA will accept, as an acceptable alternative design, detectable warning surfaces that comply with all of the following:

DSA (AC) IR 11B-4 (rev 11-01-07)

Detectable Warnings Page 1 of 2

DSA (SS) IR 11B-4 (rev 11-01-07)

Detectable Warnings Page 2 of 2

1. 2.

Pattern: Detectable warnings consisting of a surface with truncated domes that are aligned in a square grid (in-line) pattern. Dome Spacing: Truncated domes aligned in a square grid (in-line) pattern shall have a center-to-center spacing of 1.67 inches (42.4 mm) to 2.35 inches (59.7 mm). In addition to the above criteria regarding detectable warning design, the DSA will accept, as an acceptable alternative design, dimensional placement of detectable warning surfaces at curb ramps that comply with the following criteria:

3.

Dimensional Placement at Curb Ramps: The detectable warning surface shall extend 36 inches (914.4 mm) minimum in the direction of travel for the full width of the curb ramp. For curb ramps, also see IR 11B-2 and 11B-3.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

MECHANICAL ONLY PROJECTS EXEMPT FROM ACCESSIBILITY REVIEW


References: California Building Code, Section 1134B.2.1, Exception 4 Discipline: Access Compliance

IR 11B-6
Issued 02-04-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify that


mechanical only projects do not require DSA Access Compliance review.

Discussion: Mechanical only means projects where all work is undertaken solely for the purpose of heating, ventilation or air conditioning (HVAC). California Building Code (CBC) Section 1134B.2 indicates that all existing buildings and facilities, when alterations, structural repairs or additions are made to such buildings or facilities, shall comply with all provisions of Division I, New Buildings.
However, the building code also states that for existing buildings, projects which consist only of HVAC are not considered alteration projects for the purposes of accessibility for persons with disabilities and are not subject to the accessibility provisions of the code. DSA Access Compliance considers structural work that is required solely for the purpose of performing the mechanical work to be incidental to the mechanical project which is exempt work per CBC 1134B.2.1, Exception 4.

Exemption from DSA Access Compliance Review: Mechanical only projects are exempt by accessibility code provisions and do not require DSA Access Compliance review or approval. This includes mechanical only projects that contain incidental structural upgrades required solely for the purpose of performing mechanical only work. It should be noted that compliance with the building code is still required (i.e. the height of thermostats shall be installed 48 above the finish floor to the operating handle).

DSA (SS) IR 11B-6 (iss 02-04-08)

Mechanical Only Projects Exempt From Accessibility Review

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

REQUIREMENTS FOR ACCESSIBLE PARKING SPACES


References: 2007 California Building Code, Sections 1129B.3 and 1129B.4, Figure 11-B-18A, 11B-18B and 11B-18C Discipline: Access Compliance

IR 11B-7
Revised 08-01-09 Issued 07-15-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings.. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify requirements for accessible
parking.

Background: On October 10, 2007 the Governor of California approved Assembly Bill (A.B.) 1531 (2007). A.B. 1531 does the following:
Amends the requirements for signage and striping at accessible parking spaces, Directs that the initial regulations to implement these provisions shall be adopted as emergency regulations, Provides that the adoption of these regulations shall be considered by the Department of General Services (DGS) to be an emergency necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety, or general welfare.

On May 21, 2008 the California Building Standards Commission approved amended regulations proposed by DGS implementing A.B. 1531. The amended regulations became effective July 1, 2008 and are contained in California Building Code Sections 1129B.3, 1129B.4, Figures 11B-18A, 11B-18B and 11B-18C. The amended regulations can be found on the DSA Internet web site at:

http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/pubs/regulations_rev_08-01-09.pdf Scope: The amended regulations apply to all new construction projects and alterations to existing
buildings and facilities covered by California Building Code, Chapter 11B. Construction documents submitted to DSA for review and approval on or after July 1, 2008 must indicate compliance with the amended regulations.

1. Signage Requirements: The amended regulations indicate that the signage at accessible parking spaces shall include Minimum Fine $250 below the International Symbol of Accessibility as either an additional sign or additional language. This fine posting requirement is in addition to other signage regulations contained in the California Building Code for accessible parking spaces. 2.

Striping Requirements: The revised regulations indicate that the accessible parking space
The border (perimeter) of the loading and unloading access aisle shall be painted blue.

striping shall be as follows:

DSA (AC) IR 11B-7 (rev 08-01-09)

Requirements for Accessible Parking Spaces Page 1 of 2

DSA (AC) IR 11-7 (rev 08-01-09)

Requirements for Accessible Parking Spaces Page 2 of 2

The hatching within the loading and unloading access aisle shall be painted a suitable contrasting color to the parking space at 3-0 maximum on center. Blue or white paint is preferred.

The amended regulations for the border and hatching at the loading and unloading access aisle are in addition to other requirements indicated in the California Building Code for accessible parking spaces. The requirement that the hatching at the loading and unloading access aisle be a suitable contrasting color to the parking space is intended to ensure that the hatching is visually distinct from the background to which it is applied, and thus can be more easily seen. As hatching is generally recognized as a noparking area, this difference in contrast assists drivers in providing a conspicuous visual deterrent to parking in the loading and unloading access aisle.

3. Acceptable Designs: Asphalt is often the parking surface material used at accessible parking spaces. Asphalt is generally considered to be fairly dark in appearance. In order to provide a suitable contrasting color at the hatched area of the loading and unloading access aisle, a light color hatching must be used at locations where asphalt is the parking surface material. Although white paint is preferred (and traditionally the color most often used), its use is not mandatory under the CBC.
In order to provide a suitable contrast at the hatching of the loading and unloading access aisle in locations where light concrete is used as the parking surface material (such as at concrete parking garages), a dark color hatching must be used. Although blue paint is preferred, its use is not mandatory under the CBC.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

USE OF PREDETERMINED CONSTRUCTION TOLERANCE GUIDELINES FOR ACCESSIBILITY


References: 2007 California Building Code, Section 1101B.5 Discipline: Access Compliance

IR 11B-8
Issued 11-19-09

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulation clarifies DSAs position regarding the use of construction tolerance guidelines related to accessibility provisions contained in the California Building Code.
Background: Often, the subject of construction tolerance arises with regard to provisions for accessibility as indicated in California Building Code Section 1101B.5. Requests have been received for DSA to predetermine guidelines for what is considered an acceptable construction tolerance for various architectural components. 1. LEGAL ISSUES: According to the California Attorney Generals office, developing guidelines for construction tolerances .unnecessarily encourages contractors and others to deviate from the access regulations found in the California Building Code. 1
The California Attorney Generals office also indicated we are concerned that local building officials and members of the general public, when they consult Construction Tolerance Guidelines,.may assume that they have been adopted by a state agency and therefore, have the force of state law, which they do not. Such reliance, in our view, may result in violations of the California Building Code and, possibly, litigation against local building officials and/or property owners. 1 Separately, a United States District Court case discussed the term conventional building industry tolerances as follows: What is an acceptable dimensional tolerance obviously will vary, depending in part upon the purpose for the standard and the technological capacity to closely adhere to the target dimensions. 2

2. REGULATORY BUILT-IN TOLERANCES: California Building Code Section 1101B.5 indicates all dimensions are subject to conventional industry tolerances except where the requirement is stated as a range with specific minimum and maximum end points. Where a California Building Code requirement states a specified range, such as in Section 1133B.4.2.1 where handrails must be installed between 34 inches and 38 inches above the nosing, the regulation itself already provides an adequate tolerance and therefore no further tolerance outside of the range at either limit is permitted. In such cases, the technological capacity to achieve literal compliance with the dimensional requirements is quite easy to accomplish.
DSA IR 11B-8 (iss 11-19-09) Use of Predetermined Construction Tolerance Guidelines For Accessibility Page 1 of 3

DSA IR 11B-8 (iss 11-19-09)

Use of Predetermined Construction Tolerance Guidelines For Accessibility

Page 2 of 3

MINIMUMS, MAXIMUMS AND SPECIFYING AT THE LIMIT: Where an element is to be installed at the minimum or maximum permitted dimension, such as "48 inches maximum", it is not good practice to specify 48 inches, although it is allowed. Rather, it would be good practice to specify a dimension less than the required maximum (or more than the required minimum) by the amount of the expected field or manufacturing tolerance and not to state any tolerance in conjunction with the specified dimension.
In other words, dimensions noted in accessibility provisions as maximum or minimum should not be considered dimensions for design, because they represent the absolute limits of a requirement. To be sure that field tolerances result in usable construction, notes and dimensions in construction documents should identify and incorporate expected tolerances so that a required dimensional range is not exceeded by the addition of a finish material or a variation in construction practice, to the maximum extent feasible. Specifying dimensions for design in the manner described above will better ensure that facilities and elements accomplish the level of accessibility intended by the requirements. It will also more often produce an end result of strict and literal compliance with the stated requirements and eliminate enforcement difficulties and issues that might otherwise arise. On the other hand, by voluntarily choosing to specify the exact maximum limit or the exact minimum limit of a requirement for design, field construction based on such specification may unnecessarily fail to achieve the compliance that is required. In such cases the failure is not necessarily a consequence of field tolerance, but rather it is a result of the decision to design at the very edge of the prescribed limit.

3.

4.

ABSOLUTE DIMENSIONS: In the few cases where absolute dimensions are indicated, the application of construction tolerances is most likely to be influenced. In construction, the technological capacity to achieve an exact and precise placement of an architectural element in some cases can be quite difficult. In addition, the technological capacity to place one particular architectural element at a specific distance may not be the same for a different architectural element. For instance, consider the requirement that water closets (toilets) be an absolute 18 from the adjacent wall to the centerline. Variations in wall finish thicknesses or structural members could easily influence the final constructed condition, especially in concrete slab construction.
In such water closet installations, it would not be unusual to see minor deviations (17 to 18) based on these field conditions. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that at least some minor deviation from absolute dimensions could be expected for water closets. In recent projects however, water closet centerline dimensions in newly constructed toilet rooms for adults measured as much as 21 and as little as 15 from the adjacent wall. In both cases the amount of variation equaled or even exceeded the entire thickness of the combined wall finishes. Under analysis, it was clear that the lack of care and coordination exercised in the planned placement of the wall, the rough plumbing, and the wall finish was the cause of the deviation, rather than any field condition or manufacturing variant. While acceptance of a water closet centerline variance may be allowed as a DSA jurisdictional building code approval, it should be noted that such acceptance may not necessarily have effect or provide immunity under a judicial review.

5. ESTABLISHING TOLERANCE GUIDELINES: In conclusion, establishing predetermined construction tolerances guidelines related to the requirements for accessibility contained in the California Building Code is inappropriate.

DSA IR 11B-8 (iss 11-19-09)

Use of Predetermined Construction Tolerance Guidelines For Accessibility

Page 3 of 3

As previously stated, the California Attorney Generals office has indicated that construction tolerance guidelines may wrongfully be viewed by some to have the effect of law 1 and unnecessarily encourages contractors and others to deviate from the access regulations contained in the California Building Code. 1 The use of predetermined construction tolerance guidelines allows a blanket acceptance of departures from the building code requirements with no analysis as to the reason the use of a tolerance is either justified or warranted. As a result, the guidelines are then arbitrarily substituted for building code requirements, without taking into account the specific facts of each circumstance. It is preferred that construction tolerance acceptance be on a case-by-case basis, with the degree of departure from the literal requirements coupled with the specific reason that the requirement was unable to be achieved as the basis to be utilized for analysis. Many times when questions arise regarding tolerances, it is often found after analysis that neither field conditions nor manufacturing variables contributed to the deviation, but rather there was simply a lack of proper planning or coordination. Inadequate planning and coordination are not justifications for the use of construction tolerances.

6.

For questions regarding this interpretation contact: Aaron P. Noble Senior Architect Division of the State Architect, Headquarters 1102 Q Street, Suite 5100 Sacramento, CA 95811 Phone: (916) 445-4310 Email: aaron.noble@dgs.ca.gov Copies of this IR are available in the following formats: standard print, large print, audio cassette tape, and computer disk. Copies can be obtained by calling the Division of the State Architect, Headquarters at (916) 445-8100.

MORE INFORMATION:

Endnotes
1

Letter from the State of California Department of Justice to the Orange Empire Chapter of the International Conference of Building Officials dated August 22, 2002. Independent Living Resources v. Oregon Arena Corporation

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

ATTACHMENT OF CLAY OR CONCRETE "S" ROOF TILE


Reference: California Building Code, Section 1507.7, Tables 15-D-1.1 & 15-D-2.1

IR 15-1
Issued 9-1-99 Revised 04-21-05 Supercedes IR M-7 (9/99)

This interpretation is intended for use by the plan review and field engineers of DSA to indicate an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations. Its purpose is to promote more uniform statewide criteria for use in plan review and supervision of construction of public schools and essential services projects. Other methods proposed by design professionals to solve a particular problem will be considered by DSA and reviewed for code and regulation compliance.

Purpose: The purpose of this IR is to provide guidelines for the installation of "S" roof tiles. Note that this IR is not applicable to roof tile with an interlocking channel. General. Clay or concrete "S" roof tile attachments are acceptable as shown on the following details. Refer to Section 1507.7A and Tables 15-D-1.1 and 15-D-2.1, of the CBC for additional requirements. The inspector of record is to provide continuous inspection of the attachment of the roof tile. Application of the roof tile is not to be started until the attachment details have been reviewed and approved by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) field engineer, if the details do not conform to the approved drawings. Attachment Figure 1

IR 15-1 - Page 2 of 2 Figure 1 Fig. 1A

1 fastener to wood strip S roof tile

1 fastener to sheathing

Height as required to fully support cover portion of tile

11/4" net

Continuous sound soft grain wood strip attached to roof sheathing with fastener (8d min.) at 12" o.c. (Staggered toe-nails each side when height of strip is greater than 11/2")

Fig. 1B

Tile tie wire to continuous tie or wire fastener roof sheathing

1 fastener to roof sheathing

All tile installations on roof slope 7:12 and greater require tile lock device at bottom of each tile to prevent uplift

S roof tile

Fig. 1C

Twist continuous tie wire loop as required at tile tie wires to prevent rotation of tile

Equal angle at each tile tie wire Continuous tie S roof tile

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CLAY AND CONCRETE ROOF TILE MATERIALS AND APPLICATION


References: California Code of Regulations (CCR), Title 24, Part 2, California Building Code (CBC) 2001 CBC, Sections 702A, 704A.1.2, 1507.1, and 1507 2007 CBC, Sections 702A, 704A.1.2, 1507.3, 1510 and 1511.1 2010 CBC, Sections 702A, 705A.2, 1507.3, 1510 and 1511.1 ASTM C1167-03 and C1492-03 Discipline: Structural

IR 15-2
Revised 09-20-10 Revised 04-27-10 Issued 10-15-07

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/Resources/IRManual.aspx at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

1.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify the acceptance and test requirements for all tile roof covering materials and anchorage systems, including mechanical and foam adhesive attachment systems. This IR also specifies installation, testing and inspection requirements for these systems.

2.

Background:
2001 CBC: Section 1507 and UBC Standard 15-5. 2007 CBC: Section 1507.3, ASTM C1167-03 and ASTM C1492-03.

Applicable requirements for roof tile materials and installation in the California Building Code (CBC) include:

For newer materials and installation methods not included in the above CBC requirements, the provisions of this IR apply.

3.
3.1

Material Qualifications - Tile:


Qualification by Listing: Roof tile may be qualified and accepted if the roof tile has a DSA recognized listing or evaluation report that indicates compliance with ICC AC180, Acceptance Criteria for Clay and Concrete Roof Tiles. See Section 8 of this IR for DSA recognized listings or evaluation reports. Qualification by Project Specific Testing: Provide test documentation for each project to show compliance with: UBC Standard 15-5 for projects governed by the 2001 CBC, or ASTM C1167-03 for clay tiles, or C1492-03 for concrete tiles for projects governed by the 2007 CBC.

3.2

4.

Mechanically Attached Systems: Roof tile system utilizing mechanical devices or fasteners for attachment shall comply with one of the following requirements:
2001 CBC: Section 1507.7.1, 2007/2010 CBC: Section 1507.3, or DSA IR 15-1 for clay or concrete S-tiles

DSA IR 15-2 (rev 09-20-10)

Clay and Concrete Roof Tile Materials and Application

Page 1 of 3

DSA IR 15-2 (rev 09-20-10)

Clay and Concrete Roof Tile Materials and Application

Page 2 of 3

4.1

Alternate Systems: Mechanical attachment systems that are not prescribed by the CBC may be accepted if they have a DSA recognized listing or evaluation report for the entire system or for each component of the system. See Section 8 of this IR for DSA recognized listings or evaluation reports. The listing or evaluation report shall indicate compliance with the following criteria: Tiles: See Section 3.1 of this IR. Underlayments: ICC ES AC-188, Acceptance Criteria for Roof Underlayment or (in areas described in Section 6.1 of this IR) ICC ES AC-48, Acceptance Criteria for Roof Underlayments for Use in Severe Climate Conditions. Installation: See Section 6 of this IR. Inspection: See Section 7 of this IR.

4.2

Fasteners: Shall be copper, brass or stainless steel per, CBC Section 1511.1 (2001 CBC Section 1507.1.1.1).

5.

Roof System with Adhesive Attachment: Roof systems that utilize foam adhesive for attachment may be accepted under the alternate materials and methods provisions of Title 24, Part 1 (California Building Standards Administrative Code), Section 4304. Such systems shall have a DSA recognized listing or evaluation report that indicates compliance with ICC ES AC-152, Acceptance Criteria for Adhesive Attachment of Concrete or Clay Tiles. See Section 8 of this IR for DSA recognized listings or evaluation reports.
The listing or evaluation report shall indicate compliance with the following criteria: Underlayments: ICC ES AC-48, Acceptance Criteria for Roof Underlayments for Use in Severe Climate Conditions Installation: See Section 6 of this IR. Inspection: See Section 7 of this IR.

6.

Installation for Listed Roof Systems:

The roof structure must be able to

support the anticipated vertical and lateral loads of the tiles as required by the CBC. Only qualified or certified installers and applicators may install roof tiles. Installation of roof tiles shall meet all of the following requirements: Tile Roofing Institutes Installation Manual for Moderate Climate Regions, which is also approved by ICC-ES, and known as ESR-2015P, Installation provisions of the tile evaluation report, and Tile and tile anchorage systems manufacturers recommendations. 6.1 Cold Weather Regions: Cold weather regions are areas where ice damming may occur or where roof snow load is 150 psf or greater. In such areas installation must conform with the following: The Standard Installation Guides for Concrete and Clay Roof Tile in Cold Weather Applications, published by the National Tile Roofing Manufacturers Association, Inc. (NTRMA)/ Western States Roofing Contractors Association (WSRCA); ESR-2015P; Follow the instructions in the applicable evaluation reports; Manufacturers recommendations.

DSA IR 15-2 (rev 09-20-10)

Clay and Concrete Roof Tile Materials and Application

Page 3 of 3

If clay tiles are used in the cold weather regions, the designer shall specify Grade 1 clay tiles per ASTM C1167-03. 6.2 Wildland Urban Interface Area: Where tile roofing is installed in areas designated as a Wildland Urban Interface area as defined in the 2001 or 2007 CBC Section 702A, or where the site conditions warrant, roof covering shall be constructed to prevent the intrusion of flames and embers in accordance with the 2001 or 2007 CBC Chapter 7A, Section 704A.1 (Section 705A.2 for 2010 CBC).

7. Inspection and Testing: The project inspector shall verify that the tile roof covering materials meet the requirements of Sections 3, 4 and 5 of this IR, and inspect the installation of the tile roof covering systems. The project inspector shall also verify that all installers and applicators are certified either by the manufacturer or the Roof Tile Institute, as required in the applicable evaluation report.
7.1 Pull Test for Adhesive Systems: In addition to the above requirements, for adhesive tile attachment systems a vertical upward pull force of 35 pounds shall be applied to the nose edge of randomly chosen tiles for a duration of five seconds. Test one tile per square of roofing area. If any tiles fail the pull test, test the four adjacent tiles. A simple method to perform the pull test is to slip an L-shaped hook under nose edge of the tile and attach the hook to a fish scale. The pull test must be performed or witnessed by the project inspector.

8.

Recognized Listings: DSA recognized listings include the following:


ICC ES Evaluation Report (ESR) or Miami-Dade County Notice of Acceptance (NOA) or Other evaluation reports meeting the requirements and conditions of DSA IR-A5

9.

Reroofing: Reroofing of an existing roof-covering system with a clay or concrete tile system shall comply with CBC Section 1510, and ESR 2015P (see Section 6 above). Structural roof components shall be capable of supporting the roof-covering system and the material and equipment loads that will be encountered (CBC Section 1510.2). Substantial increase in roof load can be expected if the original roof-covering system was not a clay or concrete tile system.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CONDITIONAL CERTIFICATION FOR RELOCATABLE SCHOOL BUILDINGS


References: California Administrative Code, Section 4-314 Discipline: Structural

IR 16-1
Revised 04-15-08 Revised 09-10-02 Issued 01-07-02

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to allow exceptions to


the durability requirements for single classroom-size relocatable buildings intended for temporary use. A conditional certification will then be issued stating the modified durability conditions. The procedures for processing conditional certification are outlined below and are intended to follow the intent of Sections 17292 and 17405 of the Education Code.

1. Basic Requirements. All portions of relocatable school buildings are to conform to all requirements of the building standards adopted for public schools in Title 24 except as specifically described in this IR and shall be submitted to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) for approval at each site. The State Fire Marshal regulations contained in Parts 2 through 9, Title 24 and Title 19, and the regulations for accessibility are to be followed without modification. DSA Access Compliance Program approval is required for all new and existing construction. 2. Request for Waiver. The applicant shall initiate a request for waiver of the durability requirements for permanent foundations at the time the application for plan approval is filed. The applicant thereby acknowledges that a conditional certification is acceptable. The request for waiver may be made on the application form or by letter from the applicant or an agent of the applicant. A request for waiver from the building manufacturer or leasing company will not be accepted. This written request shall be submitted to DSA before the construction documents are stamped for identification. The DSA letter will indicate conditional approval.

3. Modified Requirements. The modified requirements may be applied only to individual one-story relocatable buildings with 2,160 square feet or less of floor area. Individual buildings may be placed adjacent to each other provided that any building will be capable of being relocated without affecting the stability of adjacent buildings. The clear separation shall not be less than four inches (drift/separation calculations are required for two-story relocatables) and the joint may be covered with flashings or other materials that do not prevent differential movement of the buildings. The detail of the covered joints shall be shown on the drawings. 4. Substandard Foundations. The following modifications will be permitted for conditionally approved foundations provided that the distance below the underside of the lowest floor framing member to the supporting grade does not exceed 18 inches.
4.1 A wood sill plate of foundation grade redwood or preservative pressure-treated sawn lumber may bear directly on soil or paved surface. Grass or turf shall be cleared to bare soil under the entire area of the building. The wood sill plate may support wood cripple studs, posts, or continuous blocking and sheathing which need not be treated.
Conditional Certification for Relocatable School Buildings Page 1 of 5

DSA (SS) IR 16-1 (rev 04-15-08)

DSA (SS) IR 16-1 (rev 04-15-08)

Conditional Certification for Relocatable School Buildings

Page 2 of 5

4.2

Isolated piers may be constructed of stacked wood members nailed together with hot-dipped zinc coated galvanized or equivalent corrosion resistant nails. Nailing shall be sufficient to transfer the required lateral forces to grade level. The bottom layer of wood shall be foundation grade redwood or preservative pressure-treated sawn lumber. Where the surface of the adjacent exterior grade is higher than the bottom of the floor joists on any side of the building, all wood in the substructure and floor framing (excluding the floor sheathing) shall be foundation grade redwood or preservative pressure-treated sawn lumber with flashing, mow strip or paving, and drain in accordance with Figure 1. Nails used in the foundation or floor framing, except for floor sheathing attachment nails, shall be hot-dipped zinc coated galvanized or equivalent corrosion resistant nails. The area of openings to provide under-floor ventilation shall be that specified in Title 24, Volume 2, Section 2306A.7. Foundation walls or pedestals may be constructed of reinforced concrete or reinforced fully grouted concrete block masonry. Provisions shall be made to transfer the required lateral shear force. Concrete shall be a minimum of 2500 psi and mortar 1800 psi. Metal frame jacks, specifically designed or justified by testing for the project, may be used as isolated piers. Metal jacks shall be attached to the structure by mechanical means. Overturning and bending forces due to vertical and lateral loads are to be resisted in accordance with the applicable provisions of Part 2, Title 24, CCR. The maximum bearing pressure for wood foundations bearing on soil or paving shall not exceed 1000 psf, unless substantiating soil data for some greater value is approved by DSA. The maximum allowable soil bearing pressure for concrete foundations designed in accordance with 2007 CBC, Section 1805A shall not exceed 1500 psf, unless substantiating soil data for some greater value is approved by DSA. The footings and foundation structure shall be capable of resisting all loads specified in Part 2, Title 24, CCR. Unless the individual modules of the building are positively fastened together at intervals not exceeding 10'-0" o.c. at the roof and floor level, each module and its diaphragm shall be designed as a separate unit. The foundation shall be designed to prevent sliding on the supporting surface by attaching the wood foundation plates for the building, ramps and stairs to the ground with restraining devices. An acceptable design would incorporate one-inch diameter Standard Weight (1.315" actual O.D.) hot dipped galvanized pipes or one-inch diameter solid steel rods spaced at not more than 10'-0" o.c. One pipe/rod shall be located a maximum of two feet from each corner in both directions and a minimum of two pipes/rods per discontinuous foundation strip. Pipes should penetrate into soil and/or paving a minimum of 12" measured vertically. Alternate or equivalent designs, when provided with structural calculations and details, will be considered.

4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

4.7

4.8

Permanent Foundations. Permanent foundations are required for all buildings, when the height between the underside of the lowest floor framing members and the supporting grade exceeds 18 inches, or when the building area exceeds 2,160 square feet. Permanent foundation design shall conform to all requirements of Part 2, Title 24, CCR. 6. Protection Against Deterioration. To reduce the problems of deterioration, dry rot, or rust, drainage shall be provided to prevent water from ponding beneath the structure. Under-floor ventilation and clearance, and the treatment of wood members in close proximity to exposed ground, shall be in accordance with Section 2306A, Part 2, Title 24. A minimum clearance of two inches is required under floor members at all points.

5.

DSA (SS) IR 16-1 (rev 04-15-08)

Conditional Certification for Relocatable School Buildings

Page 3 of 5

6.1

The minimum thickness of steel deck diaphragms and steel structural members permitted is 20 gage. The minimum thickness of non-structural steel roof decking and wall siding is 26 gage, protected with a durability coating. Steel members shall be given a rust inhibitive coating.

7.

Electrical, Mechanical and Plumbing. All utility installations shall conform to the requirements of Title 24, Parts 3, 4 and 5. Provisions shall be made for grounding the electrical system and equipment of each individual building and this shall be shown on the drawings.
7.1 A bonded common grounding electrode shall be provided for each metal building, exposed metal frame, ramp or stair and the electrical system installed at a readily verifiable location. A means of access shall be provided to all under-floor utilities such as electrical, mechanical and plumbing.

7.2

8.

Site Plan. A plot plan is required which shows the following:


1. Fully dimensioned location of the proposed relocatable building(s) in relation to other buildings on the site. Show all buildings on the site and their DSA application numbers. 2. Elevation of finished and original grade at each corner of the building and the elevation of the finished floor. Show elevation of adjacent exterior finished grade at each corner of the building if different from foundation grade, and the elevation of the top and bottom of stairs and ramps. 3. Location of means requirements. of access to the building including access compliance

4. Location of all utilities serving the relocatable from the source to the point of connection. Include a signed statement, on the drawings, from the appropriate responsible engineer indicating verification of the location of the utilities shown as existing and that their capacity is adequate for the additional load. If the source of utilities is in or on an existing building, show the DSA application number under which the building was approved. 5. Location of existing fire alarm pull stations and signal devices. Location of fire apparatus access in accordance with Sections 3.05 and 3.16, Title 19, Public Safety, CCR.

9. Identification. The manufacturer or builder shall place two permanent metal identification labels on each building module, one mechanically fastened and visible from the exterior and the other mechanically fastened to the interior frame above the ceiling, at the end of the module. The labels shall show the DSA application number under which the building construction was authorized, the manufacturer or builder's name, the serial number, the design live loads for the roof and floor framing, wind speed and exposure category.
9.1 The location of the identification label shall be shown on the building plans. For buildings that are manufactured in-plant, the plant inspector is to provide a verified report with each building, which shall indicate the manufacturer's name and the serial number for each building module and the DSA application number.

10. Relocation of Existing Relocatable School Buildings. Details shall include new foundation construction, superstructure to foundation connections, and module bolting

DSA (SS) IR 16-1 (rev 04-15-08)

Conditional Certification for Relocatable School Buildings

Page 4 of 5

details if necessary. Do not reuse A-325 bolts. Plans submitted shall include site plan, complete floor plans, and details of all proposed work. Checking may be expedited if complete plans of the existing building to be relocated are submitted with the application package. 10.1 The certification by DSA of a relocatable building applies only to the location shown on the approved site plans and certification is therefore void if the building is relocated to another location. It is recommended that, when a building is moved, the district shall apply for DSA certification to avoid the possibility of individual liability of school board members. Relocation of an existing certified building within the same district shall be considered to be an alteration for the purpose of completing the application (Form DSA-1). A filing fee based only upon the value of the work shown on the plans and specifications, including moving costs, will be charged if an approved building is relocated. When existing DSA-certified buildings are moved within the same school district or from one district to another, the plans and specifications are to indicate the application number of the previous certification for each building. If the building is moved as one unit, without disconnecting the individual modules, complete foundation and floor plans are required, but the plans of the superstructure need not be submitted. The design professional in responsible charge shall verify by appropriate means, subject to DSA approval, and submit a letter certifying that the building conforms to the originally approved plans and specifications and has not suffered structural deterioration or been structurally altered. A site plan and floor plan for the relocatable building shall be provided to facilitate review of electrical, mechanical, utility, fire and panic work as well as access compliance. When relocation is proposed for existing buildings for which drawings were approved but the construction was not certified, the plans and specifications must include the DSA application number of the previous plan approval for each building and the design professional in responsible charge shall examine, by appropriate means, and certify that the building conforms to the originally approved plans and has not structurally deteriorated. Any deviations from the originally approved plans and specifications shall be indicated on the plans and specifications submitted under the current application for approval. If the building is moved as one unit and modifications or corrective work are not required, the plans of the superstructure need not be submitted. Existing buildings not previously certified by DSA are considered to be new buildings. Complete plans, specifications, structural calculations for existing conditions and necessary reconstruction work, and site data are required to be submitted. In addition to the criteria of this IR, the design professional in responsible charge shall examine and certify, subject to DSA approval, that the building conforms with the plans being submitted for approval and so state in an accompanying letter. Any special tests or inspections required to verify the work are to be performed under the direction of the design professional in responsible charge.

10.2

10.3

10.4

11. Notice of Contract. In the event the contractor has been selected and a bid price has been established prior to approval of the plans, the design professional in responsible charge is to file the Contract Information (Form DSA-102) at the time the plans are submitted for approval. Attachment Figure 1

DSA (SS) IR 16-1 (rev 04-15-08)

Conditional Certification for Relocatable School Buildings

Page 5 of 5

Note: Cross-ventilation at underfloor spaces is required per 2001 CBC Section 2306A.7 (2007 Section 1203.3) Provide underfloor access as required per 2001 CBC Section 2306A.3 (2007 CBC Section 1209.1)

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

COMPUTER OR OFFICE ACCESS FLOORS


References: 2001 California Building Code, Sections 1632A and 1634A Discipline: Structural

IR 16-2
Revised 09-23-10 Revised 01-02-08 Issued 09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/Resources/IRManual.aspx at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to provide guidance in


the design of Computer Access Flooring (CAF) for proper support and anchorage to resist seismic forces as prescribed in the California Building Code. This IR is only applicable to projects submitted to DSA under the 2001 California Building Code (CBC). For projects submitted under later editions of the CBC, refer to the regulations. 1. Seismic Load. The lateral force applied to the CAF platform in any horizontal direction should be determined using the equations in the 2001 CBC, Section 1632A.2, where; Wp = dead load of platform + actual super-imposed equipment load, the minimum load for the entire platform area is 50 psf. See Footnote 9 of Table 16A-O in the CBC See 2001 CBC, Section 1607A.3, for floor live load Fp may be 2/3 of the values shown when CAF's are mounted on concrete slabs on grade.

2.
2.1

Lateral Resistance.
If the lateral bracing of the raised floor is provided by surrounding structural elements: 1. Structural elements of the building are to be designed to resist the platform lateral loads. 2. Floor panels and struts are to be tightly fitted together and against the structure to prevent "hammering" of the platform against the resisting structure. 3. Floor panels and struts acting in tension are to be mechanically connected together and anchored to the structure.

2.2

If the raised floor is not surrounded by structural elements: 1. Pedestals are to be restrained at base against sliding and overturning. 2. If pedestals are positively tied together by a system of struts and floor panels then the total lateral load may be divided equally to each pedestal 3. If pedestals are not tied together then design each for the pedestal based on the tributary lateral load.

DSA IR 16-2 (rev 09-23-10)

Computer or Office Access Floors

Page 1 of 2

DSA IR 16-2 (rev 09-23-10)

Computer or Office Access Floors

Page 2 of 2

4. Pedestal stems and bases are to be designed for vertical and lateral load combinations. 2.3 Testing. All tests are to be performed by a testing laboratory. Tests are to be observed and the results recorded in a report signed by a California registered civil engineer.

2.3.1 When shot-in anchors or drilled-in anchors are used to attach the pedestal bases to the supporting floor, testing of anchors is required. Test one of every ten shot-in anchors and one of every two drilled-in concrete anchors at 160% of the ICBO recommended allowable load. In case of test failures, see the 2001 CBC, Section 1923A.3.5, for procedure. 2.3.2 Use of adhesives to attach pedestal bases to concrete or wood floor systems will not be accepted unless test reports on long term durability, high temperature and strength are submitted to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) for review. 2.3.3 Mechanical connections in the floor system that are not subjected to analysis are to be tested for twice the lateral load. Submit test procedure to DSA for approval before testing.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

EARTH RETAINING SYSTEMS


References: 2001 CBC, Section 1611A.6 2007 CBC, Section 1806A.1

IR 16-3
Revised 09-18-2007 Issued 09-01-1999

Discipline: Structural
This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this IR is to provide guidelines for use of segmental retaining wall systems. Requirements for segmental retaining walls are not completely addressed in the California Building Code. 1. General. Gravity type retaining walls assembled of precast concrete or concrete masonry units, referred to as Segmental Retaining Walls (SRW), may be approved for use on school building projects as an alternative to conventional retaining systems. Approval of SRW systems requires compliance with the conditions of this IR and approval of the Division of the State Architect (DSA). SRW systems consist of facing units anchored to a reinforced soil mass that provides gravity load for resistance to overturning and lateral sliding. Geosynthetic grid materials (geogrid) are used to anchor the facing units and to reinforce the soil mass. Only soil-reinforced SRW systems will be acceptable for use on public school, state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings or California Community College projects. The reinforced soil mass may consist of cohesive or cohesionless soil subject to the recommendations of a geotechnical report. Retaining walls less than four feet above the top of the foundation and not supporting a surcharge do not require review and approval by DSA as defined in Title 24, Part 1, Section 4314 under the definition of "school buildings." However, such walls should meet the manufacturer's specifications and the applicable design and wall system requirements described below. 2. Geotechnical Requirements. A California licensed geotechnical engineer, in accordance with the 2001 CBC, Section 1804A (2007 CBC, Section 1802A), shall prepare a soil investigation report for each project site. Recommendations for preparation of the reinforced soil mass and slope stability above and below the retaining wall (if necessary) shall be addressed in the report. 3. Design Requirements. Design of the SRW systems shall comply with the National Concrete Masonry Association (NCMA) Design Manual for Segmental Retaining Walls, latest edition (based on the Coulomb earth-pressure theory), or the AASHTO Highway Specifications, latest edition, (based on the Rankine earth-pressure theory). Seismic analysis will be required for walls greater than 10'-0" above the top of the foundation that support loads from roads, parking areas, etc. or which retain soil adjacent to structures where failure can create a life safety hazard. Structures shall not be supported by SRW systems. Seismic analysis shall be based on
Earth Retaining Systems DSA (SS) IR 16-3 (rev. 09-18-07) Page 1 of 3

Earth Retaining Systems DSA (SS) IR 16-3 (rev. 09-18-07) Page 2 of 3

the Mononabe-Okabe theory and shall comply with the NCMA Segmental Retaining Wall Seismic Design Procedure (latest edition), or AASHTO Highway Specifications. The design shall include the effect of all surcharge loads, potential settlement and sloping soil conditions for both gravity and seismic analyses.

The wall design shall be prepared by a California licensed civil engineer.


Complete design calculations and details of the retaining system shall be submitted to DSA for review and approval with the contract drawings and specifications. Deferred approvals will not be permitted. Design drawings shall include the following information: 1. Locations and elevations of the top and bottom of all wall sections including the foundations. 2. Geogrid type, location and embedment lengths behind the interior face of the block units. 3. Soil gradation requirements, assumed soil design properties and placement/compaction specifications for the reinforced backfill and block unit fill material. 4. Location and size of all holes or openings cut into the geogrid. 4. Wall Height Limitations. 4.1 SRW systems shall be limited to a maximum height of 10'-0" above the top of the foundation and shall have a minimum horizontal clear distance from the back of the block units to the building foundation of 12'-0". 5. Wall System Requirements. 5.1 All SRW block units shall have a mechanical interlocking mechanism between adjacent units, such as formed lips, pins or keys, that will resist horizontal movement out of the plane of the wall. The geogrid shall be mechanically anchored to the block units through the use of aggregate interlock, pins, pipes, etc. Formed lips in block units will not provide adequate anchorage unless configured to mechanically engage the geogrid. Adequacy of the mechanical interlock must be maintained if separation in block courses due to settlement of the lower course, uplift of the upper course or bulging of the surface between geogrid layers occurs. The design performance objective of SRW's is to limit course separations to 1/4" maximum for the life of the wall. 5.2 Installation of SRW systems shall be in conformance with the manufacturer's instructions and the NCMA Design Manual for Segmental Retaining Walls or AASHTO Highway Specifications provisions. 5.3 Acceptable geogrid suppliers and grid types shall be identified and their allowable long-term design strength and pullout of grid-to-block values provided. 5.4 Design factors of safety for systems based on NCMA Design Manual for Segmental Retaining Walls shall be considered as a "critical application" per Table 5-1. Design factors of safety for systems based on AASHTO Highway Specifications shall be equivalent to the NCMA Design Manual for critical application. 5.5 The maximum vertical spacing of the geogrid shall be 2'-8" o.c. An additional layer of geogrid shall be provided in the top 12" of all soil-reinforced walls. 5.6 Drainage pipes and aggregate backfill shall be provided between the facing units and the reinforced soil mass. The backfill shall extend full height and length of the wall at a minimum thickness of 1'-0" and shall meet the compaction requirements specified in the manufacturer's

Earth Retaining Systems DSA (SS) IR 16-3 (rev. 09-18-07) Page 3 of 3

specifications. Surface drainage at the top and bottom of the wall shall be directed away from the wall. 5.7 In retaining wall systems with corners, the geogrid layers shall be staggered at adjacent walls to avoid overlap of grids and permit planer installation at each level. 6. Testing and Inspection. 6.1 An approved special inspector shall continuously inspect the construction of the wall. 6.2 The reinforced soil mass and granular backfill shall be placed and compacted under the direction of a Geotechnical Engineer (or his representative) as required by the 2001 CBC, Section 1804A.1 (2007 CBC, Section 1802A.1). 6.3 The concrete or concrete masonry mix design and strength evaluation for the precast units shall be in compliance with the CBC, Chapter 19A and 21A. A letter of certification shall be provided with the units indicating the manufacturer's name and address, name of product and unit type. The certification shall include applicable laboratory compressive strength and absorption test results. 6.4 Letters of certification shall be provided for the supplied geogrid indicating the supplier's name and address, name of product and the product designation meeting the requirements of the project's design. The letter of certification shall include the roll numbers and identification procedures, sampling procedures and the results of the quality control tests which include flexural rigidity, tensile strength and modulus and junction strength for each batch of resin and each shift's production used.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

WIND LOAD DESIGN FOR ONE STORY RELOCATABLE SCHOOL BUILDINGS (Less than 2160 Sq. Ft. in Floor Area)
References: 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Sections 1615A 1622A Discipline: Structural

IR 16-4
Revised 09-23-10 Revised 01-02-08 Issued09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/Resources/IRManual.aspx at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to supplement the wind forces set forth in the 2001 California Building Code (CBC), for the purposes of the design of one story relocatable school buildings having a gross floor area of less than 2,160 square feet in projects submitted to DSA under the 2001 CBC. For projects submitted under later editions of the CBC, see DSA IR 16-7.

1.

Environmental Site Factors:


Exposure: Basic Wind Speed: Ht., Exp. & Gust Coefficient: Importance Factor: C [Assumed. See Section 1619A] Per Figure 16A-1, 80 MPH recommended Ce = 1.06 (for less than 15'-0" in height) I = 1.0

2. For the design of primary frames and systems per Section 1621A, Method 2 may be used for all structural systems. The vertical pressures are assumed to act simultaneously with the horizontal pressures. The following factors apply:
Cq [H] = 1.3 horizontally (on vertical projected area of structure) Cq [V] = 0.7 upward (on the horizontal projected area of the structure) Simultaneous vertical and horizontal application need not apply to: 1. Overall building stability. 2. At or below the foundation level of individual primary frames and systems for structures with substandard foundations as described in IR 16-1. For the design of elements and components per Section 1622A, the design and wind pressures used to design the elements and components of the structure may use the C q values set forth below in lieu of the values set forth in Table 16A-H, Section 2. Roof Elements: Wall Elements: Cq = 1.2 Cq = 1.2

3.

The requirements for local areas at discontinuities as set forth in Section 1622A, Item 2 are not applicable except for discontinuities at roof overhangs, architectural projections, eaves, canopies, cornices and similar structures. The coefficient for this discontinuity condition is: Cq = 1.7 (overhang, et al.)

4.

The windows and doors must be designed as required per Section 1616A to ensure that the building will perform as an enclosed structure.
DSA IR 16-4 (rev 09-23-10) Wind Load Design for One Story Relocatable Buildings Less than 2160 Sq. Ft. in Floor Area

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF REVIEWING STANDS, GRANDSTANDS, AND BLEACHERS: 2001 CBC
References: 2001 California Building Code, Sections 1021, 1611A.12 Discipline: Structural

IR 16-5
Revised 09-23-10 Revised 06-02-08 Revised 04-21-05 Issued 09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/Resources/IRManual.aspx at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to provide provisions solely for the design of bleachers with an overall height of 20 feet or less, and in no instance should be considered as a precedent for, or be used in the design of other types of structures. This IR is applicable for projects submitted to DSA under the 2001 CBC. For projects submitted under later editions of the CBC, see IR 16-10.

1.
1.1

Definitions:
Reviewing stands, grandstands and bleachers more than five rows of seats above grade are considered "school buildings" (2001 CBC, Section 4-314) and are subject to DSA approval. Bleachers which remain at a location for less than 90 days are excluded from DSA approval. Portable bleachers refer to seating facilities located outside of a building and not attached to permanent foundations. The maximum height of any portable bleachers may not exceed eleven rows, or nine feet above grade to the top seating board. Folding and telescoping seating facilities are structures used for tiered seating whose overall size and shape may be reduced without being dismantled for purposes of moving or storing.

1.2 1.3

1.4

2.

Footings: Footings for outdoor seating facilities are required to comply with 2001 CBC, Section 1806A.10. 3. Relocation: DSA approval is only for the specific location originally shown. Any subsequent move to another location voids the approval and will require submittal of an application for approval at the new site. 4.
4.1 4.1.1

Steel Design: (l = unsupported length of member).


Slender Columns: Columns having a slenderness ratio (l/r) from 200 to 300 may be used with the following restrictions. Maximum Allowable Axial Load: The maximum permitted axial load is 2,000 lbs.

DSA IR 16-5 (rev 09-23-10)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2001 CBC

Page 1 of 5

DSA IR 16-5 (rev 09-23-10)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2001 CBC

Page 2 of 5

4.1.2

Allowable Stresses: The column will be checked for combined axial plus bending stress using the formula: fa Fa

fb 0.6Fy

< 1.0

For a vertical column the additional bending will be computed by assuming a 20 lbs. concentrated horizontal load applied half-way between lateral supports (so as to produce maximum moment). For inclined or horizontal struts the additional bending will be computed for a 20 lbs. concentrated horizontal load or 150 lbs. concentrated vertical load applied at mid-span, whichever gives the larger bending stress. The allowable column stress will be determined from the formula:

Fa =
4.1.3 4.2

2E
(l/r)

35

l/r-125

This formula is indicated graphically in Figure 1 on page 5 of this IR. Lateral Stays for Columns: Columns should be stayed laterally by direct connected compression struts in two directions at the points of lateral support. Effective Lengths of Compression Members in X-Braces: Where a compression member is stayed by a tension member in the same plane, the length of the compression member will be limited to a maximum l/r of 200 based on the distance between the tension support and the end connection.

5.

Tests on Steel: DSA will require steel tests in accordance with 2001 CBC, Section 2231A, subject to the following modifications:
5.1 Small Shapes and Bars: Shapes less than l square inch in cross section and bars other than flats less than 1/2 " thickness or diameter will not require the tension test, but will require a bend test. Steel Tubing: Steel tubing used in bleachers is required to be made from new billets. Each size of tubing used on any project will be tested and required to conform to the following properties: Minimum yield point: 35,000 psi Minimum ultimate tensile strength: 60,000 psi Elongation 15% minimum in two inch gage length

5.2

6.

Qualification of Welders and Inspection of Welding: Either of the following methods, items 6.1 or 6.2, may be used to satisfy the requirements of 2001 CBC, Section 2231A.
EXCEPTION: This provision need not apply to tack welds that were not later incorporated into finished welds carrying calculated stress. 6.1 Verified Reports: With each bleacher, the manufacturer will send DSA a verified report made by a qualified professional engineer, stating the following: "Welds on this bleacher have been made by operators who have been previously qualified by tests, as prescribed in the Qualification Section of the Structural Welding Code of the American Welding Society, to perform the type of work required. I have selected a person qualified to act as welding inspector. I certify him to be experienced in inspection of arc welds on work requiring unquestioned reliability, and that he has the ability to distinguish between sound and unsound welding."

DSA IR 16-5 (rev 09-23-10)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2001 CBC

Page 3 of 5

With each bleacher, the welding inspector will send DSA a verified report stating: "I have checked the equipment and find it adequate and have checked the ability of the welders and found them satisfactory. I have inspected all the welding and find it proper and in conformity with the plans and specifications and 2001 CBC, Chapter 22A. I have used all necessary tests to assure myself of the adequacy of the welding." 6.2 Local Welding Inspection: A local qualified welding inspector, approved by DSA, will inspect the welding after delivery in California, and will submit a verified report stating: "I have inspected all the welding and find it proper and in conformity with the plans and specifications and 2001 CBC, Chapter 22A. I have used all necessary tests to assure myself of the adequacy of the welding." The manufacturer will pay the cost of inspection and necessary removal and retouching of paint.

7.
7.1

Lumber: Any one of the following three methods may be used to satisfy the
Method I: The bleacher manufacturer may send DSA a lumber inspection certification by an approved grading agency, and a notarized certificate, signed by an official of the bleacher manufacturing company, stating that the lumber used in the bleachers is the same as that covered by the lumber inspection certificate. Method II: The bleacher manufacturer may send DSA a notarized certificate, signed by the official of the bleacher manufacturing company, stating that the official has personally inspected the lumber prior to processing or painting, and that it was grade marked by an approved grading agency and is in accordance with the approved plans and specifications. He shall list the grades indicated by the grade marks and note the maximum slope of grain if it is specified to be more restrictive than the grading rules requirement. Method III: A qualified professional engineer may certify that the lumber used in the bleachers conforms to the grades and other requirements called for in the approved plans and specifications. When lumber is fabricated by gluing, certification of quality control and inspection of glue joints by an approved inspection agency will be submitted with the above certifications. Note that all methods of glue fabrication of lumber must be previously approved by DSA and the certification must state that all conditions of the approval have been complied with.

requirements.

7.2

7.3

8.
8.1

Concrete: The requirements governing the quality of concrete may be satisfied by


A report of strength tests of two identical cylinders taken for each days pour; one tested at the age of seven days and the other at 28 days. The report should indicate strengths equal to or exceeding the specified strength required for the project. The above test report and affidavit are not required when the following provisions of bleacher pier footings are complied with and not listed on the structural test and inspection list. Bleacher Pier Footings: Concrete may be placed in bleacher pier footings without continuous inspection by the inspector of record providing the thickness of such footings is not less than one half (1/2) the width or length of the footings,

one of the following: (Also see 2001 CBC, Section 1905A.)

8.2

8.2.1

DSA IR 16-5 (rev 09-23-10)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2001 CBC

Page 4 of 5

whichever results in the greater thickness. Test cylinders will not be required for such concrete.

9.

Other Materials: Certification and testing of materials other than the proceeding should be in accordance with the appropriate sections of the CBC, and/or as determined by DSA.
9.1 General Affidavit Requirements: All verified reports and certificates will be filed in duplicate. They must be notarized or the original signature of the person making the report or certificate must be preceded by the statement: "I certify (or declare) under penalty of perjury that I have read the above report and know of the contents thereof, and that all of the above statements are true."

10. Load Tests: When load tests are made as a basis for approval of bleachers by DSA, test loads will be applied in not less than four, approximately equal increments, without shock to the structure and in a manner to avoid arching of the loading materials or stiffening of the structure. The load test procedure must by approved by DSA prior to testing. The strength of the material in the test bleacher should not exceed the minimum specified strength by more than 5 percent.
10.1 Test Load Factors: When load tests are made to check design or as a basis for approval of bleachers, the test load should be not less than twice the design vertical load combined with twice the design lateral load.

Attachment: Figure 1

DSA IR 16-5 (rev 09-23-10)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2001 CBC

Page 5 of 5

Figure 1
Allowable stresses in minor bleacher struts and columns (200 l/r 200 300)

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

COMPOSITE BASE FOR HVAC UNITS


References: California Code of Regulations (CCR), Title 24; Part 1, 2001 California Administrative Code, Section 4-317(b) Part 2, 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Section 1632A Part 2, 2010 CBC, Section 1615A.1.12, 1615.10.10* ASCE 7-05 Chapters 6 and 13. Discipline: Structural

IR 16-6
Revised 09-23-10 Revised 10-15-07 Issued 05-07-07 as CR 16-1

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/Resources/IRManual.aspx at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable. * Indicates alternative 2010 CBC sections that may be used by community colleges, per 2010 CBC, Section 1.9.2.2.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify seismic


anchorage requirements for HVAC units which use a composite base, in construction projects under DSA jurisdiction.

Background: HVAC units may be packaged with a base constructed of composite material
(e.g. glass-mat reinforced thermal plastic). The composite base may serve three purposes: 1) as a base for the HVAC unit and mounting internal components such as compressors, 2) as a drain pan and 3) as a shipping pallet.

1.
1.1 1.2

Requirements for All HVAC Units: These requirements are applicable for all
The composite base must be assembled by the manufacturer and shipped as an integral part of the equipment. The HVAC unit must be listed or certified by a qualified independent testing and certification agency such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL), Inc., or Intertek ELT Semko. The listing shall indicate that the composite base is suitable for exposure to ultra violet light, for immersion in water, and for use in exterior climatic conditions and operating temperatures. Composite bases shall be rated for indoor air smoke and flame spread per UL94, Test 94-5V.

HVAC units with composite bases:

1.3

The curb or sleeper supporting the HVAC unit must be constructed to match or fit the composite base as recommended or supplied by the manufacturer.

2.

HVAC Units Weighing Less than 400 Pounds: In addition to the requirements of Section 1 above, the HVAC unit must be anchored to resist wind or seismic forces per ASCE 7-05, Chapters 6 and 13 (2001 California Building Code (CBC) Chapter 16A, Divisions III and IV). However, such anchorage need not be detailed in the construction documents per ASCE 7-05, Section 13.1.4 and 2010 CBC Section 1615A1.12 (1615.10.10*). For projects submitted under the 2001 CBC, refer to Part 1, Section 4317(b). HVAC anchorage details shall be provided by the manufacturer or its authorized representative to the project design professional and project inspector. An acceptable anchorage detail is shown on Appendix A and Appendix B.
Composite Base for HVAC Units

DSA IR 16-6 (rev 09-23-10)

Page 1 of 3

DSA IR 16-6 (rev 09-23-10)

Composite Base for HVAC Units

Page 2 of 3

3.
3.1 3.2 3.3

HVAC Units Weighing 400 Pounds or More: In additions to the requirements


The project design professional specifies and approves its use. A licensed design professional shall provide calculations to verify that wind or seismic forces do not cause overturning of the HVAC unit. Details and calculations shall be provided by the design professional in general responsible charge for the project for transfer of wind and seismic loads between the HVAC unit and supporting structure. Screws or bolts embedded into the composite material shall not be considered effective to transfer wind or seismic loads. Lateral loads may be transferred through composite base by means of bearing clips or other connections that bear on the composite material. If the HVAC unit with a composite base is mounted on a metal curb, the metal curb must be rated for gravity and lateral loads and detailed on the construction documents. If the metal curb has a valid OSHPD anchorage pre-approval, the OPA number and anchorage detailing must be shown on the construction documents.

of Section 2 above, the following shall also be applicable:

3.4

APPENDICES
Appendix A Photograph of unit showing Seismic Restraint Clips Appendix B Drawing showing attachment method for composite base to metal roof curb

Appendix A

Example of Seismic Anchorage

(Only for HVAC Units Weighing Less Than 400 LBS. See Section 3 above for Units Weighing 400 LBS or More)

DSA IR 16-6 (rev 09-23-10)

Composite Base for HVAC Units

Page 3 of 3

Appendix B

Example of Seismic Anchorage

(Only for HVAC Units Weighing Less Than 400 LBS. See Section 3 above for Units Weighing 400 LBS or More)

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

WIND LOAD DETERMINATION ALTERNATE METHOD


References: 2007 California Building Code (CBC), Section 1609A.1.1 ASCE 7-05, Chapter 6 Discipline: Structural

IR 16-7
Issued 12-18-07

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) provides a simplified method to determine wind loads from that given in CBC Section 1609A.1 and Section 6.5 Method 2 of ASCE 7. Background: A Tri-State Wind Code Committee consisting of delegates from the Structural Engineering Associations of California, Oregon and Washington developed the following alternate wind design procedure. This alternate procedure is formatted similar to the 1997 UBC, but includes the basic approach, nomenclature and latest wind design knowledge of the ASCE 7 Standard. This procedure combines the internal and external pressures on each external surface of a building into a single Net Pressure Coefficient, Cnet. The Cnet coefficients are used in the equation for obtaining the design wind pressure, Pnet, for each external surface of the building.
For additional background and commentary, see the Appendix.

Policy: The following Alternate Wind Design Procedure is not mandatory, but will be accepted by DSA as an alternate to Section 1609A.1 of the 2007 CBC for projects under the jurisdiction of DSA. 1. Alternate Wind Design Procedure: The following wind load provisions are permitted by DSA as an alternative to Section 6.5 Method 2 Analytical Procedure of ASCE 7, as mandated in Section 1609A.1 of the 2007 (CBC). Limitations: Buildings or other structures whose design wind forces are allowed to be determined in accordance with this IR shall meet the following requirements:
2.1 2.2 The building or other structure shall have no unusual geometric irregularity or spatial form. The building or other structure does not have response characteristics making it subject to across wind loading, vortex shedding, instability due to galloping or flutter; and does not have a site location for which channeling effects or buffeting in the wake of upwind obstructions warrant special consideration. A building or other structure greater than 100 feet (30480 mm) in height shall be limited to a height-to-least-width ratio of 4 or less, and with a fundamental natural period less than or equal to one second.
Wind Load Determination Alternate Method Page 1 of 8

2.

2.3

DSA (SS) IR 16-7 (iss 12-18-07)

DSA (SS) IR 16-7 iss 12-18-07)

Wind Load Determination Alternate Method

Page 2 of 8

Commentary: The starting assumption of the procedure is that the structures are "rigid," which is defined as having a fundamental natural period of at least one Hz (period of less than one second). Item 2.3 is intended to define that item. Structures less than 100 ft can generally be considered rigid, at least for the approximate period in ASCE Section 12.8.2.1 (these are similar period calculations as 2001 CBC Section 1630A.2.2). Thus the flexible structure requirements in ASCE 7 Chapter 6 can be ignored.

3.
3.1

Modifications to ASCE 7: The text of ASCE 7 shall be modified as follows:


Symbols and notations: Symbols and notations are specific to this section in conjunction with Symbols and notations in ASCE 7, Section 6.3. B = Horizontal dimension of building measured normal to wind direction

BMWFRS = Maximum horizontal distance between vertical elements of MWFRS resisting wind forces in any given direction. Cnet G I Kd Pnet qs 3.2 = Net-pressure coefficient based on Kd [GCp (GCpi)], see Table 2 = Gust effect factor equal to 0.85 for rigid buildings as defined in ASCE 7, Section 6.5.8.1 = Importance factor in ASCE 7 Table 6-1 = Wind directionality factor as defined in ASCE 7, Section 6.5.4.4. = Design wind pressure used to determine wind loads on buildings or other structures, or their components and cladding, in lb/ft2 (N/m2) = Wind velocity pressure in lb/ft2 (N/m2), Table 1

Design wind pressures: When using the Alternate Wind Design Procedure, the Main-Wind-Force-Resisting System, (MWFRS) and Components and Cladding of every building or structure shall be designed to resist the effects of wind pressures on the building envelope. The net pressure on exterior building surfaces shall be determined as follows: Pnet = qs Kz Cnet [I Kzt] (Equation 1)

Design wind forces for the MWFRS shall not be less than 10 lb/ft2 (0.48 kN/m2) multiplied by the area of the building or structure projected on a plane normal to the wind direction under consideration. See ASCE 7 Section 6.1.4 for criteria. Design wind pressure for components and cladding shall not be less than 10 lb/ft2 (0.48 kN/m2) acting in either direction normal to the surface. 3.3 Design procedure: The MWFRS of every building or other structure shall be designed for the combination of the windward and leeward net pressure, Pnet, using Equation 1. Components and claddings of every building or structure shall be designed for the critical net pressure, Pnet, using Equation 1. Main wind force resisting systems: The MWFRS shall be designed for the wind load cases as defined in ASCE 7 Figure 6-9. Exceptions: 1. One-story buildings with h less than or equal to 30 ft, buildings two stories or less framed with light-frame construction, and buildings two stories or less

3.3.1

DSA (SS) IR 16-7 iss 12-18-07)

Wind Load Determination Alternate Method

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designed with flexible diaphragms need only be designed for Load Case 1 and Load Case 3 in Fig. 6-9. 2. Where the ratio BMWFRS/B exceeds 0.7, only Load Case 1 and Load Case 3 in Fig. 6-9 need be considered, provided the design wind load is increased 20% for the vertical elements of the MWFRS closest to the perimeter, for those lateral lines which resist less than 50% of the total wind force at that story. Commentary: Section 3.3.1 of the IR is different than the code change proposal by SEA. The original ASCE 7 requirement to use the load cases in Figure 6-9 was put back into the procedure. Exception 1 is directly from ASCE 7. The proposal by SEA to simplify the torsion was included as Exception 2. However, since there is an increase to some of the vertical elements in the MWFRS due to the torsion load case, the 20% increase was included for the perimeter lines of resistance. When using Exception 2, wall lines that resist more than 50% of the lateral load at that story will not see an increase due to the torsional load cases. 3.3.2 Determination of Kz and Kzt: Velocity pressure exposure coefficient, Kz, shall be determined in accordance with ASCE 7 Section 6.5.6.6; and Topography Factor, Kzt, shall be determined in accordance with ASCE 7 Section 6.5.7. 1. For windward side of a structure, Kz and Kzt shall be based on height z. 2. For leeward side and side walls, and for windward and leeward roofs, Kz and Kzt shall be based on mean roof height h. Kz for exposure C = 2.01(z/900)0.21 where z is the height in ft and z 15 ft. For other exposures, see ASCE 7 Table 6-3. 3.3.3 Determination of net pressure coefficient Cnet: For the design of the main wind force resisting system and for components and cladding, the net pressure shall be as follows: 1. The net pressure coefficient, Cnet for walls and roofs shall be determined from Table 2. 2. Where Cnet may have more than one value, the more severe wind load combination shall be used for design. 3.4 Application of wind pressures: When using Alternate Wind Design Procedure, wind pressure shall be applied simultaneously on, and in a direction normal to, all building envelope wall and roof surfaces. Components and cladding: Wind pressure for each component or cladding element is applied using Cnet values based on the effective wind area, A, contained within the zones in areas of discontinuity of width and/ or length a, 2a or 4a at: corners of roofs and walls; edge strips for ridges, rakes and eaves; or field areas on walls or roofs as indicated in Table 2, and shall meet the following requirements: 1. Calculated pressure at local discontinuities acting over specific edge strips or corner boundary areas. 2. Include field (Zones 1, 2 or 4 as applicable) pressures applied to areas beyond the boundaries of the areas of discontinuity. 3. Where applicable, calculated pressures at discontinuities (Zones 2 or 3) shall be combined with design pressures on rake or eave overhangs.

3.4.1

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TABLE 1 WIND VELOCITY PRESSURE (qs) AT STANDARD HEIGHT OF 33 FEETa Basic Wind Speed, V (mph)b Pressure, qs (lb/ft2) c a. b. c. 85 18.5 90 20.7 95 23.1 100 25.6
2

110 31.0

120 36.9

130 43.3

140 50.2

150 57.6

For wind speeds not shown, use qs = 0.00256 V Multiply by 1.61 to convert to km/h Multiply by 0.0478 to convert to kN/m2

TABLE 2 NET PRESSURE COEFFICIENT, Cnet STRUCTURE OR PART THEREOF 1. Main Wind Force Resisting System DESCRIPTION Walls: Windward wall Leeward wall Side wall Parapet wall Enclosed 0.43 -0.51 -0.66 1.28 -0.85 CNET FACTOR a, f Partially enclosed 0.11 -0.83 -0.97 1.28 -0.85

Windward Leeward

Roofs: Wind perpendicular to ridge Leeward roof or flat roof Windward roof slopes: Slope 2:12 (or 10) Case 1 Case 2 Slope 4:12 (or 18 ) Case 1 Case 2 Slope 5:12 (or 22 ) Case 1 Case 2 Slope 6:12 (or 27 ) Case 1 Case 2 Slope 7:12 (or 30 ) Case 1 Case 2 Slope 9:12 (or 37 ) Case 1 Case 2 Slope 12:12 (or 45) Case 1 Case 2 Slope 21:12 (or 60 ) Slope > 21:12 (or 60 ) Wind parallel to ridge or flat roofs 2. Components and cladding Walls b Affected zone d Wall elements h 60 ft. Wall elements h > 60 ft. Parapet walls h 60 ft Parapet walls h > 60 ft 10 sf 500 sf 20 sf 500 sf 4 1.00 0.75 0.92 0.66 2.53 2.87

-0.66

-0.97

-1.09 -0.28 -0.73 -0.05 -0.59 0.03 -0.47 0.06 -0.37 0.06 -0.27 0.14 -0.15 0.14 0.28 c -1.09 4 -1.09 -0.83 -0.92 -0.75 -1.94 -1.68 5 1.00 0.75 0.92 0.66 3.38 3.64

-1.41 -0.60 -1.05 -0.37 -0.90 -0.29 -0.79 -0.25 -0.68 -0.25 -0.58 -0.18 -0.47 -0.18 -0.03 c -1.41 5 -1.34 -0.83 -1.68 -1.00 -2.19 -2.45

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3. Components and cladding Roofs b

Affected zone d Roof for h > 60 ft Slope 2: 12 (or 10) 10 sf 500 sf Gable and Hipped Roof h 60 ft Slope 6:12 (or 27 ) 10 sf 100 sf Overhang 10 sf 100 sf Slope 6:12 to 12:12 10 sf (or 27 to 45 ) 100 sf Overhang 10 sf 100 sf Monoslope Roof h 60 ft Slope 7:12 (or 30 ) 10 sf 100 sf
e

1 -

1 -1.34 -1.00

2 -

2 -2.11 -1.51

3 -

3 -2.87 -2.11

0.58 0.41 0.92 0.83 0.49 0.41 1

-1.00 -0.92 -1.45 -1.36 -1.00 -0.83 -1.26 -1.09

0.58 0.41 0.92 0.83 0.49 0.41 7

-1.68 -1.17 -1.87 -1.87 -1.17 -1.00 -1.70 -1.53 -1.51 -1.43

0.58 0.41 0.92 0.83 0.49 0.41 25

-2.53 -1.85 -3.15 -2.13 -1.17 -1.00 -1.70 -1.53 -2.62 -1.85

4. Chimneys, tanks and solid towers b

Height / depth or diameter (h/D) Square (wind normal to face) Square (wind along diagonal) Hexagonal or Octagonal Round Ratio of solid to gross area Flat Round Horizontal to vertical dimension (B/s) Case A and Case B (all B/s) Case C (2 B/s 5) Case C ( B/s > 5)

0.99 0.77 0.81 0.65 < 0.1 1.45 0.87 0 to s 1.45 2.24 3.10

1.07 0.84 0.97 0.81 0.1 to 0.29 1.30 0.94 s to 2s 1.45 1.45 1.88

1.53 1.15 1.13 0.97 0.3 to 0.7 1.16 1.08 3s 1.45 1.45 1.45

5. Open sign and lattice frameworks

6. Solid Freestanding Wall

a. b. c. d. e. f.

Linear interpolation between tabulated Cnet values and between tabulated slope or effective wind areas is acceptable. Overhang values are for both enclosed and partially enclosed buildings. For other than overhangs, component and cladding values are for enclosed buildings. For partially enclosed buildings, algebraically add or subtract 0.32 to increase values on table. Use wall element values for slopes greater than 21:12 (60). Refer to ASCE 7 Figure 6-11-A through Figure 6-17 for affected zone designations. For roof slope > 2:12 (or 10), use coefficients tabulated for gable and hipped roof h 60 ft. Open structures can conservatively use the values for enclosed structures except for a MWFRS mono-slope windward roof, which must add +0.15 to the Case 2 Cnet factor.

Commentary: Many of the Figures in ASCE include multiple Cp pressure values that are not included in Table 2. For example, in Figure 6-6, the wall pressure coefficient Cp varies depending on the L/B ratio. The L/B ratio with a Cp value that results in the largest Cnet value was used in Table 2. The same logic was used for other ratios not included in Table 2, such as the h/L values for the MWFRS roof values. Also, the reduction factor for the MWFRS roof values based on area were ignored.

DSA (SS) IR 16-7 iss 12-18-07)

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Appendix 1 Additional Background and Commentary


Reason for Developing the Alternate Method: The following is an excerpt from the SEAOC presentation to the IBC requesting the addition of the Alternate Method into the IBC model code.
In response to concerns from design engineers on the complexity of wind design procedures, this proposal provides for an alternate design procedure to Method 2 of ASCE 7. In using 2006 IBC and ASCE 7, engineers have found that, except for low rise light framed buildings, lateral force design of most structures tends to be controlled by seismic forces in the western states. While ASCE 7 includes a simplified procedure under Method 1 for buildings not greater than sixty feet in height, the procedure includes various limitations such as simple diaphragm, low rise building with no unusual geometrical irregularity, and requires an engineer to refer to numerous relatively complicated charts. The complexity of the detailed Analytical Procedure has daunted even the most experience engineers. The need for wind design procedure in the IBC similar to that which was in the 1997 UBC has been echoed throughout most of the United States. The Structural Engineers Association of California established a Wind Ad Hoc Committee in late 2006. The group was charged to develop alternate wind design procedures for all height buildings in conjunction with the Tri-state (California, Oregon and Washington) Wind Committee. The Tri-state Wind Committee, with representatives appointed by each of the three states structural engineers associations, all of whom are experienced structural engineers, was active in code development for the 1991 UBC using ASCE 7-88 standard as the source document, and also took a primary roll in developing the basic format of the wind design provisions in the 1997 Uniform Building Code, which is still being used in several states. This proposed alternate design procedure is developed for the most common type of buildings that are not subjected to dynamic response with further limitations for building or other structure over 100 feet. The alternate method follows closely with design requirements Chapter 6 of ASCE 7. Simplification is accomplished by generating a table of net pressure coefficients (Cnet), combining a number of parameters in a simple and yet conservative manner. Application of the net pressure coefficients meets the intent to reduce the number of steps required for performing a wind loading analysis on buildings that satisfy the criteria prescribed under the limitations statement, resulting in net forces which meet or exceed those calculated based on Method 2. The reduction of design effort should be helpful in the determination of wind forces for the main wind force resisting system; and should be substantial for components and cladding. The procedure has been designed to give results equal to or more conservative than the present provisions in ASCE 7. While the proposed code change by SEAOC Wind Ad Hoc Committee has been developed in concert with the Tri-state Wind Committee proposed document, this proposal has some uniqueness in addressing buildings of all heights and the table developed for Cnet coefficient has been arranged in a format similar to the 1997 Uniform Building Code, which most engineers preferred in the past. Given the substantial time savings using this proposed alternate design procedure, and given that the next edition of ASCE wind standard will not be published until after 2010, we respectfully request that this proposed change be adopted into the IBC as an alternative procedure until such time as the next edition of ASCE wind standard can incorporate this alternate design method.

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Appendix 2 - Additional Commentary on Design Wind Pressure


The simplification of this procedure is to combine some of the factors in the wind equations to reduce the number of computations required. For example, the ASCE 7 formulas for the MWFRS are: Equation 6-15 qz = 0.00256 Kz Kzt Kd V2 I Equation 6-17 p = q G Cp qi (GCpi) Combining the two above equations, p = 0.00256 Kz Kzt Kd V2 I G Cp 0.00256 Kz Kzt Kd V2 I (GCpi) or p = (0.00256 V2) Kz Kd (G Cp (GCpi))[I Kzt] With the following new terms: qs = 0.00256 V2 Cnet = Kd [GCp (GCpi)], Then the pressure p = (0.00256 V2) Kz Kd (G Cp (GCpi))[I Kzt] can be rewritten as: Pnet = qs Kz Cnet [I Kzt] Therefore, the simplification is in the Cnet value combining the Kd, GCp and GCpi terms into a single value in Table 2. Gust Effect Factor G: ASCE Section 6.5.8.1 allows the designer to use G = 0.85 or calculate G according to Formula 6-4. As the building projected wind area becomes very large, the G factor in Formula 6-4 is reduced. For example, a 50 foot high building that is 200 feet wide has a G just below 0.85, but a 50 foot high building that is 500 feet wide has a G of 0.81. The values in Table 2 are based on the maximum G = 0.85. ASCE 7 Section 6.5.12.2.1: For the MWFRS, Equation 6-17 is permitted to be used for buildings of all heights per ASCE Section 6.5.12.2.1. Section 6.5.12.2.1 is the basis for Table 2 in this IR. ASCE Section 6.5.12.2.2 provides an alternate method for low rise buildings in Equation 6-18 and Figure 6-10, but this alternate was not used and therefore the load cases in Figure 6-10 are not required. MWFRS Walls: ASCE Figure 6-5 for the GCpi values requires that two load cases must be considered. Case 1 is positive internal pressure applied to all internal surfaces and Case 2 is negative internal pressure applied to all internal surfaces. For the MWFRS, the authors used the positive internal pressures. This results in reducing the windward values and increasing the leeward values. It is more conservative to use the positive internal pressures because the leeward pressure is based on the full height of the building, where the windward pressure is based on the height going up the structure. At the top of the structure, you have maximum positive and maximum negative pressures. As you go down the structure, you continue to use the maximum negative pressure (leeward), but use a reduced positive pressure (reduced windward with respect to the maximum). Since positive internal pressure results in increased negative values, the resulting sum of the forces will be higher with positive internal pressures. MWFRS Roof: For the MWFRS roof, there are two load cases in Figure 6-6. Case 1 for the maximum wind uplift force occurs when the maximum negative windward pressure is combined with the maximum negative leeward pressure. The maximum

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external negative pressures are increased with a positive internal pressure. Positive internal pressures were used for Table 2. Case 2 for the maximum horizontal wind shear force occurs when the maximum positive windward pressure is combined with the maximum negative leeward pressure. However, when combining windward and leeward loads, the same internal pressure is used. The positive internal pressure is used in Table 2 to reduce the MWFRS windward pressure since the leeward roof and leeward walls are both based on positive internal pressure. Components and Cladding: For components and cladding, the authors used the internal pressure (positive or negative) that would result in the greatest total pressure on the element. Determination of qi: In Section 6.5.12.2.1, q = qz for windward walls, q = qh for leeward and side walls. The simplified formula uses qi based on the height used for the external pressure, which results in qi= qz for windward walls and qi = qh for leeward and side walls. The qi = qz for windward walls is conservative since it results in a higher windward pressure by subtracting a smaller inward pressure. With qi = qh for leeward and side walls, this matches the ASCE 7 language since windward and side walls are required to use qh. Open Structures were not included in Table 2. Open structures have no internal pressure so there is no simplification of combining external and internal pressures. Open structures can conservatively use the enclosed structure values, except for the MWFRS windward pressures on mono-slope roofs. The internal pressure cancels out when combining windward and leeward pressures on walls and roofs for the MWFRS. An open structure with only a mono-slope roof will not cancel out the internal pressure where there is no leeward wall.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC AND THERMAL SYSTEMS ACCEPTANCE REQUIREMENTS


References: 2007 California Building Code (CBC), Sections 1609A and 1613A 2007 California Electrical Code (CEC), Articles 250, 310, and 609 California State Fire Marshal Photovoltaic Installation Guideline dated April 22, 2008 Discipline: Structural, Access Compliance, Fire-Life Safety, Electrical

IR 16-8
Revised 06-25-10 Revised 04-03-09 Issued 08-15-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) describes the Division of the State
Architect (DSA) requirements for acceptance of solar photovoltaic and solar thermal systems used in construction projects under the jurisdiction of DSA

Scope: This IR clarifies the requirements for structural support, and anchorage of panels
and balance-of-system (BOS) equipment. It also addresses the basic Fire-Life Safety and some Electrical requirements of the California Building Code (CBC). Photovoltaic roofing systems (such as tiles) that incorporate photovoltaic technology physically integrated into the roof covering materials are outside the scope of this IR.

Background: Typical photovoltaic (PV) or solar thermal systems consist of solar panels
and BOS equipment. The BOS equipment includes factory assembled foundations or support structures, DC-to-AC inverters, electrical wiring, electrical protection, monitoring, and safety equipment. Photovoltaic panels are anchored to building structures. The anchoring relies on various attachment systems such as support frames (Section 3, below), ballast (Section 4, below), or adhered systems (Section 5, below). Solar thermal panels are typically anchored by support structures.

1.

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: DSA will not review the design and construction of the panels and the BOS equipment. However, the panels and BOS equipment must be designed and constructed to meet the requirements of Title 24.

See Sections 7 and 8 below for the requirements of Access Compliance and Fire-Life Safety, respectively.

2. REVIEW OF SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC AND THERMAL SYSTEMS: The Division of the State Architect Structural Safety reviews the anchorage of solar panels and their BOS equipment to the building structure or foundation. The anchorage design for solar panels and their BOS equipment must meet the wind force requirements of the CBC, Section 1609A and the seismic requirements of ASCE 7-05, Chapter 13.
Manufacturers support frames will also be review by DSA. The buildings vertical and lateral load resisting systems will also be evaluated for the additional loads from the solar panels and BOS equipment.
DSA (SS) IR 16-8 (rev 06-25-10) Solar Photovoltaic and Thermal Systems Acceptance Requirements

Page 1 of 5

DSA (SS) IR 16-8 (rev 06-25-10)

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2.1

Projects Exempt from DSA Review: Additions of solar energy systems to existing buildings may be exempt from DSA review when the total cost of the project (including any other construction, site work, etc.) is less than the cost limit indicated in IR A-10 for alteration projects. The cost limit is adjusted annually, from a baseline cost of $25,000 in 1999 dollars as required by Title 24, Part 1, Sections 4-308 and 4-309. The adjusted cost limit is published in IR A-10 annually. All solar energy systems and their installation, including projects exempt from DSA review, shall meet the requirements of Title 24 and applicable provisions of this IR.

2.1.1 Exception: Regardless of costs, solar energy systems installed on or supported by free standing structures (whether standing alone or attached to existing buildings) are not exempted from DSA review. Examples of free standing structures are shade structures, lunch shelters, canopies, large arrays of panels supported on a single pole, etc.

3.

PANELS SUPPORTED ON FRAMING SYSTEMS AND FOUNDATIONS:

DSA will review support frames either supplied by manufacturers or designed by the architects or structural engineers in general responsible charge (see Section 6 below), foundations, primary structure, the connection details of panels to support frames and connection details of support frames to primary structures or foundations. The design of the support frames, foundations and connections must meet the following wind and seismic requirements: 3.1 Requirements for Wind Design: The wind design requirements are given in CBC Section 1609A. The design shall consider the effects of partially enclosed structure configuration (if presented), and discontinuities at panel free edges and corners. Requirements for Seismic Design: The seismic anchorage design requirements are given in CBC Section 1613A, and ASCE Standard 7-05, Chapter 13.

3.2

4.

BALLAST PANEL SYSTEMS: Ballast panels may only be installed on a flat roof with minimal slope for drainage purposes. Panels in a ballast system are not attached to the roof. They rely on their weights and aerodynamics to counter the wind uplift forces.
Requirements for Wind Design: The panels shall be designed and installed to resist wind loads prescribed in CBC, Section 1609A. The minimum design wind force shall be a net pressure of 10 lb/ft2 acting in either direction normal to the panels per ASCE 7, Section 6.1.4.2. Wind tunnel test reports for wind (uplift) are required to verify the design. Requirements for Seismic Design: The panels must be seismically restrained from falling off the roof or excessive movements on the roof. Individual panels need not be restrained independently if the panels are connected with an interlocking mechanism that is capable of holding the panels together in the horizontal and vertical directions. The overall panel array must be restrained. The restraint and panel interlocking mechanism must be designed to resist sliding and pop-up resulting from lateral and vertical seismic forces and displacements per CBC Section 1613A, and ASCE Standard 7-05, Chapter 13. The restraint and panel interlocking mechanism may be verified either through time-history non-linear dynamic analysis or shake table testing in accordance with International Code Council (ICC) Evaluation Service (ES) Acceptance Criteria AC-156.

4.1

4.2

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4.2.1 4.2.2 4.3

Flexible utility connections, such as electrical cables, may be required to accommodate movement of the panels. BOS equipment shall be anchored per CBC Section 1613A, and ASCE Standard 705, Chapter 13. Other Considerations: Ballast panel systems shall not cause excessive sagging of the roof resulting in ponding. They shall also not block or impede drainage flows to any overflow drains and scuppers.

5. ADHERED PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS: Adhered photovoltaic panels are attached to supports by adhesive. Currently, there are no building code criteria, ASTM standards, ICC evaluation criteria, or other recognized industrial standard for adhesives used to anchor solar panels. Adhered photovoltaic panels may be accepted if test and analysis data, and quality control and assurance program are submitted that demonstrate an equivalent level of safety as positive mechanical anchorage systems.
The local DSA Regional Office should be contacted early in the design phase if an adhered system is anticipated.

6.

SUBMITTAL REQUIREMENTS: All projects involving installation of photovoltaic or solar thermal systems shall have a California licensed or registered architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge per Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-316. Applications for project review shall be submitted to the DSA Regional Offices, following the normal process for project submittal. An overview of the project submittal process and requirements may be found on the DSA web site. (See Appendix B for web links.)

In addition to the above requirements, the following items are also required for review: 6.1 General 6.1.1 Construction plans and specifications shall be signed and stamped by architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge per IR A-19. The architect or structural engineer in general responsible may use construction plans and specifications prepared by the manufacturers California registered engineer provided the requirements of IR A-18 are met. The plans and specifications shall including anchorage or restraint details of the panels, BOS equipment, support structures, and foundations. Also submit any applicable anchorage calculations. Shop drawings or fabrication and installation drawings of the system. Calculations to verify that the primary structure will support the additional vertical and lateral loads from the panels and BOS equipment. Also provide calculations verifying that roof deflection will not cause ponding. Roof Live Loads on Panels. It is not necessary to include roof live load (20 psf) in the area(s) covered by the panels when these area(s) are inaccessible, or post signs prohibiting storage under the panels. Inaccessible areas are areas where the clear space between the panels and the roof top is 12 inches or less. When applicable, include snow loads and loads from snow drift. 6.2 Ballast Panel Systems 6.2.1 Wind tunnel test reports that address wind uplift per Section 4.1.2 above. Listings or evaluation reports issued by ICC Evaluation Services, Dade County, or other recognized testing and evaluation organizations per IR A-5 may be substituted for wind tunnel test reports if the listings or evaluation reports were issued on the basis of wind tunnel testing.

6.1.2

6.1.3 6.1.4

6.1.5

DSA (SS) IR 16-8 (rev 06-25-10)

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6.2.2

Provide Panel Interlocking system verification using either a time-history nonlinear dynamic analysis or shake table testing in accordance with ICC ES Acceptance Criteria AC-15-6, per Section 4.2 above.

Projects which consist only of solar energy system work installed on existing buildings do not trigger accessibility code requirements or DSA accessibility review. See Section 1134B.2.1, Exception 4, Part 2, Title 24, CCR, for detailed requirements. Also see DSA IR 11B-6, Mechanical Only Projects Exempt from Accessibility Review. New shade structures, lunch shelters, canopies, and carports incorporating solar panels will require access compliance review. For example, a new shade structure over an existing parking lot will trigger access compliance review to determine if upgrades are required to the parking area and the path of travel to conform with current access compliance code requirements.

7. ACCESS COMPLIANCE:

8. FIRE-LIFE SAFETY: The installation of solar or thermal systems will be reviewed for
code compliance by adherence to the State Fire Marshal Solar Photovoltaic Installation Guideline in all respects including any additional amendments, supplements, or official interpretations. Other proposed means of achieving compliance will be considered and evaluated. 8.1 Fire-Life Safety Review: Photovoltaic and thermal stand alone systems that have support structures of combustible materials shall be located per CBC requirements and may not be located in Frontage areas used for adjacent building area increases. Noncombustible support structures and BOS equipment may be located next to adjacent buildings provided exiting is maintained and are not required to have automatic fire sprinkler system coverage where the configuration of the system will not allow heat, smoke or gasses to be trapped. Noncombustible stand alone systems need not be included in the basic area calculations. 8.2 Requirements for Fire-Life Safety Design: When panels are supported on framing systems and foundations, they shall be of non-combustible materials and shall be designed so that heat, smoke and other gasses can not be trapped under the panels. Framing systems may not be placed in designated fire access lanes. Combustible framing systems may not be placed within the 2007 CBC Frontage Increase areas of buildings constructed under the 2007 CBC, nor within the required side yard areas for existing buildings constructed under previous codes, without prior approval of DSA Fire-Life Safety.

9.

ELECTRICAL REQUIREMENTS: Solar energy systems shall meet the requirements of the 2007 California Electrical Code (CEC). All systems shall be grounded in accordance with the 2007 CEC, Article 250. Electrical cables and materials shall meet the criteria for weather proof locations per the 2007 CEC, Article 310. Solar photovoltaic systems shall comply with the requirements of 2007 CEC, Article 690. Appendix A shows an example of a PV system grounding.

Appendices: Appendix A Example of PV System Grounding Appendix B Hyperlinks to Web Pages

DSA (SS) IR 16-8 (rev 06-25-10)

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Appendix A: Example of PV System Grounding

Scale: none

Appendix B: Hyperlinks to Web Pages


Some of the documents referenced in this IR are available from the following web pages: IR A-5: http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/pubs/IR_A-5_rev06-02-08.pdf IR A-10: http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/pubs/IR_A-10_03-17-08.pdf IR A-18: http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/pubs/IR_A-18_issued02-01-08.pdf IR A-19: http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/pubs/IR_A-19_rev04-07-08.pdf IR 11B-6: http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/pubs/IR_11B-6_02-04-08.pdf Overview of DSA Submittal Process: http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/PlanRev/overview.htm Fire Marshalls Guidelines: http://www.osfm.fire.ca.gov/pdf/reports/solarphotovoltaicguideline.pdf

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

PENDANT MOUNTED LIGHT FIXTURES


References: California Building Code, Part 2, Section 1614A1.12. ASCE 7 Sections 13.6.1 and 13.2.3 Discipline: Structural

IR 16-9
Issued 06-22-09

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose:

The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to set forth an acceptable method for support of pendant mounted light fixtures.

shall be detailed and installed so that they can swing at least 45 degrees from the vertical in any direction without contacting an obstruction. Adjacent fixtures shall be separated by a distance equal to at least one and one half times the length of the pendant. Exception: When it can be demonstrated by rational analysis that fixtures will swing less than 45 degrees in the maximum credible earthquake, fixture location and spacing may be based on such analysis.

General: Pendant mounted light fixtures that are free to swing in the lateral direction

1. SAFETY CABLES: Fixtures that are supported by cables shall have cables (including

cable connections and supports) designed to support a load of at least 1.4 times the weight of the fixture acting simultaneously in the vertical and horizontal direction and applied at the point of lateral support. Fixtures supported by hollow rods, or other support mechanisms shall be provided with a safety cable attached directly to the fixture and directly to competent supporting structure above. The safety cable, its connections, and supports shall be designed to support a load of at least 1.4 times the weight of the fixture acting simultaneously in the vertical and horizontal direction and applied at the point of lateral support.

2. RIGID PENDANTS: When a pendant mounted light fixture is supported by a rigid (rod-type) pendant the pendant shall be attached to the structure above with a device that allows movement in any direction (i.e. ball and socket joint). When a single fixture is supported by more than one rigid pendant, the pendants shall be attached to the structure above, and to the fixture, with devices that allow movement in any direction; devices that allow rotation around only one axis (i.e. hinge-type devices) are not acceptable. 3. RESTRAINED PENDANT MOUNTED FIXTURES: When fixtures are restrained from lateral movement all restraints, connections, and supports shall be designed to resist all applicable code prescribed forces. 4. PENDANT MOUNTED FIXTURES WITH PENDANTS PENETRATING SUSPENDED ACOUSTIC TILE CEILINGS: Where pendants penetrate Acoustic

ceilings they shall be braced in accordance with Section 1.22 of IR 25-5.

Exception: Fixtures that have passed shaking table tests approved by the enforcement agency shall be supported by devices identical to those used in the tests.

DSA IR 16-9 (iss 06-22-09)

Pendant Mounted Light Fixtures

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF REVIEWING STANDS, GRANDSTANDS, AND BLEACHERS: 2007 CBC
References: 2007 California Building Code, Sections 1025.1.1, and 3401.1 ICC/ANSI 300-02 Discipline: Structural

IR 16-10
Issued 08-06-09

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This IR clarifies the structural design requirements for bleachers with an overall
height of 20 feet or less from the top of foundation at the front to the uppermost seatboard. Bleachers exceeding the height 20 shall be designed, constructed and inspected in compliance with the requirements of the current California Building Code (CBC).

Do not use this IR for any other structures. This IR is applicable only to projects submitted to DSA for review under the 2007 CBC. For projects submitted under the 2001 CBC, see IR 16-5.

1.

Definitions: In addition to those in ICC/ANSI 300, Section 202, the following terms are defined for this IR. Please note that ICC 300 defines bleachers, and grandstands identically. The terms bleacher and grandstand will be used interchangeably in this IR. All provisions pertaining to bleacher will also be applicable to grandstand and vice versa.
1.1 School Buildings: DSA reviews and approves the construction of school buildings. Section 4-314, Part 1, Title 24, California Code of Regulation defines reviewing stands, grandstands and bleachers more than five rows of seats above grade as school buildings. Portable Bleachers: Seating facilities located outside of a building and not attached to permanent foundations. The maximum height of any portable bleachers may not exceed eleven rows, or nine feet above grade to the top seating board. Temporary Portable Bleachers: Portable bleachers that remain at a location for less than 90 days. They are exempted from DSA review, but must be in compliance with the requirements of ICC/ANSI 300. Folding and Telescoping Seating Facilities: Structures used for tiered seating whose overall size and shape may be reduced without being dismantled for purposes of moving or storing. All provisions in this IR pertaining to bleachers and grandstands will also be applicable to this type of seating facilities. Approved Bleacher Fabrication Shops: Fabrication shops shall be accredited or certified by International Accreditation Service (IAS) or other independent accreditation agencies to fabricate bleachers. The accreditation shall be based on the review of the fabricators written procedural, quality control manuals and unannounced annual visit and audit of fabrication practices by an auditor approved by the accreditation agency.

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

DSA IR 16-10 (iss 08-06-09)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2007 CBC

Page 1 of 8

DSA IR 16-10 (iss 08-06-09)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2007 CBC

Page 2 of 8

A bleacher fabrication shop accredited for steel fabrication and welding in a manner similarly to the above paragraph is also considered an approved bleacher fabrication shop, provided the fabrication shop has a minimum of five years of documented continuous experience in the fabrication of bleachers. Proof of experience may include past certification, and a history of projects completed. Upon request by DSA, the fabrication shop shall provide proof with a cover letter on the fabrication shops stationary, signed and stamped by the manufacturers (California registered) civil or structural engineer per Section 4.3 below.

2.

Footings: Footings for portable bleachers are required to comply with CBC, Section 1805A. Temporary portable bleachers as defined in Section 1.2 above maybe supported by wood sills or steel plates directly bearing on the ground surface, provided the soil pressure does not exceed 1200 pounds per square foot (psf).

3. Relocation: DSA approval is only for the specific location originally shown. Any subsequent move to another location voids the approval and will require submittal of an application for approval at the new site. 4. Structural Design: The structural design shall be in accordance with ICC/ANSI 300, Section 303. Also see Table 1607A.1, CBC.
4.1 Sway Loads: The design of bleachers shall consider sway loads as live loads in accordance with Footnote (d), Table 4-1, ASCE 7-05. See Appendix A for applicable load combinations for bleacher design. Seatboards and Footboards as Structural Elements: On the basis of previously approved designs, and engineering data that were submitted, DSA has determined that seatboards and footboards are acceptable alternate structural elements, per Title 24, Part 1, Sections 4-304 and 4-305, for the following applications: Bracing the compression flanges of stringers, Torsional restraint of the stringers or girders, and Diaphragm action for distribution of forces. Note: The provisions of this section will be valid only for projects design under the 2007 CBC. See Section 8.2 below. 4.3 Professional Stamps and Signatures: A California licensed architect or registered structural engineer shall prepare and submit construction documents, which include plans and specifications, along with any supporting documents such as calculations to DSA for review and approval. All construction documents shall bear the stamp and signature of the architect or structural engineer per IR A-19, Design Professionals Signature and Seal (Stamp) on Construction Documents. The architect or structural engineer who is in general responsible charge of a project as defined by Title 24, Part 1, may exercise the option to use plans and specifications prepared by the manufacturers (California registered) civil or structural engineer. The requirements for using this option are provided in IR A-18, Use of Construction Documents Prepared by Other Professionals. 4.4 Approval by Comparison With Previously Approved Similar Designs: Subject to the limitations and exceptions shown this section, approval of the design drawings and specifications for site-specific outdoor and indoor telescopic bleachers, which have already been approved at a DSA Regional Office or through the Pre-Check (PC) process, will be approved on the basis of a comparison review. Site-specific outdoor and indoor telescopic bleachers that are smaller than a previously approved bleacher will be approved with a limited review if it meets the conditions in the sub-sections below.

4.2

DSA IR 16-10 (iss 08-06-09)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2007 CBC

Page 3 of 8

Exception: site adopted ancillary attachments such as ramps and walkways may require a full review. 4.4.1 Structural Element Limitation: Structural elements and connections, such as welds, bolts, etc., must be the same or stronger than those used in the previously DSA approved drawings and specifications. The length of structural elements must be the same or shorter than previously approved. Span Limitation: The spans of the structural system must be the same or less than shown on the previously DSA approved drawings and specifications. Additional Limitations: 4.4.4 There are no conceptual changes to the configuration of the structural system. There have been no subsequent structural code changes that would adversely affect the bleacher design. The design loads are no greater than those indicated in the previously DSA approved design. Material Specifications (sizes and grades) shall remain unchanged.

4.4.2 4.4.3

Soil Condition Limitation: The soil conditions must provide equal or greater capacity to support the structure than indicated in the previously DSA approved design. If the soil conditions provide less capacity, DSA will review the affected portions of the design. Once DSA determines that the site specific foundation system complies with the code requirements, the design will be approved.

5.
5.1

Testing and Inspection Requirements:


Approved Fabrication Shops: In accordance with CBC Section 1704A.2.2, special inspections are not required where the bleachers are fabricated on the premises of an approved bleacher fabricator as defined in Section 1.5 above. Proof of accreditation for the fabrication shop shall be included with the construction documents that are submitted to DSA for review. Documentation: At the completion of the fabrication, manufacturer shall submit a Certificate of Compliance, form DSA-130, per CBC Section 1704A.2.2 to the owner, project inspector, the engineer or architect in general responsible charge, and DSA. The certificate of compliance shall meet the following requirements. See sample certificate of compliance in Appendix A. It must be signed and stamped by the manufacturers (California registered) civil or structural engineer in accordance with Section 4.3 above. The engineer shall state in the Certificate of Compliance that he/she has personal knowledge of the fabrication, as defined in Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-336, and certify, under the penalty of perjury, that the materials used and works performed are in accordance with DSA approved construction documents.

5.1.1

5.2

Unapproved Fabrication Shops: Where bleachers or grandstands are fabricated on the premises of an unapproved fabricators shop, special inspection shall be required per CBC, Section 1704A.2. The special inspector shall inspect the fabrication, verify the fabricators quality control procedure, and the fabricators ability to conform to approved construction documents and referenced standards per CBC Section 1704A.2.1. The special inspector shall be employed by the school district (owner) and approved by DSA in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-333(c).

DSA IR 16-10 (iss 08-06-09)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2007 CBC

Page 4 of 8

5.2.1

Material Certification: The special inspector is responsible for ensuring all bleacher material are identifiable or traceable to the certificates of compliance, such as mill certificates for steel and fasteners, lumber inspection certificates, etc. The DSA approved special inspector shall attach copies of these certificates, or completed forms DSA-131, to his or her daily inspection reports (DSA-250). Material Testing: If any material testing is required, such as for unidentifiable steel, testing must be performed by a test laboratory employed by the school district and acceptable to DSA. A list of acceptable test laboratories can be found on DSA website. Test reports shall be submitted by the laboratory within 14 days of the testing, and a final verified report (DSA-292) shall be submitted at the conclusion of the fabrication.

5.2.2

5.2.3

Special Inspection for Welding: If welding is required in the fabrication shop, an AWS-certified welding inspector (CWI) approved by DSA shall inspect welding in accordance with the CBC and IR 17-3, Structural Welding Inspection. The welding inspector shall provide daily inspection reports (DSA 250). At the completion of the work, he/she shall submit a verified report (DSA 292).

6.0 Inspection in the Field: When the bleacher or grandstand is delivered to the job site, the project inspector (PI) shall be responsible for, but not limited to, the following:
Ensure all the required documents per Sections 5.1 or 5.2 are submitted by the manufacturer. Review the manufacturers submitted documents for compliance with DSA approved construction documents. Inspect the bleacher or grandstand for defects and compliance with DSA approved construction documents. Inspect the field installation, including site work. 6.1 Special Inspection of Field Welding: If welding is required in the field, an AWScertified welding inspector (CWI), approved by DSA, shall inspect welding in accordance with the CBC and IR 17-3. The field welding inspector shall provide daily inspection reports (DSA-250). At the completion of the work, the field welding inspector shall submit a verified report (DSA-292).

7.

Yearly Inspection: After the installation, the owner shall conduct annual inspections as required by ICC/ANSI 300, Section 105.2. The owner will also maintain copies of all annual inspection reports and make them available on site for DSA review upon request.

8. Load Tests: For the 2007 CBC, load tests when approved by DSA may be used to check bleacher design or as a basis for approval in lieu of engineering analysis.
The load test procedure must by approved by DSA prior to testing. Test loads will be applied in not less than four, approximately equal increments, without shock to the structure and in a manner to avoid arching of the loading materials or stiffening of the structure. The strength of the material in the test bleacher should not exceed the minimum specified strength by more than 5 percent. 8.1 Test Load Factors: When load tests are made to check design or as a basis for approval of bleachers, the test load should not be less than twice the design vertical load combined with twice the design lateral load.

DSA IR 16-10 (iss 08-06-09)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2007 CBC

Page 5 of 8

8.2

Testing Beyond 2007 CBC: When the 2010 CBC becomes effective, load tests for verification of primary structure of fixed bleachers shall not be permitted. They shall be designed in accordance with the requirements of CBC and ICC 300, Section 303.1. Seatboards and footboards may not be considered as providing torsional restraint for stringers or girders, nor distributing lateral forces by diaphragm action. Folding Bleachers: Load tests for the verification of primary structure of folding bleachers may be permitted on a case by case basis. Testing protocols and procedures must be submitted for review and approval prior to testing. Accessories: Load tests for minor accessories such as hand rails may be verified by tests on a case by case basis. Testing protocols and procedures must be submitted for review and approval prior to testing. Exception: Testing shall not be permitted for structural verification of press boxes.

8.2.1

8.2.2

9.

Existing Bleachers, Seating and Grandstands:

Structures that were installed prior to the adoption of ICC/ANSI 300 shall comply with Chapter 5 of ICC/ANSI 300.

Attachments

Appendix A Load Combinations for Bleacher Design

Attachment 1 Form DSA-130 Certificate of Compliance Bandstand/Grandstand Approved Fabricator

Attachment 2 Form DSA-131 Bleacher/Grandstand Material Certification Unapproved Fabricator

DSA IR 16-10 (iss 08-06-09)

Design and Construction of Reviewing Stands, Grandstands, and Bleachers: 2007 CBC

Page 6 of 8

Appendix A Load Combinations for Bleacher Design CBC Section 1605A.2.1 (Strength or LRFD)1,2
1.4 (D + F) 1.2(D + F + T) + 1.6 (L + Lsway + H) + 0.5 (Lr or S or R) 1.2D + 1.6(Lr or S or R) + (f 1 (L + Lsway) or 0.8 W) 1.2D + 1.6 W + f 1L + 0.5(Lr or S or R ) 1.2D + 1.0E + f 1L + f 2S 0.9D + 1.6W + 1.6 H 0.9D + 1.0E + 1.6H

Equations
Equation 16A-1 Equation 16A-2 Equation 16A-3 Equation 16 A-4 Equation 16A-5 Equation 16A-6 Equation 16A-7

Increase? No No No No No No No

CBC Section 1605A.3.1 ASD Basic1,2


D+F D + H + F + L + Lsway + T D + H + F + (Lr or S or R) D + H + F+ 0.75 (L + Lsway + T) + 0.75 (Lr or S or R) D + H + F + (W or 0.7 E) D + H + F+ 0.75 (W or 0.7 E) + 0.75L + 0.75 (Lr or S or R) 0.6D + W + H 0.6D + 0.7 E + H

Equations
Equation 16A-8 Equation 16A-9 Equation 16A-10 Equation 16A-11 Equation 16A-12 Equation 16A-13 Equation 16A-14 Equation 16A-15 No No No No No No No No

CBC Section 1605A.3.2 ASD Alternate Basic1,2,3


D + L + Lsway + (Lr or S or R) D + L + W D + L + W + S/ 2 D + L + S + W/ 2 D + L + S + E/ 1.4 0.9D + E/ 1.4 Equation 16A-16 Equation 16A-17 Equation 16A-18 Equation 16A-19 Equation 16A-20 Equation 16A-21
Yes except 3 Yes except 3 Yes except 3 Yes except 3 Yes except 3 Yes except
3

Notes:
1. 2. 3. Sway loads shall be considered as live loads per ASCE 7-05, Table 4-1, Footnote (d) For seismic analysis, bleachers shall be considered as all other self-supporting structures per ASCE 7-05, Table 15.4-2 (the last non-building structural type in the table, R=1.25). ICC 300, Section 303.4 allows stresses permitted in the design standards of the various materials to be increased by one-third due to sway or wind loads or by a combination of sway or wind loads and vertical loads. The 2007 CBC allows stress increase only in Section 1605A.3.2 (ASD alternate basic load combinations) and only where permitted by the material chapter or the referenced standard. The steel chapter and the referenced standard AISC 360 does not permit stress increase for steel design. Therefore, ICC 300, Section 303.4 is not adopted for materials such as steel that does not permit stress increase.

STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES

FORM

DIVISION OF THE STATE ARCHITECT

DSA-130
Issued 08-09

Certificate of Compliance Approved Bleacher / Grandstand Fabricator


Certification form to be completed by the manufacturer of the Bleacher or Grandstand at the completion of fabrication. Completed form is to be submitted to the owner, project inspector, the engineer or architect in general responsible charge, and DSA

DSA File # Application #

Bleacher/Grandstand ID: I certify (or declare) under the penalty of perjury that the following statements are true: All boxes must be checked for the submittal to be considered complete.) I have personal knowledge, as defined in Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-336, of the fabrication of the bleacher/grandstand identified above. The materials and works performed for the fabrication of the bleacher/grandstand identified above are in accordance with DSA approved construction documents. Attachments: Proof of accreditation of the fabrication shop where the identified above was fabricated Welding inspection reports for shop welds Certificates for seatboards and footboards, i.e. mill certification.
Signed:
Engineer LEA Lab. Engineer

bleacher/grandstand

Date: CA Reg./ License No.:

Print Name: Engineer Stamp:

Form DSA-130 (iss. 08-06-09)

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES

Page 1 of 1

STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES

FORM

DIVISION OF THE STATE ARCHITECT

DSA-131
Issued 08-09

Bleacher/Grandstand Material Certification - Unapproved Fabricator


Material Certification form to be completed by the DSA approved Special Inspector and attached to his/her daily inspection reports (DSA-250)
DSA File #

Bleacher/Grandstand ID:

Application #

Part No.

Description

Material

ASTM Standard, Grade, or Test Report

Certified, Stamped, or Tested by

I certify (or declare) under penalty of perjury that the materials listed above have been used in the construction of the referenced bleacher or grandstand. Signed:
DSA Approved Special Inspector

Date:

Print Name:

Form DSA-131 (iss. 08-06-09)

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

SAMPLING AND TESTING OF STRUCTURAL MATERIALS


References: California Building Code, Title 24, Part 1 Section 4-335 Discipline: Structural

IR 17-1
Revised 10-15-07 Issued 10-20-05 as CR 17-1

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable. This IR applies also to testing laboratories, technicians and special inspectors working on projects under DSA jurisdiction.

responsible for the sampling, handling, and testing of structural materials as specifically required by Title 24, Part 1 (California Building Standards Administrative Code), Section 4335 and 2001 CBC, Title 24, Part 2, Chapters 14A, 16A through 23A (Chapters 14, 16A through 19A, 20, 21A, 22A and 23 respectively in the 2007 CBC) and 33. This IR is not applicable to tests required by other portions of the Code. Section 4-335 of Part 1 requires that a testing facility acceptable to Division of the State Architect (DSA) perform all tests. Testing facilities are evaluated and accepted as part of the Laboratory Evaluation and Acceptance (LEA) program. Accepted facilities are listed at http://www.applications.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/etrackerweb/approvedlabs.asp Section 4-335(d) of Part 1 requires that all test reports state that materials were sampled and tested in accordance with the requirements of the DSA approved project construction documents. Reports must also state that materials meet the requirements of the DSA approved documents.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify who is

Background: Title 24 requires sampling and testing of various structural materials.

1.
1.1

REQUIREMENTS: Sampling and testing shall be performed as follows:


The project inspector, a representative of the architect, engineer, DSA or the testing facility may select the locations for sampling. In no case shall the contractor, supplier, or construction manager select locations for sampling. Testing (including laboratory and field testing) may only be performed by qualified representative of the LEA accepted testing facility identified on form DSA-102, Contract Information Form. Sampling, protection, handling, transporting and storing of samples may only be performed by qualified representatives of the LEA accepted testing facility. Exception: For a minor scope of work, the project inspector may, if qualified and other duties permit, be authorized in writing by the DSA Field Engineer to sample, protect, handle, transport, and/or store test specimens. Copies of this approval will be sent to the laboratory, project inspector, design professional and the school district.

1.2

1.3 1.3.1

If the project inspector performs these tasks he or she shall specifically identify the tasks performed on a verified report (form DSA-6). The engineering manager of the LEA accepted facility must note Exception in Section D of the Laboratory Verified Report (form DSA-291) and attach a list of each type of material specimen for which sampling and handling were performed by others.
Sampling and Testing of Structural Materials Page 1 of 1

DSA (SS) IR 17-1 (rev. 10-15-07)

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING (N.D.T.) OF WELDS


Reference: California Building Code, Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-335 Discipline: Structural

IR 17-2
Revised 10-15-07 Issued 05-15-07 as CR 17-2

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable. This IR applies also to testing laboratories, technicians and special inspectors working on projects under DSA jurisdiction.

1. Purpose:

The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify the minimum requirements for the qualification and certification of facilities, and their personnel, that perform nondestructive testing (NDT) of welds. It is applicable to the performance of the following NDT test methods: liquid penetrant (PT), magnetic particle (MT), ultrasonic (UT) and radiographic (RT) testing.

2. Background: This IR does not apply to visual inspection during the welding operation. NDT is considered a test, not an inspection. Title 24, Part 1 Section 4-335 requires that all tests are to be conducted by a testing facility acceptable to Division of the State Architect (DSA). Testing facilities are evaluated and accepted by DSA through the Laboratory Evaluation and Acceptance (LEA) program. Nondestructive testing shall be performed only by currently approved LEA facilities.
Facilities performing NDT for projects under DSA jurisdiction shall meet the following requirements for facilities, NDT program, personnel and reporting: 3.1 3.1.1 NDT Facilities: Only currently approved LEA facilities may perform NDT. LEA facilities are listed on the DSA web site, on the Testing Laboratories web page (http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/labs/default.htm). The LEA facility may perform only those NDT test methods that are accepted through the LEA program. The California Registered civil engineer with engineering managerial responsibility for the LEA facility (the laboratory engineer) shall be responsible for overall implementation of the facilitys NDT program, including supervision of the Level III administrator. All NDT testing equipment must be kept calibrated and the use controlled by the laboratory engineer. Facilitys NDT Program: The NDT program of an LEA facility must be administered by an individual with valid certification as an NDT Level III by the American Society for Nondestructive

3. Requirements:

3.1.2 3.1.3

3.1.4 3.2 3.2.1

DSA (SS) IR 17-2 (rev 10-15-07)

Nondestructive Testing (NDT) of Welds

Page 1 of 3

DSA (SS) IR 17-2 (rev 10-15-07)

Nondestructive Testing (NDT) of Welds

Page 2 of 3

Testing (ASNT). The NDT administrators Level III certification must be obtained through the successful completion of an examination given by ASNT, or an ASNT authorized examination center. The NDT administrators certification must be current and verifiable on the ASNT website. The NDT administrator must be certified in all NDT test methods for which the facility has been accepted, or is seeking acceptance, through the LEA program. The NDT administrator may be an employee of the facility or a contracted individual from an outside organization. The NDT administrator is, at a minimum, responsible for: a) b) c) 3.2.2 3.2.3 Developing, administering, and grading all general, specific, and practical exams for Level I and II NDT personnel, Creating and maintaining qualification and certification records for all Level I and II personnel, and Supervising and monitoring the NDT work of all Level I and II NDT personnel.

The NDT program must meet the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards E 54304 and E 121204. The NDT program shall include a certification program which clearly outlines qualifications and certification of nondestructive testing personnel. The certification program must meet the requirements of ANSI/ASNT CP-189-2001 and be approved by the NDT administrator (see Section 3.2.1 above) and the laboratory engineer (see Section 3.1.3 above). The NDT program shall include written method-specific procedures applicable to all NDT methods for which the facility is LEA approved. The written procedures must meet the requirements of applicable ASTM standards (as listed below) and be approved by the NDT administrator and the laboratory engineer. Test Method Liquid Penetrant (PT) Magnetic Particle (MT) Ultrasonic (UT) Radiographic (RT) ASTM Standards E-165-02, E1417-05 E-1444-05, E-709-01 E-164-03, E-587-00, E114-95, A-898-91 E-1032-01, E-94-04, E-1742-05

3.2.4

3.2.5

Written procedures that meet the requirements of ANSI/AWS D1.1-04 Structural Welding Code Steel, shall be required for ultrasonic flaw detection of weldments. Personnel Performing NDT: NDT shall be performed by personnel with valid certification as NDT Level II. Certification records must include the signature and printed name of both the NDT administrator and the laboratory engineer. Evidence of certification shall be presented to the project inspector and maintained on the project site. Evidence of certification shall be available for review by the DSA field engineer.

3.3 3.3.1

DSA (SS) IR 17-2 (10-15-07)

Nondestructive Testing (NDT) of Welds

Page 3 of 3

3.3.2

NDT shall be performed in accordance with the DSA approved documents, California Code of Regulations Title 24, The American Welding Society (AWS) D1.104, D1.8-05, applicable ASTM standards, and the facilitys written procedures. Reporting: The NDT Level II technician is required to issue a daily report that includes records of equipment calibration and a systematic record of all welds tested and accepted. Test reports must state that materials were tested in accordance with and met the requirements of the DSA approved documents. Reports must be submitted as required by C.C.R. Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-335 (d). A sample report template (DSA 210) is available on the DSA web site. Reports shall be sent to the school district and copied to the architect, structural engineer, project inspector, and DSA within 14 days of the date of the test. Reports shall also be presented to the project inspector on a daily basis. Reports indicating non-compliant materials shall be submitted immediately. The California Registered civil engineer with engineering managerial responsibility for the LEA facility (Section 3.1.3 above) is responsible for signing and submitting a Laboratory Verified Report (Form DSA-291) at the conclusion of the testing program. The Laboratory Verified Report shall include all NDT testing.

3.4 3.4.1

3.4.2

3.4.3

3.4.4

4.0

Failure to Perform: Failure to perform all required nondestructive testing in a

professional and competent manner, report defective work, file all required reports in a truthful and timely manner, or fulfill any other duties defined by the code may have serious consequences for the NDT technician and/or the LEA facility. These consequences include but are not limited to withdrawal of DSA approval, and/or denial of any future DSA approval to work as a NDT technician on projects under DSA jurisdiction.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

Structural Welding Inspection


Reference: California Building Standards Administrative Code, Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-333(c) 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Title 24, Part 2, Sections 1701A.5.5, 2203A and 2231A Discipline: Structural

IR 17-3
Revised 04-07-08 Revised 01-02-08 Issued 05-15-07 as CR 17-3

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable. This IR applies also to testing laboratories, technicians and special inspectors working on projects under DSA jurisdiction.

1. Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify the minimum requirements and responsibilities for personnel conducting structural welding inspections for projects submitted to DSA under the 2001 California Building Code (CBC). It is applicable to shop and field welding activities. 2. Background: The 2001 California Building Code requires constant special inspection of all welding operations except that continuous inspection is permitted for certain weld types in accordance with the 2001 CBC, Section 1701A.5.
2.1 For welding, constant means constant presence of the welding inspector at point of welding, and that he or she inspects each pass as it is being done prior to subsequent weld layers. Constant inspection is applicable to the following types of welds: Multi-pass fillet welds, partial penetration groove welds and complete penetration groove welds. For welding, continuous means the welding inspector must be in the vicinity of the welding during all phases, and shall inspect in a timely manner, before subsequent operations are performed. Continuous inspection is applicable to single pass fillet welds, deck welding, shear studs, hand rails, etc.

2.2

3.
3.1

Qualifications: Welding inspectors shall meet the following minimum requirements:


Have valid certification as an American Welding Society (AWS) certified welding inspector (CWI) or senior certified welding inspector (SCWI) as defined in the provisions of ANSI/AWS QC1, Have taken the AWS Open Code Book examination on ANSI/AWS D1.1, Structural Welding Code Steel. Be not less than 25 years of age, and Must possess knowledge of the administrative requirements of Title 24 Part 1 and special welding inspection requirements of Title 24, Part 2.

3.2 3.3 3.4

DSA (SS) IR 17-3 (rev 04-07-08)

Structural Welding Inspection Page 1 of 3

DSA (SS) IR 17-3 (rev 04-07-08)

Structural Welding Inspection Page 2 of 3

4. Approval: A welding inspector shall be approved for each specific project prior to performing any work in accordance with Section 4-333 (c) of Title 24, Part 1 and 2231A of the 2001 CBC. To be approved for a project the welding inspector may be required to demonstrate the following to the satisfaction of DSA:
4.1 4.2 4.3 The minimum requirements defined in Section 3 above, At least 3 years experience in construction or inspection work on projects similar to the project for which the inspector is applying, and That adequate time and attention will be devoted to the project.

5.
5.1

Inspection Duties:
Review and understand the applicable portions of the DSA approved plans, specifications, field changes and other DSA approved documents. Approved shop drawings, erection drawings, referenced codes and standards must also be reviewed and understood. (Note that shop/erection drawings are NOT DSA approved documents and shall NOT be used as a basis for determining compliance). Review manufacturers Material Test Report (MTR). Verify that all materials properties (e.g. grade, type, size, thickness) are as specified by the DSA approved documents, and that all materials are readily identifiable and traceable to an MTR. Sample any unidentifiable material for testing. All testing of materials must be performed by a laboratory accepted in the DSA Laboratory Evaluation and Acceptance (LEA) Program. For seam welds in hollow structural sections (HSS), conduct a thorough visual examination of the seam weld area for visible discontinuities. Visual examination should include, as a minimum, the exterior of the seam weld and the interior at each end. For structural plate, conduct a thorough visual examination of surfaces for visible lamination discontinuities. Verify that all applicable welder, welding operator, and tack welder qualifications are available, current, and accurate. Verify that a written Welding Procedure Specification (WPS) is available on site for each type of weld, that the WPS is in compliance with all requirements, and that the WPS has been approved as required by the construction documents. Witness all Procedure Qualification Tests required for non-prequalified welds and verify that Procedure Qualification Records (PQR) are compliant with all applicable requirements. Verify that all welding consumables comply with the DSA approved documents and the approved WPS. Verify that all electrodes are properly stored. Verify that the welding current and voltage are within the WPS parameters by using a calibrated hand-held volt/amp meter. Readings should be taken as near the arc as possible.

5.2

5.3

5.4 5.5 5.6

5.7

5.8 5.9

DSA (SS) IR 17-3 (rev 04-07-08) 5.10

Structural Welding Inspection Page 3 of 3

Verify that joint preparation, assembly practice, preheat temperatures, interpass temperatures, welding techniques, welder performance, and post-weld heat treatment meet the requirements of the DSA approved documents, WPS, and applicable AWS code. Conduct visual inspection of the work: Verify size, length, and location of all welds. Verify that all welds conform to the requirements of the AWS code and the DSA approved documents. Weld size and contour shall be measured with suitable gauges. Mark completed welds, parts, and joints that have been inspected and accepted with a distinguishing mark, tag or dye stamp. The mark shall include: Testing laboratory initials (if applicable), inspectors initials, inspection date and status. Schedule or notify those responsible for nondestructive testing (NDT) technicians in a timely manner, after visual inspection and acceptance is complete, and the assembly has cooled. See DSA IR 17-2 for further information regarding NDT.

5.11

5.12

5.13

6.
6.1

Reporting:
Provide daily inspection reports that clearly describe the inspection process. The report shall document all inspection duties listed in Section 5. above. Reports shall include a systematic list of accepted and rejected welds, parts, or joints. Reports shall clearly document weld locations by grid line, elevation or other acceptable means. Reports shall reference the details on the DSA approved documents used as a basis for inspection. Inspection reports must state that the work was inspected in accordance with, and met the requirements of, the DSA approved documents. Reports must be submitted as required by Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-333 (c). A sample special inspection form (DSA 250) is available on the DSA web site. Reports shall be sent to the school district and copied to the architect, structural engineer, project inspector and DSA within 14 days of the date of the inspection. For field welding, reports shall also be presented to the project inspector on a daily basis. Reports indicating non-compliance shall be submitted immediately. At the conclusion of the work, the welding inspector is required to sign and submit a verified report. The verified report shall be made on form (DSA 292) available on the DSA website.

6.2 6.3

6.4

6.5

7.

Failure to Perform: Failure to inspect in a professional and competent manner, report defective work, file all required reports in a truthful and timely manner, or fulfill any other duties defined by the code may have serious consequences for the welding inspector. These consequences include but are not limited to withdrawal of DSA approval, and/or denial of any future DSA approval to work as a welding inspector on projects under DSA jurisdiction.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

BASICS OF STRUCTURAL TESTS AND SPECIAL INSPECTIONS


References: California Administrative Code (CAC), Section 4-333(c) California Building Code (CBC), Chapter 17A Discipline: Structural

IR 17-4
Issued 11-03-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify general structural test and special inspection requirements for projects under DSA jurisdiction.
See IR 17-5 for more specific interpretations regarding structural testing. See IR 17-6 for special inspections. See IR 17-7 for testing requirements for soil.

Background: The California Building Code (CBC) requires special inspection and/or testing of various construction work, materials, or completed components. These requirements were adopted from the model code applicable to construction nationwide where a project inspector is generally not required. For this reason, some issues require clarification in their application to projects under DSA jurisdiction. Issues that will be addressed in this IR include:
Definition of the structural tests and special inspections required for a project and the Statement of Structural Tests and Special Inspections (T&I List; Form DSA-103) required by CBC Section 1704A.1.1. The difference between a test and a special inspection.

Definitions:
LEA Approved Testing Laboratory A testing laboratory that has been accepted into the DSA Laboratory Evaluation and Acceptance (LEA) Program. LEA approved laboratories are listed on the DSA website at: https://www.apps.dgs.ca.gov/tracker/ApprovedLabs.aspx. Project Inspector An individual employed by the school district and approved by DSA to provide continuous, personal inspection of all aspects of construction for a project in accordance with Section 4-333(b) and 4-342 of Title 24, Part 1. Special Inspection A careful and thorough examination of a specific construction procedure (e.g. welding, masonry placement, etc.) for a project. Note that material identification and other related responsibilities are also generally a part of the special inspector's duties. See Appendix A for a list of common special inspections. Special Inspector A specially qualified individual employed by an LEA approved testing laboratory or hired directly by the school district to perform special inspection. Technician A qualified employee of a testing facility properly trained and supervised to sample, handle, transport, and conduct tests on materials or on completed assemblies. Test A procedure performed on a material or on a completed element of the structure to determine strength, ductility, or other properties of the material or element. Tests must be
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DSA (SS) IR 17-4 (rev 11-03-08)

Basics of Structural Tests and Special Inspection

Page 2 of 3

conducted by an appropriately qualified technician employed by an LEA approved testing laboratory. See Appendix A for a list of common tests.

1.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS: The architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge of a project is responsible for defining the structural tests and special inspections required for the project. All test and special inspection requirements shall be thoroughly described in the project specifications or on the drawings. Also, the Statement of Structural Tests and Special Inspections (T&I List; Form DSA-103) shall be completed by the project architect or structural engineer and submitted to DSA for approval along with project plans and specifications.

1.1 Statement of Structural Tests and Special Inspections (T&I List; Form DSA103): After it is completed, Form DSA-103 may be referred to as the T&I List. Common structural tests and special inspection requirements are included on the form and are accessible by expanding the menus for the various construction categories (Soil, Concrete, Masonry, Steel, and Wood) and subcategories. Mandatory tests and special inspections within each category are already checked for convenience. Depending on the structural elements included in the project, items in applicable categories must be checked by the architect or structural engineer. 1.2 Changes to testing or special inspection requirements during construction: All changes to the testing and inspection program that are made after a construction contract has been awarded shall be accomplished by change order, or field change document, (see IR A-6) and approved by DSA.

2.

TESTS, SPECIAL INSPECTIONS, AND SOIL TESTING: Procedures, responsibilities and verified report requirements vary for tests, special inspections, and soil testing. See IR 17-5 for tests, IR 17-6 for special inspections, and IR 17-7 for soil testing.
2.1 The following Table clarifies the differences in requirements for tests vs. special inspections. The Statement of Structural Tests and Special Inspections (T&I List: Form DSA103) also indicates which tasks are considered tests and which are considered special inspections. See Appendix A for a list of a number of common tests and special inspections. Tests: Special Inspections: Performed during specific construction processes as the process is occurring. (Note that certain aspects of special inspection also occur before, and after, the actual process.) Performed by a qualified and/or certified special inspector (or the project inspector) employed either by the testing laboratory, or directly by the school district. Special inspection reports are required within 14 days of the date of the special inspection (or semi-monthly when performed by the project inspector). Each individual special inspector must sign a Special Inspection Verified Report (Form DSA-292) for the work inspected.

Performed on materials, or on completed elements of the structure.

Performed by an appropriately qualified and/or ceritifed technician under the supervision of the laboratory civil engineer. Test reports are required within 14 days of the date of the test.

Tests are included in the Laboratory Verified Report (Form DSA-291) signed by the laboratory engineer at the conclusion of the testing program for the project.

DSA (SS) IR 17-4 (rev 11-03-08)

Basics of Structural Tests and Special Inspection

Page 3 of 3

Appendix A
Sample List of Tests and Special Inspections (This list is not all inclusive)

Tests:
Soil: Fill material acceptance tests Fill compaction Pile load tests

Special Inspections:
Soil: Fill placement (includes verification of site preparation, excavation depth, etc.) Pile driving (count blows, verify pile depth, also includes verifying pile materials, size and length prior to driving) Pier drilling (depth, diameter, location) Concrete: Verify mix Batch plant inspection Formwork Rebar and embedded item placement Concrete placement Curing Form removal Application of prestressing force and grouting of bonded tendons, (includes measuring prestressing force applied and elongation of tendons) Precast concrete fabrication Shotcrete placement Installation of post-installed anchors (wedge, sleeve, epoxy, shot-pins, etc.) Masonry: Verify proportions of mortar and grout Preparation of prisms for testing Verify size, location and condition of all construction supporting masonry, dowels, etc. Placement of units, mortar, rebar, embedded items and grout Curing and weather protection Installation of post-installed anchors (wedge, sleeve, epoxy, shot-pins, etc.) Steel: Verify material size, grade, mill certificates and markings HS bolt installation and tightening (including Skidmore-Wilhelm bolt tension verification testing) Welding Joist and truss fabrication Shop fabrication Spray applied fireproofing (substrate condition application, thickness*) Wood: Glued-laminated member fabrication Open-web truss fabrication

Concrete: Rebar Air content Slump Temperature Compression Prestressing tendons and anchorage Testing of post-installed anchors (wedge, sleeve, epoxy, shot-pins, etc.)

Masonry: Rebar Units, mortar and grout Prisms Core-drilled samples Veneer bond Testing of post-installed anchors (wedge, sleeve, epoxy, shot-pins, etc.)

Steel: Tensile, (yield, ultimate, elongation) HS bolt tests, (hardness, tension, wedge, chemical, etc.) Non-destructive examination of welds Fireproofing thickness* Fireproofing bond test Fireproofing density * Thickness testing of spray applied fireproofing may be performed as a test or as part of the application inspection. Wood:

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

STRUCTURAL TESTING LABORATORY RESPONSIBILITIES


References: California Administrative Code, Section 4-335 California Building Code, Chapter 17A Discipline: Structural

IR 17-5
Issued 11-03-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify structural test
requirements for projects under DSA jurisdiction. See IR 17-4 for general information on the test and special inspection program, and definitions of tests vs. special inspections. See IR 17-6 for further information on special inspection requirements. See IR 17-7 for information regarding soil testing requirements.

Scope: This interpretation applies to structural tests that are required to be performed by
a DSA approved, independent testing laboratory in accordance with Code and/or project specifications. See IR 17-4, Appendix A for a list of common tests required. This interpretation does not apply to non-structural tests such as: Plumbing leak tests, Electrical grounding tests, Fire alarm or fire sprinkler tests,

Also, this interpretation does not apply to testing of structural materials that is not specifically required by the Code or the project plans or specifications such as: Spot checking of moisture content of lumber by the project inspector, Checking the tightness of bolts (except high strength bolts), Compaction testing of soil that do not support buildings or structures (unless required by project specifications),

Finally, this interpretation does not apply to testing of materials conducted by (or contracted by) manufacturers, suppliers or contractors.

1.

GENERAL: Tests may only be conducted by qualified representatives of the testing laboratory for the project. The testing laboratory must be accepted in the DSA Laboratory Evaluation and Acceptance (LEA) program and listed on the DSA website at https://www.apps.dgs.ca.gov/tracker/ApprovedLabs.aspx.
Employment of the Testing Laboratory: The school district shall employ an LEA approved laboratory to perform all tests indicated on the DSA approved documents including the Statement of Structural Tests and Special Inspections (T&I List). The testing laboratory must be employed directly by the school board and no other agency or individual.
Structural Testing Laboratory Responsibilities Page 1 of 3

1.1

DSA (SS) IR17-5 (iss 11-03-08)

DSA (SS) IR 17-5 (iss 11-03-08)

Structural Testing Laboratory Responsibilities

Page 2 of 3

Soil related testing must be performed under the supervision of a registered geotechnical engineer, see IR 17-7. 1.2 Sampling and testing: All sampling and testing shall be performed by technicians employed by the testing laboratory except as specifically approved by DSA in accordance with IR 17-1.

2. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: The civil engineer in charge of the laboratory is responsible for supervising all testing activities and verifying that all of the requirements of Section 2.1 through 2.3 of this IR are met. LEA laboratory must meet the following requirements:
2.1 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.1.3 2.1.4 Equipment, resources, and personnel qualifications: All technicians shall be appropriately qualified, and certified as required, to perform the functions to which they are assigned. All equipment used shall be properly calibrated, certified, labeled, and maintained as required by ASTM E329 and other appropriate referenced standards. A quality control manual as required by ASTM E329 for all testing and special inspections procedures shall be maintained. A library with up-to-date codes, standards and reference manuals necessary to perform the tests and inspections shall be maintained at the laboratory and available to appropriate staff. DSA approved documents (including drawings, specifications, change orders, etc.) shall be readily available to appropriate technicians. Supervision and performance of tests: Technicians shall be adequately supervised and shall perform all sampling, handling, transporting, storing, testing, documenting and other tasks involved in laboratory and field testing in strict accordance with the requirements of the DSA approved documents, referenced Codes and Standards, and the laboratorys quality control manual. All procedures shall be carried out in accordance with the quality control manual. Only DSA approved documents (and appropriate referenced standards) shall be used for establishing acceptance criteria for tested materials. Reporting and verification: Test reports shall be submitted in accordance with Section 3. below. All tests that are performed shall be reported to all parties without exception. The laboratory engineer shall review the DSA approved documents (including plans, specifications, addenda, change orders, etc.) and verify that all tests required by the DSA approved documents are performed. The laboratory engineer shall prepare a laboratory verified report on Form DSA291 per Section 4, below. The laboratory verified report shall be submitted within 14 days of the completion of the testing program.

2.1.5 2.2 2.2.1

2.2.2 2.2.3 2.3 2.3.1 2.3.2 2.3.3

2.3.4

3. TEST REPORTS: All tests reports shall be submitted to the school district within 14 days of the date of the test. Copies of each report shall be submitted to the architect, the structural engineer, the project inspector, and DSA by the testing laboratory within 14 days of the date of the test. Reports indicating deficiencies shall be submitted immediately.

DSA (SS) IR 17-5 (iss 11-03-08)

Structural Testing Laboratory Responsibilities

Page 3 of 3

Reports shall include all information required by Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-335(d). Test report templates for common structural tests are provided on the DSA website at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Labs/report_temp_forms.htm.

4.

LABORATORY VERIFIED REPORT: At the conclusion of the testing program the civil engineer in charge of the testing laboratory shall submit a Laboratory Verified Report on Form DSA-291 in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-335(e). All testing (except soil related testing, see IR 17-7) is covered by a single verified report. Special inspections shall NOT be included on the laboratory verified report even when special inspectors are employed by the testing laboratory, see IR 17-6 for special inspections.
The civil engineer in charge of the laboratory certifies under penalty of perjury whether or not: All tests required by DSA approved documents were performed, All tests were carried out in accordance with DSA approved documents, referenced Codes and Standards and the laboratory quality control manual, All tests were reported to all entities as required, Qualified personnel under the supervision of the laboratory engineer performed all testing and related procedures, and The results of all tests indicate that the materials tested met the requirements of the DSA approved documents.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

STRUCTURAL SPECIAL INSPECTOR DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES


References: California Administrative Code, Section 4-333(c) California Building Code Chapter 17A Discipline: Structural

IR 17-6
Issued 11-03-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify special inspection requirements for projects under DSA jurisdiction.
See IR 17-4 for definition of terms and general information on the test and special inspection program and definitions of tests vs. special inspections. See IR 17-5 for further information on test requirements. See IR 17-7 for information regarding soil testing requirements.

General: A project inspector is required to perform continuous inspection of all aspects of construction on projects under DSA jurisdiction. The project inspector may perform special inspection of certain aspects of construction as required by the code. However, specially qualified individuals will be required to perform special inspection on aspects of construction that either:
are performed away from the construction site, or require special knowledge or expertise to inspect.

When specifically approved by DSA in writing, special inspectors may also be used for some aspects of construction that are typically performed by the project inspector at the project site (such as placement of concrete or installation of post-installed anchors). An individual special inspector may only perform the type of special inspection that he or she has been approved to perform by DSA. An individual may perform special inspection on more than one aspect of the project only when specifically approved to do so, in writing, by DSA. Special inspectors may not be utilized as assistant inspectors unless specifically approved in writing by DSA. See IR A-12 for more information on assistant inspectors. The project inspector is still responsible for the construction inspected by a special inspector. The project inspector is required to monitor the activities of all special inspectors in accordance with IR A-8.

1.

EMPLOYMENT OF SPECIAL INSPECTORS: The school district shall contract with an LEA approved testing laboratory to provide special inspectors to perform the special inspections indicated on the DSA approved documents including the T&I List (see Form DSA-103).
1. The school district may contract directly with individual special inspectors rather utilizing employees of the testing laboratory.

Exceptions:

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DSA (SS) IR 17-6 (iss 11-03-08)

Strucutral Special Inspector Duties and Responsibilities

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2.

The project inspector shall perform certain special inspections as indicated on the T&I List (Form DSA-103).

2.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: The special inspector is personally responsible for verifying whether or not every aspect of the work that he or she is responsible to inspect is in compliance with DSA approved documents. The special inspector is subject to supervision/direction from the project inspector, architect, structural engineer, and DSA. However, the special inspector shall base all conclusions exclusively on the requirements of the DSA approved documents and applicable codes. In no case shall direction of the architect or engineer be construed to cause work to be done that does not conform with the DSA approved documents.

The special inspector, or project inspector performing special inspection, is always responsible for the following duties whether periodic or continuous special inspection is required: 2.1 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.1.3 2.1.4 2.1.5 2.1.6 2.1.7 Preparation for Inspection: Review and understand DSA approved plans, specifications, addenda, change orders and FCDs (see IR A-6) relevant to the tasks to be performed. Review and understand all relevant Code requirements and referenced standards. Review shop drawings, manufacturers instructions, or other related documents which do not require the approval of DSA. Review requirements with the contractor and resolve all questions and/or differences of interpretation prior to start-up of each phase of the work. Coordinate with the testing laboratory for any sampling and testing requirements. Verify that all materials meet requirements of DSA approved documents. Verify that existing conditions relevant to the work are in accordance with DSA approved documents (e.g. for masonry work verify that surfaces of foundations are level, clean and properly roughened, etc.). Verify that tools, consumables, formwork, shoring and other items that may affect working conditions or the quality of the work are in accordance with relevant requirements. Verify that construction workers are appropriately certified when required. Coordinate with the project inspector on the interface of the work inspected with other aspects of the work. Inspection: Verify that all materials sampling and testing are performed as required. Inspect all aspects of the work including dimensions, connections, embeds, finishes, etc. Inspect the work at start-up until satisfied that all workers understand the requirements and are adequately performing the work. Inspect work when conditions change, a new phase of work starts, new workers, equipment or procedures are implemented, or any other change to work or job conditions takes place. Inspect work during its progress from time to time (see Section 3 for frequency). Inspect all work upon completion and/or prior to covering with other work.

2.1.8

2.1.9 2.1.10 2.2 2.2.1 2.2.2 2.2.3 2.2.4

2.2.5 2.2.6

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2.2.7 2.2.8 2.3 2.3.1 2.3.2 2.3.3

Personally verify that all work is in accordance with DSA approved documents. Mark, or tag, all inspected work when required. Reporting: Verbally report all deviations from DSA approved documents to the contractor and the project inspector immediately. Provide written daily reports (see Section 5 below for report requirements). When deviations are not immediately corrected, report the deviations in writing to the contractor, project inspector, DSA, project architect and structural engineer. If work that deviates from DSA approved documents is not reported in a timely manner, it will be considered evidence of incompetence and/or negligence of the inspector. When inspector incompetence or negligence is evident, DSA may withdraw approval of the inspector for the project and/or withdraw certification of the inspector to work on future projects under DSA jurisdiction. Keep a log of deviations including status and resolution. Report the resolution of deviations to all parties in writing when deviations are corrected. Submit a Special Inspection Verified Report (DSA-292). See Section 6 below for verified report requirements. Exception: Project inspectors performing special inspections may include some special inspections on their form DSA-6 rather than submitting Form DSA-292; see Sections 5 and 6 below.

2.3.4

2.3.5 2.3.6 2.3.7

3.

The 2007 CBC, Title 24, Part 2, Section 1702A includes the following definitions:

FREQUENCY OF PERIODIC AND CONTINUOUS SPECIAL INSPECTION:

Special Inspection, Periodic. The part-time or intermittent observation of work requiring special inspection by an approved special inspector who is present in the area where the work has been or is being performed and at the completion of the work. Special Inspection, Continuous. The full-time observation of work requiring special inspection by an approved special inspector who is present in the area where the work is being performed.

Note: These definitions are only applicable to special inspectors. See Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-342 and IR A-8 for the definition of continuous inspection for the project inspector. The definitions of periodic and continuous special inspection are identical except for two things: Periodic inspection may be performed on a part-time or intermittent basis while continuous inspection is done on a full-time basis, Periodic inspection may be performed by an inspector who is in the area where the work has been performed while continuous inspection must be performed where the work is being performed.

DSA (SS) IR 17-6 (iss 11-03-08)

Strucutral Special Inspector Duties and Responsibilities

Page 4 of 5

Note: Work subject to periodic special inspection requires the presence of the special inspector prior to start of work, from time to time during the work, and upon completion of the work. 3.1 Periodic special Inspection: When periodic special inspection is required, part time or intermittent means that inspection of the task needs to be performed from time to time during the progress of the task. The period of time between inspections varies greatly for different types of work depending on the type of inspection performed. For example, the laying of masonry block must be inspected almost constantly; the special inspector shall not leave while work is proceeding for more than a few minutes; conversely the protection of masonry during cold weather generally may only need to be inspected once at the end of the day and once at the beginning. The period of time between inspections also depends on the pace of the construction, the number of workers, the quality of the workmanship, and other factors. It is the responsibility of the special inspector to provide inspections at an appropriate frequency and at appropriate times during construction. The inspector must have adequate experience and exhibit good judgment in determining the frequency and timing of inspections. 3.2 Continuous special inspection: When continuous inspection is required, the special inspector must always be present where the work is being performed.

Tables 1704A.3, 1704A.4, 1704A.5.1, 1704.A.5.3, and 1704A.7 (Title 24, Part 2) list tasks that require special inspection. On projects under DSA jurisdiction some of the tasks may be, or must be, performed by the project inspector rather than the special inspector. The T&I List (form DSA-103) defines whether certain special inspection tasks shall be performed by a special inspector or the project inspector. Exceptions are permitted with the written approval of DSA (for example, the project inspector could be approved to inspect some minor masonry work if he or she were appropriately certified and had the time available to perform the masonry inspections in addition to all other duties). The project inspector is responsible for providing continuous inspection of all aspects of construction for which a special inspector is not provided, including, but not limited to, items identified in the Code as requiring special inspection such as high-load wood diaphragms and non-structural components. When the project inspector performs special inspection he or she shall provide continuous inspection of all work in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-342(b)1 and IR A-8. Note: The definition of continuous inspection for the project inspector is different from the definition of continuous for special inspectors.

4.

SPECIAL INSPECTIONS PERFORMED BY THE PROJECT INSPECTOR:

5.

SPECIAL INSPECTION REPORTS: Special inspectors working at the project site are required to submit reports on a daily basis to the project inspector. Special inspectors working at locations off-site are required to submit daily reports to the project inspector within 14 days of the date of the inspection. All daily reports must be copied to the project architect, structural engineer, school district, and DSA within 14 days of the date of the inspection. Reports indicating deviations in the work shall be forwarded immediately. A daily special inspection report template (DSA-250) is provided on the DSA website.
Daily special inspection reports shall include: Project name, DSA file number and DSA application number, the name of the employer of the special inspector,

DSA (SS) IR 17-6 (iss 11-03-08)

Strucutral Special Inspector Duties and Responsibilities

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the date of the inspections; inspection start and finish time, a thorough and detailed description of the work inspected including reference to piece numbers, column line locations, drawing details, etc. as appropriate, a thorough and detailed description of the work completed in accordance with DSA approved documents as well as work that remains incomplete, a thorough and detailed description of all work that is not in conformance with DSA approved documents, a statement that the special inspections were (or were not) performed in accordance with the requirements of the DSA approved documents, a statement that the work complied (or did not comply) with the requirements of the DSA approved documents, the signature and printed name of the special inspector, a list of persons to whom the report was sent. Note: Project inspectors shall submit separate special inspection reports for masonry, welding, high-strength bolting and shotcrete work if they perform these inspections. Other types of special inspections may be included on the project inspectors semimonthly reports unless separate special inspection reports are specifically requested.

6.

SPECIAL INSPECTION VERIFIED REPORTS: All special inspectors shall submit verified reports on Form DSA-292 in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-336. When more than one special inspector shares responsibility for inspecting a specific facet of construction each special inspector shall clearly describe the portions of the construction they inspected in detail on Form DSA-292.
Exception: Project inspectors will submit separate verified reports on Form DSA-292 for masonry, welding, high-strength bolting, and shotcrete work if they perform these special inspections. Project inspectors need not submit Form DSA-292 for most special inspections that they personally perform; instead project inspectors shall specifically list the special inspections which they performed on Form DSA-6.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

SOIL AND FOUNDATION TESTING


References: California Administrative Code, Section 4-333(c) California Building Code Chapter 17A Discipline: Structural

IR 17-7
Issued 11-03-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify structural test
requirements for soil and foundation aspects of projects under DSA jurisdiction. This IR does not apply to the initial soil investigation or project design phase.

See IR 17-4 for general information on the test and special inspection program and definitions of tests vs. special inspections. See IR 17-5 for further information on test requirements. See IR 17-6 for information on special inspection requirements.

General:

All construction phase laboratory and field soil testing shall be performed by qualified technicians from a testing laboratory currently accepted in the DSA Laboratory Evaluation and Acceptance (LEA) program. The tests shall be performed under the supervision of a California registered geotechnical engineer (GE) employed by, or subcontracted by the testing laboratory.

1.
1.1 1.2

GE RESPONSIBILITIES: The GE is responsible for:


Supervision of all technicians performing tests. Understanding and complying with Codes and reference standards relevant to the tests performed including, but not limited to, Title 24 Code amendments applicable to school construction. Verifying that testing and reporting is performed in accordance with DSA approved documents and all applicable requirements. Submitting verified reports on Form DSA-293 (see Section 3 below).

1.3 1.4

2. PROGRESS REPORTS: Daily reports are required for testing activities that occur at the project site. Daily reports shall be handed to the project inspector each day. Copies of daily reports and reports of tests performed in the laboratory shall be sent to the project inspector, architect, structural engineer, school district, and DSA within 14 days of the date of the test. 3. VERIFIED REPORTS: At the conclusion of soils related testing activities, and at other times as specified in Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-336(c), the GE shall submit Form DSA293 to the school district with copies to the architect, structural engineer, project inspector, and DSA.
Note: For projects that started construction prior to January 1, 2009, Form DSA-293 will be accepted from geotechnical engineers who were not associated with an LEA accepted testing laboratory.

DSA (SS) IR17-7 (iss 11-03-08)

Soils and Foundations Testing and Inspection

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

POST- INSTALLED ANCHORS IN CONCRETE

IR 19-1

Discipline: Structural Issued 9-1-99 References: Revised (in its entirety) 03-06-06 2001 California Building Code, Sections 1912A.1 and 1923A.3.5 ICC ES Acceptance Criteria AC-01, AC-58, AC-193 including Annex 1, AC-106, AC-308, and AC-70 ACI 355.2 or ACI 318-02, Appendix D
This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Publications/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Code Section: 1923A.3.5 Drilled-in expansion bolts or chemical-type anchors in concrete. When drilled-in expansion-type anchors are used in lieu of cast-in place bolts, the allowable shear and tension values and test loads shall be acceptable to the enforcement agency. When expansion-type anchors are listed for sill plate bolting applications, 10 percent of the anchors shall be tension tested. When expansion-type anchors are used for other structural applications, all such expansion anchors shall be tension tested. Expansion-type anchors shall not be used as hold-down bolts. When expansion-type anchors are used for nonstructural applications such as equipment anchorage, 50 percent or alternate bolts in a group, including at least one-half the anchors in each group, shall be tension tested. The tension testing of the expansion anchors shall be done in the presence of the project inspector and a report of the test results shall be submitted to the enforcement agency. If any anchors fail the tension-testing requirements, the additional testing requirements shall be acceptable to the enforcement agency. The above requirements shall also apply to bolts or anchors set in concrete with chemical (adhesives) if the long-term durability and stability of the chemical material and its resistance to loss of strength and chemical change at elevated temperatures are established to the satisfaction of the enforcement agency. Purpose: This interpretation establishes the allowable shear and tension values, testing
procedures and test values for post-installed anchors, including a new product line known as screw anchors, in accordance with Section 1923A.3.5, 2001 CBC for projects under the jurisdiction of the Division of the State Architect (DSA).

1. LISTING REQUIREMENTS: Post-Installed anchors must be listed in a current evaluation report issued by an evaluation agency recognized by DSA, which include the following:
International Code Council Evaluation Service (ICC-ES) City of Los Angeles Research Report (RR)
Post-Installed Anchors in Concrete

DSA (SS) IR 19-1 (rev 03/06/06)

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DSA (SS) IR 19-1 (rev 03/06/06)

Post-Installed Anchors in Concrete

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Commentary: ICC-ES Evaluation Reports are generally considered to be current if they are listed and available from the ICC website http://www.icc-es.org/reports/index.cfm?search=search

2. BASIS FOR DESIGN CAPACITIES: Design capacities for expansion-type and epoxy (adhesive)-type anchors should reflect the tested capacity of the anchors including the degree of scatter in the recorded peak loads and the load-displacement response, the type and mechanical properties of the concrete or masonry in which the anchor is installed, anchor edge distance and spacing, and whether the anchors are installed through metal decking into concrete fill. In addition, the potential for concrete cracking in the vicinity of the anchor during its service life and the effect of such cracking on the capacity of the anchor to resist loads shall be considered. The effects of temperature variations on epoxy (adhesive) type anchors shall also be taken into account where applicable.
The age, composition and mechanical properties of the materials in which the anchor will be installed shall be evaluated. The relevant mechanical properties include unit weight, compressive strength, and aggregate size and type. Evaluation of compressive strength on the basis of cores taken at or near the anchor locations shall be permitted. Exception: The design capacities for anchors tested in lightweight concrete may be used for anchors installed in normal-weight concrete provided the compressive strength of the normal-weight concrete equals or exceeds the compressive strength of the lightweight concrete in which the anchor was tested. Furthermore, design capacities for anchors tested in all-lightweight concrete (unit weight 90-115 pcf) may be used for anchors installed in sandlightweight concrete (unit weight 105-120 pcf) provided that the compressive strength of the sand-lightweight concrete equals or exceeds that of the alllightweight concrete in which the tests were conducted. The compressive strength of the material in which the anchor will be installed shall meet or exceed the compressive strength of the material in which the anchor was tested. 2.1 Expansion-type anchors. Expansion-type anchors may be used, provided the allowable shear and tension loads are determined by test in accordance with the following: The allowable values listed in an ICC-ES Evaluation Services Report, with special inspection, may be used for allowable stress design, provided the report states that the anchors were tested in accordance with AC01, latest revision, including the seismic qualification tests of AC01 Section 5.6. Strength design values may be used provided the anchors have been tested in accordance with AC193, latest revision, including the seismic qualification tests of ACI 355.2 Sections 9.6 and 9.7 and Annex 1 of AC193.

2.1.1

Commentary: The ICC-ES Reports generally allow the use of the 33-1/3% stress increase for duration of loading if the anchor(s) have satisfied the seismic qualification testing criteria. Section 1632A.1, 2001 CBC, precludes the use of the stress increase in determining capacities of some anchorages. For anchors installed in the underside of a beam/slab, the allowable tension load design values should be based on the tabulated value for the anchors installed without special inspection (special inspection is still required), unless allowable load values for anchors installed in cracked concrete are provided in the ICC-ES Report, or the anchors have been tested in accordance with ACI 355.2, latest

DSA (SS) IR 19-1 (rev 03/06/06)

Post-Installed Anchors in Concrete

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revision, Table 5.2 and Annex 1 of AC-193, or ACI-318-05 Appendix D. Shear values are based on the tabulated values in the ICC-ES Report. Once an ICC-ES Report complying with AC-193 has been issued, it shall take precedence over any previous report. Commentary: Once a report is issued that complies with the provisions of AC-193, the values established by that report take precedence over previous reports. Provisions of AC-193 will provide the most accurate evaluation of anchor capacities in various installed conditions. The use of older reports, which may have provided for higher capacities, is not appropriate once the AC-193 compliant report has been published. 2.1.2 If anchors have not been tested in accordance with the requirements for seismic qualification tests of AC01, Section 5.6, the allowable load values listed in the ICC-ES Report may be used with the following modifications. Allowable shear and tension design loads shall be limited to 80% of the tabulated allowable values for anchors installed with special inspection. For anchors installed in the underside of a beam/slab, the allowable tension load should be based on 80% of the tabulated allowable value for anchors installed without special inspection (special inspection is still required). Allowable shear values should be based on Section 2.1.2.1 above. Exception: Anchors installed in conformance with requirements of
Section 4 of this IR.

2.1.2.1 2.1.2.2

Commentary: Previous Interpretations of Regulations have allowed the submittal of test data by
anchor manufacturers for review and acceptance by the DSA. Given the complexities of ICCES Acceptance Criteria, and the volume of data that can be submitted, it is no longer feasible for the DSA to evaluate products without a current ICC-ES Report.

2.2

Epoxy-type anchors. Epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors include anchors that rely on organic and inorganic compounds (including epoxies, polyurethanes, methacrylates and vinyl esters) to develop the bond to the concrete. The use of shallow epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors to resist direct tension loads where concrete cracking may occur is not permitted. Shallow epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors are those with an embedment to diameter ratio less than 8.

Commentary: Laboratory testing has shown that the tension performance of epoxy-type (adhesive)
anchors in cracked concrete can be significantly reduced. This is particularly true of small diameter and shallow embedment anchors. In the absence of recognized testing criteria for establishing the performance of epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors in cracked concrete, their use shall be restricted.

Epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors should only be installed in conditioned, interior spaces. Commentary: This limitation is due to the absence of test results demonstrating long-term durability
of the adhesives when exposed to numerous cycles of either high or low temperatures and the ability of the anchor to resist loads when either the adhesive or a bolt is exposed to weather to transfer the heat/cold to the adhesive.

Exception: Where epoxy-type anchors are used as shear dowels at the perimeter of an existing opening (slab or wall) to be filled with concrete, or are being used to connect new concrete elements to existing concrete

DSA (SS) IR 19-1 (rev 03/06/06)

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elements (e.g. gunite), they may be installed in exterior locations with prior approval of the DSA.

Commentary:

DSA has ongoing concerns regarding long-term durability of the adhesives when exposed to numerous cycles of either high or low temperatures and the ability of the anchor to resist loads when either the adhesive or a bolt is exposed to weather to transfer the heat/cold to the adhesive.

If epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors are exposed to fire, all anchors in the affected area shall be inspected and evaluated by a qualified person to ensure their load carrying capability has not been compromised. The design shear and tension capacities for epoxy-type anchors must be determined in accordance with the following: 2.2.1 The allowable loads may be based on the values listed in an ICC ES Report that complies with the requirements of AC58 for a specific anchor in the same configuration as tested. Supporting data shall include the Seismic Qualification test performed in accordance with the procedures of Section 5.3.7 of AC58.
As strength level capacities are developed to meet ACI 355.2, or ACI 318 Appendix D provisions, those capacities should be based on the capacities either listed or determined in accordance with the ICC ES Report.

Commentary:

2.2.2

Where epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors are used for structural applications, such as dowels between new and existing concrete, the anchors shall be installed in a manner such that the ultimate tensile capacity is controlled by the ultimate strength of the steel element. Exception: Epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors which cannot develop the tensile capacity of the steel element may be used to transfer shear forces only, provided that the loads on the anchor are amplified by factor of 4.0. Alternatively, allowable shear capacity may be based on bolt shear capacities obtained from Table 19A-D, 2001 CBC. When epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors are used to resist tensile forces in structural applications, the minimum depth of embedment shall be greater than or equal to the development length, ld, determined in Section 1912A.1 for a castin-place reinforcing bar of the same diameter and grade when considering a tensile splitting failure mode. Where tensile splitting need not be considered, the depth of embedment may be determined in accordance with Appendix D of ACI 318-02 as amended by Section 3.3 of AC 308.

2.3

Screw Anchors. Screw anchors are not directly addressed by Section 1923A.3.5, 2001 CBC. The fastener is produced from hardened steel with threads, similar in appearance to a lag bolt. Screw anchors may be used, provided the allowable shear and tension loads are determined in accordance with the following: The allowable values listed in an ICC ES Report, with special inspection, may be used for allowable stress design, provided the report states that the anchors were tested in accordance with AC106, latest revision, including the seismic qualification tests of AC106 Section 4.6.

2.3.1

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Commentary:

As strength level capacities are developed to meet ACI 355.2, or ACI 318 Appendix D provisions, those capacities should be based on the capacities either listed or determined in accordance with the ICC ES Report.

2.3.2 2.3.3

Welding to these anchors is not permitted. Screw anchors may be used to attach components, such as equipment, mechanical vibration isolators or snubbers, to structural (reinforced) concrete, or for sill bolting applications. All screw anchors installed through a wood sill plate requires a plate washer in conformance with Section 1806A.6.3, Item 2. The use of screw anchors is not permitted in overhead applications or for discrete hold down forces, such as shear walls.
the tension zone of concrete members. Until cracked concrete testing methods are adopted and incorporated into ICC Acceptance Criteria, similar to ACI 355.2, screw anchors cannot be used overhead. In addition, the high Rockwell hardness of some screw anchors may make them susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Screw anchors may be very effective in sill bolting applications to reduce the possibility of concrete splitting due to edge distance limitations, and a reduction or elimination of expansion pressures associated with bolt installation.

2.3.4

Commentary: There is very little experience data on the performance of these anchors installed in

2.4

Power-actuated fasteners. Power-actuated fasteners (shot pins) are not addressed by Section 1923A.3.5, 2001 CBC. Power-actuated fasteners may be used for limited applications provided the allowable shear and tension loads are determined in accordance with the following: The allowable values listed in an ICC ES Evaluation Services Report, with special inspection, may be used for allowable stress design, provided the report states that the anchors were tested in accordance with AC70, latest revision. Power-actuated fasteners may be used for hanging metal suspension systems for lay-in panel ceilings (see IR 25-2) and for the attachment of metal track in conjunction with non-bearing partitions. The use of power-actuated fasteners for other applications shall be subject to review and approval of DSA.

2.4.1

3. EMBEDMENT, SPACING, AND EDGE DISTANCE. All anchors shall meet the minimum embedment, spacing, edge distance, and slab thickness criteria established by the relevant ICC-ES Report.
3.1 Unless otherwise noted in the Report, the edge distance should be a minimum of ten (10) bolt diameters from the free edge of the slab and center-to-center spacing should be a minimum of twelve (12) bolt diameters. If the edge distance is less than ten (10) diameters, and the load is directed toward the free edge, the allowable shear load should be reduced per Section 1923A.3.3.

4. UNDERSIDE OF BEAM/SLAB INSTALLATIONS. Except as noted in Section 2.1, all expansion type anchors installed in the underside of a beam/slab should use the reduced allowable design load values determined in Sections 2.1.1 and 2.1.2.2 of this IR.
4.1 The allowable design loads in Sections 2.1.1 or 2.1.2.1 may be used for expansiontype anchors installed in the underside of a beam/slab, provided the installation meets one of the following criteria:

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4.1.1

The design engineer provides information that indicates the anchor installation will occur in the negative moment (-M) region of the beam/slab, considering unbalanced loading, or Data is submitted to indicate that specific anchor is suitable for use in cracked concrete (testing per ACI 355.2, Table 5.2, including Annex 1 of AC193), or The anchor is installed in the high flute (rib) of the metal deck in a concrete on metal deck assembly, or The anchor is installed with sufficient embedment that the load transfer zone is above the neutral axis of the beam/slab. Exception: If the slab is intended to serve as a diaphragm for transferring seismic forces to other lateral-load resisting elements, anchors to be installed must be qualified per 4.1.2 above or the reduced allowable design load values determined in Sections 2.1.1.1 and 2.1.2.1 must be used.

4.1.2 4.1.3 4.1.4

4.2

When installing expansion-type anchors through the low flutes of metal deck into concrete, the anchors should be placed as close to the center of the flute width as practicable. The deck shall be 20 ga. minimum thickness per CBC Section 2205A.4.1 and the flute width shall meet or exceed the value set forth in the ICC-ES Report for the anchor. The minimum effective depth of embedment shall be as noted in the ICC-ES Report for the anchor.
flute of deck. This rib is problematic as the drill bit will have a tendency to walk down the rib. An offset in the hole is acceptable so long as the hole is as close as possible to the center of the deck.

Commentary: Several deck manufacturers have a small rib that runs down the middle of the low

5. TESTING AND INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS. Post-installed anchors shall be tested in accordance with the provisions of Section 1923A.3.5, by an LEA accepted testing facility, unless approval of an alternative individual is obtained in advance from the DSA Field Engineer for the project.
If any anchor fails testing, test all anchors of the same type, not previously tested until twenty (20) consecutive anchors pass, then resume the initial test frequency. If the anchors are used for the support and bracing of non-structural components (pipe, duct or conduit), the twenty (20) shall be only those anchors installed by the same trade. Refer to Note 8 on the Test Values Table (attached) for acceptance/failure criteria. Regardless of which test method is chosen by the consultant, test values and all appropriate criteria shall be shown on the contract documents. 5.1 5.1.1 5.1.1.1 Expansion-type Anchors Setting verification: Torque-controlled anchors: Following attainment of 10% of the required torque, torque-controlled anchors shall not require more than six (6) additional complete turns of the nut during installation to achieve the manufacturers specified installation torque. The extent of bolt projection after installation shall be measured to confirm that this requirement has been met. Displacement-controlled anchors: The position of the plug in the anchor shell shall be checked with the manufacturer-supplied installation tool or other appropriate device. The position of the plug shall conform to the manufacturers specifications.

5.1.1.2

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Commentary: Torque-controlled anchors (wedge anchors, sleeve anchors) should be limited in the
number of turns required to develop the specified installation torque. An excessive number of turns could indicate a failure to set and also reduces the effective embedment of the anchor. Most anchors should not require more than 2-3 turns (after the parts are snug) to set properly. The degree of bolt projection conforming to proper set should be established for the specific anchor being inspected. The tension performance of displacement-controlled anchors (drop-ins) depends in large part on the degree to which the plug is driven into the anchor shell during installation (i.e., the plug displacement).

5.1.2

Testing: An acceptable testing procedure is attached to this IR. The test load may be applied by any method that will effectively measure the tension in the anchor, such as direct pull with a hydraulic jack, calibrated spring loaded devices, or a calibrated torque wrench. Displacement-controlled anchors such as drop-ins shall not be tested using a torque wrench. Required test loads may be determined by either of the following methods:

5.1.2.1 5.1.2.2

Twice the allowable tension load as determined in Section 2, or; Tension or torque test values from the table and procedures attached to this IR. Anchors tested with a hydraulic jack should exhibit no discernable movement during the tension test, e.g., as evidenced by loosening of the washer under the nut. Anchors tested with a calibrated torque wrench must attain the specified torque within 1/2 turn of the nut. Exceptions: Undercut anchors that are so designed to allow visual confirmation of full set, need not be tension or torque tested.
If the manufacturers installation torque is less than the specified test torque, use the manufacturers specified installation torque for testing the anchor.

5.2

Epoxy-type (adhesive) Anchors Epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors shall be tension tested per Section 1923A.3.5. The tension test load shall equal twice the allowable load for the specific location of the anchor to be tested (i.e., accounting for edge distance) or 80% of the yield strength of the bolt (0.8AbFy), whichever is less. The test procedures for expansion-type anchors in the attached table shall also be used for epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors. Torque testing of epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors is not permitted. Where epoxy-type (adhesive) anchors are used as shear dowels across cold joints in slabs on grade and the slab is not part of the structural system, testing of those dowels is not required. Anchors shall exhibit no discernible movement during the tension test.

5.3

Screw-type Anchors: Screw-type anchors shall be torque tested in accordance with the testing procedure attached to this IR.
holes) would typically exhibit excessive movement, or spinning in the hole at relatively low torque values. Tension testing of these anchors is not necessary as the testing procedure would require partial removal/withdrawal of the anchor to facilitate testing.

Commentary: Screw-type anchors that are installed improperly (either over tightened or over-sized

TEST VALUES
Hardrock or Lightweight Concrete

ANCHOR Diameter (in.) 1/4 5/16 3/8 1/2 5/8 3/4 1

WEDGE Load (lbs.) 800 1100 2000 2300 3700 5800 Torque (Ft. lbs.) 10 25 50 80 150 250

SLEEVE Load (lbs.) 400 400 700 900 1100 1400 Torque (Ft. lbs.) 4 5 10 20 45 90 -

SHELL Load (lbs.) 1000 1400 1800 2700 3700 5400 Torque (Ft. lbs) -

SCREW Torque (Ft. lbs.) 10 10 10 20 -

NOTES 1. Anchor diameter refers to the thread size for the WEDGE & SHELL categories, and to the anchor outside diameter for the SLEEVE category. 2. Apply proof test loads to WEDGE & SLEEVE anchors without removing the nut if possible. If not, remove nut and install a threaded coupler to the same tightness as the original nut using a torque wrench to apply the test load. 3. For SLEEVE/SHELL internally threaded categories, verify that the anchor is not prevented from withdrawing by a baseplate or other fixtures. If restraint is found, loosen and shim or remove fixture(s) prior to testing. 4. Reaction loads from test fixtures may be applied close to the anchor being tested, provided the anchor is not restrained from withdrawing by the fixture(s). 5. SHELL type anchors should be tested as follows: a. Visually inspect 25% for full expansion as evidenced by the location of the expansion plug in the anchor body. Plug location of a fully expanded anchor should be as recommended by the manufacturer, or, in the absence of such recommendation, as determined on the job site following the manufacturers installation instructions. At least 5% of the anchors shall be proof loaded as indicated in the table above, but not less than three anchors per day for each different person or crew installing anchors, or; b. Test installed anchors per Section 1923A.3.5 6. Test equipment (including torque wrenches) is to be calibrated by an approved testing laboratory in accordance with standard recognized procedures. 7. Alternate torque test procedures and test values for SHELL type anchors may be submitted to the enforcement agency for review and approval on a case-by-case basis when test procedures are submitted and approved by the enforcement agency. 8. The following criteria apply for the acceptance of installed anchors: a. HYDRAULIC RAM METHOD: The anchor should have no observable movement at the applicable test load. For wedge and sleeve type anchors, a practical way to determine observable movement is that the washer under the nut becomes loose. b. TORQUE WRENCH METHOD: The applicable test torque must be reached within the following limits: i. Wedge or Sleeve type: One-half (1/2) turn of the nut. ii. One-quarter (1/4) turn of the nut for the 3/8 in. sleeve anchor only. 9. If the manufacturers recommended installation torque is less than the test torque noted in the table, the manufacturers recommended installation torque should be used in lieu of the tabulated values.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

REQUIREMENTS FOR GLASS FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE (GFRC) PANELS

IR 19-2
Issued 9-1-99 Supercedes IR 10-1 (7/96)

This interpretation is intended for use by the plan review and field engineers of DSA to indicate an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations. Its purpose is to promote more uniform statewide criteria for use in plan review and supervision of construction of public schools, community colleges and essential services buildings. Other methods proposed by design professionals to solve a particular problem may be considered by DSA and reviewed for code and regulation compliance.

Purpose: This IR provides guidelines for the acceptance of glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) panels by the Division of the State Architect (DSA). 1. Definition. Glass fiber reinforced concrete is the term applied to products manufactured using a cement/aggregate slurry reinforced throughout with alkali-resistant glass fibers. GFRC is typically used in thin-walled architectural cladding panels with a minimum thickness of 1/2". 2. Product Description. Mix composition, degree of compaction, type of cement, and the proportion, length and orientation of glass fibers may all be varied to produce a specific product. Typically, a GFRC panel consists of 5% by weight (of total mix) alkali-resistant glass fiber (absolute minimum of 4%) combined with a portland cement/sand slurry (cement/sand ratio not less than 1:1 nor greater than 3:1). Panels are fabricated using a spray-up process. An alternate method of fabrication uses a GFRC premix, which consists of 3% to 4% by weight (of total mix) pre-chopped alkali-resistant glass fiber combined with a portland cement/sand slurry. Panels, utilizing the GFRC premix, are fabricated by placing the slurry into molds in a manner similar to precast concrete. Curing is provided with the use of a thermoplastic copolymer admixture, which retains moisture in the mix until adequately cured, or by moist curing. Admixtures such as waterreducers, accelerators, retarders and air-entraining agents may be used. GFRC manufactured in accordance with the recommendations of the PCI Recommended Practice for Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete Panels, 3rd Edition, has shown a history of good performance in resistance to weather and water penetration. A weather-resistive coating, however, is recommended over the GFRC panel, along with approved joint caulking compounds, to create a complete weather-resistive barrier. 3. Plant Fabrication and Quality Control Requirements of Precast GFRC Panels. The following requirements apply to all GFRC panels regardless of the fabrication process (spray-up or premix). 3.1 A testing and inspection program shall be provided by the design professional in responsible charge, shall be approved by DSA, and shall be referenced on the project Test and Inspection List. The program for the specific project shall require the testing and inspection provisions of the following sections. 3.2 GFRC panels shall be fabricated under the PCI Recommended Practice for Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete Panels, 3rd Edition. The manufacturer shall have an established quality control program which meets the requirements of the PCI Manual for Quality Control for Plants and Production of Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete Products, including the testing and inspection requirements of Part A, Division II, and utilizing the test procedures of Appendix F, except as noted below. Verification shall be provided by 1) a DSA review of the manufacturers quality control manual, or 2) certification under the PCI Plant Certification Program. (A copy of the certificate shall be provided to DSA.)

IR 19-2 Page 2 of 3
3.2.1 The acceptance criteria for the Flex Anchor and Gravity Anchor Pull-off and Shear Tests, Part A, Division II, Section 2.1.5, Production Testing - After Curing is that the minimum ultimate strength at failure shall achieve three times the design load required by CBC,Section 1631A.2.4.2.5. 3.3 The manufacturing of the GFRC panels and the testing of the panels and connections shall be continuously inspected by a DSA approved independent inspection agency. The approved agency shall submit an affidavit at completion of fabrication stating that the panels and all components have been fabricated in all material respects in accordance with the DSA approved plans and specifications. Exception: Continuous inspection is not required when plants are currently approved under the PCI Plant Certification Program. 3.4 All panels shall be marked with the approved inspectors identification mark, and a list of approved panels shall be provided to the project Inspector of Record (IOR) and DSA. Exception: Panel identification by an approved inspector is not required when plants are currently approved under the PCI Plant Certification Program. 3.5 The testing program of premix products may be modified as it applies to specific panels. 3.6 All test reports shall be sent to the architect, structural engineer, IOR and DSA within five (5) working days of the completion of each test. 4. Specifications for GFRC Panels. Specifications should include the following: 1. GFRC panels shall be fabricated in accordance with the PCI Recommended Practice for Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete Panels, 3rd Edition, as modified below. The manufacturer shall have an established quality control program that meets the requirements of the PCI Manual for Quality Control for Plants and Production of Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete Products. 2. Requirements to provide corrosion protection for the stiffening frames, anchors, connectors and inserts. 3. Mix design requirements for the GFRC backing material. The cement/sand ratio shall not be less than 1:1 nor greater than 3:1 4. Requirement for glass fiber material. Only alkali resistant fiber may be used. 5. Bonding material for panel connectors. 6. Strength, strain and shrinkage requirements. 7. Requirement that the designs for in-service conditions be based on fully aged strength and strain properties. 8. Admixtures to be used. Admixtures containing calcium chloride shall not be used. 9. Description of the required testing procedures and apparatus. 10. Requirement for reporting test results to Architect, Structural Engineer, IOR and DSA. 11. Requirement for continuous fabrication inspection by an approved independent inspector, unless the plant is currently certified under the PCI Certification Program. 5. Drawings for GFRC Panels. Drawings for the GFRC panels should include the following:

IR 19-2 Page 3 of 3
1. Details for panel connectors; dimensions and thickness of bonding material; embedment dimension of panel anchors connectors in bonding material; dimension for weld length of anchor to steel stud framing. 2. Detail of enlarged or slotted hole to allow for erection tolerances and for sliding of panel, when floor to floor lateral drift is considered, without the yielding of rods. Drawings shall indicate the acceptable clearance between the connector rod and the sides of the hole, as determined by the design professional, to allow for movement without rod yielding. 3. For rectangular support tubes, indicate orientation. 4. Clearly identify the boundary and interface between GFRC Panel and supporting structural members on the design drawings. 6. Design for GFRC Panels by the Manufacturers Engineer. 6.1 Check panel to structure connectors for buckling. 6.2 Check all structural members (tubes, angles, etc.) and connections to members that support GFRC panels and tie them to the structure. 6.3 Provide calculations for the design of the sub-frame to support the panels. 6.4 Provide calculations for the design of the GFRC panels for dead load, live load, wind load, earthquake load, the effects of creep, shrinkage and other moisture induced elements, and the effects of temperature change as applicable. Consider differences in the thermal and moisture induced strain properties of the facing and the backing. 7. Design Considerations for Project Design Engineer. Check structural members and their connections for the torsional, vertical and lateral loads imposed by the GFRC panels.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

FLY ASH AND NATURAL POZZOLANS USED IN CONCRETE


References: 2007 California Building Code, Section 1903A.5 ACI 318-05, ASTM C 618, ASTM C 311, ASTM C 94 Discipline: Structural

IR 19-3
Issued 06-10-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This IR provides general requirements for acceptance and use of concrete mixes

containing a significant amount of fly ash or natural pozzolans as a substitute for Portland cement, for projects under DSA jurisdiction. This IR describes the DSA requirements for the use of fly ash, which also apply to the use of raw or calcined natural pozzolans.

Scope: This IR is applicable for all concrete mixes utilizing fly ash or natural pozzolans in excess of 15% by weight, per 2007 California Building Code, Section 1903A.5.
This IR does not address issues related to constructability, curing, rate of strength gain, admixture compatibility, or sampling and testing. The design professional in responsible charge of the project shall clearly delineate all special requirements or procedures in the construction documents. Individuals experienced in the use of concrete mix designs using fly ash should be consulted, especially for mixes exposed to freeze / thaw or deicing chemicals.

Background: Conventional or standard concrete mixes, as the term is used in this IR, typically contain from 0 to 15% fly ash by weight. The percentage of fly ash is usually expressed as the percent fly ash, by weight, of all the cementitious materials (cement and fly ash) in the mix. Because Class F fly ash is a by-product of the combustion of coal, a concrete mix containing significant amounts of fly ash is being recognized as a green product. Compared to Portland cement, it offers these environmental benefits:
Diverts material from the waste stream Reduces green house gas emissions from the processing of raw material Conserves raw material

There are other benefits such as improved workability and durability, reduced permeability and water demand, and lower heat of hydration. However, there are also some drawbacks such as extended curing time, and slower early strength gain, which may impact testing and handling of samples, and construction schedules (e.g: form and shoring removal). A special strength testing specification may be necessary.

1.
1.1

Material:
Fly Ash: Fly ash and raw or calcined natural pozzolans shall meet the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard specification C 618-05 for Class N or F (Class C fly ash is not permitted). Per ASTM C 618, sampling and testing of fly ash shall be in accordance with ASTM C 311.
Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans Used in Concrete Page 1 of 3

DSA (SS) IR 19-3 (iss 06-10-08)

DSA (SS) IR 19-3 (iss 06-10-08)

Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans Used in Concrete

Page 2 of 3

Additional requirements for fly ash are as follows: 1.2 Fly ash shall be supplied by an experienced producer that complies with all applicable standards (e.g. ASTM C 618, ASTM C 311). Fly ash shall be from one source for the duration of the project unless additional physical testing of the changed mix is preformed, per Section 2 below.

Other Material Components: All other materials used in the concrete mix shall meet the requirements of Chapter 3 of ACI 318.

2.
2.1

Concrete Mix Designs:


General: For all mix designs, concrete proportions shall be selected by a registered civil engineer with experience in concrete mix design, and shall be determined in accordance with the provisions of ACI 318, Section 5.2. All mix designs shall be identified by a mix design identification number. The civil engineer shall prepare and submit a mix design report to the DSA approved (LEA) testing laboratory for review. Mix design reports shall include all the data as required to verify conformance with ACI 318, Section 5.2 and 5.3, and the following: The mix design identification number Cement certification Fly ash certification of compliance or test data Admixture data Aggregate test data

The report shall also bear the signature and seal of the registered engineer responsible for proportioning in accordance with DSA Interpretation of Regulation IR A-19, Section 1.1. 2.2 Mix Designs Utilizing 15% Or More Fly Ash: Proportioning shall be based on field experience or trial mixtures, or both, per ACI 318, Section 5.3. Proportioning per ACI 318, Section 5.4 (without field experience or trial mixtures) is not permitted. Mix Design Review and Approval Process: An engineer from a DSA approved (LEA) testing laboratory shall review the mix design report and the design professional in responsible charge of the project shall approve the mix design. Review by LEA Engineer: A qualified civil engineer associated with a DSA approved (LEA) testing laboratory shall review the report for conformance with ACI 318, Sections 5.2 and 5.3. He shall issue an evaluation report of findings and recommendation for either acceptance or rejection and forward his report to the design professional in responsible charge of the project. Approval by the Project Engineer in Responsible Charge: Based on the findings and recommendation of the LEA engineers evaluation report, the project design professional in responsible charge decides whether to accept or reject the mix design. He will issue a letter stating his acceptance or rejection. The letter shall be sent to DSA, and copied to the project inspector, the LEA laboratory, and the mix design engineer. Documentation by the Concrete Supplier: The concrete supplier shall submit copies of the cement certification, fly ash certification of compliance or test data, admixture data, aggregate test data, and mix design identification number to the project inspector and the LEA engineer who reviewed the mix design report.

2.3

2.3.1

2.3.2

2.3.3

DSA (SS) IR 19-3 (iss 06-10-08)

Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans Used in Concrete

Page 3 of 3

2.4

Record Keeping: The LEA engineer and project inspector shall maintain a copy of the approved mix design report, the approval letter from the engineer in general responsible charge, and the documents submitted by the concrete supplier and make them available to DSA upon request.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

MASONRY WALLS NON STRUCTURAL


References: 2001 California Building Code, Sections 2112A and 2113A 2007 California Building Code, Sections 2114A and 2115A Discipline: Structural

IR 21-1
Revised 09-18-07 Issued 09-01-1999

This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This IR provides various requirements for non-structural masonry walls. 1. Garden Wall and Screen Wall Construction: A garden wall or screen wall is any
non-bearing wall, which is not part of the structural system of a building. In general, construction is as required for non-bearing partitions except that minimum thickness permitted is six inches. Wall reinforcement is as required for design loads with minimum of #4 @ 24" o.c. vertical for running bond, or #4 @ 16" o.c. for stacked bond. Horizontal steel is to be 0.001 times the nominal cross sectional area and may be spaced up to 4'-0" o.c. maximum. Cells containing reinforcement shall be grouted. Though walls less than six feet high are not required to be approved by the Division of the State Architect (DSA), if shown on drawings, the design should consider the above requirements.

2. Grouting: If a 16" grout lift is called for, horizontal steel spacing should be 16" o.c. The high lift grout method will be allowed for both brick and block walls when the design indicates the use is feasible. Specifications should include the procedures outlined in DSA IR 21-2 and IR 21-3. 3. Thickness of Walls: In figuring stresses use the net dimensions of the block or brick walls. It is not necessary to deduct for raked or tooled joints less than 1/2" in depth. 4. Wall Projection Beyond Foundation: The maximum allowable projection for a brick wall is one-half brick for a block wall, the shell thickness minus 1/2". Design the wall to be capable of carrying its load on the reduced area. 5. Concentrated Loads: Extra bars are necessary only when required by design. For
concentrated loads causing eccentric moments, use four times the wall thickness plus length of bearing to compute bending stresses for interior supports. Use two times the wall thickness plus length of bearing for support at ends of walls.

DSA (SS) IR 21-1 (rev 09-18-07)

Masonry Walls Non Structural

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CONCRETE MASONRY HIGH LIFT GROUTING METHOD


References: 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Title 24, Part 2, Sections 2104A.6 and 2105A.7 2007 CBC, Section 2104A.6 Discipline: Structural

IR 21-2
Revised in its entirety 12-17-09 Issued 09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to provide the

requirements and procedure for high lift concrete masonry grouting when the high lift method is specified on the DSA approved plans and specifications.

1. Description: The high lift grouting method as developed for use in reinforced concrete block masonry is intended for use on wall construction where openings, block pattern arrangements, reinforcing steel, or embedded structural steel details do not prevent the free flow of grout or inhibit the use of mechanical vibration to properly consolidate, and reconsolidate, the grout in all cells or horizontal grout spaces.
1.1 Procedure: The high lift method requires that all masonry units, reinforcing steel and embedded items will be in place before grouting of the wall commences. The work shall be so arranged that once grouting of a section of wall is started the grouting shall proceed in lifts without stopping, except as noted below, until the full height of the prepared section is poured. The waiting period between lifts shall be limited to the time required to obtain an initial consolidation of grout. This also allows for a reduction in hydrostatic pressure of the grout on the masonry unit and reduces the possibility of "blow-outs." Grout: The grout shall be a high-slump workable mix, preferably placed by pumping to permit continuous pouring. The grout shall be worked into all voids. Mechanical vibrators shall be used for consolidation and reconsolidation. Where job conditions preclude such use, other methods may be employed if approved in advance by DSA. Because of the high water/cement ratio used in this type of grout, it is essential that the grout be reconsolidated after it has taken on a plastic consistency, but prior to taking an initial set. The reconsolidation is intended to overcome settlement shrinkage, separation from the reinforcing steel and to promote bonding to the masonry unit shells. Pour: For the purpose of this IR, a "pour" is considered as the entire height of grout fill placed in one day and is composed of a number of successively placed grout lifts. A "lift" is the layer of grout placed in a single continuous operation. The maximum height of pour is limited by the practical considerations of segregation of grout due to the height of free fall, the effect of dry grout deposits left on block projections, congestion due to reinforcing steel and embedded items, and the ability to effectively reconsolidate the grout. Unless specifically approved otherwise, the maximum height of pour will be 12 feet for walls with a nominal thickness of less

1.2

1.3

DSA IR 21-2 (rev 12-17-09)

Concrete Masonry High-Lift Grouting Method

Page 1 of 6

DSA IR 21-2 (rev 12-17-09)

Concrete Masonry High-Lift Grouting Method

Page 2 of 6

than 12 inches, and 16 feet for walls with a nominal thickness of 12 inches or more. For height of lift see Section 4.10.1 of this IR.

2. Quality of Materials: All materials shall conform to 2007 CBC, Section 2103A (Section 2102A in the 2001 CBC), with the following additional requirements:
2.1 Aggregate. Aggregate for grout shall conform to Section 2103A.12.3 of the 2007 CBC (Section 2103A.4.3 of the 2001 CBC) except when alternatives are specifically approved by the architect or structural engineer and DSA. Admixture. The grout shall contain an admixture of the type that reduces early water loss to the masonry units and produces an expansive action in the plastic grout sufficient to offset initial shrinkage and promote bonding of the grout to all interior surfaces of the masonry units. Admixtures shall have an listing from ICC-ES or other acceptable evaluation agency per IR A-5. The approval of the architect or structural engineer and DSA is required for the use of any admixture.

2.2

3.
3.1 3.1.1 3.1.2 3.1.3 3.1.4

Mortar and Grout:


Mortar: Mortar shall comply with the requirements of 2007 CBC, Section 2103A.8 (Section 2103A.3 in the 2001 CBC), with the following additional requirements: Place approximately half of the required water and sand into the mixer while it is running. Add cement, the remainder of the sand, and water in that order and mix for a period of at least two minutes. Add lime and continue mixing as long as needed to achieve a uniform mass. The total mixing time shall be 3 to 10 minutes. When pre-blended mortar is specified mixing shall conform to manufacturers instructions in lieu of the requirements of Section 3.1.

Exception: 3.2

Grout: The grout mix shall comply with the requirements of 2007 CBC, Section 2103A.12 (Section 2103A.4 in the 2001 CBC). Sufficient water may be added to make a workable mix that will flow into all voids of the masonry without separation or segregation. The slump of the grout shall be 8 to 11 inches per ACI 530.1, Article 2.6 B.2 and ASTM C476, Section 4.2.2. Grout mixes shall contain an approved admixture conforming to the requirements of Section 2.2 above. Admixture shall be used in strict accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and appropriate listing from ICC-ES or other acceptable evaluation agency per IR A-5 .

3.3

Mixing of Grout: The mixing of grout shall conform to the requirements of ASTM C476. The procedure used and timing for adding the admixture to the grout mix shall conform with admixture manufacturers instructions. Tests: Testing of mortar and grout shall conform to the requirements of 2007 CBC, Section 2105A.5 (Section 2105A.3.4 in the 2001 CBC).

3.4

4. Construction: The construction of high lift concrete block masonry work shall conform to the requirements of CBC, Chapter 21A, with the following additional requirements:

DSA IR 21-2 (rev 12-17-09)

Concrete Masonry High-Lift Grouting Method

Page 3 of 6

4.1

Foundations: The contact surface of all foundations and floors that are to receive masonry work shall be thoroughly cleaned and roughened in accordance with 2007 CBC, Section 1906A.4.1 (Section 1906A.4 in the 2001 CBC) before start of block placement. Protect the roughened surface during construction to assure a good bond between the grout fill and the concrete surface. Cleanouts: Provide cleanout openings for all walls at the bottom of every cell for each pour in accordance with 2007 CBC, Section 2104A.6.1.2.3 (Section 2104A.6.1.2.3 in the 2001 CBC). However, if the course at the bottom of the pour is constructed entirely of inverted open-end bond beam units, cleanout openings need only be provided in the reinforced cells. The openings shall be made prior to the laying of masonry units and be of sufficient size and location to allow thorough removal of all mortar droppings and debris. After the laying of masonry units is completed, the cells cleaned, the reinforcing stell positioned, and the inspection completed, close the cleanouts by inserting face shells of masonry units or covering the openings with forms. Face shell plugs shall be adequately braced to resist the hydrostatic pressure exerted by the grout in its fluid phase.

4.2

4.3

Reinforcement: All reinforcing steel shall be accurately placed in accordance with the DSA approved construction documents. For 8 inch block walls, all horizontal bars shall be placed in a single vertical plane in order to provide for continuous, and unobstructed vertical cells as required by Section 4.9.1.2 of this IR. Both horizontal and vertical bars are to be held in position by wire ties or spacing devices near bar ends and at intervals not exceeding 192 diameters of the reinforcement. Place the horizontal bars as the placement (or laying) of the masonry units progresses. Vertical bars may be dropped into position after the completion of the laying if the bars are held in place with positioning devices near the bottom of the wall and at intervals not exceeding 192 bar diameters. Masonry Units: Use of open-end concrete masonry units is preferred, wherever possible, and is required for stacked bond. Use open-end bond-beam units wherever possible to facilitate the horizontal flow of grout. Bond-beam units are required at all horizontal bars to provide a minimum three inch high by three inch wide vertical opening at all cross webs. Laying: Fill all head and bed joints solidly with mortar for a distance in from the face of the unit not less than the thickness of the face shell. Take care in placing the mortar to minimize its dropping into the block cells. Arrange open-end concrete masonry units used in stacked bond so that closed ends are not abutting. Consolidate mortar adequately by tooling to form a tight bond with the concrete masonry unit, and to enhance the water resistance of the assemblage. Wall Ties and Bracing: When stacked bond is used, or when adequate cross webs between face shells are not provided, use ties of heavy gage wire embedded in the horizontal mortar joints across continuous vertical joints or between face shells to prevent "blow-outs" due to the hydrostatic pressure exerted by the grout in its fluid phase. External ties or braces may also be used for this purpose. During construction, adequately brace ungrouted walls to resist wind and other forces.

4.4

4.5

4.6

4.7

Mortar Droppings and Overhangs: Mortar that projects into the grout space more than shall be removed. Thoroughly remove mortar droppings from the foundation or bearing surface, cell walls and reinforcing steel. An acceptable method

DSA IR 21-2 (rev 12-17-09)

Concrete Masonry High-Lift Grouting Method

Page 4 of 6

is to cover the exposed surface of the foundation with a minimum one inch thick layer of dry sand, and then dislodge any hardened mortar from the cell walls and reinforcement with a pole or rod. Remove the mortar debris and the sand cover prior to clean up and grouting. 4.8 Construction Joints: In the high lift grouting method, intermediate horizontal construction joints are not permitted. Grouting shall be completed in one continuous pour to the top of the wall in maximum four-foot layers or lifts in the same working day. An alternate procedure may be used with the approval of the architect or structural engineer and DSA. The section of wall to be grouted in any one pour is limited to a length in which successive lifts can be placed within one hour of the preceding lifts. Vertical control barriers shall be placed between pour sections in locations approved by the architect or structural engineer and DSA. 4.9 4.9.1 4.9.1.1 4.9.1.2 Grouting: Preparation: Adequate preparations shall be made prior to start of grouting operations including but not limited to: All cleanout closures, reinforcing steel, and embedded items shall be properly secured in place. All cells shall be clear and unobstructed. To be considered unobstructed all of the following requirements must be met (also see Table 1.16.1 of ACI 53005): For grout pours up to and including twelve feet in height the minimum grout space dimensions of all cells shall be three inches by three inches, For grout pours over twelve feet in height (only permitted for walls with a nominal thickness of 12 inches or more) the minimum grout space dimensions of all cells shall be three inches by four inches, The minimum grout space dimensions of cells containing horizontal reinforcing steel, electrical conduits or any other obstruction shall be increased by the diameter or width of the obstruction, and No cell shall contain vertical reinforcing steel exceeding six percent of the cell area,

4.9.1.3 4.9.1.4

All equipment used for grouting shall be functional, appropriate and adequate for the intended task. An adequate number of vibrators (including at least one spare vibrator to be available if a vibrator breaks down or gets stuck in the wall cavity) shall be available. All vibrators shall be suitable for vibrating the masonry (e.g. small diameter, with a shaft long enough to penetrate into the previous lift as required). To reduce the possibility of "blow-outs," do not pour grout until the mortar has adequately cured. Grout the walls as soon as possible after mortar has cured to reduce shrinkage and cracking of the vertical joints. Blow Outs: If a blow-out occurs and the contractor immediately patches or shores the wall while the grout is still in a fluid state, the contractor shall reconsolidate the grout by mechanical vibration. If the grout achieves its initial set prior to this reconsolidation see Section 4.11 of this IR; the zone of damage shall be delineated for removal. The special inspector shall immediately report the extent of the blow-out damage to the project inspector, architect, structural

4.9.2

4.9.3

DSA IR 21-2 (rev 12-17-09)

Concrete Masonry High-Lift Grouting Method

Page 5 of 6

engineer, and DSA, and shall keep records of the blow-out damage and any repair procedures for review by the DSA field engineer. 4.10 4.10.1 Grouting Procedure: Transport grout from the mixer to the point of deposit in the grout space as rapidly as practical by means and methods which will prevent segregation of the mix and minimize grout splatter on reinforcing steel and masonry unit surfaces not being encased in the grout pour. Depending on weather conditions and absorption rates of the masonry units, the lift heights and waiting periods may be varied. For construction under weather conditions other than cold or hot weather construction, as defined in 2007 CBC Sections 2104A.3 and 2104A.4 respectively, the individual lifts of grout shall be limited to four feet in height with a waiting period between lifts of 30 to 60 minutes. No lift shall exceed four feet in height without prior written DSA approval. Place the first lift of grout to a uniform height within the pour section and mechanically vibrate thoroughly to fill all voids. Vibration shall follow closely behind grout placement and at the same pace as the grouting operation. When the grout becomes plastic, but before initial set, pour the succeeding lift and vibrate alternate cells twelve to eighteen inches into the preceding lift to reconsolidate the preceding lift and close any plastic shrinkage cracks or separations from the cell walls. If, because of unavoidable job conditions, it is anticipated that the placement of the succeeding lift is going to be delayed beyond the period of workability of the preceding lift, reconsolidate each lift by reworking with the mechanical vibrator as soon as the grout has achieved its settlement shrinkage. The waiting, pouring and reconsolidation steps shall be repeated to the top of the pour. The top lift shall be reconsolidated after the required waiting period to fill any space left by settlement shrinkage. Provisions, such as drypacking, shall be made to provide solid bedding for nailers at the tops of walls. Equipment Breakdown or Emergency: If equipment breaks down, or any other unforeseen circumstance prevents the grouting operation from proceeding in accordance with these requirements, stop the grout pour until repairs can be made. If any grout does not receive consolidation, or reconsolidation, in a timely manner the areas in question shall be clearly delineated and reported. If cold joints or non-compliant construction joints result from an emergency interruption of the placing sequence, clearly delineated and reported these areas. The architect or engineer in general responsible charge of the project will either propose methods for repair, replacement, additional testing or propose acceptance of the delineated areas. The proposal shall be submitted to DSA for review and approval. Curing: Attention shall be given to proper curing of the mortar and grout. Cleaning Wall: Immediately after the wall has been fully grouted, water pressurized through a jet nozzle shall be used to remove stains which have percolated through the blocks and joints.

4.10.2

4.10.3

4.10.4

4.10.5

4.10.6 4.11

4.12 4.13

5.
5.1

Inspection and Core Tests:


Inspection: All masonry work is required to be continuously inspected during the laying of masonry, placing of reinforcing steel and grouting by an inspector specially

DSA IR 21-2 (rev 12-17-09)

Concrete Masonry High-Lift Grouting Method

Page 6 of 6

approved for that purpose by DSA. A qualified individual acceptable to the testing laboratory shall make test samples and perform such field tests as are required. The special masonry inspector shall check the materials, details of construction and construction procedure. The inspector shall furnish a verified report on Form DSA292 certifying that of his or her own personal knowledge the work covered by the report has, in every material respect, been performed in compliance with the DSA approved construction documents. 5.2 Core Tests: Core samples of the completed masonry construction shall be taken in accordance with 2007 CBC, Section 2105A.4 (Section 2105A.3.1 in the 2001 CBC). All core samples shall be submitted to the testing laboratory for examination and testing. A representative of the testing laboratory shall inspect the coring of the masonry walls and prepare a report of the coring operations. The report shall include the following: number, location and condition of all cores cut on the project detailed description of the bond between the grout fill and the cell walls of the masonry unit and any difficulties encountered in the coring operation which might impair the strength of the sample

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CLAY BRICK MASONRY HIGH LIFT GROUTING METHOD


Reference: California Building Code, Section 2104A.6

IR 21-3
Issued 9-1-99 Supercedes IR 24-5 (3/90)

This interpretation is intended for use by the plan review and field engineers of DSA to indicate an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations. Its purpose is to promote more uniform statewide criteria for use in plan review and supervision of construction of public schools, community colleges and essential services buildings. Other methods proposed by design professionals to solve a particular problem may be considered by DSA and reviewed for code and regulation compliance.

Purpose: The purpose of this IR is to provide the requirements and procedure for high lift clay brick masonry grouting when the use of this method is approved by the Division of the State Architect (DSA). 1. Description. The high lift grouting method has been developed for use on wall construction consisting of two wythes of brick masonry bonded to a grout core which contains the vertical and horizontal reinforcing. The wythes are connected by wire ties laid in the mortar joints at a spacing adequate to resist the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid grout during the pouring operation. Use of this method should be restricted to walls where openings, arrangement of piers, special reinforcing details, or embedded items do not prevent the free flow of grout or inhibit the use of mechanical vibration to properly consolidate the grout core. Horizontal reinforcing or embedded items such as structural connections or electrical conduit should be positioned so as to allow maximum accessibility to the grout space. The procedure requires that all masonry units, reinforcing steel and embedded items are in place before grouting of the wall commences. Arrange the work so that once the grouting of a section of wall is started, the grouting proceeds in lifts without stopping except as noted below, until the full height of the prepared section is poured. The waiting period between lifts is limited to the time required to obtain an initial consolidation of grout due to settlement, shrinkage and absorption of excess water by the masonry units. The waiting period reduces the hydrostatic pressure of the grout on the masonry wythes and reduces the possibility of "blow-outs." The grout is to be a workable mix, preferably placed by pumping, to permit continuous pouring and is to be worked into all voids with mechanical vibrators. Because of the high water/cement ratio used in this type of grout, it is essential that the grout be reconsolidated after it has taken on a plastic consistency, but prior to taking an initial set. The reconsolidation is intended to overcome settlement shrinkage, separations from the reinforcing steel and to promote bonding to the masonry unit walls. For the purpose of this IR, a "pour" is considered as the entire height of grout fill placed in one day and is composed of a number of successively placed grout lifts. A "lift" is the layer of grout placed in a single continuous operation. The maximum height of pour is limited by the practical considerations of segregation of grout due to the height of free fall, effect of dry grout deposits left on the bonding face of the masonry units and reinforcing steel and the ability to effectively reconsolidate the grout. Unless specifically approved otherwise, the maximum height of pour is sixteen feet for walls with a single curtain of reinforcing steel (less than 12" thick) and twenty feet for walls with two curtains of reinforcement (12" or more in thickness). The minimum grout space width is 3 " and the wall shall be constructed so as to preserve an unobstructed vertical alignment of the grout space.

IR 21-3 Page 2 of 5
2. Quality of Materials. All materials are to conform to CBC, Section 2102A with the following additional requirements: 1. Pea Gravel. Pea gravel for grout is to conform to ASTM C404 Aggregates for Grout, except when other gradings are specifically approved by the architect or structural engineer and DSA. 2. Coarse Aggregate. Coarse aggregate as for concrete, when permitted in grout fill, is to conform to CBC, Section 1903A.3. 3. Admixture. The grout should contain an admixture of the type that reduces early water loss to the masonry units and produces an expansive action in the plastic grout sufficient to offset initial shrinkage and promote bonding of the grout to all interior surfaces of the masonry units. Obtain the approval of the architect or structural engineer and DSA for use of the admixture. 3. Mortar and Grout. 3.1 Mortar. Mortar is to comply with the requirements of CBC, Section 2103A with the following additional requirements: 1. Place approximately half of the required water and sand into the mixer while running. 2. Add cement and the remainder of the sand and water into the mixer in that order and mix for a period of at least two minutes. 3. Add lime and continue mixing as long as needed to secure a uniform mass. 4. The total mixing time may not be less than 10 minutes. 3.2 Grout. The grout mix is to comply with the requirements of CBC, Section 2103A.4. Sufficient water may be added to make a workable mix that will flow into all voids in the masonry tiers without separation or segregation. The slump of the grout should be varied depending on the rate of absorption of the masonry units and temperature and humidity conditions. The range should be from eight inches (8") for units with a low rate of absorption (30 to 40 grams per minute) up to ten inches (10") for units with a high rate of absorption (80 to 90 grams per minute). Grout mixes are to contain an approved admixture conforming to the requirements of Item 2 (3.) above. Use such admixture strictly in accordance with the manufacturers instructions. Where the width of the grout space exceeds five inches, grout using a coarser aggregate may be used if the mix is designed in accordance with CBC, Section 1905A. The maximum size aggregate is not to exceed one inch. The water per sack of cement may be greater than is shown in CBC, Table 19A-A-8 to allow for absorption by the masonry units and sufficient workability to meet the requirements given above. 3.3 Mixing of Grout. The mixing of grout is to conform to the requirements for mixing of concrete, CBC, Section 1905A.8. Whenever possible, batch, mix and deliver grout in accordance with the requirements for transit-mixed concrete. Time the admixture addition in strict accordance with the manufacturers instructions. The procedure used for adding it to the grout mix should provide for good dispersion.

IR 21-3 Page 3 of 5
3.4 Tests. Testing of mortar and grout is to conform to the requirements of CBC, Sections 2105A.3, 2105A.4 and 2105A.5. 4. Construction. The construction of high lift clay brick masonry work is to conform the requirements of CBC, Chapter 21, with the following additional requirements: 1. Wall Make-Up. Lay brick level in two wythes with a separation for grout space not less than 3 ". The minimum wall thickness is governed otherwise by CBC, Table 21A-R. 2. Foundations. Clean thoroughly and roughen the contact surface of all foundations and floors that are to receive masonry work in accordance with CBC, Section 2906A.4 before start of laying. Protect the roughened surface during construction to assure a good bond between the grout fill and the concrete surface. 3. Cleanouts. Provide cleanout openings for all walls at the bottom of each pour. These openings are to be made by omitting alternate bricks on one wythe of the wall or by forming openings of equivalent size and spacing in the foundation. After the laying of the masonry units is completed, clean all foreign material from the bottom of the grout space and position the reinforcing steel. Have all preparatory work approved by the inspector, then close the cleanout holes. The holes may be plugged with brick units set in mortar or covered with forms. The brick plugs are to have a twoday minimum curing time or are to be adequately braced to resist the pressure of the fluid grout. 4. Control Barriers. Place vertical barriers or dams to control the extent of the pours horizontally. Such barriers may be formed of brick across the grout space (in full vertical and horizontal joints of mortar) full height of wall. Dams are to be located where designated by the architect or structural engineer. 5. Reinforcement. Place all reinforcing steel accurately in strict accordance with the approved plans and specifications. Both horizontal and vertical reinforcing are to be held in position by wire tie or spacing devices near ends and at intervals not exceeding 192 diameters of the reinforcement. Place the horizontal reinforcing as the work progresses and the vertical reinforcing may be dropped into position after the completion of the laying if adequate positioning devices are provided to hold the threaded reinforcement. 6. Laying Brick. The brick is to be clean and all dust or dirt removed from the surfaces before laying. At the time of laying, all brick is to be damp and have a residual absorption between 5% and 10%. Take special care when using units with different absorption characteristics in the same wall. Lay the brick in mortar with full shoved bed and head joints. Take care in placing the mortar to keep a minimum of droppings from falling into the grout space. As the work progresses, both of the wythes should be kept approximately at the same height to accommodate the wall ties. Place the ties in the mortar bed and vertically align all ties to facilitate the vibrating of the grout pours. 7. Cleaning the Grout Space. Thoroughly clean all mortar droppings from the construction joint at the foundation and from the reinforcing steel. Remove all mortar projections which extend more than one-quarter inch (1/4") into the grout space. Recommended methods to maintain a clean horizontal construction joint at the foundation are to cover the exposed foundation surface with a one-to-two inch layer of

IR 21-3 Page 4 of 5
sand to receive the mortar debris and, (1) removing mortar from reinforcing steel and mortar projecting into the grout space from the mortar joists by hosing out the grout space at least twice a day (at mid-day and quitting time) with a high pressure stream of water or, (2) dislodging the mortar droppings and projections with a pole or rod as the work progresses. After the lay-up of the wall is completed, remove the sand cover and mortar debris at the bottom of the grout space. The surface of the foundation should be left with clean aggregate exposed in the concrete matrix. 8. Wall Bracing. After construction of the masonry walls and prior to grouting, the walls should be adequately braced against lateral forces and other construction hazards until permanent supports are in place. 9. Grout Pours. In the High Lift Grouting Method, intermediate horizontal construction joints are not permitted. Plan the work for one continuous pour of grout to the top of the wall in four foot layers or lifts in the same working day. Should a blow-out, a breakdown in equipment, or any other emergency stop the grouting operation, an alternate procedure may be used with the approval of the architect or structural engineer and DSA. The total length of wall to be grouted in any one pour is limited to the number of sections between vertical control barriers in which each lift can be placed within one hour of the preceding lift. To prevent "blow-outs," no grout should be poured unless the mortar of the brick work has been allowed to set a minimum of three days in hot weather or five days in cold, damp weather. After all droppings and foreign material have been removed from the grout space (see Item 4 (7.) above), close the cleanout holes (see Item 4 (3.) above). All reinforcing, bolts and embedded connection items should be rigidly held in position before grouting is started. In order to control the rate of absorption of the brick units at the time of grouting, pre-wet the interior surfaces of the brick wythes prior to the start of the grout pour. Soak the bricks thoroughly with water the evening prior to the start of the grouting. In the case of hot, dry weather conditions it may be necessary to provide additional moistening of the grout contact surface of the brick the day of the pour. 10. Grouting Procedure. Handle the grout from the mixer to the point of deposit in the grout space as rapidly as practical by pumping and placing methods which will prevent segregation of the mix and cause a minimum of grout splatter on reinforcing and masonry unit surfaces not being immediately encased in the grout lift. Discard the grout not in place within 1 hours after water is first added to the batch. Depending upon weather conditions and absorption rates of the masonry units, the lift heights and waiting periods may be varied. Under normal weather conditions with typical masonry units, the individual lifts of grout are limited to four feet (4') in height with a waiting period between lifts of 30 to 60 minutes. Place the first lift of grout to a uniform height within the pour section and vibrate thoroughly to fill all voids. This first vibration should follow immediately behind the pouring of the grout by not more than ten feet (10'). For vibration or consolidation, use an approved mechanical vibrator. After a waiting period sufficient to permit the grout to become plastic, but before it has taken any set, the succeeding lift should be poured and vibrated twelve to eighteen

IR 21-3 Page 5 of 5
inches (12"18") into the preceding lift. This reconsolidates the preceding lift and closes any plastic shrinkage cracks or separations from the masonry units. If the placing of the succeeding lift is going to be delayed beyond the period of workability of the preceding lift, each lift is to be reconsolidated by reworking with a second vibrator as soon as the grout has taken its settlement shrinkage. Repeat the waiting, pouring and reconsolidation steps until the top of the pour is reached. Reconsolidate the top lift after the required waiting period so that any space left by settlement shrinkage is filled with grout. 11. Curing. Attention should be given to proper curing of the mortar joints as well as the grout concrete pour. The brick masonry work and top of the grout pour should be kept damp to prevent too rapid drying during hot or drying weather, and drying winds. 12. Cleaning Wall. Soon after the grout work is completed, all exposed brick faces showing grout spotting should be washed down thoroughly with a pressure stream of water through a jet nozzle. Subsequent cleaning may be necessary as the curing is taking place and before final acceptance, and as directed by the architect. 5. Inspection and Core Tests. 5.1 Inspection. All masonry work is required to be continuously inspected during laying and grouting by an inspector specially approved for that purpose by DSA. The inspector makes test samples and performs such tests as are required by Item 4 (5.) above. The special masonry inspector checks the materials, details of construction and construction procedure. He will furnish a verified report stating that of his own personal knowledge, the work covered by the report has been performed and materials used and installed in accordance with and in conformity to, the duly approved plans and specifications. 5.2 Core Tests. Take core tests of the completed masonry construction in accordance with CBC, Section 2105A.3.1.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

MASONRY: CONCRETE MASONRY UNIT STANDARDS


Reference: California Building Code Sections 2102A.5, U.B.C Std. 21-04 Discipline: Structural

IR 21-4
Revised 11-01-07 Issued 08-18-04 as CR 21-1

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

1.

PURPOSE: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) indicates Division of the State Architects (DSA) acceptance of current standards applicable to concrete masonry unit materials, sampling and testing for projects under DSA jurisdiction, which includes public schools (K-12 and Community Colleges) and state essential services facilities. These current standards, published by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), include the following:
ASTM C 90-02a, Standard Specification for Load-Bearing Concrete Masonry Units ASTM C 140-02a, Standard Test Methods for Sampling and Testing Concrete Masonry Units ASTM C 426-99, Standard Test Method for Linear Drying Shrinkage of Concrete Masonry Units

2 BACKGROUND: Section 2102A.5.2 of the 2001 CBC, which was based on ASTM C 90-95, mandates the use of Grade N-1 concrete masonry units (Type I moisture controlled units) for projects under DSA jurisdiction.
ASTM C 90 was revised in year 2000 to remove the Type I and Type II classifications. This change has been continued in subsequent revisions of ASTM C 90, including the current edition, ASTM C 90-02a.

3.

SUMMARY: When these current standards are applied on a project under DSA jurisdiction, the design, sampling and testing of masonry units must comply with the following requirements.
Design and Specifications Plans and specifications shall reference the current standards, listed above, and the project design shall conform to these standards and this DSA Circular. Type I moisture-controlled units shall not be specified since they are no longer recognized in the current edition, ASTM C 90-02a. Control joints should be specified at a maximum of 25 feet spacing, in accordance with the National Concrete Masonry Association (NCMA) TEK 10-1A, Crack Control in Concrete Masonry Walls. Alternatively, refer to Section 3.2.2, below. Masonry: Concrete Masonry Unit Standards Page 1 of 2

3.1

DSA (SS) IR 21-4 (rev 11-01-07)

DSA (SS) IR 21-4 (rev 10-15-07)

Masonry: Concrete Masonry Unit Standards

Page 2 of 2

3.2

Sampling and Testing Of Concrete Masonry Units The owners material testing laboratory must be currently accepted by DSAs Laboratory Acceptance Program (LEA). The owners laboratory shall sample masonry units in accordance with ASTM C 90 Section 4 and perform the following tests: Mandatory Tests Measurements (Section 5, ASTM C 140) Compressive strength (Section 6, ASTM C 140) Absorption (Section 8, ASTM C 140) Shrinkage Testing of Concrete Masonry Units Per ASTM C 90, Sections 5.2 and 8.3, manufacturers are required to conduct regular quality control testing to ensure that units delivered to projects will meet the linear shrinkage requirement (0.065 percent maximum). DSA will not require project-specific linear shrinkage testing if control joints are specified at 25 feet maximum spacing, otherwise testing is required. Additionally, the project design professional may require linear shrinkage testing for special design or construction conditions. When testing is required, the owners material testing laboratory shall conduct linear shrinkage testing in accordance with ASTM C 426. Test data shall be traceable to the units being supplied for the project, and shall comply with ASTM C 90, Section 8.3.

3.2.1

3.2.2

3.2.3

Reporting Test reports conforming to Section 10 of ASTM C 140 and Section 4-335 (d) of Title 24, Part 1 shall be submitted to the project design professionals, the project inspector, the owner, and DSA.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

DESIGN PROCEDURE FOR STEEL DECK DIAPHRAGMS WITH STRUCTURAL CONCRETE FILL
References: 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Section 2205A.4.1 2007 CBC, Section 2209A.3 Discipline: Structural

IR 22-1
Revised 01-02-08 Issued 09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to provide guidelines


and limitations, additional to the California Building Code (CBC), for the design of steel deck composite diaphragms with structural concrete fill.

1. General. Designs of metal deck diaphragms with concrete weighing from 95 to 150 pounds per cubic foot, detailed in accordance with International Code Council Evaluation Service (ICC ES) Evaluation Service Reports (ESR), will be accepted at 80% of the Report values. For projects submitted to DSA under the 2007 CBC, 100% of the ESR value will be accepted if the report values were based on test data, per ICC AC43 (2007 CBC, Section 2209A.2).
Where diaphragm shears exceed 80% of the ESR values, the structural concrete fill is to be designed to resist the entire horizontal load, in accordance with 2007 CBC, Section 1901A (Section 1911A in the 2001 CBC).

2. Shear Transfer. Transfer lateral loads to chords, reaction members and drags as
follows: 2.1 Diaphragms with Shears Not Greater than 80% of ESR Shear Value - Shear may be transferred entirely by welding the metal deck to the steel framing in accordance with the ESR, except use weld values given in Table J2.5 (AISC, 360-05). The first sheet of steel decking adjacent and parallel to chords, reaction members and drags (on one or both sides as applicable) is required to be a full width sheet. This arrangement will reduce the shear in the concrete along the line of the first seam and will provide maximum bond area of concrete to deck in the most highly stressed regions. 2.2 Diaphragms Using Structural Concrete Fill to Resist the Entire Shear Transfer lateral loads directly from the concrete by means of dowels or welded shear connectors to the building frame. Do not consider deck welding to be part of the shear transfer connection. Use allowable shear values for dowels equal to the values for bolts of the same diameter as given in 2007 CBC, Section 1911A for Allowable Design Load (ASD) and 1912A for Load Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) (for projects submitted under the 2001 CBC, see Table 19A-D and Section 1923A). Note that allowable shear values for welded connectors given in Section I1.3 of AISC 360-05 are for composite design only, and allowable values for diaphragm shear transfer to drag members, reaction
DSA (SS) IR 22-1 (rev. 01-02-08) Design Procedure For Steel Deck Diaphragms with Structural Concrete Fill Page 1of 2

DSA (SS) IR 22-1 (rev. 01-02-08)

Design Procedure For Steel Deck Diaphragms With Structural Concrete Fill

Page 2 of 2

members and chords, etc., are not to exceed one-third of the available strength (2007 CBC, Section 2204A.1.2).

3.
3.1 3.2

Reinforcing for Concrete Slabs on Metal Deck.


The minimum requirements for reinforcing steel in structural concrete fill on metal deck may not be less than the minimum called for in CBC, Section 1907A.12. Provide temperature and shrinkage reinforcement perpendicular to the direction of the ribs with an area not less than that specified in CBC, Section 1907A.12, considering the net area of the concrete above the ribs. Provide slab reinforcement parallel to the ribs which is not less than that used in establishing diaphragm shear values as shown in ESR AC43. Provide continuity and other special reinforcement as required by calculations.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

ANCHOR BOLTS CONNECTING STEEL TO CONCRETE

IR 22-2

Reference: 2001 Title 24, California Building Code, Sections 1923A, 2205A.11 and 2205A.12 Revised 11-01-07 2007 Title 24, California Building Code, Section 2204A.2.2 Revised 03-19-07 and AISC 360, Section J9 Issued 01-30-07 as CR 22-1 Title 8, Industrial Relations, Sections 1710 (f) (1) (A) and 1710 (b)
This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is applicable to cast-in-place anchor bolts used to fasten structural steel to concrete. The purpose of this IR is to clarify the dimensional
requirements, and the acceptability of both full diameter body and reduced body diameter style bolts. This IR is not applicable to anchor bolts used to attach wood elements to concrete or to masonry (refer to IR 23-5), bolts used for steel to steel connections, or postinstalled bolts (refer to IR 19-1).

1. DESIGN REQUIREMENTS: Cut-thread or rolled-thread bolts of full diameter body style shall meet the requirements of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) standard ASME B18.2.1 or ASME B18.2.6 (Section 3 below). Full body style bolts may be designed per Sections 1.1 or 1.2 below.
Rolled-thread bolts of reduced diameter body style shall meet the requirements of ASME B18.2.1 (Section 4 below). Reduced body style bolts shall be designed per Section 1.1 below. 1.1 The construction documents shall indicate that the anchor bolts must meet the requirements of ASTM F-1554. The anchor bolts shall be designed in accordance with ACI 318, Appendix D. When the anchor bolts are designed in accordance with 2001 CBC, Section 1923A.1 (Section 1911A.2 in the 2007 CBC), the body or shank diameters (from Table 3-1 below) shall be specified on the construction documents and utilized for the design. The body or shank diameters herein specified shall supersede ASTM F-1554.

1.2

In addition, the minimum number of anchor bolts required for a column base plate is four (4), per Title 8, Industrial Relations, Section 1710 (f) (1) (A). Steel posts weighing 300 lbs. or less, as defined by Title 8, Section 1710 (b), are not subject to this requirement. Base plate holes for anchor bolts may be oversized per 2001 CBC Section 2205A.11 (for projects submitted under the 2007 CBC, refer to AISC 360, Section J9 and AISC Manual of Steel Construction, Table 14-2).

2.

BACKGROUND: Dimensional requirements for bolts are given in ASME B18.2.1, Square and Hex Bolts and Screws, and ASME B18.2.6, Fasteners for Use in Structural Applications. Bolt threads are formed either by cutting or rolling. Dimensional requirements for threads are given in ASME B1.1, Unified Inch Screw Thread (UN and UNR Thread Form), and ASME B1.3M, Screw Thread Gaging Systems for Dimensional Acceptability Inch and Metric.

Anchor bolts are manufactured from bolt blanks, which is a headed smooth rod or bar intended for subsequent threading. Blanks come in full body diameter and reduced body diameter styles.
DSA (SS) IR 22-2 (rev 11-01-07) Anchor Bolts Connecting Steel to Concrete Page 1 of 2

DSA (SS) IR 22-2 (rev 11-01-07)

Anchor Bolts Connecting Steel to Concrete

Page 2 of 2

2.1

Cut-Thread Bolts. The original blank is full diameter body style, and equal to the major thread (outside) diameter. Threads are formed by cutting and removing metal from the blank. Full Diameter Body Style Rolled-Thread Bolts. The original blank is full diameter body style, and the threaded length portion is reduced to the thread pitch diameter during extrusion. Threads are formed by rotating dies that displace the metal. Reduced Diameter Body Style Rolled-Thread Bolts. Similar to full diameter body style rolled-thread bolts, except the blank diameter is reduced for the entire bolt length. Commercially, the terms cut-thread and rolled-thread may not indicate the method of forming threads. The term cut-thread bolt may refer to either a cutthread bolt or a full diameter body style rolled-thread bolt. The term rolled-thread bolt may refer to a reduced diameter body style rolled-thread bolt.

2.2

2.3

2.4

3. FULL DIAMETER BODY STYLE BOLTS: Dimensional requirements for cutthread or rolled-thread bolts with full diameter body style are given in Table 3-1. Table 3-1 Diameters of Full Diameter Body Style Bolts 1, 2
Nominal Size (inches) Body or Shank Diameter (inches) 3 Max. Min.
Notes: 1) Adopted from ASME B18.2.1 and ASME B18.2.6. 2) For bolt diameters not indicated, refer to ASME B18.2.1 and B18.2.6. 3) The body or shank of a bolt is the smooth portion between the head and the threads.

1/2 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1-1/4 1-1/2 1-3/4 2

0.5000 0.6250 0.7500 0.8750 1.0000 1.2500 1.5000 1.7500 2.0000

0.515 0.642 0.768 0.895 1.022 1.277 1.531 1.785 2.039

0.482 0.605 0.729 0.852 0.976 1.223 1.470 1.716 1.964

4. REDUCED DIAMETER BODY STYLE BOLTS: Dimensional requirements for rolled-thread bolts with reduced diameter body style are given in Table 4-1. Table 4-1 Diameters of Reduced Diameter Body Style Bolts 1, 2 Nominal
Size (inches)

Threads per Inch


(TPI) 4

Body or Shank 3 Diameter (inches)


Max. Min.

Notes: 1) Body diameters are based on ASME B18.2.1, Table 2, Notes 7 & 13, and ASTM B1.1, UNRC or 8 UNR series, Class 2A threads. 2) For bolt diameters not indicated, refer to ASME B18.2.1, B18.2.6 and ASTM B1.1. 3) The body or shank of a bolt is the smooth portion between the head and the threads. 4) TPI means threads per inch (ASTM B1.1, UNRC or 8 UNR series, Class 2A threads).

1/2 5/8 3/4 7/8 1 1-1/4 1-1/2 1-3/4 2

0.5000 0.6250 0.7500 0.8750 1.0000 1.2500 1.5000 1.7500 2.0000

13 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4-1/2

0.482 0.605 0.729 0.852 0.976 1.223 1.470 1.716 1.964

0.444 0.559 0.677 0.795 0.910 1.148 1.381 1.608 1.843

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

OPEN WEB STEEL JOISTS AND JOIST GIRDERS


Discipline: Structural References: 2007 CBC Sections 2206A, and 1704A.3 DSA IR 17-2, 17-3 Steel Joist Institute Specifications SJI K-1.1, SJI LH/DLH-1.1 and SJI JG-1.1 nd Steel Joist Institute 42 Edition Catalog

IR 22-3
Issued 07-15-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies the process and criteria under which the Division of the State Architect will evaluate, accept for use and inspect the use of open web steel joists (OWSJ) on projects under DSA jurisdiction.
Note: Frequently used terms are defined in the glossary, Section 9, of this IR.

1.

Qualified Manufacturers: The OWSJ manufacturer must be a current member in good standing with the Steel Joist Institute (SJI) and currently certified as an approved fabricator by one of the following organizations:

International Accreditation Service, Inc. City of Los Angeles


2. Approval Process: The approval of OWSJ for use on a specific project is a fourphase process. There are specific requirements and responsibilities for the joist manufacturers, and architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge (project design professional) in each phase. The four phases and the key players involved are as follows:
Review and Approval Professional, and DSA of Construction Documents: Project Design

Review and Approval of Joist Documents: Project Design Professional, Manufacturer, and DSA Manufacturing of Joists: Manufacturer and Fabrication Special Inspector Field Installation: Project Inspector and Field Welding Special Inspector

3.

Review and Approval of Construction Documents. This phase occurs before a project construction contract is awarded to a qualified joist manufacturer. The steps and requirements for this phase are as follows:

DSA (SS) IR 22-3 (iss 07/15/08)

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DSA (SS) IR 22-3 (iss 07/15/08)

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3.1

Project design professional prepares construction documents (plans and specifications) for the project. In addition to the requirements in CBC Section 2206A.2, the portion of the construction documents pertaining to OWSJ shall also include the following: Structural framing plan including layout of OWSJ and all supporting elements Loading diagrams for all OWSJ in accordance with CBC Section 2206A.2.1 and any deflection requirement. Specify the SJI joist designation for each joist. The designation shall comply with CBC Section 2206A.2. Project specifications shall require that OWSJ manufacturer(s) comply with Section 1 of this IR. The project design professional should closely coordinate OWSJ design (including all connections, non-standard products, and details) with a qualified OWSJ manufacturer prior to the submittal of contract documents for DSA review. Project specifications and Statement of Special Inspections (CBC Sections 1704A.1.1 and 1705A) shall include testing and inspection requirements for OWSJ per Section 7 of this IR. The following note shall be shown on the plans: Mechanical, electrical, and plumbing units and elements shall be coordinated with manufacturers joist document prior to field installation. Field modification of OWSJ is prohibited without the prior approval of DSA. As an option, joist documents as described in Section 4 below may be included with the construction documents. Otherwise, they are submitted as deferred approval per Section 4 below and Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317(g).

3.2 3.3

Project design professional submits application and construction documents to DSA for review. After the DSA plan review process is completed, the approved construction documents will bear the DSA identification stamp with the initials of the plan reviewer.

4. Review and Approval of Joist documents. This phase occurs after the project has been bid and the contract for the fabrication of the OWSJ has been awarded to a qualified manufacturer as defined in Section 1 of this IR. The steps and requirements for this phase are as follows:
4.1 Submittal Preparation: Manufacturer prepares joist documents for DSA approval, in accordance to the requirements of DSA approved project construction documents and working in a fully coordinated effort with the project design professional. If the requirements in the approved construction documents (see Section 3 above) were altered by the manufacturer during the preparation of the joist document, the project design professional must prepare and submit Field Change Documents to DSA for review in accordance with IR A-6. These changes may include joist designation, joist depths, layout, framing plans, loads, joist anchorage, etc.

4.1.1

DSA (SS) IR 22-3 (iss 07/15/08)

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4.2

Submittal Documents: The manufacturers joist documents shall include: Placement drawings per CBC Section 2206A.4 Calculations per CBC Section 2206A.3, signed and stamped by the manufacturers California registered professional engineer per CBC Section 2206A.4. Joist profiles with member sizes and connection details, signed and stamped by the manufacturers California registered professional engineer per CBC Section 2206.A.4, Design Approval. This information may be included with the calculation package. When alternate design substitutions (ADS) are anticipated during the manufacturing process, the manufacturer may specify alternate member thickness or weld sizes that may be substituted during manufacturing. If the joist documents with ADS are approved by DSA, the manufacturer will not be subject to the provisions of Section 8 of this IR if ADS were used during the manufacturing.

4.3

Design Professional Review of Submittal Documents: The manufacturer submits the joist documents to the project design professional for review and approval. This step may take multiple exchanges between the project design professional and the OWSJ manufacturer to finalize the joist documents for submittal to DSA. The project design professional and the OWSJ manufacturer, working together, shall coordinate the joist documents with the following: Mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) plans that include locations and sizes of roof top or floor units, ducts, pipes, conduits, etc. Roof pitch or slopes Top elevations of support elements to insure proper seating of OWSJ, i.e. top of steel girders, concrete or CMU pilasters or walls,

4.4

Submittal to DSA: When the project design professional approves the joist documents, he/she shall provide a signed and stamped statement of general conformance and submit it to DSA for approval in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317(g). For additional information on the Statement of General Conformance, see DSA IR A-18. The project design professional shall submit two sets of joist documents to DSA. One set will be used for marking up DSA review comments if there are any. The other set will be used for DSA stamping.

4.5

DSA Review This step may involve a back-check review if the documents were not approved. The project design professional shall coordinate with the manufacturer to resolve DSA plan check comments (as noted on the mark-up set of joist documents) and schedule a back-check appointment with DSA. Bring two sets of revised joist documents to the back-check appointment. DSA review of the calculations typically includes verification of input and output. Each of the following conditions must be met: The manufacturer is licensed by SJI to manufacture the joist series (which includes SJI certification of joist design software).

DSA (SS) IR 22-3 (iss 07/15/08)

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The joist designation K, LH, DLH, or Joist Girder (JG) listed in the SJI 42nd Edition Catalog containing the Standard Specifications and the design loads are not greater than those listed in the load tables of the SJI 42nd Edition Catalog. Effects of eccentricity on LH/DLH series joists and joist girders is permitted to be neglected if the eccentricity is within the allowable tolerance specified in Section 103.4(d) and 1003.4(d) respectively of the SJI Standard Specifications.

4.6

DSA Approval: After DSA reviews the submitted joist documents and determines that they are in conformance, DSA stamps the joist documents as approved. The stamped set of joist plans will be scanned into the DSA database and then returned to the project design professional who shall forward a copy to the manufacturer and the fabrication special inspector. Additional copies of DSA stamped joist documents may be made available to the project design professional by arrangement with the DSA regional office.

5.
5.1

Manufacturing of Joists: The manufacturing of OWSJ occurs in this phase.


Manufacturer prepares shop orders or shop drawings from DSA approved construction documents and joist documents. Other than the approved alternate design substitutions described in Section 4.2 above, changes to the approved joist documents must be reviewed and approved prior to manufacturing in accordance with Section 8 of this IR. Manufacturer notifies the project design professional, project inspector, and fabrication special inspector of the fabrication schedule. Manufacturing may not start without the presence of fabrication special inspector. A fabrication special inspector must be approved by DSA for each project prior to manufacturing. The fabrication special inspector provides inspection during OWSJ manufacturing in accordance with Section 7 of this IR. At the end of fabrication, the manufacturer shall submit a certificate of compliance per CBC Section 2206A.5 to DSA, the owner, and the project design professional.

5.2

5.3

5.4

6. Field Installation: During this phase, the OWSJ arrive at the construction site and are ready to be installed. The steps and requirements for this phase are as follows:
6.1 Working from the DSA approved construction documents and DSA approved joist documents (and joist revision documents as may be needed per Section 8 of this IR), the project inspector shall verify joist size, fabrication special inspectors ID tag or mark, and placement in the field. Working from the DSA approved documents listed above the field welding special inspector provides continuous inspection for field welding of attachments of the OWSJ.

6.2

7.

1704A.3 and shall be performed in accordance with Sections 4-333(c) and 4-335, Title 24, Part 1, and DSA IR 17-3.

Testing and Inspection: Testing and inspection shall comply with CBC Section

DSA (SS) IR 22-3 (iss 07/15/08)

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7.1

Unidentified Steel. All steel shall be identified by the fabrication special inspector per 2007 CBC Section 1704A.3.2.2. Unidentified steel shall be tested per 2007 CBC Section 2212A.1. Shop Fabrication. Inspection of shop fabrication shall comply with 2007 CBC Section 1704A.3.2.2. Marking: The special inspector shall place a distinguishing mark, and/or tag with this distinguishing mark, on each inspected joist or joist girder. This mark or tag shall remain on the joist or joist girder throughout the job site receiving and erection process. At a minimum the distinguishing mark shall include the special inspectors initials and date. Welding: Inspection of shop and field welding shall comply with 2007 CBC Section 1704A.3.2.2 and DSA IRs 17-2 and 17-3. Additional requirements for welding inspections are listed below: The cost of inspection shall be paid by the owner (which is usually the school district.) Fabrication special inspectors and field welding special inspectors shall hold current certification as an AWS CWI, in accordance with AWS QC1. Welding procedure specification shall be pre-qualified or qualified by test per AWS D1.1/D1.1 M 2006 Sections 3 and 4 respectively and SJI Specifications.

7.2 7.2.1

7.3

7.3.1 7.3.2 7.3.3

8. Revisions During Manufacturing: This section is not applicable to the approved alternate design substitutions described in Section 4.2 above. If revisions to the approved joist document are necessary, the manufacturer shall obtain DSA approval of the revisions prior to the manufacturing of the affected joists. The steps and requirements for making revisions are as follows:
8.1 8.2 Manufacturer notifies the fabrication special inspector of changes being proposed. Manufacturer submits the joist revision documents to the project design professional for approval. The joist revision documents shall include all the items listed in Section 4.1 of this IR for the affected joists. When the project design professional approves joist revision documents, he/she shall provide a signed and stamped statement of general conformance on these documents and submit to DSA for approval. DSA reviews the joist revision documents and the statement of general conformance. DSA approves and stamps the joist revision documents. The manufacturer starts the manufacturing of the joists with the approved joist revision documents following the procedures in Section 5 of this IR.

8.3

8.4 8.5

9.

defined below:

Glossary:

For clarity and reference, some frequently used terms in this IR are

DSA (SS) IR 22-3 (iss 07/15/08)

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9.1

Alternate Design Substitutions (ADS) DSA approved alternate member(s) or components that may be substituted during manufacturing. The ADS are shown in the joist documents, and they are equal or greater in load carrying capacity than the components(s) being substituted, and they can be readily verified by the fabrication special inspector.

9.2

Construction Documents Project documents pertaining to the construction of the project and submitted to DSA for review prior to construction. These documents may include drawings and specifications for site, architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical and energy features.

9.3

Fabrication Special Inspector An AWS certified welding inspector who provides continuous inspection during the manufacturing of OWSJ. He/she is employed by the school district and approved by DSA for the project, Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-333(c)

9.4

Field Welding Special Inspector A welding inspector who provides continuous inspection of field welding. He/she is employed by the school district, Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-333(c), and approved by DSA for the project.

9.5

Joist Documents (CBC 2206A.4 - Design Approval) The joist placement drawings, calculations, joist profiles with member sizes and connection details prepared by the manufacturer. The joist documents usually are submitted to DSA for deferred approval, CBC Sections 2206A.3 and 2206A.4

9.6

Joist Manufacturer An OWSJ manufacturer who manufactures the members and components of OWSJ and uses those members and components to fabricate on a continuing basis joists of the K-, LH-, DLH-Series, and/or Joist Girders conforming to the Steel Joist Institutes Standard Specifications and Load Tables of latest adoption.

9.7

Joist Revision Documents The revised joist documents for joists that are affected by changes to the DSA approved joist documents during fabrication.

9.8

Project Design Professional The architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge of a project, Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-316(a)

9.9

Project Inspector A DSA certified inspector who is in general responsible charge of inspection for the project. He/she is employed by the school district and approved by DSA for the project, Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-333(b)

9.10

Shop Order/Drawings Fabrication plans and details develop by manufacturer to facilitate the fabrication of OWSJ.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

PRE-FABRICATED WOOD CONSTRUCTION CONNECTORS


References: 2001 Title 24, Part 2, California Building Code (CBC), Sections 2304A.3, 2304A.4.2, 2316A.2, and 2318A.4 2007 CBC, Sections 2304.9.3, 2306, 2307, 1715A.1 DSA Interpretation of Regulations (IR) A-5 ICC ES AC-13 Discipline: Structural

IR 23-1
Revised 11-01-07 Revised (in its entirety) 08-18-04 Issued 09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies acceptable load capacities, design and installation requirements for pre-fabricated wood construction connectors used on projects under Division of the State Architect (DSA) jurisdiction, which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. Scope: Pre-fabricated metal connectors are used to attach wood structural members to other wood structural members, or to structural steel, masonry, or concrete members (including foundations). The application of Sections 1 through 6 of this IR is permitted for pre-fabricated concrete anchorage devices, including cast-in-place bolts and post-installed expansion or epoxy anchors used in conjunction with wood construction connectors. Post-installed anchor design and testing must also comply with 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Section 1923A (Section 1912A.1 in the 2007 CBC) and DSA IR 19-1. Requirements for metal plate connectors for wood trusses are addressed in 2001 CBC Section 2318A.7 (Section 2303.4.2 in the 2007 CBC) and DSA IR 23-4. Manufactured lateral-load resisting systems as defined in 2001 CBC, Table 16A-N (for projects submitted under the 2007 CBC, refer to ASCE-7, Table 12.2.-1) (e.g. shear walls, moment frames) are not included within the scope of this IR. Specific DSA approval must be granted for these systems in accordance with DSA Product Acceptance Program requirements. 1. LISTING REQUIREMENTS: Pre-fabricated connectors must be listed in a current and valid evaluation report issued by an evaluation agency recognized by DSA, which include the following: International Code Council Evaluation Service (ICC-ES) City of Los Angeles Research Report (RR) DSA Product Acceptance Report (for projects submitted under the 2001 CBC only) 1.1 Effective January 1, 2004, Product Acceptance (PA) Reports will not be issued or renewed by DSA for pre-fabricated wood construction connectors. Any Product Acceptance reports previously issued by DSA for pre-fabricated wood connectors will expire upon expiration of the 2001 edition CBC. 2. ACCEPTABLE LOAD CAPACITIES: In accordance with IR A-5, DSA allows 100% of listed gravity load capacities and 80% of listed wind and seismic load capacities for manufactured wood construction connectors. One hundred percent (100%) of the listed wind and seismic load capacities will be allowed if listed load capacities are based upon
DSA IR 23-1 (rev 11-01-07) (corrected 03-17-10) Pre-Fabricated Wood Construction Connectors Page 1 of 2

DSA IR 23-1 (rev 11-01-07) (corrected 03-17-10)

Pre-Fabricated Wood Construction Connectors

Page 2 of 2

DSA-approved cyclic testing. Listed load capacities based on load duration factors allowed by 2001 CBC Section 2316A may be used. For projects submitted under the 2007 CBC, listed load capacities based on values listed in NDS-05, Section 2.3, Adjustment of Reference Design Values, may be used. 3. DESIGN REQUIREMENTS: 3.1 Load duration factors, or adjustment of reference design value, (e.g. 33% increase for short-term loading) shall be determined in accordance with Amendment 6 in 2001 CBC, Section 2316A.2, (for 2007 CBC projects, NDS-05, Section 2.3) and the evaluation report. Wood member properties such as minimum specific gravity and maximum moisture content, must comply with applicable provisions of the CBC and also all requirements of the connector manufacturer and the evaluation report. INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS: All connectors, including holdowns shall be installed in accordance with the applicable evaluation report and/or manufacturer's published information. Holdown connectors specified to be installed with clearance between the connector and the sill plate (e.g. one inch stand-off) may result in increased deflection of the holdown connection, which shall be considered in the design. Fasteners must comply with all requirements (e.g. nail gauge and length, corrosionresistant coatings) of the manufacturer and of the evaluation report. Fastener protective coatings or corrosion-resistant materials shall be compatible with preservative treatment chemicals in the wood, when in contact with them, and comply with manufacturers recommendations. Connectors shall not be field bent, except as specifically permitted by the evaluation report and/or the manufacturer's instructions. Connection details shall be designed to minimize the potential for splitting of wood members. In the event of splitting, a DSA-approved repair procedure will be required.

3.2

4. 4.1

4.2

4.3 4.4

5. CONNECTOR FABRICATION: Connector fabrication must meet the quality control requirements of ICC ES AC-13, Acceptance Criteria for Joist Hangers and Similar Devices, Section 6. Connectors must meet the following requirements: 5.1 Connector steel shall be corrosion-resistant material (e.g. stainless steel) or shall have a protective coating (e.g. G90 minimum, G185, or post-fabrication hot-dipped galvanized coating). Paint may be used as a protective coating in lieu of galvanization when the connector is not exposed to weather or to corrosive elements, such as pressure treated wood. Connectors shall show no fracturing in either the protective coating or the base metal. Connector protective coatings or corrosion-resistant materials shall be compatible with preservative treatment chemicals in the wood, when in contact with them, and comply with manufacturers recommendations. Each pre-fabricated connector must bear a stamp or adhered label showing the name of the manufacturer, model number, and evaluation report number. Minimum thickness of steel shall comply with Section 5.0 of ICC ES AC-13.

5.2 5.3

6.

Testing Requirements: For projects submitted under the 2007 CBC, testing shall comply with 2007 CBC Section 1715A.1 and ICC ES AC 13.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

WOOD DIAPHRAGMS
References: 2001 California Building Code, Sections 2315A Discipline: Structural

IR 23-2
Revised 11-01-07 Issued 09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The provisions of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) provide additional

requirements related to the design and construction of wood diaphragms for projects submitted to DSA under the 2001 CBC.

PARTIAL BLOCKING OF HORIZONTAL DIAPHRAGMS: Blocking edges of plywood only in the higher stressed areas of a roof diaphragm is allowed under the following conditions:
1. 2. The blocking portion at each end is extended to 1/10 of the diaphragm length (span) past where it is not required, or at least to one-half the diaphragm depth. The maximum span/depth ratio is the same as required for an unblocked diaphragm.

1.

DSA (SS) IR 23-2 (rev. 11-01-07)

Wood Diaphragms Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

CONCRETE CURBS IN WOOD FRAMED BUILDINGS


References: 2001 California Building Code, Section 2306A.4 2007 California Building Code, Section 2304.11.2.4.1 Discipline: Structural

IR 23-3
Revised 10-03-07 Issued 09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to provide alternatives

to a six-inch high concrete curb at the exterior of buildings or at shower and toilet room partitions.

1.

Curb At Exterior Walls: The curb may be omitted if the exterior ground surface is paved for 18 and sloped away from the building, and the roof overhang length is equal to, or greater than, the height of the exterior wall.

2. Shower and Toilet Room Curbs: In lieu of the six-inch high curbs required at shower rooms, or toilet rooms with more than two fixtures, the following stud wall and partition protection, extending a minimum of six-inches up from the finish floor level, may be submitted for approval:
1. Continuation of hot-mopped floor membrane. 2. Continuation of epoxy resin floor surfacing. 3. Copper Floor pan. 4. Other equivalent products which will prevent water seepage under the wall or partition. The requirements for exterior wall curbs remains as per the referenced requirements.

EXCEPTION: For toilet rooms of relocatable buildings, continuous vinyl flooring, with fully
sealed joints, is acceptable.

DSA (SS) IR 23-3 (rev 10-03-07)

Concrete Curbs in Wood Frame Buildings

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

LIGHT METAL PLATE CONNECTED WOOD TRUSSES


References: 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Section 2318A.7 Discipline: Structural

IR 23-4
Revised 11-01-07 Issued 09-01-99

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to provide detailed


design and construction requirements for projects submitted to DSA under the 2001 CBC.

1. General: Design, fabrication and inspection of trusses are to comply with 2001
California Building Code (CBC), Section 2318A.7. Plate material is to be ASTM A653, Grade SQ (Fy=33 ksi) or better. Plates are to be installed in pairs, one plate each face of truss, by means of a press. In addition, one 8d short ring-shank nail is to be applied to each member, at each plate. Each plate shall be identified by grade, type, gage and manufacturer's name. Wood under plates must be free of knots, knot holes and greatly distorted grains. Maximum truss span is 35'-0", unless the approval of the Division of the State Architect (DSA) is obtained for longer spans prior to submittal of project plans and specifications for approval.

2. Drawings: The following items must be shown on truss drawings:


1. Steel plate grade, type, gage and dimensions. 2. Wood species and grades. 3. Fully dimensioned truss elevations showing geometry, member sizes and centerline, intersections, plate sizes and readily interpretable plate locations, truss member end cuts and location and width of supports. 4. Truss design loads. 5. Any other pertinent information.

3. Analysis of Trusses: Axial forces in truss members are determined by assuming member ends to be pinned at joints.
The uniformly distributed loads on top and bottom chord are to be concentrated at panel points, but their effects are to be taken into consideration in top and bottom chord design.

4. Analysis of Metal Plate Connectors: The allowable lateral load per tooth or per square inch of plate is to be determined from Section 2318A.7.2.
In lieu of this requirement, the allowable load per tooth or per square inch may be assumed to be equal to 80% of the value recommended by ICBO research report for "loads at 46 degrees to 90 degrees with respect to the length of the plate."
DSA (SS) 23-4 (rev 11-01-07) Light Metal Plate Connected Wood Trusses Page 1 of 6

DSA (SS) IR 23-4 (rev 11-01-07)

Light Metal Plate Connected Wood Trusses

Page 2 of 6

EXCEPTION: 80% of the "0 degrees to 45 degrees" value may be used when orientation of the plates is shown on the drawings and calculations show that resultant loads are at 0 to 45 degrees with respect to the length of the plate. No increase for load duration or metal side plates is permitted. Effective area of plate is determined as per Section 2318A.7.1. Member ends at all joints are to be shaped for full bearing, but because of possible shrinkage, all forces, including compression, are assumed to be transferred through steel plates (end bearing of compression members is neglected). Forces in members are assumed to act along member center lines. The plates are assumed to be rigid. Effect of uniformly distributed loads on top and bottom chords may be neglected in plate analysis. Evaluation of stresses in plate prongs in all joints shall consider both direct load, and moment due to eccentric loading of the plate. (For illustration see Figure 1 on page 6 of this IR). Stresses in steel at critical net sections of the plate are to be checked.

5. Analysis by Computer Program: If the analysis of trusses and/or metal plate connectors is done by a computer program, the documentation as well as complete explanation of input, output, and of the assumptions used in the program is to be submitted along with the printout. A hand calculation shall be provided which shows in detail the procedure used by the program, starting with the given input and leading directly to the given output. 6. Load Testing: In lieu of the truss design and connection analysis, the trusses may be
load tested as follows: 1. One load test is to be made for every 50 trusses (or fractional part thereof) of every type of truss. The method of making load tests is subject to the approval of DSA. Load tests are to be made either by application of a symmetrically distributed load upon two identical trusses braced as required by the approved plans, or by use of concentrated loads supplied by means of calibrated testing apparatus upon the two trusses braced or laterally supported as required by the approved plans. The loads are to be arranged so that they do not cause arching, composite action or load redistribution. The test trusses are to be supported as called for on the approved building plans. Truss test results are to be submitted to, and accepted by, DSA before trusses are erected. 2. Each tested truss should be clearly and permanently marked for identification. 3. At the option of the manufacturer, a preload not exceeding 50% of the design total load (D.L. & L.L), may be applied and removed before testing begins. 4. All loads are to be applied simultaneously to both trusses. 5. Deflections are to be measured at bottom edge of bottom chord at mid span and at 1/4 points. 6. All tests are to be performed by an independent testing laboratory acceptable to DSA. A copy of each test result is to be submitted to DSA.

DSA (SS) IR 23-4 (rev 11-01-07)

Light Metal Plate Connected Wood Trusses

Page 3 of 6

7. Load Testing procedure should be as follows:

1. 0 record zero load deflection reading 2. D apply design DEAD LOAD, measure deflection 3. T apply design LIVE LOAD, measure deflection 4. 1 apply additional design LIVE LOAD, measure deflection 5. 2 leave loads on for minimum of 24 hours, measure deflection 6. 3 remove all loads, measure deflection
8. Deflection criteria:

D 3

must be < L/240

T - D must be < L/360


must be < L/1200 9. Creep criteria:

2 - 1 must be < 0.4 1


10. Should a truss exhibit signs of distress such as cracking, lateral buckling, noticeable deformation of connector plates, etc. or fail to meet the deflection criteria it is to be noted on the test report. The architect or structural engineer should submit a change order to correct all deficiencies in the truss design, or a letter stating that, in his opinion, the trusses are adequate and an explanation of his determination. NOTE: Load testing of trusses does not relieve the designer of the responsibility for checking bearing perpendicular to grain at truss supports nor L/d requirements in truss members.

7. Truss Lumber Grading Provisions for MSR F'b = 2400 psi:


1. The lumber grading must equal or exceed the standards as set forth for the grade and species in the CBC. 2. Machine Stress Rated lumber must be graded by an American Lumber Standard's Committee (ALSC) approved machine under the certification and quality control supervision of a lumber inspection agency approved by the ALSC Board of Review. 3. 2'-0" long portions at each end of each MSR rated piece of lumber shall be visually graded and must be rated DENSE SELECT STRUCTURAL D.F.L. 4. All pieces shall have a stress rating machine symbol, indicating the E value, and a supervisory agency stamp to verify the visual grade. 5. Knots. A. Holes and Knots are Interchangeable. B. Measurement of Knots. a) The size of a knot is determined by measuring on the face of the piece in a line across the width of the piece perpendicular to its length. b) Seriously distorted grain associated with knots shall be included in determining knot size.

DSA (SS) IR 23-4 (rev 11-01-07)

Light Metal Plate Connected Wood Trusses

Page 4 of 6

C. Wide Face Knots. a) A wide face knot is defined as a knot having an average of 1/4" or more of wood between the knot and the edge of the piece. When a knot is half or less the size of the maximum allowable edge knot, then a wide face knot is defined as a knot having an average of 1/8" or more of wood between the knot and the edge of the piece. b) The size of a wide face knot is the largest single measurement made on either wide face of the piece. D. Edge Knots. a) An edge knot is defined as a knot having less than an average of 1/4" of wood between the knot and the edge of the piece. When a knot is half or less the size of the maximum allowable edge knot then an edge knot is defined as having less than an average of 1/8" of wood between the knot and the edge of the piece. b) Knots appearing wholly or in part on the narrow faces of the piece. c) The size of an edge knot is the average of the two measurements made on the wide faces of the piece. Knots appearing on the narrow faces are limited to the same displacement as knots specified at edges of wide faces. E. Distorted grain or burls are permitted, if judged to have not more detrimental effect than knots allowed.

8. Compression-wood: Compression-wood is prohibited in all grades if present in readily identifiable and damaging form, based on an ordinary visual inspection. 9. Splits: Splits at ends are limited in length to 1 times the width of the piece. 10. Warp: Warp is limited to 1/2 medium 11. Combinations: Skips, wane or other combinations of characteristics in the same
cross section of the piece are permitted, if the combination is judged to be no more than equivalent in effect to the maximum size knot permitted.

12. Computation of Shear Stress in Light Metal Plates: The forces in the top

chord, vertical, and diagonal member are H, V, and R, respectively. All forces are assumed to act at their member neutral axes. The stresses in the plates are calculated on the basis of an equivalent shear stress per square inch of plate. The active areas of plate are those portions of the plate at a minimum of inch away from the edge of plate, or end of a member (See Figure 1 on page 6). 12.1 Analysis Procedure: The procedure given below will use the horizontal force in the top chord active area as an example. The procedure will be the same for the other active areas. 1. Determine stress component at point 1 due to direct translation forces:

f hd1 =

H 2 Ah

This stress will be a vector parallel with the force H

2. Determine stress component at point 1 due to rotational forces:

DSA (SS) IR 23-4 (rev 11-01-07)

Light Metal Plate Connected Wood Trusses

Page 5 of 6

Mh = eh x H, The moment of the member force about the centroid of the considered
active area, OR:

Mh = (eh x H) + (ev x V) + (er x R): The sum of the moments of all the member forces
about the centroid of the considered active area Use the maximum of these moments for analysis

f hr1 =

Mhxr1 2 Jh This stress will be a vector perpendicular to the position vector r1

3. Compute the maximum magnitude and the angle of the resultant stress:

f h1 = f hd1

+ f hr1

SYMBOLS: (See Figure 1 on page 6)


H = Horizontal axial force to top chord. V = Vertical axial force in vertical web member. R = Axial force in diagonal web member resolving H and V. Ah = Area of the active plate area over top chord Av = Area of the active plate area over the vertical web member Ar = Area of the active plate area over the diagonal web member. eh= Eccentricity between the centroid of the considered active area and the axial force in the top chord neutral axis. ev = Eccentricity between the centroid of the considered active area and the axial force in the vertical web member. er = Eccentricity between the centroid of the considered active area and the axial force in the diagonal web member. 1 = The furthest point from the active area centroid. r1 = The distance from point 1 to the active area centroid. Mh = The design moment about the centroid of the considered active area. Jh = The Polar Moment of Inertia of the considered active area about its centroid

IR 23-4 - Page 6 of 6 Figure 1

ev

H
1 1/2" CLR Typical Ar er Av Ah r1 eh

Represents centroid of an individual active area Shaded area represents the active area of the plate over a member

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

BOLTS USED IN WOOD CONSTRUCTION


References: 2001 California Building Code, Section 2318A.2 2007 California Building Code, Sections 2306, 2307 and NDS-05, Chapter 11 Discipline: Structural

IR 23-5
Revised 10-15-07 Issued 10-01-2002 as CR 23-1

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify dimensional


requirements for bolts used in wood frame construction. 1. General: Cut-thread or rolled-thread bolts with full diameter bodies meeting the requirements of ASME B18.2.1 or ASME B18.2.6 are permitted for use on projects approved by DSA. See Table 1 below for dimensional requirements of cut-thread or rolled-thread bolts with full diameter bodies. Rolled-thread bolts with reduced diameter bodies per ASME B18.2.1 are not permitted.

2. Background: Dimensional requirements for bolts are given in ASME B18.2.1, Square
and Hex Bolts and Screws, and ASME B18.2.6, Fasteners for Use in Structural Applications. Bolt threads are formed either by cutting or rolling. 2.1

Cut-Thread Bolts. The original blank must be full size, and equal to the major thread (outside) diameter. Threads are formed by cutting and removing metal from the blank. A bolt blank is a headed rod or bar intended for a subsequent threading operation. Full Diameter Body Rolled-Thread Bolts. The blank diameter is full size and the threaded length portion is reduced to the thread pitch diameter during extrusion. Threads are formed by rotating dies that displace the metal. Reduced Diameter Body Rolled-Thread Bolts. Similar to full diameter body rolled-thread bolts, except that the blank diameter is reduced along the entire length of the bolt. Commercially, the terms cut-thread and rolled-thread may not indicate the method of forming threads. The term cut-thread bolt may refer to either a cutthread bolt or a full diameter body rolled-thread bolt. The term rolled-thread bolt may refer to a reduced diameter body rolled- thread bolt.

2.2

2.3

2.4

3. Application: Cut-thread or rolled-thread bolts with full diameter bodies are permitted.
For each nominal bolt size utilized on a project, the minimum shank or body diameter shall be specified and ASME B18.2.1 or ASME B18.2.6 shall be referenced on the drawings or specifications.
Bolts Used in Wood Construction

DSA (SS) IR 23-5 (rev 10-15-07)

Page 1 of 2

DSA (SS) IR 23-5 (rev 10-15-07)

Bolts Used in Wood Construction

Page 2 of 2

Table 1 Diameter of Full Diameter Body Bolts


Nominal Size (inches) 1/2 0.5000 5/8 0.6250 3/4 0.7500 7/8 0.8750 1 1.0000 Body or Shank Diameter (inches) Max. Min. 0.515 0.482 0.642 0.605 0.768 0.729 0.895 0.852 1.022 0.976

Notes: 1) Adopted from ASME B18.2.1 and ASME B18.2.6. 2) For bolt diameters not indicated, refer to ASME B18.2.1 and B18.2.6. 3) The body or shank of a bolt is the smooth portion between the head and the threads.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

WOOD STRUCTURAL PANELS - MARKING FOR PLYWOOD AND ORIENTED STRAND BOARD (OSB)
References: 2001California Building Code, Sections 2302A.1, 2304A.1, 2312A.1, 2312A.2, 2315A.3.3, and 2315A.5. UBC Standard 23-2 2007 California Building Code, Sections 2302.1, 2303.1.4, 2304.6, and 2304.7. Voluntary Product Standard PS 1-95, and PS 2-92 Discipline: Structural

IR 23-6
Revised 08-25-09 Revised 11-01-07 Revised 12-15-04 Issued 11-05-2004 as CR 23-2

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) provides clarification on the panel marking
requirements for plywood and oriented strand board (OSB) panels used on DSA projects, which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (Grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings.

Policy: Plywood and OSB panels meeting the requirements of this IR shall be considered to have met the marking requirements of the 2007 CBC, Section 2303.1.4.
Note: For projects submitted under the provisions of 2001 CBC, see AC 23-2 for additional requirements on OSB.

1. MATERIALS: Certification and panel marking shall comply with Department of Commerce Voluntary Product Standard (PS) 1-95, Section 7 for plywood, or PS 2-92, Section 7 for OSB. Each panel shall bear markings identifying the qualified testing and inspection agencies per Section 2 below, grade, nominal thickness, span rating, exposure durability classification and the standard to which it is certified.
Note: Current versions of PS 1 and PS 2 are acceptable.

2. QUALIFIED TESTING AND INSPECTION AGENCY: Appendix A, on page 2, is a


list (furnished by International Accreditation Service, Inc.) of qualified testing and inspection agencies. Testing and inspection agencies may be placed on this list if they meet all of the following conditions: 2.1 2.2 2.3 Conform to PS 1-95, Section 7.2 (plywood), or PS 2-92, Section 7.1.1 (OSB). Accredited by International Accreditation Service, Inc. in accordance with ISO/IEC 17020 and 17025 standards, and The scope of accreditation shall include the inspection of plywood panels for compliance with PS 1 (plywood) or PS 2 (OSB) requirements.

Next Page Appendix A: List of Qualified Testing and Inspection Agencies


DSA IR 23-6 (rev 08-25-09) Wood Structural Panels Markings for Plywood and Oriented Strand Board (OSB)

Page 1 of 2

DSA IR 23-6 (rev 08-25-09)

Wood Structural Panels - Markings for Plywood and Oriented Strand Board (OSB)

Page 2 of 2

Appendix A: List of Qualified Testing and Inspection Agencies


Accredited by International Accreditation Service (IAS) to Certify and Mark/Stamp Plywood Panels under Product Standard PS 1-95 or PS 2-92 (Listed alphabetically by Agency)

Inspection Agency APA The Engineered Wood Assoc. 7011 South 19th Street Tacoma, WA 98466 Intertek Testing Services NA Ltd. 1500 Brigantine Drive Coquitlam, British Columbia V3K 7C1 Canada Intertek Testing Services NA, Inc. 16015 Shady Falls Road Elmendorf, TX 78112

IAS Accreditation Number AA-649 Scope1 Plywood OSB AA-688 Plywood OSB

Contact Information Contact: Mr. Borjen Yeh Telephone: 253-565-6600 e-mail: borjen.yeh@apawood.org Contact: Greg Sabo Telephone: 604-520-3321 Fax: 604-524-9189 e-mail: greg.sabo@intertek.com Contact: Mike Luna Telephone: 210-635-8100 Fax: 210-635-8101 e-mail: mike.luna@intertek.com Contact: Mr. Robert L. Hill Telephone: 301-430-6244 e-mail: rhill@nahbrc.org Contact: Mr. Randy Webb Telephone: 541-484-9212 e-mail: randy.webb@psiusa.com Contact: Mr. Steven Verhey Telephone: 608-837-2790 e-mail: steve.verhey@tecotested.com Contact: Liisa Rautiainen Telephone: +358-20 722 4920 Fax: +358-20 722 7003 e-mail: Liisa.Rautiainen@vtt.fi

AA-657

Plywood

NAHB Research Center 400 Prince Georges Blvd. Upper Marlboro, MD 20774 Professional Services Industries, Inc. Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory 2710 W 5th Avenue Eugene, OR 97402 TECO 2902 Terra Court Sun Prairie, WI 53590

AA-663

OSB

AA-660

Plywood OSB

AA-654

Plywood OSB

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland P.O. Box 1000 FIN-02044 VTT Finland

AA-607

Plywood

Plywood - PS 1-95 (or current version); OSB - PS 2-92 (or current version).

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

MINIMUM FASTENER PENETRATION IN FRAMING-WOOD DIAPHRAGMS

IR 23-7

References: Revised 11-01-07 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Section 2315A, Tables 23A-II-H & 23A-II-I-1. Issued 03-14-2005 as CR 23-3 2003 International Building Code (IBC), Section 2305, Tables 2306.3.1 & 2306.4.1. American Forest & Paper Association 2001 Edition National Design Specification (NDS), Supplement - Special Design Provisions for Wind and Seismic. American Plywood Association (APA) Report T98-22; APA Form No. TT-045. Discipline: Structural
This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies DSA acceptance of current standards, including the 2003 edition International Building Code (IBC) and 2001 edition National Design Specification (NDS), pertaining to minimum nail penetration requirements for wood structural panel (plywood or OSB) diaphragm construction for projects submitted to DSA under the 2001 CBC. 1. Background: The California Building Code (Tables 23A-II-H & 23A-II-I-1 in the 2001 CBC) prescribes minimum penetration of 1-1/2 inch for 8d nails and 1-5/8 inch for 10d nails into framing and blocking members for nails that attach wood structural panels.

Current standards (Tables 2306.3.1 & 2306.4.1 in the 2003 IBC) indicate minor revision of these penetration requirements, and prescribe minimum penetration of 1-3/8 inch for 8d nails and 1-1/2 inch for 10d nails. Recommended shear values and other requirements for wood structural panel diaphragm design and construction contained in these current standards remain unchanged from those contained in the 2001 edition CBC. The 2001 CBC requirement of 1-5/8 inch minimum penetration for 10d nails precludes the use of 1-1/2 inch net thickness framing members for wood structural panel diaphragm attachment. DSA acceptance of 2003 IBC provisions permits the use of 1-1/2 inch net thickness framing members for wood structural panel diaphragm attachment.

2.

Application: The minimum nail penetration of 1-3/8 inch for 8d nails and 1-1/2 inch for 10d nails prescribed in Tables 2306.3.1 & 2306.4.1 of the 2003 IBC may be used in lieu of the minimum nail penetration specified in Tables 23A-II-H and 23A-II-I-1 of the 2001 CBC.

This is applicable only to 8d or 10d nails that attach wood structural panel diaphragms to framing and blocking members. 8d or 10d nails used in any other connections (e.g. interconnection of framing members, timber connectors) shall comply with the requirements of 2001 CBC, Section 2318A.

DSA (SS) IR 23-7 (rev. 11-01-07)

Minimum Fastener Penetration In Framing-Wood Diaphragms

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

MANUFACTURED WOOD-CHORDMETAL-WEB TRUSSES


References: 2007 California Building Code (CBC), Title 24, Part 2, Sections 2303.4 and 1704A.3, ICC ES AC306 Discipline: Structural

IR 23-8
Issued 12-17-09

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies the criteria and process under which the Division of the State Architect (DSA) will evaluate, accept for use, and establish requirements for inspection of manufactured wood trusses on projects under DSA jurisdiction.
Note: Frequently used terms are defined in the glossary, Section 8, of this IR.

Scope: This IR is applicable only to wood-chord-metal-web (WCMW) trusses. 1. Acceptance Criteria: Wood-Chord-Metal-Web trusses shall meet the requirements of ICC Evaluation Service (ICC-ES) Acceptance Criteria AC306.

Trusses must be designed and manufactured in accordance with a valid evaluation report issued by ICC-ES or other qualified evaluation organizations per DSA IR A-5. The evaluation report must indicate conformance with AC306. Truss manufacturers shall maintain a quality control and assurance program with periodic audits by an approved inspection agency as required by AC306 and the evaluation report. For design purposes, trusses that utilize bearing clips that result in eccentricity between the truss support point and the panel point (i.e. a no-notch clip) to transfer loads to the supporting structure may only use 80% of the listed values on the evaluation report. The manufacturing of trusses must be inspected per Section 5 below.

2.

specific project is a four-phase process. There are specific requirements and responsibilities for the truss manufacturer, and architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge (project design professional) in each phase. The four phases and the key players involved are as follows:

Approval Process: The approval of manufactured wood trusses for use on a

DSA IR 23-8 (iss 12-17-09)

Manufactured Wood-ChordMetal-Web Trusses

Page 1 of 5

DSA IR 23-8 (iss 12-17-09)

Manufactured Wood-ChordMetal-Web Trusses

Page 2 of 5

Review and Approval of Construction Documents (Section 3 below): Project Design Professional, and DSA Review and Approval of Truss Submittal Package (Section 4 below): Project Design Professional, Manufacturer, and DSA Manufacturing and Special Inspection of Wood Trusses (Section 5 below): Manufacturer and Fabrication Special Inspector Field Installation (Section 6 below): Project Inspector The process outlined in this IR is a deferred approval process in compliance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317(g). As an option, the truss submittal package as described in Section 4 below may be included with the construction documents in the first phase. In this case, the review and approval of construction documents and truss submittal package, will be combined. This phase occurs before a project construction contract is awarded to a qualified wood truss manufacturer. The steps and requirements for this phase are as follows: 3.1 Project design professional prepares construction documents (plans and specifications) for the project. In addition to the requirements in CBC Section 2303.4.3, Item 1, the portion of the construction documents pertaining to wood trusses shall also include the following: Structural framing plan including layout of wood trusses, depths, and all supporting elements Loading diagrams for all wood trusses in accordance with CBC Section 2303.4.3 Item 1-1.2. Detailed requirements for the transfer of loads and anchorage of each truss to the supporting structure per CBC Section 2303.4.1.6. Detailed requirements for truss top chord dimensions, orientation, and ability to receive plywood diaphragm nailing. Project specifications shall require that wood truss fabricator(s) comply with Section 1 of this IR. The project design professional should closely coordinate wood truss design (including all connections, non-standard products, and details) with a qualified fabricator prior to the submittal of contract documents for DSA review. Project specifications and the Statement of Tests and Special Inspections (CBC Sections 1704A.1.1 and 1705A) shall include inspection requirements for wood trusses per Section 5.3 of this IR.

3.

Review and Approval of Construction Documents.

3.2 3.3

Project design professional submits an application and construction documents to DSA for review. After the DSA plan review process is completed, the approved construction documents will bear the DSA identification stamp with the initials of the plan reviewers.

4. Review and Approval of Truss Submittal Package. This phase may occur after the project has been bid and the contract for the fabrication of the wood trusses has been awarded to a qualified manufacturer as defined in Section 1 of this IR. The steps and requirements for this phase are as follows:

DSA IR 23-8 (iss 12-17-09)

Manufactured Wood-ChordMetal-Web Trusses

Page 3 of 5

4.1

Manufacturer, working in a fully coordinated effort with the project design professional, prepares the truss submittal package for DSA approval, in accordance with the requirements of CBC Section 2303.4.1.4 and DSA approved project construction documents. If the requirements in the approved construction documents (see Section 3 above) were altered during the preparation of the truss submittal package, the project design professional must prepare and submit a change order or Field Change Document to DSA for review in accordance with IR A-6. These changes may include, but are not limited to, truss depths, layout, framing plans, loads, truss anchorage, etc. The manufacturers truss submittal package shall include truss design drawings, calculations, and truss placement diagrams per CBC Sections 2303.4.1.4, 2303.4.1.2, and 2303.4.1.3. The truss design drawings in the truss submittal package shall be prepared, signed and stamped by the fabricators California registered professional engineer per CBC Section 2303.4.3, Item 2. The manufacturer submits the truss submittal package to the project design professional for review and approval. This step may take multiple exchanges between the project design professional and the manufacturer to finalize the submittal package for submittal to DSA. When the project design professional approves the submittal package, he/she shall provide a signed and stamped Statement of General Conformance and submit a set to DSA for approval in accordance with Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-317(g). For additional information on the Statement of General Conformance, see DSA IR A-18. If DSA reviews the submittal package and determines that they are in conformance, DSA stamps the truss design drawings as approved. The stamped set of the truss design drawings and the remainder of the submittal package will be scanned into the DSA database and then returned to the project design professional who shall forward a copy to the manufacturer. Additional copies of DSA stamped truss design drawings may be available to the project design professional by arrangement with the DSA regional office. This step may involve a back-check review if the submittal package was not approved. The project design professional shall coordinate with the manufacturer to resolve DSA plan check comments (as noted on the mark-up set of submittal package) and schedule a back-check appointment with DSA. Bring a set of corrected submittal package and the original DSA marked-up set to the back-check appointment.

4.1.1

4.2

4.2.1

4.3

4.4

4.5

5. Manufacture and Special Inspection of Wood Trusses: The manufacture of wood trusses shall not occur prior to DSA approval of the truss submittal package (Section 4 above).
5.1 Manufacturer prepares shop drawings documents and truss design drawings. from the DSA approved construction

Changes to the approved construction documents and truss design drawings must be reviewed and approved prior to truss fabrication in accordance with Section 7 of this IR.

DSA IR 23-8 (iss 12-17-09)

Manufactured Wood-ChordMetal-Web Trusses

Page 4 of 5

5.2

Manufacturer notifies the project design professional, who will notify the project inspector, and fabrication special inspector of the fabrication schedule. Fabrication may not start without the presence of fabrication special inspector. Fabrication Special Inspection: A fabrication special inspector must provide continuous inspection during wood truss fabrication in accordance with CBC Section 1704A.6 and Section 4-333(c), Title 24, Part 1. This inspection is in addition to and independent of the quality control procedures and inspections by the manufacturer. Qualifications: The fabrication special inspector must be approved by DSA for each project prior to fabrication. Qualifications include compliance with all the following: He/she must be employed by the school district or by an LEA laboratory and approved by DSA for the project, Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-333(c). He/she must have a minimum of 3 years inspection experience in wood construction or wood truss fabrication. Must be at least 25 years of age. Responsibilities: Inspection: Each truss shall be continuously inspected by the fabrication special inspector during all stages of fabrication. Material grades, dimensions, joint details and all other aspects of truss fabrication shall be thoroughly inspected. Marking: Each inspected truss shall be stamped with an identification mark by the special inspector. At a minimum the identification mark shall include the special inspectors initials and date. Verified Report: The fabrication special inspector shall furnish a verified report to the project design professional, and DSA in accordance with CBC Section 1704A.6.2.

5.3

5.3.1

5.3.2

6.

Field Installation: During this phase, the wood trusses are installed at the construction site. The steps and requirements for this phase are as follows:
6.1 Working from the DSA approved construction documents and DSA approved truss submittal package and any DSA approved field change documents, the project inspector shall verify truss size, fabrication special inspectors stamp, placement in the field and all truss installation details including bridging, bracing, connections, etc..

7.

DSA truss submittal package are necessary, the fabricator and the project design professional, working together, shall prepared and submit a change order or Field Change Document to DSA for review in accordance with DSA IR A-6. DSA approval of all changes is required prior to the implementation of the changes. defined below: 8.1

Revisions: If changes to the DSA approved construction document, and/or the

8.

Glossary:

For clarity and reference, some frequently used terms in this IR are

Construction Documents Project documents pertaining to the construction of the project and submitted to DSA for review prior to construction. These documents may include drawings and

DSA IR 23-8 (iss 12-17-09)

Manufactured Wood-ChordMetal-Web Trusses

Page 5 of 5

specifications for site, architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical, fire and life safety, accessibility and energy features. 8.2 Fabrication Special Inspector Special inspector who provides continuous inspection during the fabrication of wood trusses. He/she is employed by the school district or by an LEA laboratory and approved by DSA for the project, Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-333(b) 8.3 Field Change Documents Any changes to the DSA approved construction documents, and/or DSA approved truss submittal package. See IR A-6. 8.4 Project Design Professional The architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge of a project, Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-316(a) 8.5 Project Inspector A DSA certified inspector responsible for inspection for the project. He/she is employed by the school district and approved by DSA for the project, Title 24, Part 1, Section 4-333(b) 8.6 Truss Design Drawings Truss design drawings are prepared under the responsible charge of the manufacturers California registered engineer, who shall stamped, and signed the drawings. The truss design drawings shall include as a minimum all the items listed in CBC Section 2303.4.1.2. The truss design drawings are part of the Truss Submittal Package. 8.7 Truss Submittal Package A package prepared by the truss manufacturer and submitted to DSA for review through the Project Design Professional. The package shall include all the items prescribed in CBC Section 2303.4.1.4.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

PREFABRICATED WOOD I-JOIST


References: 2007 California Building Code, Section 2303.1.2 ICC ES AC-014 National Design Specification for Wood Construction (NDS-2005) Discipline: Structural

IR 23-9
Revised 08-25-09 Revised 07-15-08 Issued 03-14-05 as AC 23-1

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) clarifies qualification and quality

control/assurance requirements for acceptance of prefabricated wood I-joists for use in projects submitted to DSA under the 2007 California Building Code (CBC). This IR does not apply to open web trusses. This IR supersedes DSA AC 23-1 and is applicable to projects submitted under the 2001 CBC and the 2007 CBC.

Background:

A prefabricated wood I-joist is a structural member manufactured with sawn or structural composite lumber flanges and structural panel webs composed of either plywood or oriented strand board (OSB) bonded together with exterior-type adhesives, forming an I cross sectional shape.

1.

the following criteria: 1.1

ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA: I-joists may be accepted on DSA projects based on


I-joists must have a valid evaluation report issued by a qualified independent evaluation agency prescribed in DSA IR A-5.

1.2

The evaluation report shall indicate compliance with all the following building codes and standards: 2006 IBC ASTM D5055-04 ICC-ES AC-14 The evaluation report shall also require a quality control/assurance program complying with the requirements of ICC AC-14 and ASTM D5055-04. See Section 4, below.

1.3

2.
2.1 2.2 2.3

DESIGN REQUIREMENTS:
Joists shall only be used for dry conditions of use and must be protected from weather exposure during construction. Joists shall be designed in accordance with AF&PA NDS-2005, Chapter 7 and the appropriate evaluation report. Lateral and rotational supports shall be provided at all bearing locations per AF&F NDS 2005 Section 7.3.5. Lateral and rotational support may be provided by joist hangers complying with ICC AC13, Section 3.3.
Prefabricated Wood I-Joist

DSA IR 23-9 (rev 08-25-09)

Page 1 of 2

DSA IR 23-9 (rev 08-25-09)

Prefabricated Wood I-Joist

Page 2 of 2

2.4

Bridging shall be provided in accordance with manufacturers requirements and the products evaluation report. Additional bridging may be required to provide lateral support for the bottom chord when it is in compression (i.e. wind uplift, large cantilevers, etc.). Design flexure, shear and bearing shall be determined through ASTM D5055-04 procedures, and as listed in the evaluation report. Deflection shall be computed per the defined in CBC Table 1604A.3., recommendation, whichever is more Specification for Wood Construction deflection limit of L/480 for floor joists evaluation report and shall not exceed limits evaluation report, or the manufacturers restrictive. As a reference, National Design (NDS-2005) Section C7.4.5 recommends a live load.

2.5 2.6

2.6.1

NDS-2005 Section C7.4.5 also recommends the consideration of creep deflection for unique applications, such as heavy dead loads, may be in accordance with NDS Section 3.5.2. I-Joist blocking panels may be used for shear transfer if allowed by the evaluation report. Shear transfer capacity is limited to the allowable shear capacity specified in the evaluation report. Shear transfer nailing (size and spacing) shall be determined by calculations and must conform to manufacturers requirements.

2.7

DETAILING CONSIDERATIONS: Follow the manufacturers detailing and construction requirements. Connection details shall be designed to minimize the potential for splitting of wood members and I-Joists. In the event of splitting, a repair procedure shall be submitted to DSA for review and approval on a project specific basis. The following are typical conditions where splitting may occur:
3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Solid sawn lumber flange connections at bearing locations (e.g. wall top plates). Tie strap or other connector hardware (end distance and spacing of nails). Web stiffeners material and size (comply with the manufacturers requirements). I-joist chord, or web filler, that is a part of a wall anchorage system (attachment must meet the requirements of ASCE 7-05 Section 12.11.2). I-Joist flange receiving diaphragm sheathing nails (the minimum thickness and width of the flange shall meet applicable CBC code requirements, i.e. edge distance, minimum nail penetration per CBC Tables 2306.3.1, 2306.3.2, and 2306.4.1). Shear transfer nailing at I-Joist blocking panels.

3.

3.6

4.

I-JOIST QUALITY CONTROL/ASSURANCE: Continuous independent inspection of wood I-joist fabrication is not required. Only mills that qualify under an approved QA/QC program shall provide I-joists. The quality assurance program shall meet the following requirements:
4.1 ASTM D5055, Sections 8,9, and 10 ICC-ES AC14, Appendix A, Quality Assurance Guidelines for Prefabricated Wood Ijoists, promulgated by the Wood I-joists Manufacturers Association, or ICC-ES approved equivalent such as APA QA Policy for Performance Rated I-Joists. ICC-ES AC 14 Appendix B. Unannounced audits by a third party auditor of a qualified inspection agency shall be performed, per ICC-ES AC14. All quality control reports resulting from such audits must be maintained by the manufacturers and made available to DSA upon request.

4.2

4.3 4.4

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

STRUCTURAL (CERTIFIED) GLUED LUMBER


References: 2007 California Building Code, Section 2303.1.1 Dept. of Commerce PS 20-99 ALSC Glue Lumber Policy Discipline: Structural

IR 23-10
Issued 08-15-08

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

PURPOSE: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies qualification and quality control/assurance requirements for acceptance of structural Certified Glued Lumber (CGL) for use in projects submitted to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) under the 2007 California Building Code (CBC).
This IR does not apply to Certified End Joint or Stud Use Only lumbers per Section 1.70, Western Wood Products Association (WWPA) Western Lumber Grading Rules, or Section 210.b and 210.c of West Coast Lumber Inspection Bureau (WCLIB) Standard Grading Rules No. 17 for Certified End Joint or Stud Use Only lumber.

BACKGROUND: Structural glued lumber does not qualify as structural glued-laminated timber (glulam) per Title 24, Part 2, CBC Section 2303.1.3. CGL is typically manufactured in the same facilities as glulam, and from laminations that are E-rated and/or visually graded which may not meet the requirements of ANSI/AITC A 190.1 for glulam. The strength design values for CGL are the same as those assigned to the lumber or timber grades but are typically lower than those of glulam. CGL is visually graded to the standard lumber grading rules while glulam is rated for the layup combination.
Structural CGL is intended as an alternative to solid sawn lumber or timber, 3 inch nominal or larger. CGL is considered as a solid piece of lumber or timber and is sized, grade stamped, and assigned the same values as solid sawn lumber or timber of the same species and visual grade in conformance with the Voluntary Product Standard PS 20-99 or current edition, American Softwood Lumber Standard and the American Lumber Standard Committee (ALSC) Glued Lumber Policy. CGL is manufactured by face gluing laminations to produce a new piece of structural lumber or timber and is grade stamped as Light Framing, Structural Light Framing, Structural Joists and Planks, Beams and Stringers or Posts and Timbers, as described in the WCLIB Standard Grading Rules No. 17 or WWPA Western Lumber Grading Rules.

1. ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA: Structural glued lumber shall be designated Certified Glued Lumber (CGL) and grade stamped by an inspection agency accredited by the American Lumber Standard Committee (ALSC) to supervise glued lumber manufacturing.
DSA (SS) IR 23-10 (iss 08-15-08) Structural (Certified) Glued Lumber

Page 1 of 2

DSA (SS) IR 23-10 (iss 08-15-08)

Structural (Certified) Glued Lumber

Page 2 of 2

1.1 1.2

Grading: CGL shall be graded in conformance to ALSC Glued Lumber Policy (GLP) and Voluntary Product Standard PS 20-99 or current edition. Qualification and Quality Control: CGL shall be qualified by the inspection agency in accordance to ALSC GLP. The inspection agency may follow its own control or quality control procedure when the procedure is in general conformance with ALSC GLP and approved by ALSC. Quality Assurance: Inspection agency shall provide a minimum of twelve periodic inspections per year, at regular intervals or in accordance with ALSC GLP. Copies of the inspection reports shall be maintained and made available to DSA upon request. Special Inspection: Continuous independent inspection during fabrication is not required provided the manufacturers QA program is in compliance with ALSC GLP.

1.3 1.4

2.
2.1 2.2

CONDITIONS OF USE:
CGL shall only be used for dry conditions of use and must be protected from weather exposure during construction. CGL shall be assigned the same design values as solid sawn lumber or timber of the same species and visual grade.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

WOOD STRUCTURAL PANELS ORIENTED STRAND BOARD (OSB)


References: 2001California Building Code (CBC), Title 24, Part 2, Sections 2302A.1, 2304A.1, 2312A.1, 2312A.2, 2315A.3.3, and 2315A.5 UBC Standard 23-3 (same a Voluntary Product Standard PS 2-92) APA Panel Design Specification D510 Discipline: Structural

IR 23-11
Revised 12-17-09 Revised 4-17-06 Issued10-06-04 as AC 23-2

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify the criteria

under which the Division of the State Architect (DSA) will accept the use of oriented strand board (OSB) as wood structural panels on projects under DSA jurisdiction.

Background: OSB panels have demonstrated a history of acceptable performance. The 1997 UBC model building code includes OSB in the definition of wood structural panels. However, in adopting the 1997 UBC as the basis for the 2001 CBC, the definition adopted by DSA of wood structural panels was amended to include only "all-veneer plywood." Scope: This IR applies to OSB panel grades (structural floor, roof and wall sheathing) contained in UBC Standard 23-3, and is not applicable to OSB exterior siding.
This IR is applicable only to projects submitted to DSA for review under the 2001 CBC. For projects submitted under the 2007 CBC, see IR 23-6.

1.

CONDITIONS OF USE: Wood structural panels may include OSB panels. The use and installation of OSB panels shall comply with the requirements for wood structural panels in the 2001 CBC, and this document.

2. MATERIALS: OSB panels shall comply with UBC Standard 23-3. Certification and panel marking shall comply with PS 2-92, Section 7. Each panel shall bear markings identifying the qualified testing and inspection agency (as defined in Section 3), grade, nominal thickness, span rating, exposure durability classification and the standard to which it is certified. 3. QUALIFIED TESTING AND INSPECTION AGENCY: Appendix A is a list (furnished by International Accreditation Service, Inc.) of qualified testing and inspection agencies. Testing and inspection agencies may be placed on this list if they meet all of the following conditions:
3.1 3.2 3.3 Conform to PS 2-92 Section 7.1.1. Accredited by International Accreditation Service, Inc. in accordance with ISO/IEC 17020 and 17025 standards, and The scope of accreditation shall include testing and inspection of wood-based structural-use panels for compliance with PS 2-92 requirements.
Wood Structural Panels Oriented Strand Board (OSB)

DSA IR 23-11 (rev 12-17-09)

Page 1 of 3

DSA IR 23-11 (rev 12-17-09)

Wood Structural Panels Oriented Strand Board (OSB)

Page 2 of 3

4.
4.1 4.2

DESIGN:
Sheathing. OSB structural floor sheathing and roof sheathing shall meet the design requirements of CBC Section 2312A.1 and 2312A.2 respectively. Diaphragms. OSB diaphragms shall be designed in accordance with CBC Sections 2315A.3.3, and 2315A.5. A reduction factor of 0.8 shall apply to Tables 23A-II-H and 23A-II-I-1. Maximum diaphragm dimension ratios shall comply with CBC Table 16A-V for plywood. Deflection. When calculating shear wall and diaphragm deflections, the equations for plywood may be used. The modulus of elasticity (E) may be determined from APA Panel Design Specification D510 or may be provided directly by the manufacturer. The nail slip coefficients may be considered the same as for plywood. For OSB panels under constant load equal to or greater than 50% of their allowable design strength, creep must be considered. Use a creep adjustment factor of 1/6 on panel stiffness (EI) to calculate deflection for panels used in moist conditions (such as raised floors) that produce panel moisture content (MC) of 16% or higher. For dry service conditions that produce panel moisture content of less than 16%, use a creep adjustment factor of 1/2, which is the same for plywood. See APA Panel Design Specification D510, Section 4.5.1, Creep.

4.3

5.
5.1

with the following requirements:

INSTALLATION REQUIREMENTS: The installation of OSB panels shall comply

When panels are used in areas subject to high relative humidity or where condensation can develop (such as roofs with attic space, mansards, raised floor crawl space, etc.), ventilation shall be provided in conformance with Section 1505.3, Part 2, Title 24, CCR, with ample vents located to eliminate dead-air pockets. Panels shall be protected from moisture during transit and storage. Wetted OSB panels shall be dried to 16% moisture content or less prior to being installed. If installed panels are wetted, they shall be dried to 16% moisture content or less prior to being covered. Alternatively, provide adequate ventilation on the back side to allow drying. All nails pushed up due to material swelling shall be re-driven. Additional nails shall be installed if material swelling causes the nail heads to penetrate into the surface by more than 1/16 inch after drying. If the additional nails result in nail spacing closer than the allowable, then framing or blocking must be added to receive the new nails and provide appropriate shear transfer. Installed panels shall be protected from moisture by approved finish materials. Edge checks are defined as wood flakes that have become separated from the panel leaving voids in the panel edges. Panels with edge checks greater than 1/4 inch in depth or 2 inches in length at any one location shall render the panel unacceptable for use. The maximum cumulative length of edge checks in a standard 4-ft. by 8-ft. panel shall not exceed 8 inches. Panel edge nailing shall be adjusted to avoid nailing into edge checks. Field cut edges of panels shall be protected from the weather, or sealed using an exterior acrylic latex paint.

5.2 5.3

5.4 5.5

5.6

DSA IR 23-11 (rev 12-17-09)

Wood Structural Panels Oriented Strand Board (OSB)

Page 3 of 3

Appendix A: List of Qualified Testing and Inspection Agencies


Accredited by International Accreditation Service (IAS) to Certify and Mark/Stamp Structural Wood Panels under Product Standard PS 2-92

IAS Accreditation Number AA-649

Inspection Agency

Contact Information

APA The Engineered Wood Association 7011 South 19th Street Tacoma, WA 98466 TECO 5650 Terra Court Sun Prairie, WI 53590 Pittsburgh Testing Laboratory 2710 W 5th Avenue Eugene, OR 97402 NAHB Research Center 400 Prince Georges Blvd. Upper Marlboro, MD 20774 Intertek Testing Services NA Ltd. 1500 Brigantine Drive Coquitlam, British Columbia V3K 7C1 Canada

Contact: Mr. Borjen Yeh Telephone: 253-565-6600 e-mail: borjen.yeh@apawood.org Contact: Mr. Jim Vogt Telephone: 608-837-2790 e-mail: jim.vogt@tecotested.com Contact: Mr. Randy Webb Telephone: 541-484-9212 e-mail: randy.webb@psiusa.com Contact: Mr. Robert L. Hill Telephone: 301-430-6244 e-mail: rhill@nahbrc.org Contact: Lawrence Gibson Telephone: 604-520-3321 Fax : 604-524-9189 e-mail: lawrence.gibson@intertek.com

AA-654

AA-660

AA-663

AA-688

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

GLASS PANEL RAILINGS


References: 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Section 2406.6, Table 16A-B 2007 CBC, Sections 2407, 2403.2, 1607A.7, and 2406.1.1 Discipline: Structural

IR 24-1
Revised 03-17-10 Revised in its entirety 01-02-08 Revised 11-01-07 Revised 04-21-05 Issued 09-01-99 as IR M-1

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies DSA requirements for glass panel
railings to be accepted for use in the construction of projects under Division of the State Architect (DSA) jurisdiction. DSA will require the use of either a design or a test option, as explained in this IR.

1. General: Glass panel railing refers to a railing assembly, consisting of glass panels cantilevered from a base and capped with a continuous rail at the top. The system shall be designed so that the top rail remains in place in the event of failure of an individual glass panel. Glazing in railing panels shall be an approved safety glazing material that conforms to 2007 California Building Code (CBC) Sections 2406.1.1 and 2407.1 (Section 2406.6 in the 2001 CBC). Minimum nominal thickness shall be 1/4. Fully tempered glass and laminated glass shall comply with Category II of Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) standard 16 CFR Part 1201.
Glass panel railings shall not be used in locations where they may be subject to vehicle impact, in accordance with 2007 CBC Section 2407.1.3 (Section 2406.4 in the 2001 CBC).

2.

Design Option: The components and assembly of the glass panel railings are to be designed for a factor of safety of four (4) times the design load.
Projects submitted to DSA under the 2001 CBC: The required vertical design load for glass panel railings is 100 lbs. per lineal foot. Horizontal load is as tabulated in Table 16A-B of the 2001 CBC and are applied horizontally at right angles to the top rail. Projects submitted to DSA under the 2007 CBC: The required vertical and horizontal design loads for glass panel railings are prescribed in 2007 CBC, Section 1607A.7.1 for uniform load and Section 1607A.7.1.1 for concentrated load.

2.1

2.2

3.

Test Option: In lieu of the Design Option in Section 2 above, glass panel railings may be accepted by test. Tests may be conducted in the field or in the laboratory on exact duplicate mock ups as evidence of acceptability of each railing configuration or design.

All tests are to be performed by a DSA approved testing laboratory. Tests are to be observed and results recorded in a report signed by a California registered civil or structural engineer (per 2007 CBC, Section 2403.2).
DSA IR 24-1 (rev 03-17-10) Glass Panel Railings Page 1 of 2

DSA IR 24-01 (rev 03-17-10)

Glass Panel Railings Page 2 of 2

3.1 3.1.1 3.1.2

Test Protocol: An acceptable test for the entire completed glass railing assembly shall meet the following minimum criteria: Test for two (2) times the horizontal design load(s) in Section 2 above, applied at right angles to the top rail. Test the deflection of the top rail at one (1) times horizontal design load applied at right angles to the top rail for maximum allowable of h/120, where h is the distance from the floor level to the top of the rail. Top rail shall recover to the original position upon release of the test loadings. At least one test shall be performed for each railing configuration or design. Testing procedures for glass panel railings are to be indicated in specifications and on drawings and noted on the Test and Inspection list.

3.1.3 3.1.4 3.1.5

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE LOAD FOR 10 GAGE AND 12 GAGE WIRES


References: California Code or Regulations (CCR) Title 24 Part 2, California Building Code (CBC) 2001 CBC, Section 2501A.5 2007 CBC, Sections 803.9.1 and 1614A.1.2 2010 CBC, Sections 803.9.1 and 1615A.1.2, 1610.1.2* Discipline: Structural

IR 25-1
Revised 09-23-10 Revised 04-21-05 Issued 09-01-99 as IR M-2

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/Resources/IRManual.aspx at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable. * Indicates alternative 2010 CBC sections that may be used by community colleges, per 2010 CBC Section 1.9.2.2.

Purpose: The purpose of this IR is to clarify the allowable loads for mild steel wire. 1. Description. "Galvanized soft annealed mild steel wire," as defined in ASTM A641
(Class 1 Coating) is the wire referred to in this IR.

2. Basis of Design Strength. Based on tests which the Division of the State Architect
(DSA) has received to-date for this type of wire, an ultimate stress of 60,000 psi will be used for #10 gage and #12 gage wire.

3. Design Value. Basic stress will be the ultimate stress divided by 2.5, or 24,000 psi.
Testing is not required when these values are used.

4. Diameter of Wire. #10 wire is 0.135 inches in diameter and a #12 wire is 0.106 inches in diameter as shown by the U.S. Steel Wire Gage. 5. Allowable Load.
Wire Size #10 wire #12 wire Basic Load 343 lbs. 209 lbs.

6. Fabrication. When using twists on wire to develop the maximum allowable load, use a
minimum of 4 twists within 1". Three twists may be used to develop not more than one half the above values.

7. Limitations.
7.1 These values are for tension only. Tearing of thin metal by wire must be considered. If the specification requires a special wire, a higher allowable base load may be used, subject to DSA approval.

DSA IR 25-1 (rev 09-23-10)

Maximum Allowable Load for 10 Gage and 12 Gage Wires

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

METAL SUSPENSION SYSTEMS FOR LAY-IN PANEL CEILINGS


References: California Building Code, Section 2501A.5 Discipline: Structural

IR 25-2
Issued 9-1-99 Revised 04-21-05 Revised 07-21-05 Supercedes IR M-3

This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Publications/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this IR is to provide guidelines for the installation of metal
suspension systems for lay-in ceilings.

1.

for ceiling systems whose total weight, including air conditioning/heating grills and light fixtures, does not exceed two (2) psf. Heavier systems, and those supporting lateral loads from partitions, will require special design details. Also, see IR 25-3 for heavier systems. 1.1 1.2

CEILING NOTES: The following notes will be acceptable in plans and specifications

#12 gage (min.) hanger wires may be used for up to and including 4 ft. by 4 ft. grid spacing and shall be attached to main runners. Provide #12 gage hanger wires at the ends of all main and cross runners within eight (8) inches of the support or within one-fourth (1/4) of the length of the end tee, whichever is least, for the perimeter of the ceiling area. End connections for runners which are designed and detailed to resist the applied vertical and horizontal forces may be used in lieu of the #12 gage hanger wires, subject to Division of the State Architect (DSA) review and approval. Provide trapeze or other supplementary support members at obstructions to typical hanger spacing. Provide additional hangers, struts or braces as required at all ceiling breaks, soffits or discontinuous areas. Hanger wires that are more than 1 in 6 out of plumb are to have counter-sloping wires. Ceiling grid members may be attached to not more than two (2) adjacent walls. Ceiling grid members shall be at least 1/2 inch clear of other walls. If walls run diagonally to ceiling grid system runners, one end of main and cross runners should be free, and a minimum of 1/2 inch clear of wall. At the perimeter of the ceiling area where main or cross runners are not connected to the adjacent wall, provide interconnection between the runners at the free end to prevent lateral spreading. A metal strut or a #16 gage wire with a positive mechanical connection to the runner may be used. Where the perpendicular distance from the wall to the first parallel runner is 12 inches or less, this interlock is not required.

1.3

1.4

1.5

DSA (SS) IR 25-2 (rev 07-21-05)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay In Panel Ceilings

Page 1 of 12

DSA (SS) IR 25-2 (rev 07-21-05)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay In Panel Ceilings

Page 2 of 12

1.6

Provide bracing assemblies consisting of a compression strut and four (4) #12 gage splayed bracing wires oriented 90 degrees from each other (see Figure 1) at the following spacing: 1. For school buildings, place bracing assemblies at a spacing not more than 12 ft. by 12 ft. on center. 2. For Essential Services Buildings, place bracing assemblies not more than 8 ft. by 12 ft. on center. 3. Provide bracing assemblies at locations not more than one half (1/2) the spacings given above, from each perimeter wall and at the edge of vertical ceiling offsets. The slope of these wires shall not exceed 45 degrees from the plane of the ceiling and shall be taut. Splices in bracing wires are not to be permitted without special DSA approval. 4. Suspended acoustical ceiling systems with a ceiling area of 144 square feet or less, and fire rated suspended acoustical ceiling systems with a ceiling area of 96 square feet or less, surrounded by walls which connect directly to the structure above, do not require bracing assemblies when attached to two adjacent walls.

1.7

Fasten hanger wires with not less than three (3) tight turns. Fasten bracing wires with four (4) tight turns. Make all tight turns within a distance of 1-1/2 inches. Hanger or bracing wire anchors to the structure should be installed in such a manner that the direction of the anchor aligns as closely as possible with the direction of the wire. Note: Wire turns made by machine where both strands have been deformed or bent in wrapping can waive the 1-1/2 inch requirement, but the number of turns should be maintained, and be as tight as possible.

1.8 1.9

Separate all ceiling hanger and bracing wires at least six (6) inches from all unbraced ducts, pipes, conduit, etc. When drilled-in concrete anchors or shot-in anchors are used in reinforced concrete for hanger wires, 1 out of 10 must be field tested for 200 lbs. in tension. When drilled-in concrete anchors are used for bracing wires, 1 out of 2 must be field tested for 440 lbs. in tension. Shot-in anchors in concrete are not permitted for bracing wires. If any shot-in or drilled-in anchor fails, see CBC, Section 1923A.3.5. Note: Drilled-in or shot-in anchors require special DSA approval prior to use in prestressed concrete.

1.10

Attach all light fixtures and ceiling mounted air terminals, to the ceiling grid runners to resist a horizontal force equal to the weight of the fixtures. Screws or approved fasteners are required. Flush or recessed light fixtures and air terminals, weighing less than 56 lbs., may be supported directly on the runners of a heavy duty grid system but, in addition, they must have a minimum of two (2) #12 gage slack safety wires attached to the fixture at diagonal corners and anchored to the structure above. All 4 ft. x 4 ft. light fixtures must have slack safety wires at each corner. All flush or recessed light fixtures and air terminals weighing 56 lbs. or more must be independently supported by not less than four (4) taut #12 gage wires, each attached to the fixture and to the structure above regardless of the type of ceiling grid system used.

1.11

DSA (SS) IR 25-2 (rev 07-21-05)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay In Panel Ceilings

Page 3 of 12

The four (4) taut #12 gage wires, including their attachment to the structure above, must be capable of supporting four (4) times the weight of the unit. 1.12 All fixtures and air terminals supported on intermediate duty grid systems must be independently supported by not less than four (4) taut #12 gage wires each attached to the fixture or terminal, and to the structure above. Support surface mounted light fixtures by at least two positive devices which surround the ceiling runner and which are each supported from the structure above by a #12 gage wire. Spring clips or clamps that connect only to the runner are not acceptable. Provide additional supports when light fixtures are 8 ft. or longer. 1.14 Support pendant mounted light fixtures directly from the structure above with hanger wires or cables passing through each pendant hanger and capable of supporting four (4) times the weight of the fixture. A bracing assembly, per Figure 1, is required where the pendant hanger penetrates the ceiling. Special details are required to attach the pendant hanger to the bracing assembly to transmit horizontal forces. Required notes on construction documents: Classification of ceiling grid (fill in blanks). Classification of ceiling grid is (1) duty. (2) (3) . . (3) . Manufacturer's catalog number - main runner

1.13

1.15

Manufacturer's catalog number - cross runner (2) (3) (1) Fill in either "intermediate" or "heavy". (2) Runners must be rated for duty listed.

Manufacturer's catalog number of detail for runner splice

(3) Show manufacturer, duty classification and catalog numbers. Show light fixture and air terminal or grille support details for grid duty classification selected. See Items 1.11 and 1.12 above.

2.
2.1

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR FIRE RATED CEILINGS:


Provide Underwriter Laboratory (U.L.) design number or State Fire Marshal (SFM) listing number. The components and installation details must conform in every respect with the U.L. or SFM approval for the design number specified. Custom designs which combine components from different approved designs but have not been tested as a complete assembly are not acceptable. For schools and Essential Services Buildings, bracing assemblies are required for each 96 square feet. The first bracing assembly is required not more than four (4) feet from each wall. A minimum of one bracing assembly is required between any two adjacent expansion cut-outs on runners being braced. Pop rivets, screws, or other attachments are not acceptable unless specifically detailed on the drawings and approved by U.L. and SFM.

2.2

2.3

DSA (SS) IR 25-2 (rev 07-21-05)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay In Panel Ceilings

Page 4 of 12

3. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR METAL PANELS: Metal panels and panels weighing more than 1/2 psf, other than acoustical tile, are to be positively attached to the ceiling suspension runners. 4. SUSPENDED ACOUSTICAL CEILINGS BELOW GYPSUM BOARD CEILINGS: Where gypsum board or other ceiling finishes are attached to the

framing, special details will be required for the vertical hanger wire and lateral bracing wire support connections to the framing.

5.
5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4

REUSE OF EXISTING CEILING HANGER WIRES AND SPLAY WIRES:


The gage and spacing of the wires must comply with the current applicable codes. All existing ceiling hanger wires must be tested to 200 lbs. in tension. All existing splayed bracing wires must be field tested to 440 lbs. in tension. If a new wire is to be spliced to an existing wire, the following is required: 1. The architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge must submit to DSA a detail and specification describing how the splice is to be made. 2. All new wires, after being spliced to the existing wires, must be field tested per Items 5.2 and 5.3 above. 3. All field tests must be performed in the presence of the project inspector.

6.

LIST OF DSA PRODUCT ACCEPTANCE FOR SUSPENDED ACOUSTICAL CEILING SYSTEMS

DSA Product Acceptance (PA) Report #_ PA-008 PA-022 PA-026 PA-030 PA-041 PA-078 Tectum I and Tectum II - Form Board, Acoustical Board and Suspended Ceiling Tile Armstrong Cassettes 800 Series Metal Ceiling System Chicago Metallic Suspended Ceiling System USG Interior Donn Suspended Ceiling Grid Systems Armstrong World Industries Suspended Ceiling System Metaline, Plantostile and Magna T-Cell Suspended Ceiling Systems

Note: Alternate manufacturers and systems may be submitted for review and acceptance by the Division of the State Architect.

DSA IR 25-2 - Rev 07-21-05

Metal Suspension Systems for Lay-In Panel Ceilings - Page 5 of 12

Figure 1 SUSPENDED CEILING BRACING ASSEMBLY


Bracing assemblies are required at spacing indicated in section 1.6 on page 2 of IR 25-2

Compression struts: Steel section with l/r ratio of 200 maximum. Attach to main runners within 2" of cross runner with 2-#12 self-drilling self-tapping (SDST) screws and to structure with 2-#12 x 2" screws at wood or 3/16" diameter anchor at concrete/steel. Compression strut shall not replace hanger wire. Note: See figures 3,4,5,6 for connections of bracing & hanger wire to the structure above

Compression strut

12 ga. bracing wire w/min. 4 tight turns in 11/2" both ends of wire - connect to main runner

12 ga. bracing wire w/min. 4 tight turns in 11/2" both ends of wire - connect to main runner

45 degrees max typ.

45 degrees max typ.

Main runner Cross runner

12 ga. vertical hanger wire at 4'-0" each way (4' oc at main runner) minimum 3 tight turns in 11/2" both ends (typical)

2" (max) from bracing wires to compression strut and cross runner

DSA IR 25-2 - Rev 07-21-05

Metal Suspension Systems for Lay-In Panel Ceilings - Page 6 of 12

Figure 2 ACCEPTABLE HANGER WIRE CONNECTION TO GRID

Spacers may be slotted angles


or channels with diamond points of spring steel which snap tight to prevent movement of strut. Channel 1/2" Hanger wire 8" max. or note (1) below

12 ga. hanger wire 8" max. or note (1) below

Alternate location w/o nail. Notching permitted only at runner Min 3 tight turns on 11/2" Main or cross runner Acoustic panel

Pop rivet-see section 1.4, IR 25-2 Wall angle Wall connection-anchor to structural element

Slotted angle spacer w/horiz. 6d ringshank nail (see note (2) )

Detail (A) Horizontal strut - typical (see section 1.5, IR 25-2)


Notes: (1) 1/4 of the length of the end runner whichever is less. (2) Nails at the end of horizontal struts are to be placed with nail head toward centerline of span of strut

Main runner

12 ga. hanger wire 3 tight turns in 11/2"

Cross runner

Detail (B)

Acoustic panel

DSA IR 25-2 - Rev 07-21-05

Metal Suspension Systems for Lay-In Panel Ceilings - Page 7 of 12

Figure 3A ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTIONS TO WOOD FRAMING


Three 11/2" x 9 ga. staples or 3-stronghold J nails at each wire loop 1" min. 3" max. 1/4" dia. screw eye with full thread embedment (11/4" min.) Install in direction of wire

Bracing wire

Hanger wire Joist or rafter

Bracing wire

(A) Wood joist or rafter

(B) Wood joist or rafter

Three 11/2 " x 9 ga. staples or three stronghold J nails at each wire loop

For bracing wires fully embed screw eye threads in direction of wire 1/4" dia. drilled hole 2" min. Hanger wire Saddle tie, per detail (F) Hanger wire Saddle tie required for all widths greater than 1/2

2 X blkg. w/2-16d common nails at ea. end Bracing wire

(C) Wood joist or block

(D) At bottom of joist

Web member (typical) Bottom chord

Note: Saddle tie has double loop at support Hanger wires-3 tight turns and bracing wires 4 tight turns

Hanger wire saddle tie per detail (F) Brace wire saddle tie per detail (F)

(E) Bracing wire parallel to wood truss

(F) Typical saddle tie

DSA IR 25-2 - Rev 07-21-05

Metal Suspension Systems for Lay-In Panel Ceilings - Page 8 of 12

Figure 3B ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTION AT WOOD FRAMING


Plywood floor/roof sheathing

Wood I-joist

Ceiling splay wire attached to joist bottom flange per (H) Add 21/2" x 20 ga. stud* w/(1) #10 x 1" wood screw to each of 3 joists. Place stud flat and within 6" of splay wire.

*Alternate:
(G) Wood I-joist

2 x 4 flat with 1-10d or 1-#10 x 3" screw to each of 3 truss bottom flanges

Note: Do not insert screw eyes parallel to laminations

1/4" dia. screw eye with 11/4" min. penetration align with brace wire Brace wire with 4 tight turns 1" minimum 1/4" dia. screw eye with 11/4" min. penetration at bottom flange

(H) Wood I-joist bottom flange

Hanger wire with 3 tight turns

DSA IR 25-2 - Rev 07-21-05

Metal Suspension Systems for Lay-In Panel Ceilings - Page 9 of 12

Figure 4 ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTION TO CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE

Shot-in anchor 3/4" (minimum) penetration - test

Structural concrete 5/16 inch (minimum) drill-in expansion anchor - test

Structural concrete

Ceiling clip 13 ga. x 3/4" wide 5/8" max (minimum) 3 tight turns in 11/2" Vertical hanger wire

5/8" max Steel strap 1" wide x 12 ga. (minimum) 4 tight turns in 11/2"

45 max Splayed brace wire see sections 1.6, 1.7 of IR 25-2

(A) Vertical hanger wire clip attachment

(B) Splayed bracing wire clip attachment

Structural concrete

Structural concrete

45 max

Vertical hanger wire embedded in concrete with pigtail - 2" dia. loop & 4" tail Vertical hanger wire embedded in concrete with pigtail - 2" dia. loop & 4" tail

(C) Hanger wire at C.I.P. concrete

(D) Brace wire at C.I.P. concrete

DSA IR 25-2 - Rev 07-21-05

Metal Suspension Systems for Lay-In Panel Ceilings - Page 10 of 12

Figure 5 ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTIONS TO STEEL FRAMING

Steel strap see Fig. 4 detail (B)

Web member

Structural steel member Ceiling clip see Fig. 4 detail (A) with shot - in anchor attachment Splayed brace wire with shot-in anchor attachment (test for 440 lbs)

Bottom chord

Vertical hanger wire Saddle tie per Fig. 3 A detail (F) Splayed bracing wire

Vertical hanger wire (test for 200 lbs)

Splay wires parallel to joist. Splay wires can not be perpendicular to joist

(A) At steel beams

(B) At open-web steel joist

Insulation over steel deck

Insulation over steel deck

#3 x 12" rebar

20 ga. min. deck Bracing wire

2-#8 x 1/2" self-tapping screws Steel strap 3" wide x 4" long x 12 ga. (minimum)

20 ga. min. deck

Hanger wire-tie to #3 rebar with three wraps around rebar and one wrap around wire

(C) At steel roof deck


Note: If self-tapping screws are used with concrete fill, set screws before placing concrete

(D) At steel roof deck

DSA IR 25-2 - Rev 07-21-05

Metal Suspension Systems for Lay-In Panel Ceilings - Page 11 of 12

Figure 6 ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTIONS TO STEEL FRAMING


#3 rebar x length required to cover min. of 4 high corrugations Non-structural concrete fill

Structural concrete fill

Wire pigtail see figure 4 detail (C)

Steel deck See Fig 5 (D) for alternative support detail

Steel deck

Hanger wire

Shot-in or expansion anchor with eye-bolt (test)

(A) At steel deck with insulation fill

(B) At steel deck with concrete fill

Structural concrete fill

Structural concrete fill

See Fig. 4 detail (B) Bracing wire

Steel deck

Steel deck See Fig. 4 detail (A) Hanger wire

(C) At steel deck with concrete fill


Note: If self tapping screws are used with concrete fill, set screws before placing concrete.

(D) At steel deck with concrete fill

DSA IR 25-2 - Rev 07-21-05

Metal Suspension Systems for Lay-In Panel Ceilings - Page 12 of 12

Figure 7 ACCEPTABLE LOCATION OF SLIP JOINTS IN ESB EXITWAYS


Typical hanger wire, see sections 1.1, 1.2 and 1.7 of IR 25-2 4' o.c.

4'-0" o.c. Typical splice

4'-0" or less

8" max see Fig. 2

8" max see Fig. 2 4'-0" o.c.

Pop rivet Continuous runners (splice all joints)

Pop rivet 1/2" clear slip joint at adjacent

(A) Acceptable slip joint at exitways intersection


Typical hanger wire see sections 1.2 & 1.7 of IR 25-2 8" max see Fig. 2 Pop rivet Splice must be thru conn. - snap conn. unacceptable Typical hanger wire at 4'-0" w/one pair of bracing wires parallel to wall at 12'-0" o.c. - see sections 1.6 & 1.7 of IR 25-2 Typical hanger

1/2" CLR

Standard ledger angle-specify screw or bolt size (must connect to structure, not finish) Connected wall Runner splice

Pop rivet Ledger angle Wall slip

(B) Acceptable exitways details at essential sevices buildings (ESB)


Slip joint

B
Refer to T-24 Part 2, Sec. 2501A.5 Connected wall

Connected wall

A
Continuous slip joint

Plan view

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

DRYWALL CEILING SUSPENSION CONVENTIONAL CONSTRUCTION ONE LAYER


References: California Building Code, Section 2504A, 2511A Discipline: Structural

IR 25-3
Issued 9-1-99 Revised 6-11-03 Revised 4-21-05 Revised 7-21-05 Supercedes IR M-4(9/99)

This Interpretation of Regulation (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Publications/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this IR is to provide additional guidelines for the design and
construction of gypsum wall board suspended ceiling systems.

1.

MATERIALS: Materials are to comply with applicable UBC standards. Gypsum board is either 1/2 inch or 5/8 inch in thickness. DESIGN: For lateral load, refer to CBC, Section 1632A. The weight of the

2.

suspended ceiling shall not be less than four (4) pounds per square foot for design purposes.

3.
3.1

DETAILS OF CONSTRUCTION.
General: Gypboard ceilings should not support building components other than air conditioning/heating grills or light fixtures. All such components shall be supported either directly from main runners, or by supplemental framing which is supported by main runners. No vertical loads other than gypsum board dead load shall be applied to cross-furring. Vertical Support System. There are many possible variations of hanger and main runner sizes and spacings listed in CBC, Table No. 25A-A, and all of the combinations are acceptable. However, the main runners that are most frequently used are 1-1/2 inch cold rolled channels, 0.475 lbs/ft. This is acceptable provided the following requirements are met:

3.2 3.2.1

1. Vertical hanger wires are #9 gage and galvanized soft-annealed steel. 2. Cross-furring may be 7/8 inch, 25 gage galvanized hat sections at 24 inches o.c. maximum. 3. If main runners are spaced at 4'-0" o.c., hanger wires shall be spaced at 3'-0" o.c. maximum. If main runners are spaced at 3'-6" o.c., hanger wires shall be spaced at 3'-6" o.c. maximum. If main runners are spaced at 3'-0" o.c., hanger wires shall be spaced at 4'-0" o.c. maximum.

DSA (SS) IR 25-3 (rev 07-21-05)

Drywall Ceiling Suspension One Layer

Page 1 of Page 1 of 3

DSA (SS) IR 25-3 (rev 07-21-05)

Drywall Ceiling Suspension One Layer

Page 2 of Page 2 of 3

To use a main runner spacing of 4'-0" o.c. with a hanger spacing of 4'-0" o.c., main runners must be 1-1/2 inch hot rolled channels weighing 1.12 lbs/ft. Also, #8 gage galvanized hanger wires would be required. 3.2.2 The following requirements apply to all wire hanger/runner combinations: 1. Hangers should be saddle-tied around main runners to develop the full strength of the hangers. 2. Cross-furring should be saddle-tied to the main runners with one strand of #16 gage, or two strands of #18 gage tie wire. 3. Main runners should be spliced by lapping and interlocking flanges 12 inches minimum and tying near each end with double loops of #16 gage wire. 4. Cross-furring should be spliced by lapping and interlocking the pieces eight (8) inches minimum and tying near each end with double loops of #16 gage wire 3.2.3 Fasten hanger wires with not less than three (3) tight turns. Fasten bracing wires with four (4) tight turns. Make all tight turns within a distance of 1-1/2 inches. Hanger or bracing wire anchors to the structure should be installed in such a manner that the direction of the anchor aligns as closely as possible with the direction of the wire. Note: Wire turns made by machine where both strands have been deformed or bent in wrapping can waive the 1-1/2 inch requirement, but the number of turns should be maintained, and be as tight as possible. Separate all ceiling hanger and bracing wires at least six (6) inches from all unbraced ducts, pipes, conduit, etc. When drilled-in concrete anchors or shot-in anchors are used in reinforced concrete for hanger wires, 1 out of 10 must be field tested for 200 lbs. in tension. When drilled-in concrete anchors are used for bracing wires, 1 out of 2 must be field tested for 440 lbs in tension. Shot-in anchors in concrete are not permitted for bracing wires. If any shot-in or drilled-in anchor fails, see Section 1923A.3.5, Title 24. Note: Drilled-in or shot-in anchors require special DSA approval when used in prestressed concrete. Provide trapeze or other supplementary support members at obstructions to typical hanger spacing. Provide additional hangers, struts or braces as required at all ceiling breaks, soffits or discontinuous areas. Hanger wires that are more than 1 in 6 out of plumb are to have counter-sloping wires.

4.
4.1

SUPPORT AND ANCHORAGE OF LIGHT FIXTURES AND MECHANICAL SERVICES.


All recessed or drop-in light fixtures, as well as ceiling mounted mechanical air terminals and services, shall be supported directly by main runners or by supplemental framing which is supported by main runners and positively attached with screws or other approved connectors. Surface mounted fixtures shall be attached to a main runner with a positive clamping device made of material with a minimum of 14 gage. Rotational spring clamps do not comply.

4.2

DSA (SS) IR 25-3 (rev 07-21-05)

Drywall Ceiling Suspension One Layer

Page 3 of Page 3 of 3

5.

LATERAL SYSTEM:

5.1 Wire Brace System. Provide bracing assemblies, per Figure 1 of IR 25-2, as determined by calculations, with the following limitations: 1. For school buildings, place bracing assemblies at a spacing not more than 12 ft. by 12 ft. on center. 2. For Essential Services Buildings, place bracing assemblies not more than 8 ft. by 12 ft. on center. 3. Provide bracing assemblies at not more than six (6) feet from each perimeter wall and at the edge of vertical ceiling offsets. The slope of bracing wires shall not exceed 45 degrees from the plane of the ceiling and shall be taut. Splices in bracing wires are not to be permitted without special DSA approval. 4. Ceiling grid members may be attached to not more than two (2) adjacent walls. Ceiling grid members shall be at least 1/2 inch free of other walls. If walls run diagonally to ceiling grid system runners, one end of main and cross runners should be free, and a minimum of 1/2 inch clear of wall. 5. Suspended ceiling systems with an area of 144 square feet or less, and fire rated ceiling systems with an area of 96 square feet or less, surrounded by walls which connect directly to the structure above, do not require bracing assemblies when attached to at least two adjacent walls. 5.2 5.2.1 Alternate System: Design as a diaphragm, similar to plywood diaphragm concept, subject to acceptance by the DSA Regional Office. Diaphragm Ratios: Horizontal 2:1 maximum Vertical 5.2.2 1:1 maximum A maximum diaphragm shear equal to 50 lbs./ft. is allowed with 1 inch or 1-1/4 inch Hi-Lo Type S, or S-12, bugle head screws at 12 inches o.c. at all gypsum board edges (3/8 inch screw edge distance) and at all intermediate supports. A wall constructed similarly can resist the same shear force provided the gypsum board is on the same side of the studs as the ceiling is, and a positive connection between the ceiling and the wall is detailed. The gypsum board diaphragms are to resist lateral loads due to their own weight and/or the ceiling diaphragm(s) only. Details are required providing for lateral load transfer from the gypsum board to shear walls, or other lateral load resisting elements, on all four sides of the diaphragm.

5.2.3

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

SELF-FURRING LATH
References: 2001 California Building Code (CBC), Table 25A-B 2007 CBC, Section 2510 Discipline: Structural

IR 25-4
Revised 01-02-08 Issued 09-30-05 as CR 25-1

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: 1.

The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify DSA acceptance of self-furring wire lath used as reinforcement for cement plaster.

General: Lath for plaster shall be furred out a minimum of 1/4 inch when installed over a solid surface such as plywood. The use of self-furring lath is subject to a satisfactory jobsite demonstration of the lath installation for each project, with approval by the project architect and enforcement agency.

2.

Background: Many types of self-furring lath have depressions in the lath that successfully offset the lath 1/4 inch from plywood or other rigid backing, and therefore meet the 1/4 inch offset requirement of ASTM C933-04 Section 5.1.2 (or Table 25A-B of the 2001 CBC). Furring nails are not required. The lath is not offset from the backing at the location where nails or staples hold the lath to the backing/stud.

Application: Satisfactory job-site installation is required. The lath should not be pulled so tight that the depressions are straightened resulting in the lath being pressed tight to the backing. Lath must be furred out 1/4 inch over the majority of the wall area; lath within three inches of attachment points may be exempt from minimum furring requirement in order to accommodate fastening to framing. Also, the nails/staples shall not be overdriven so as to damage the weather-resistant barrier.

3.

DSA (SS) IR 25-4 (rev 01-02-08)

Self-Furring Lath Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

METAL SUSPENSION SYSTEMS FOR LAY-IN PANEL CEILINGS


References: Title 24, Part 2 - California Building Code, 2007 Sections 803.9.1.1, 1614A.1.12 and 2506.2.1 Discipline: Structural

IR 25-5
Issued 06-22-09

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose:

The purpose of this IR is to provide guidelines for the installation of metal suspension systems for lay-in ceilings for projects approved under the 2007 CBC. For projects submitted under the 2001 CBC, see IR 25-2.

1. General Requirements: The following requirements apply to ceiling systems whose total weight, including ceiling mounted air terminals, services and light fixtures, does not exceed four (4) psf. Heavier systems, and those supporting lateral loads from partitions, will require special design details.
1.1 1.2 1.3 #12 gage wire shall be 0.106 inches in diameter conforming to ASTM A641. gage wire shall be soft annealed, galvanized steel wire with a class 1 coating. #12

#12 gage hanger wires may be used for up to and including 4 ft. by 4 ft. grid spacing and shall be attached to main runners. Provide #12 gage hanger wires at the ends of all main and cross runners within eight (8) inches of the support or within one-fourth (1/4) of the length of the end tee, whichever is least, for the perimeter of the ceiling area. See Figure 2. Perimeter wires are not required when the length of the end tee is eight (8) inches or less. Provide trapeze or other supplementary support members at obstructions to typical hanger spacing. See Figure 3A, Detail F. Provide additional hangers, struts or braces as required at all ceiling breaks, soffits, or discontinuous areas. Hanger wires that are more than 1 (horizontal) in 6 (vertical) out of plumb are to have counter-sloping wires. Ceiling grid members shall be attached to two (2) adjacent walls per ASCE 7-05, Section 13.5.6.2(b). Ceiling grid members shall be at least 3/4 inch clear of other walls. If walls run diagonally to ceiling grid system runners, one end of main and cross runners should be free, and a minimum of 3/4 inch clear of wall. The width of the perimeter supporting closure angle shall be not less than 2 inches. At the perimeter of the ceiling area where main or cross runners are not connected to the adjacent wall, provide interconnection between the runners at the free end to prevent lateral spreading. A metal strut or a #16 gage wire with a positive mechanical connection to the runner may be used. Where the perpendicular distance from the wall to the first parallel runner is 12 inches or less, this interlock is not required. Expansion joints shall be provided in the ceiling at intersections of corridors and at junctions of corridors with lobbies or other similar areas. See Figure 7 Detail A.

1.4

1.5

1.6 1.7

1.8

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 1 of 13

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 2 of 13

1.9

Provide lateral-force bracing assemblies consisting of a compression strut and four (4) #12 gage splayed bracing wires oriented 90 degrees from each other (see Figure 1). The spacing of the bracing assemblies must be shown on the construction documents. Provide bracing assemblies at locations not more than one half (1/2) the calculated spacing in each direction from each perimeter wall and at the edges of any change in elevation of the ceiling. Substantiating calculations or test reports for the bracing assemblies are waived if the following requirements are met: Bracing assemblies spaced at a maximum of 12 feet by 12 feet on centers for school buildings and 8 feet by 12 feet on centers for essential services buildings, and The maximum slenderness ratio (kL/R) of the compression strut is 200 or less.

1.10

1.11

The slope of bracing wires shall not exceed 45 degrees from the plane of the ceiling and wires shall be taut. Splices in wires are not permitted without special DSA approval. Compression struts shall not be more than 1 (horizontal) in 6 (vertical) out of plumb. Suspended acoustical ceiling systems with a ceiling area of 144 square feet or less, and fire rated suspended acoustical ceiling systems with a ceiling area of 96 square feet or less, surrounded by walls which connect directly to the structure above or walls independently braced above ceiling to structure above, do not require bracing assemblies when attached to two adjacent walls. For ceiling areas exceeding 2500 square feet a seismic separation joint shall be provided in accordance with Figure 7 Detail A to divide the ceiling into areas not exceeding 2500 square feet. Alternatively, structural analysis shall be performed to demonstrate compliance with ASCE 7-05, Section 13.5.6.2.2(d). Penetrations through the ceiling for sprinkler heads and other similar devices that are not integrally tied to the ceiling system in the lateral direction shall have a two (2) inch oversized ring, sleeve or adapter through the ceiling tile to allow free movement of one (1) inch in all horizontal directions. Alternatively, swing joints may be provided per ASCE 7-05, Section 13.5.6.2.2(e). Fasten #12 hanger wires with not less than three (3) tight turns. Fasten #10 or #12 bracing wires with four (4) tight turns. Make all tight turns within a distance of 1-1/2 inches. Hanger or bracing wire anchors to the structure should be installed in such a manner that the direction of the anchor aligns as closely as possible with the direction of the wire. Note: Wire turns made by machine where both strands have been deformed or bent in wrapping can waive the 1-1/2 inch requirement, but the number of turns should be maintained, and be as tight as possible.

1.12 1.13

1.14

1.15

1.16

1.17 1.18

Separate all ceiling hanger and bracing wires at least six (6) inches from all unbraced ducts, pipes, conduit, etc. When drilled-in concrete anchors or shot-in anchors are used in reinforced concrete for hanger wires, 1 out of 10 wire/anchor assemblies must be field tested for 200 lbs. in tension. When drilled-in concrete anchors are used for bracing wires, 1 out of 2 wire/anchor assemblies must be field tested for 440 lbs. in tension in the direction of the wire. Shot-in anchors in concrete are not permitted for bracing wires. Note: Drilled-in or shot-in anchors require special DSA approval prior to use in prestressed concrete.

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 3 of 13

1.19

Attach all light fixtures and ceiling mounted air terminals, to the ceiling grid runners to resist a horizontal force equal to the weight of the fixtures. Screws or approved fasteners are required. Flush or recessed light fixtures, weighing less than 56 lbs. and mechanical terminals and services, weighing less than 20 lbs., may be supported directly on the runners of a heavy duty grid system but, in addition, they must have a minimum of two (2) #12 gage slack safety wires attached to the fixture at diagonal corners and anchored to the structure above. All 4 ft. x 4 ft. light fixtures must have slack safety wires at each corner. All flush or recessed light fixtures weighing 56 lbs. or more and mechanical terminals and services, weighing 20 lbs. or more, must be independently supported by not less than four (4) taut #12 gage wires, each attached to the fixture and to the structure above. The four (4) taut #12 gage wires, including their attachment to the structure above, must be capable of supporting four (4) times the weight of the unit.

1.20

1.21

Support surface mounted light fixtures by at least two positive devices which surround the ceiling runner and which are each supported from the structure above by a #12 gage wire. Spring clips or clamps that connect only to the runner are not acceptable. Provide additional supports when light fixtures are 8 ft. or longer. Maximum spacing between supports shall not exceed 8 feet.

1.22

Support pendant mounted light fixtures directly from the structure above with hanger wires or cables passing through each pendant hanger and capable of supporting two (2) times the weight of the fixture. A bracing assembly, per Figure 1, is required where the pendant hanger penetrates the ceiling. Special details are required to attach the pendant hanger to the bracing assembly to transmit horizontal force. If the pendant mounted light fixture is directly and independently braced below the ceiling, i.e. aircraft cables to walls, then brace assembly is not required above the ceiling. See IR 16-9 for additional requirement for pendent mounted fixtures. The ceiling grid system must be rated as heavy duty as defined by ASTM C635. A list of acceptable grid systems must be shown on the drawings. The grid systems specified must be acceptable in accordance with IR A-5. The following information must be included on the drawings for each acceptable grid system specified: Classification of ceiling grid is heavy duty. Manufacturer's catalog number - main runner (1) (2) . . (2) . Manufacturer's catalog number - cross runner (1) (2) (1) Runners must be rated as heavy duty. (2) Show manufacturer, duty classification and catalog numbers.

1.23

Manufacturer's catalog number of detail for runner splice

2.
2.1

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS:
For Fire Rated Ceilings: Provide a detail and design number for rated ceiling assemblies from an authorized testing agency listed by the State Fire Marshal (SFM) or from Chapter 7 of the 2007 CBC. A list of the SMF authorized testing agencies is available on the following website: http://osfm.fire.ca.gov/strucfireengineer/pdf/lab/approvedtestinglabs.pdf The components and installation details must conform in every respect with the listed detail and number or with the components listed in the 2007 CBC, Chapter 7

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 4 of 13

for the design number specified. Details shall clearly depict all components, including insulation materials, of the design so that the assembly can be constructed and inspected accordingly. Custom designs which combine components from different approved designs but have not been tested as a complete assembly are not acceptable. Pop rivets, screws, or other attachments are not acceptable unless specifically detailed on the drawings and approved by U.L. and SFM recognized laboratories. 2.2 For Metal and Other Panels: Metal panels and panels weighing more than 1/2 psf, other than mineral fiber acoustical tile, are to be positively attached to the ceiling suspension runners. For Essential Services Buildings: In exitways a main or cross runner shall be installed on all sides of each piece of tile, board or panel and each light fixture or grill (see Figure 7 Detail B). Splices or intersection of such runners shall be attached with through connectors such as pop rivets, screws, pins, plates with end tabs or other approved connectors. For Suspended Acoustical Ceilings Below Gypsum Board Ceilings: Where gypsum board or other ceiling finishes are attached to the framing, specific details will be required for the vertical hanger wire and lateral bracing wire support connections to the framing.

2.3

2.4

3.
3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4

RE-USE OF EXISTING CEILING HANGER WIRES AND BRACING WIRES:


The gage and spacing of the wires must comply with the current applicable codes. All existing ceiling hanger wire/anchor assemblies must be tested to 200 lbs. All existing bracing wire/anchor assemblies must be field tested to 440 lbs. If a new wire is to be spliced to an existing wire, the following is required: 1. 2. 3. The architect or structural engineer in general responsible charge must submit to DSA a detail and specification describing how the splice is to be made. All new wires, after being spliced to the existing wires, must be field tested per Items 3.2 and 3.3 above. All field tests must be performed in the presence of the project inspector.

4.

MODERNIZATION AND ALTERATION: The entire ceiling shall be upgraded to meet the current requirements of the CBC and this IR if any portion of the grid system is cut or altered.
Exception: The replacement of existing ceiling panels with panels of the same materials and light fixtures of the same size, locations, and weights does not require an upgrade to the ceiling grid and suspension system.

5. DSA ACCEPTANCE: DSA no longer issues Acceptance Reports for products. Ceiling grid systems or components, with valid evaluation reports issued by qualified evaluation agencies in accordance with DSA IR A-5, are accepted by DSA, provided the system or component meets the requirements of CBC Section 1614A.1.12 and ASCE 7-05, Section 13.5.6. Where qualified evaluation report is utilized, the installation shall comply with all the requirements specified in the evaluation report, i.e. connections, member sizes, perimeter details, special clips to wall angles, etc.

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 5 of 13

Figure 1

SUSPENDED CEILING BRACING ASSEMBLY


Compression struts:

Compression struts shall not replace hanger wires. Maximum KL/R ratio of 200 or less. The sizes of compression struts must be shown on construction documents by the engineer or architect. Attach compression struts to main runners within 2" of cross runner. Details of attachment at both ends must be designed and shown on construction documents by the engineer or architect. The attachment at the top shall be capable of supporting four times the weight of the strut.

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 6 of 13

Figure 2 CEILING HANGER DETAILS

(B) Horizontal strut - typical (see Section 1.7) Notes: (1) 1/4 of the length of the end runner whichever is less. (2) Nails at the end of horizontal struts are to be placed with nail head toward centerline of span of strut. (3) Hanger wire not required for cross runners less than 8 long between main runner and wall.

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 7 of 13

Figure 3A ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTIONS TO WOOD FRAMING

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 8 of 13

Figure 3B ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTION AT WOOD FRAMING

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 9 of 13

Figure 3C ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTION AT WOOD FRAMING

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 10 of 13

Figure 4 ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTION TO CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE


Shot-in anchors not allowed for bracing wires

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 11 of 13

Figure 5 ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTIONS TO STEEL FRAMING

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 12 of 13

Figure 6 ACCEPTABLE DETAILS - WIRE CONNECTIONS TO STEEL DECK

DSA IR 25-5 (iss 06-22-09)

Metal Suspension Systems For Lay-In Panel Ceilings

Page 13 of 13

Figure 7 ACCEPTABLE LOCATION OF SLIP JOINTS IN EXITWAYS

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

TITLE 24 ELEVATORS: BUILDING MATERIALS AND SYSTEMS


References: 2001California Building Code (CBC): Table 6-A and Section 3003.5 2004 California Electrical Code (CEC): Section 800.51 2007 CBC: Sections 707.14 and 3002 2007 CEC: Section 179 Discipline: Structural

IR 30-1
Corrected 09-10-09 Issued 08-25-09

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose:

The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to clarify the requirements for the construction materials and the fire protection systems required for elevator hoist ways.

Scope: All elevators reviewed by DSA for applicable code compliance. 1.


1.1

PROJECT DESIGN REQUIREMENTS:


Materials: Elevator hoist ways shall either be constructed of non combustible materials or the sides of the hoistway facing the elevator cab shall have a maximum flame spread rating of 25 and a maximum smoke developing rating of 50. Electrical Wiring: Electrical wiring shall meet or exceed the minimum requirements of the applicable 2007 California Electrical Code for fire resistive construction, with penetration protection per 2007 California Building Code Section 712.4.2.1. Automatic Fire Sprinkler Systems: Buildings with required automatic fire sprinkler systems will have a side-wall type of sprinkler installed a maximum of two feet above the bottom of the hoist way, but in no case shall the sprinkler be installed so as to be an obstruction to the elevator car at its lowest point of travel. An automatic fire sprinkler is not required at the top of an elevator hoist way constructed of non-combustible materials.

1.2

1.3

1.4

Fire Alarm Requirements: Smoke or Heat Detection is not required at the top of the elevator hoistway if there is no automatic fire sprinkler located at the top of the hoistway.

1.5 Elevator/Stairway Configuration: Elevators with cabs sized to accommodate ambulance gurneys are not required for two story buildings if the configuration of the stairways is such that the use of an ambulance gurney is feasible and approved by the Local Fire Authority and DSA. (See DSA Policy 09-05 for Elevator Cab Size deviation procedures).

DSA IR 30-1 (iss 08-25-09)

Title 24 Elevators: Building Materials and Systems

Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

GROUNDING OF RELOCATABLE BUILDINGS


References: California Electrical Code

IR E-1
Revised 10-03-07 Revised 04-21-05 Issued 09-01-99 as IR M-5

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA, which include State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretations of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: The purpose of this Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is to provide guidelines for the proper grounding/bonding of modular buildings. 1. Metal Modular Buildings: When metal buildings are made of components, each building component, including steel ramps, must be electrically bonded together in a manner acceptable to the Division of the State Architect (DSA). Paint on the surface of steel will inhibit passage of electrical current; therefore, bolted connections of component parts are not an acceptable electrical bond. 2. 3. Wood Modular Buildings: In wood frame modular buildings, the electrical system must be grounded as required in the California Electrical Code (CEC).

Grounding: The electrical circuits are usually properly grounded. However, it is also necessary to independently ground the steel frames. This is particularly important when the building is supported on a foundation made of wood. An acceptable detail is shown on the attached drawing.
All metal building components must be electrically bonded together, and each building must be independently grounded. Multiple buildings are not to be grounded through the electrical system. All grounding systems are to be tested with a Megger unit, or in an otherwise acceptable manner. Refer to the 2004 or the 2007 CEC, Section 250.52 for specific grounding requirements. Grounding tests are to be observed and reported by the Inspector of Record. Attachment Figure 1

DSA IR E-1 (rev 10-03-07)

Grounding of Relocatable Buildings

Page 1 of 2

DSA IR E-1 (rev 10-03-07)

Grounding of Relocatable Buildings

Page 2 of 2

Figure 1

1. Size of conductors shall comply with CEC Table 250.66 2. Bond separate conductors from ground rod to electrical panel and to metal building frame (CEC 250.52). In addition to the detail shown above, bond the electrical ground to metal underground water pipe in direct contact with the earth for 10 ft. or more, if available (CEC 250.52). 3. All modules of metal frame buildings shall be electrically bonded together. (Bolting only is not acceptable bonding.) 4. Check resistance to ground. If resistance exceeds 25 ohms, install an additional ground rod (CEC 250.56).

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

GROUND FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER


References: Title 24, California Code of Regulations (CCR), Part 1, California Electrical Code (CEC) 2004 CEC, Sections 210.8 (B), 406.3 (G), 406.4 (E), and 4406.8 2007 and 2010 CEC, Sections 210.8(B), 406.4, and 406.8 Title 24 CCR, Part 2, California Building Code (CBC) 2007 and 2010 CBC, Section 117B.6.5.2 Discipline: Fire and Life Safety

IR E-2
Revised 09-23-10 Revised 10-03-07 Issued 02-20-07

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, community colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dgs.ca.gov/dsa/Resources/IRManual.aspx at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies code requirements


based on Recognized Standards for Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for School Campuses.

General: The California Electrical Code (CEC) Section 210.8 Ground-Fault CircuitInterrupter Protection (GFCI) for Personnel requires that personnel be protected from electrical shock via the Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter device. In keeping with the intent of this section, GFCI protection shall be required in all Public School construction (K-12 and community colleges) in locations as required by recognized standards, regardless of type of occupancy and as noted below.

1.
1.1

Interpretation:
Locations: All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles, installed in the locations specified in (1), (2), (3) and (4) below, shall have ground-fault circuitinterrupter protection for the protection of personnel: (1) Bathrooms (2) Rooftops Exception: Receptacles that are not readily accessible and are supplied from a dedicated branch circuit for electric snow-melting or deicing equipment shall be permitted to be installed in accordance with the applicable provisions of CEC Article 426. (3) Kitchens (4) Regardless of the occupancy, within 6 feet of sinks or any other water sources, and other locations with proximity or exposure to water intrusion or weather conditions. These areas include but are not limited to: a. b. c. d. Classrooms Teacher Work Rooms Auto, Metal or Print Shops Science Labs
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter

DSA IR E-2 (rev 09-23-10)

Page 1 of 2

DSA IR E-2 (rev 09-23-10)

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter

Page 2 of 2

e. Teacher Lounges f. Janitors Closets g. Art and Pottery Shops/Classes h. i. j. k. 1.2 1.2.1 Laundry areas Home Economics classrooms Infant care areas/classrooms Any area where similar hazards exist

Mounting: Receptacle mounting height requirements shall be similar to that stated in CEC Section 210.52 (C) 5 for all countertops in California public schools. Receptacles shall be located above, but not more than 20 inches (500 mm) above, the countertop. Exception: Receptacle outlets rendered not readily accessible by appliances fastened in place, appliance garages, or appliances occupying dedicated space See CEC, Section 406 (Section 1117B.6.5.2 in the 2007 CBC) for determining the general requirements for electrical receptacles in the above locations.

1.2.2 1.2.3 2. 2.1

Receptacles shall never be mounted in a face up position in counter tops or other areas where exposure to water or weather is likely (see CEC 406(E)). For exterior locations see CEC Section 406.8. Modifications: Receptacles and receptacle face plates shall not be altered in any manner that would void the UL Listing. Use of broken, altered or modified receptacles, face plates or other materials associated with the receptacles is strictly prohibited.

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

RELIABLE POWER SUPPLY FOR ELECTRIC FIRE PUMPS


References: 2007 California Electrical Code, Articles 230 and 695 2003 Edition of NFPA 20, Standard for the Installation of Stationary Pumps for Fire Protection Section 5.20 Discipline: Fire and Life Safty

IR E-3
Issued 04-27-10

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies code requirements, based on the
2007 California Electric Code and 2003 NFPA 20 Section 5.20 as to what will be acceptable as a reliable power supply to an electric fire pump.

General: The 2007 California Electric Code, Article 695, Section 695.3, states, Power Source(s) for Electric Motor-Driven Fire Pumps shall have a reliable source of power. Interpretation: 1. Reliable Power Supply:
Various public utilities commissions oversee electric companies. Municipal boards are authorized to acquire, construct, operate and maintain, and to take all necessary action, in order to provide an adequate, dependable, supply of bulk electric power and energy within its jurisdiction. A fire pump may be permitted to be supplied by a separate service from a reliable municipal provider or a combination of power supply and backup supply produced on-site or as described in California Electrical Code Article 695.

2. Power Supply will include: Power source from a reliable municipal


electric supply company which has been connected per Article 230 of the California Electrical Code or on-site produced electricity with a back-up power supply installed and connected in accordance with the provisions of Section 695.

3. Connection to Power Supply: The connection shall be located and


arranged so as to minimize the possibility of damage by fire from within the premises and from exterior hazards. An electrical tap shall be ahead of the means to disconnect service, and shall comply with Section 230.82(5) of the California Electrical Code. The service equipment shall comply with the labeling requirements in Section 230.2 and the location requirements in 230.72(B) and NFPA 20:9.2.2.

DSA IR E-3 (iss 04-27-10)

Reliable Power Supply for Electric Fire Pumps Page 1 of 1

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

NONWATER- SUPPLIED URINAL FIXTURES

IR P-1

References: Revised in its entirety 06-02-08 2001 California Plumbing Code (Title 24, Part 5), Sections 301.2, 401.1, 406.2 Issued 01-05-04 as AC M-1 2007 California Plumbing Code (Title 24, Part 5), Sections 301.2, 401.1, 405.2 California Building Standards Administrative Code (Title 24, Part 1), Section 4-304 Health & Safety Code Section 17921.4 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) A112.19.19-2006 Vitreous China Nonwater Urinals Discipline: Plumbing
This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects, including State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grades K-12), community colleges, and state-owned buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Scope: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) document establishes requirements for nonwater-supplied urinal fixtures specified in project construction plans and specifications for installation in California public schools and state-owned buildings under Department of General Services (DGS) jurisdiction. 1.
1.1

Application:
Public Schools: The design professional in general responsible charge (i.e. project architect) of the design of the school construction project shall consult with the school district regarding installation and maintenance requirements for the proposed nonwater-supplied urinal fixtures. The nonwater-supplied urinal fixtures, installation, and maintenance must comply with the requirements noted in Sections 2, 3, and 4 below. State-Owned Buildings: The design professional in general responsible charge (i.e. project architect) of the state building project design shall consult with the Department of General Services regarding installation and maintenance requirements for the proposed nonwater-supplied urinal fixtures. The nonwater-supplied urinal fixtures, installation, and maintenance must comply with the requirements noted in Sections 2, 3, and 4 below.

1.2

2.
2.1

Fixture Requirements:
Performance: Nonwater-supplied urinal fixtures must meet the performance, testing, and labeling requirements of ASME A112.19.19-2006. Fixtures must comply with applicable accessibility provisions of the California Plumbing Code and California Building Code.

2.2

Listing: Fixtures, including all components, shall be listed by an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) accredited third-party certification agency to ASME 112.19.19-2006. Evidence of this listing shall be included with the construction documents submitted to DSA with each project application. A recognized agency listing [e.g. International Code Council-Evaluation Service (ICC-ES), International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) Research and Testing, Inc.]
Nonwater-Supplied Urinal Fixtures

DSA IR P-1 (rev 06-02-08)

Page 1 of 2

DSA IR P-1 (rev 06-02-08)

Nonwater-Supplied Urinal Fixtures

Page 2 of 2

may be referenced in the project construction plans and/or specifications to fulfill this requirement. 2.3 2.4 Identification: Nonwater-supplied urinal fixtures and each visible component shall be permanently marked as required in Section 4 of ASME A112.19.19. Trap Seal: Nonwater-supplied urinal fixtures must provide a trap seal that complies with the California Plumbing Code. This trap must permit the uninhibited flow of waste through the urinal to the sanitary drainage system. This trap must be installed and maintained in accordance with the urinal fixture manufacturers instructions.

Fixture Installation : A water supply rough-in to the urinal fixture location shall be provided. Water distribution and fixture supply piping sized to accommodate a water-fed urinal shall be installed to an in-wall location immediately adjacent to the urinal fixture. 4
maintained in accordance with the manufacturers instructions.

Fixture Maintenance: Nonwater-supplied urinal fixtures shall be cleaned and

California Department of General Services . Division of the State Architect . Interpretation of Regulations Document

PRE-CHECK (PC) DESIGNS ENERGY COMPLIANCE REVIEW


References: Title 24,CCR, Part 6: 2007 California Energy Code Discipline: Energy Compliance

IR N-1
Revised 06-14-10 Revised 07-01-09 Revised 04-15-08 Issued 09-15-03 as a DSA Bulletin

This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) is intended for use by the Division of the State Architect (DSA) staff, and as a resource for design professionals, to promote more uniform statewide criteria for plan review and construction inspection of projects within the jurisdiction of DSA which includes State of California public elementary and secondary schools (grade K-12, Community Colleges and state-owned or state-leased essential services buildings. This IR indicates an acceptable method for achieving compliance with applicable codes and regulations, although other methods proposed by design professionals may be considered by DSA. This IR is reviewed on a regular basis and is subject to revision at any time. Please check the DSA web site for currently effective IRs. Only IRs listed in the document at http://www.dsa.dgs.ca.gov/Pubs/default.htm (click on DSA Interpretation of Regulations Manual) at the time of plan submittal to DSA are considered applicable.

Purpose: This Interpretation of Regulations (IR) clarifies requirements for the energy
compliance review of Pre-Check (PC) designs submitted to the Division of the State Architect (DSA) for approval.

Background: All public school facility construction within the State of California, including
relocatable classrooms, must comply with all Parts of Title 24 (California Building Standards Code), including the energy efficiency standards contained in Part 6, Title 24, California Energy Code. The provisions of Part 6, Title 24 apply to the building envelope, spaceconditioning systems, water-heating systems, and lighting systems of buildings.

Scope: 1.

This IR is applicable for energy compliance. general requirements for PC designs.

See DSA Procedure PR 07-01 for

PC Designs Subject to Energy Compliance Review:

Any PC Design application submitted to DSA for approval of compliance with Title 24, current edition, and containing buildings with space-conditioning systems, water-heating systems, and/or lighting systems is subject to energy compliance review. Any project application that utilizes a PC design will be reviewed at the time of submittal to DSA to determine whether or not the PC design is approved for the climate zone in which the project is located. If the PC design is not approved for the project's climate zone, DSA will notify the project applicant and the PC owner that approval of the PC design for the climate zone in which the project is located is required prior to approval of the project application. Review and approval of the PC design for the project's climate zone will be processed as a revision. The approved revision to the PC design must be incorporated into the project application.

2.
2.1 2.2

Energy Compliance Documentation Requirements:


For any PC design subject to energy compliance review, the PC application submitted to DSA must include documentation identified in Section 3.2 below. Energy compliance documentation must be approved for each climate zone in which a project utilizing the PC is anticipated to be located, as determined by the PC owner. The climate zones for which the PC has been designed shall be noted on the PC plan cover sheet (see Section 2.3).
Pre-Check (PC) Designs Energy Compliance Review

DSA IR N-1 (rev 06-14-10)

Page 1 of 3

DSA IR N-1 (rev 06-14-10)

Pre-Check (PC) Designs Energy Compliance Review

Page 2 of 3

Any building design that complies with the worst-case orientation (see Section 2.3) in climate zones 14, 15 and 16 may be approved, from an energy standpoint, for placement in any climate zone. Climate zones 14, 15 and 16 represent the most severe types of weather (both heating and cooling) in California. Complying with code in climate zones 14, 15 and 16 does not require or prevent modeling the PC in other climate zones. Modeling and complying with code in other climate zones may allow for flexibility in the choice of insulation, fenestration, and heating and cooling system equipment. Information regarding the design variations for all climate zones or groups of climate zones for which the PC complies, must be provided in a table on the PC plan cover page/sheet as applicable. When modeling for particular climate zones use the reference cities listed in the current Building Energy Efficiency Standards. 2.3 For each climate zone considered, energy efficiency analysis must demonstrate compliance for the highest energy use (i.e. worst-case) orientation for each building within the PC Design. This worst-case orientation may be determined by modeling rotations about the compass in 30 degree increments starting at 0 degrees for each building. When a PC design contains multiple building configurations or variations of the building envelope, space-conditioning systems, lighting systems, or occupancy, the documentation author must define, in writing, the worst-case assumptions used for the energy analysis, including which orientation(s) were modeled and the worst-case orientation using the compliance method submitted, and which occupancy or occupancies are to be approved. When a unique PC design contains multiple sizes, the smallest and the largest potential size should be modeled at 30 compass intervals in each Climate Zone for which the PC seeks approval (per Section 2.3 above). The electronically-generated computer file(s) that produced the worst case energy use results for each climate zone for each unique PC design configuration that is modeled should be provided to DSA. In addition, a spreadsheet or table showing the data (standard and proposed design kBTU/ft2/yr) results from all the 30 degree simulations per climate zone in which each unique PC design configuration was modeled must be provided to DSA. PC designs for conditioned buildings may not offer unconditioned building options (such as bathrooms or storage buildings) within the same DSA pre-check application. (For further clarification of multiple occupancy limitations in the precheck approval process please see DSA Procedure 07-01, Attachment A, item 11.)

2.4

2.5

2.6

3. Process for Review of Energy Compliance of PC Designs:


For any PC design application designed to conform to Title 24, Part 6, current edition, and for any revision affecting the energy efficiency compliance of a previously approved PC design, the following steps must be completed: 3.1 Upon receipt of a submittal of a PC design application or revision of an approved PC Design, DSA will issue the DSA Pre-Check (PC) Energy Review Notification" to the PC owner or Design Professional in General Responsible Charge of the PC design. This notification provides contact information for Division of the State Architect/High Performance Section (DSA/HPS) team reviewer that will review and verify the PC's energy efficiency compliance.

DSA IR N-1 (rev 06-14-10)

Pre-Check (PC) Designs Energy Compliance Review

Page 3 of 3

3.2

A set of plans with energy compliance documents (as per DSA-3, Part 6, Sections 6.02 thru 6.05) should be sent to DSA/HPS after the applicant receives the PC Energy Review Notification letter from the DSA Intake Specialist, as per item 3.1 above. The PC owner shall summarize which climate zone(s) are to be approved, which orientation(s) were modeled, the worst-case orientation using the compliance method submitted and which occupancy or occupancies are to be approved. During the review phase, the DSA/HPS may contact the Design Professional to request additional information or to address questions regarding the PC's energy compliance. During the plan review phase, the DSA/HPS may suggest changes or corrections to the Title 24 modeling or the plans as needed. For example, the DSA/HPS may request the inclusion of specifications on the plans which are vital to the minimum energy efficiency determination. During the plan review phase, the DSA/HPS may determine that the building design does not meet one or more of the mandatory measures of the Energy code. Should this occur, staff will discuss the issue with the applicant and/or design professional. Upon completion of the energy compliance plan review, the DSA/HPS will notify the PC owner or Design Professional of the findings. If DSA determines that the Title-24 modeling for each designated climate zone conforms to the applicable Building Energy Efficiency Code, the applicant will place the results on a plan sheet entitled Title 24 Part 6. This plan sheet should contain copies of the signed Energy Pro Energy Performance Report (PERF) forms (parts 1 and 2) and the Mandatory Measures sheets for lighting, mechanical, and envelope that reflect the computergenerated or hand-written output from the approved energy Title 24 compliance documentation for each unique design. The run code printed on the drawings will appear on the bottom right corner of the PERF forms. Prior to the back check appointment for the PC plans, a copy of the final Title 24 Part 6 plan sheet shall be submitted to the DSA/HPS for an energy approval stamp by the DSA/HPS plan reviewer. Plans may be submitted either electronically or in hard copy for final review and approval. Approved electronic plan sheets will have a digital DSA/HPS approval stamp and signature and will be returned by e-mail to expedite this process. At the back check appointment for the PC plans, DSA will verify that the energy approval stamp by the DSA/HPS staff is located on the Title 24, Part 6 plan sheet. DSA will not send out the final letter of approval for the PC project unless the energy review process is complete. Fees: Costs incurred by DSA to review and approve energy compliance shall be recovered from the PC Owner or Manufacturer. Energy review costs will be included in the DSA plan review invoice issued before completion of the PC design backcheck. The fee is based on the square footage per model for each climate zone reviewed.

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

3.7

3.8

3.9

Any questions regarding this IR may be directed to the DSA/HPS staff at 916-327-0535.