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THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

WHITEFIELD
CATALOG
Eighth Edition

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

MESSAGE y {x PRESIDENT
Thank you for reading our catalog. Reformed theological education has been on the decline in America and around the world since the latter part of the nineteenth century. Many of the institutions which were established to provide a solid Reformed education, especially in training ministers of the Gospel, have been subsequently compromised. Ineffective leaders quickly sold their birthrights for the mess of pottage of the more popular systems of theology. These institutions, while remaining evangelical, have abandoned the distinctives of the Reformation. As a result, the pulpits of our churches are too often manned by graduates trained in defective theology by defective institutions. These graduates preach an impotent gospel, leaving the church without the hope of continued Reformational teachings and practices, and leaving lay leaders with little or no truth: My people perish from a lack of knowledge (Hosea 4:6). If there is any hope for reformation in America and elsewhere, the Church of Jesus Christ must once again produce pastors who boldly proclaim the whole counsel of God with the anointing of His Spirit. We must establish theologically-sound institutions that meet the present educational needs of the church, and seek to train a new generation of ministers in the old, time-honored, biblical tradition. The mission of Whitefield Theological Seminary is to return to the historic theology and methodology that God has blessed. We are dedicated to training pastors, students and Christian laymen in the theological standards of the Reformation. We are training godly men who are faithful to our Lord Jesus Christ, who will stand on the principles of Gods Word and who will not compromise the Gospel. We seek men who have a vision for the future, and a world-and-life view which seeks to bring all things under the Crown Rights of King Jesus. Come, labor with us to build the Kingdom of God. Your servant in Christ,

WELCOME

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ADMINISTRATION

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
History of the Seminary Funding and Entanglement Vision of the Seminary Statement of Faith

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Educational Philosophy Educational Objectives Directed Study Program Mentorship Program Benefits of the Directed Study Program An Approved Method of Study Recognition and Affiliation Accreditation Transfer of Credits Graduate Admission: Master Degrees Post-Graduate Admission: Doctoral Degrees Seminary Government

GENERAL INFORMATION

ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Classification of Students Grading Scale Coursework Integrity Student Conduct Academic Standing Introduction to Doctoral Degrees Graduate Degree Mentor Requirements Post-Graduate Degree Mentor Requirements. Doctoral Candidacy Requirements Thesis and Dissertation Requirements Graduation Requirements Whitefield Communications

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY


Professional Degrees Master of Divinity Pastoral Ministry Pastoral Counseling Bachelor of Divinity Without undergraduate Studies Without Biblical Languages Master of Theology Reformed Theological Interpretation Doctor of Theology Pastoral Ministry Pastoral Theology Academic Degrees Master of Arts

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Theological Studies Theology and Church History Theology and Apologetics Master of Arts in Religion Theology, Apologetics, and Church History Lay Degrees Diploma in Theology Master of Ministry in Theological Studies Master of Ministry in Pastoral Studies

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF COUNSELING


Biblical Counseling Philosophy Biblical Counseling Theology Biblical Counseling Methodology Master of Arts in Religion Christian Counseling Master of Sacred Theology Christian Counseling Doctor of Philosophy Christian Counseling

GENERAL INFORMATION

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION


Christian Philosophy of Education Master of Arts in Religion: Christian Education Doctor of Philosophy Christian School Administration Doctor of Education Christian Postsecondary Administration

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF CHURCH-STATE RELATIONS


Educational Objectives Master of Theology Christianity, Culture, and Law Doctor of Philosophy Church and State Studies

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Theological Studies Apologetic Studies Church History Studies Hebrew, Greek, and Latin Studies Biblical Studies Practical Theology Studies Christian Counseling Studies Christian Education Studies Legal Studies

Doctoral Degrees
Doctoral Core Courses Doctoral Major Courses

FURTHER READING
A Biography of George Whitefield

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INTRODUCTION
History of the Seminary / Funding and Government Vision of the Seminary / Statement of Faith HISTORY OF THE SEMINARY
Whitefield Theological Seminary derives its name from the eighteenth century revivalist, George Whitefield. Rev. Whitefield was a man of compassion, dedicated to the preaching of the Gospel. Reformed in his theology, he was one of the major influences of the eighteenth century, both in the British Isles and in the Great Awakening in colonial America. He traveled throughout England, Ireland, Wales, Scotland, and America to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Several orphanages started under his oversight, and his special ministry for children was evidenced as he saved his income to bring Christian schoolteachers to the southern colonies. His great desire to establish a theological seminary in the South was never realized in his lifetime. Fulfilling Whitefields vision, this Seminary is dedicated to training men for the ministry; men of compassion who desire to proclaim our crucified and risen Lord and King. We desire to train ministers with a vision for reformation, i.e., making the nations Christs disciples (Matthew 28:19). Whitefield Theological Seminary (WTS) was developed during a six-year period of research in the field of higher education. Various academic and practical programs were evaluated, resulting in the founding of Whitefield Theological Seminary in 1980. Whitefield began as a Graduate School of Theology, with both traditional and modular perspectives in learning. Soon, video, DVD and audio programming technologies were implemented, making it possible to develop advanced educational degree programs in a variety of new fields and allowing a better educational delivery method for distance learning. The Seminary added Graduate Schools of Education, Counseling and Church and State, and is currently developing new graduate schools in areas of missions, and philosophy.

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FUNDING AND ENTANGLEMENT


WTS is totally supported by tuition and gifts from churches and friends of the Seminary. We do not accept government benefits or programs of assistance in the area of student education or operations. WTS exists and functions under the protection of the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America. All degree programs are designed for use in conjunction with church related ministries. As a church sponsored institution, WTS strives to maintain its independent educational status, free from both governmental interference and entanglement while accountable to its ecclesiastical authority.

VISION OF THE SEMINARY


Whitefield Theological Seminary purposes to develop a deep and thorough understanding of Christianity by promoting theological and educational programs in the traditions of the Reformed faith. We emphasize both the academic and practical skills that are necessary for the Christian ministry. Our curriculum is designed to challenge students to develop a strong doctrinal and practical Christian ministry and nurture them in the grace and knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. It is also designed to acquaint them with the functions and ministry of the local church in our modern society. WTS stands true to the Reformed heritage of the Gospel: We preach Christ and Him crucified. (1 Corinthians 2:2)

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STATEMENT OF FAITH
Whitefield Theological Seminary maintains that the Holy Scriptures are the inerrant and authoritative Word of God. Additionally, WTS holds the Westminster Standards (Westminster Confession of Faith [1647] and the Larger and Shorter Catechisms) as subordinate to the Scriptures, yet as an accurate expression of biblical teachings concerning Christian life, faith and practice. We recognize also the Three Forms of Unity (Belgic Confession, Canons of Dordt and Heidelberg Catechism), the Second Helvetic Confession and other Reformed confessional standards. WTS also maintains the following distinctive doctrines: (1) Biblical Inerrancy; (2) Biblical Creationism; (3) Justification by Faith alone; (4) Bodily resurrection and (5) Presbyterian form of government. WTS accepts students from various denominations and independent churches. It is not necessary that a student be in complete agreement with the Seminarys doctrinal standards to be admitted as a student at Whitefield Theological Seminary.

ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Educational Philosophy / Educational Objectives Directed Study Program / Mentorship Program Benefits of the Directed Study Program / Recognition and Affiliation Accreditation / Transfer of Credit / Graduate Admission (Masters) Graduate Admission (Doctorate) / Seminary Government Academic Requirements and Related Processes EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY
WTS teaches that the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and in Christ are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. Whitefield is committed to that philosophy which is not after the traditions of men, or the foundational principles of this world, but after Christ (Colossians 2:8). The seminary teaches all subjects from a biblical perspective in order that we might offer an exclusively Christian approach to education. Compromise has effectively destroyed many older seminaries, and we will always need to guard against it. Our fervent prayer is that God will use our commitment to a solid biblical philosophy to keep Whitefield continually faithful to its first principles. The whole concept of Christian education is based on the confession that there is but one truth: the self-revelation of God as set forth in the Holy Bible. Education that is truly and distinctively Christian must be founded upon the principle of an authoritative, sovereign God, who speaks to us about all areas of life. There is nothing in this universe about which human beings can have full and true information unless they begin with the Bible. The very use of the term Christian as applied to education, assumes that it is impossible to understand the process of education apart from the revelation of God in His Word. We believe that the pursuit of knowledge must be built upon this very foundation, if our educational theory and methodology are to be consistently Christian. The sacred Scriptures give certainty to our efforts to educate students correctly concerning life and academic disciplines. Unity in education is bound by the principle that God, in creation, gives purpose and meaning to every fact of life, which can only be understood through His authority in Scripture. A Christian educational philosophy is also devoted to the development of the students spiritual, academic, and physical welfare. It seeks to enable the student to understand his place, meaning,

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Gods calling for his life that he might labor to advance the Kingdom of God on earth for His honor and glory.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES
Whitefield Theological Seminarys educational objectives are to give the student a foundational and an in-depth understanding of Gods Word (its meaning and principles), so that he will better understand Gods world and be able to carry out the cultural mandate as set forth in the book of Genesis. The student will develop an increasing dedication to Jesus Christ and to the building of the kingdom of God, and will develop a standard of ethics that is consistent with the Holy Scriptures. In doing this, we believe we can better prepare the student for successful ministry in his (her) chosen field of endeavor.

DIRECTED STUDY PROGRAM

ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION

The Directed Study Program of Whitefield Theological Seminary is designed to integrate theological education with the practical skills necessary for successful ministry, whether pastoring, teaching, counseling, or other related field of endeavor. The Directed Study Program is not conducted by the old correspondence method, rather it combines traditional and independent study in the context of distance learning. An approved mentor is required for each student to oversee his progress as he pursues his studies, and to assist the student in developing his gifts of ministry and/or service in the Church of Jesus Christ.

MENTORSHIP PROGRAM
We offer one basic approach to mentored study: The Media Mentored Program. The Media Mentored Program is our standard study approach and primarily utilizes courses with audio lectures on CDs. The lectures substantially introduce the subject to the student, and the reading and writing assignments further develop it. While the mentor continues to be involved in tutoring the student, the audio lectures reduce the mentors involvement, leaving him primarily responsible for answering questions from both the lectures and reading assignments as might be needed. The Mentor shall report every six months to the seminary on the progress of the student in his seminary studies and church attendance and activities.

BENEFITS OF THE DIRECTED STUDY PROGRAM


The Directed Study Program has many benefits for the student, pastor and church. 1. It allows a student who is training for the ministry the opportunity to fulfill his academic studies at his own pace, without uprooting his family and disrupting his home.

2. It provides an opportunity for the local church to receive immediate benefit from the students knowledge gained through his studies, as he instructs others and makes practical application of that knowledge in the local church. 3. It allows the church to keep the student local, so that he can help produce other disciples while training for the pastorate. Thus, a vacuum is avoided, and the core of the church is left

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intact as a source for future expansion. 4. It allows a student to receive continual hands on practical experience in the Gospel ministry, under the direction of the pastor and church session/consistory or committee on oversight.

5. It gives a student an opportunity to cultivate a pastors heart, as he prepares to shepherd the flock of God. 6. In some cases, where the local church supports the student financially in return for his assisting the pastor with daily ministerial duties, his duties may grow into a full-time position especially beneficial to the congregation, since the student already knows the needs of the church.

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7.

It provides many opportunities for the student to develop his speaking gifts via teaching and preaching in his church.

8. It enables the student to be properly evaluated as to his ministerial gifts by the session and congregation, especially in light of meeting their spiritual needs. 9. It offers the possibility of the church establishing a new mission work in the surrounding community through the efforts of the student-pastor. The list of benefits could go on! Throughout the history of the church, many pastors have been trained in the tradition of directed study, which emulates the system used by the Lord Jesus Christ in training His Apostles, who in turn trained others, one-to-one.

AN APPROVED METHOD OF STUDY


The Directed Study Program has proven to be an acceptable alternative educational method among various denominations. Graduates currently serve in many different Reformed and Presbyterian denominations, such as, the Reformed Presbyterian Church General Assembly, Presbyterian Church in America, Orthodox Presbyterian Church, Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, Bible Presbyterian Church, Reformed Presbyterian Church (Hanover), Reformed Church in the United States, as well as independent and other evangelical churches. Currently the alumni consist of individuals serving in 26 different denominations.

RECOGNITION AND AFFILIATION


Whitefield Theological Seminary is registered with the Florida Commission of Independent Education. This Commission is a division of the Florida Department of Education. Whitefield is authorized to grant degrees in areas related to religion and ecclesiastical vocations. Whitefield has been operating in the State of Florida for the past 30 years and is accountable to various state laws that regulate postsecondary education and its practices.
Whitefield Theological Seminary is also a member of the Association of Christian Schools International.

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Whitefield Theological Seminary is also a member of the Association of Christian Continuing Education Schools. This agency is committed to seeking new and better ways of advancing quality education through various distance learning motifs. Whitefield Theological Seminary is an affiliate with Institute of Theological Studies, a consortium of seminaries and graduate schools that have developed a collection of theological, philosophical, biblical and practical ministry courses. Whitefield Theological Seminary is certified by the Reformed Presbyterian Church General Assembly as a postsecondary institution for the training of individuals for Christian service.

ACCREDITATION

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A word must be mentioned here about accreditation because it is often a misunderstood practice. The primary reason an institution desires to seek accreditation by a government agency approved by the United States Department of Education (USDOE), is to qualify for federal and state funding and other entitlements programs, not to mention that accreditation has created a monopoly on our postsecondary educational institutions. Accreditation does not address issues of truth or quality or competency in the educational enterprise when it comes to Christian education and ministry. The administration of Whitefield Theological Seminary has determine, according to our educational objectives that our mission is best served by not blending church and state issues in order to accept government entitlements. This is our conviction and is not meant to reflect on others who are willing to participate in such programs. We believe that accountability as to truth or quality or competency rightfully rests with the regulatory (vocational) agencies that oversee and establish quality standards in their related fields of endeavor, such as engineering, etc. In the case of ministries it is the denominations and churches that set the standards of truth and quality and competency according to their statement of faith and practices. It is these type of agencies that should determine the competency of the individual and his/her education in light of proper testing and demonstration of abilities. On the practical side, Whitefield does recognize that there are academic and professional benefits in being associated with agencies that seek to maintain quality education and consistently developing newer programs for the delivery of educational information related to program development, which includes accrediting agencies. Whitefield is concerned with teaching the truth, giving quality education, and providing an education that will allow the student to have the competency necessary to carry out their mission or ministry. Therefore the seminary is seeking ways to affiliate for academic interaction while still being able to maintain a non-entanglement status.

TRANSFER OF CREDITS
While the Seminary has had students transfer to other institutions, both accredited and nonaccredited, the final decision regarding the transfer of credits is always left with the receiving institutions. The United States Department of Education (USDOE) wrote in its publication on accreditation, that: Accreditation does not provide automatic acceptance by an institution of credit earned in another institution [A]cceptance of students or graduates is always the prerogative of the receiving institution[F]or this reason students should take additional measures to determine, prior to enrollment, whether or not their educational goals will be met

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through attendance at a particular institution. These measures should include inquiries to institutions to which transfer might be desired. All degree programs of Whitefield Theological Seminary are intended for training in Christian and ecclesiastical vocations. All programs are taught from the perspective of a Christian world-and-life view. We encourage all students to consider the above recommendation of the USDOE prior to enrolling with WTS. This is especially important since the USDOE will not even ensure transfer of credits from one of their own accredited institutions to another accredited institution even if they are members of the same accrediting agency. In addition, we encourage students to contact their respective denominations concerning the acceptability of a WTS degree prior to enrollment for the study of the ministry. Transfer of credits to Whitefield Theological Seminary is permitted if the work required for the course is equal to or greater than the requirements by Whitefield. The Seminary refuses substandard courses for credit transfer, thereby weakening the students education. The student must submit for our review the course syllabus prior to approval for credit transfer. Course credits will be determined as follows: (1) Accepted (transfer of all credits), (2) Modified (transfer of some credit towards a course, or (3) rejected (work to inferior to receive the credits.

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GRADUATE ADMISSION: Master Degrees


Whitefield Seminary is specifically designed to provide quality Christian education. Whitefield admits students of any sex, race, color, or nationality, however, Whitefield Seminary reserves the right to deny admission to any student for any reason it deems adequate. Entrance into the Whitefield Seminary program is a privilege, not a right. The following must be submitted to the seminary administration and be approved for graduate admission. 1. A completed application with a $100 non-refundable application fee.

2. A written statement of faith. 3. A written statement giving reasons for pursuing a program of theological study. 4. A letter of recommendation from the students minister and/or church session (elders). 5. Full transcripts of all college or graduate work completed. 6. Letters of recommendation from 3 friends who have known the student for at least 3 years. They should include the following: (a) A brief background of the person writing the reference. (b) How long and under what circumstance the friend has been acquainted with the student. (c) An evaluation of the students character and spiritual development.

GRADUATE ADMISSION: Doctorate Degrees


Students must have carried a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 schale (or its equivalent) in his earlier graduate degree program of study. Students with less than a 3.0 GPA may be admitted under academic probation at the discretion of the administration. The following must be submitted to the seminary administration and be approved for post-graduate admission.

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1. Students must complete an application form and submit it to the administration with a $100 application fee (nonrefundable). 2. A statement of faith. 3. A written statement concerning why the student desires to pursue advanced studies at the doctoral level. 4. A letter of recommendation from the students church session or minister. 5. A full set of transcripts of all seminary and college level work that the student has completed, including catalogs from those schools describing the courses of study.

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6. Letters of recommendation from 3 friends who have known the student for at least 3 years. They should include the following: (a) A brief background of the person writing the reference. (b) How long and under what circumstance he is acquainted with the student. (c) An evaluation of the students character and spiritual development.

SEMINARY GOVERNMENT
Whitefield Theological Seminary is a ministry of Christ Presbyterian Church of the Reformed Presbyterian Church General Assembly, and is governed by an Executive Board of Directors. This Board has the final authority on all policy and administrative decisions pertaining to the Seminary. The Board of Directors also share in the over sight of academic policies and practices of the Seminary. This board has the duty and responsibility of reviewing and maintaining a quality standard of excellence in its educational programs. The Seminary Administration cares for the daily activities and interacts with students. The Administration has the responsibility to apply and direct the policies provided to them by the Executive Board of Directors and the Board of Directors for Academic Policy. The Board of Regents acts in an advisory capacity and represents the Seminarys interests throughout the United States and internationally.

ACADEMIC STANDARDS
Classification of Students / Advanced Standing / Course Challenge Grading Scale / Academic Honors / Coursework Integrity Student Conduct / Academic Standing / Graduate Degree Mentor (Masters) Graduate Degree Mentor (Doctorate) / Thesis and Dissertation Doctorate Degrees / Research Objectives / Research Philosophy Process of Thesis and Dissertation Requirements / Doctoral Examinations Time Limitation / Graduation Requirements (Masters / Doctorate) Whitefield Weekly / Reformed Theological Association Master Degrees

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CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
Students enrolled with Whitefield Theological Seminary shall be classified under one of the following categories:

Graduate (Master Degrees)


Junior: Students who have not completed at least 46 hours of degree credit study. No credit is granted for grades less than 2.0 on a 4.0 grade scale; Middler: Students who have completed 46 hours of degree credit, but less than 81 hours at or above the 2.0 grade scale level;

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Senior: Students who have completed 81 hours of degree credit, but less than 101 hours at or above the 2.0 grade scale level; Special: Any student who is enrolled in a contract for learning degree program. This includes a student enrolled in the Master of Ministry in Theological Studies or the Diploma of Theology programs.

Postgraduate (Doctorate Degrees)


There are three stages in a student's doctoral degree work: Initiate Candidate: A student who has passed the entrance exam and has been admitted to a doctoral program of study having met all prior academic requirements. Provisional Candidate: A student who has completed the prescribed core courses of study and passed the oral examination. Candidate: A student who has met all degree requirements except the completion of the dissertation. Special Candidate: A student who is enrolled in the Doctor of Arts in Religion which does not require a dissertation project. Post-Doctoral Candidate: A student who has completed a research doctorate currently enrolled in the advanced doctoral program. and is

ADVANCED STANDING
A student seeking advanced standing by transfer of credits, on the basis of work completed at other institutions of higher learning, must send to the Seminary administration copies of all transcripts along with a catalog from said institutions. All students must complete at least 30 credits of study with WTS in order to graduate. No credits will be received in which the grade is below the 2.0 or C grade level on a 4.0 grade scale. The student must keep in mind that the transfer of credits is a privilege, not a right. Therefore, it is possible that some credit hours of study may not be accepted or transferred into the Seminary. Transfer of credit is only granted to students who are enrolling in a degree program with the intention of completing the degree.

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COURSE CHALLENGE
Any student who feels that he has sufficient knowledge of a subject, may, by permission of the administration, take an oral or written examination given at the seminary headquarters in Lakeland, Florida. The exam covers the subject matter given in the course. Credit will be applied to the students transcript and counts toward the completion of his degree program following passage of the exam. The $800 examination fee must be paid to the seminary at least ten days prior to the examination date and is non-refundable. Neither will it be applied to the students tuition.

GRADING SCALE

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Courses completed satisfactorily are applied toward the graduation requirements on the basis of credit hours completed. They are evaluated in terms of letter grades. All grades are final and any course with a D or F grade must be retaken by the student. A+ A AB+ B B= = = = = = 10o 97-99 95-96 93-94 89-92 87-88 C+ C CD+ D D= = = = = = 85-86 81-84 78-80 76-77 73-75 71-72

WF = WP = HP = P = T =

Withdrew Failing Withdrew Passing High Pass (by examination) Pass (by examination) Transfer Credit

ACADEMIC HONORS
Students who have accumulated the following Grade Point Average will be awarded one of the following distinctions: % 100 = A+ Summa Cum Laude (With Highest Honor) % 99 = A Maxima Cum Laude (With Very Great Praise) %97-98 = A Magna Cum Laude (With Great Honor) %95-96 = A- Cum Laude (With Honor)

COURSEWORK INTEGRITY
Students are required to sign a statement when they apply, that their work is their own, and that they will not share their work with any other student. No lecture tapes, CDs or DVDs may be copied in any form without written approval from the Seminary. Should these principles be

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violated and discovered, the student may be expelled from the Seminary. All courses completed will be counted as failures and any degrees granted may be revoked. There will be no refunds of monies given. There is no time limit to these penalties.

STUDENT CONDUCT
Student conduct is determined by the standards as set forth in the Holy Scriptures. All students, whether enrolled in WTS or one of its extension seminaries, are under the spiritual oversight of their local church. The students devotional life is an important part of his nurturing in the faith of Jesus Christ. All students must maintain regular daily devotions and regular church attendance. The Seminary reserves the right to terminate a student under either of the following circumstances:

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1. The student becomes involved in questionable moral and or ethical practices; 2. The student is promoting unacceptable doctrinal teachings which fall outside of the
evangelical faith. In all cases of termination, the student agrees to return all audio/ visual materials to the Seminary.

ACADEMIC STANDING
Courses are passed upon satisfactorily completing all required course work and projects and passing the examinations. This work will be applied toward the graduation requirements on the basis of credit hours completed.

GRADUATE DEGREE MENTOR REQUIREMENTS: Master Degrees


The following are the requirements for students entering the Directed Studies Program (Master Degrees). 1. Students are required to obtain a mentor(s), who will be acceptable and approved by the Seminary.

2. Mentors must have a recognized degree, either equivalent to or beyond the degree that the student is pursuing. 3. Students are required to meet with the mentor(s) regularly for review and direction concerning the students progress and comprehension of the course assignments. 4. Students must provide a monthly report concerning his progress either in writing, by phone, fax or email. 5. Mentors must contact the seminary office semiannually and give a full report of the students progress either in writing, by phone, fax or email.

6. Students are responsible to submit all the required work for each course of study to the Seminary.

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7. Students are required to be actively attending a church. A semiannual report from the students pastor or church session, concerning the students activities in church work is to be sent to the Seminary by the church either in writing, by phone, or email.

8. Students may call the Seminary for advice and instruction concerning the program of study. 9. All master degree students will study their courses one at a time except for Biblical languages, which should be taken simultaneously with the other courses. After completion of all work for each course of study, the student may proceed to the next course of study. 10. All work submitted to the Seminary-courses and projects, tests, theses and dissertation projects-is the property of Whitefield Theological Seminary (students must keep copies of their original work). Students who have the opportunity to have their theses or dissertations published should contact the Seminary for instructions. The Seminary does not expect to receive royalties on published manuscripts.

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GRADUATE DEGREE MENTOR REQUIREMENTS: Doctorate Degrees


The following requirement must be met by the student in securing mentors for his degree program. 1. All doctorate degrees are mentored by the seminary.

2. Students must also engage the aid of two ministers or professors, who will read and submit letters of recommendation as to the acceptability of the dissertation project. These reviewers are subject to approval by the Doctoral Committee, and must possess an earned doctorate degree in a related field.

THESIS AND DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS


Master Degrees
Each student will be required to write a thesis that is a minimum of 50 pages or 12,000 words in length, with a bibliography of at least twenty recognized scholarly resources for Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Religion, and Master of Divinity degrees. Students taking the Master of Theology degree program will be required to write a thesis paper that is a minimum of 75 pages or 18,000 words in length, with a bibliography of at least twentyfive recognized scholarly resources.

Doctorate Degrees
Each student completing a research doctorate (Ph.D./Th.D./Ed.D. is required to write a dissertation that is a minimum of 300 pages or 75,000 words in length but not to exceed 400 pages or 100,000 words, with a bibliography of at least one-hundred recognized scholarly resources supporting reading and research in the field of the students dissertation. The student seeking to complete the Th.D. in Pastoral Ministry degree is required to write a dissertation that is a minimum of 150 pages or 36,000 words in length, with a bibliography of a seventy-five recognized scholarly resources supporting the reading and research in the field of

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the students dissertation. The Litt.D. advanced degree requires the student to write a dissertation that is a minimum of 400 pages or 100,000 words in length, but not to exceed 500 pages or 120,000 words, with a bibliography of at least fifty recognized scholarly resources supporting reading and research in the field of the students dissertation.

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES
Theses and dissertations must meet the following objectives: Academic: It must be a high quality academic work that represents the appropriate graduate or post-graduate level of research and written work.

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Knowledge: It must advance biblical scholarship. Dissertations must set forth a new approach or thought concerning the subject matter originality is important. Skill: It must demonstrate the students skill in using Gods Word (Holy Scripture) as the foundation and verification for all conclusions reached. Style: It must be written in accordance with the standards of A Manual for Writers of Papers, Theses, and Dissertations by Kate L. Turabian, University of Chicago Press, (current edition), or any other approved guide.

RESEARCH PHILOSOPHY
Students should keep the following in mind as they research and write their thesis or dissertation. 1. All sources of research must be documented and submitted to the Seminary with the first draft of the written project.

2. All quotations should reflect the content of the subject and the subject matter from which the quote was taken. Misrepresentation of any position is unacceptable, and reflects poor scholarship on the part of the student. Be sure that you understand the writers point of view clearly. 3. Research work is to be completed by the student only. A part of the discipline of graduate work is researching, reading and writing. No project will be accepted if the work is not entirely the students own. 4. Do not write a dissertation that consists of nothing more than footnotes. The Seminary is more interested in the thoughts, work and skills of the student, rather than those of others. Use your research to support your position, but do not simply repeat what has already been written. Make your project an original creation. 5. A thesis or dissertation must be of an academic quality that will make a contribution to the advancement of Christian knowledge.

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PROCESS TO THESIS AND DISSERTATION COMPLETION
Students will need to follow their program guides in completing the full processes required for completing and submitting approved thesis and dissertation papers. (See your program guide).

DOCTORAL EXAMINATIONS
The first examination (if required) is for entrance into the doctorate program. It will be a written examination that will be proctored by an examiner approved by the Administration and must be taken before any course work commences. The second examination will be given orally covering the core course requirements (six courses) prior to approval to begin studies in his major area of concentration. The third examination will be given orally after covering the major course requirements (six courses) prior to approval The Doctoral dissertation exam shall be given orally and will test the candidates knowledge of a specialized field, as well as his ability: 1. To integrate knowledge with other theological disciplines;

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2. To make scholarly judgments; 3. To critically analyze detractors objections; 4. To grasp bibliographical resources; and 5. To demonstrate knowledge of theological scholarship. 6. The oral examinations will be no shorter than 2 hours, and no longer than 5 hours in length.

TIME LIMITATION
All work for the Doctoral degrees must be completed within ten years after admission to the Doctoral program. If a student fails to complete his doctoral degree program in the specified time, the student must petition the Seminary to be reinstated for an additional time of study, after which the program must be completed with out additional extension (2 additional years will be permitted).

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Graduate Degrees: Masters
The following requirements must be met by a student in order to graduate from the Graduate Degree program.

ADMINISTRATION

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


1. All students are required to take final comprehensive examinations at the Seminary headquarters in Lakeland, Florida.

2. Each student shall contact the Seminary for an examination date. Whitefield Theological Seminary will establish a regional testing center for any student who resides outside North America. Such students should contact the Seminary for information on the location of the testing center. 3. In order to graduate, the student is expected to score at least an 80% passing grade on the comprehensive examination at the completion of his degree program. No degree will be awarded without completion of all required courses. 4. A student must be enrolled at WTS at the time of his graduation, and have maintained a cumulative 3.0 (B) grade point average. 5. Graduation from each degree program requires the completion of a thesis. 6. The thesis must be preapproved by the Seminary. 7. No student will receive a degree without fulfilling all the course graduation and financial requirements as listed in the catalog, administrative bulletin or otherwise communicated to the student.

ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION

Graduate Degrees: Doctorate


The following requirements must be met by a student in order to be granted permission to graduate from any of the post-graduate degree programs.

Degree program:
1. The completion of all admission and candidacy requirements to the satisfaction of the Doctoral Degree Committee and the administration.

2. All financial obligations must be paid in full, or acceptable arrangements made with the administration. 3. Successfully completing all three oral exams and the students dissertation with the approval of the Doctoral Examination Committee. 4. The submission of a typed dissertation (five copies, professionally hard bound) with the approval of the Committee Chairman and Executive Director. This includes completing the Five Phase Program for the Completion of the Graduate Doctoral Degree, as listed previously.

Whitefield Weekly
The Whitefield Weekly is an official publication of Whitefield Theological Seminary. The Whitefield Weekly is published to update students on the activities of Whitefield Theological Seminary, theological issues of importance, changes in policies or courses, and additional information of interest to the student. Whitefield Seminary also operates a posting service and a

ADMINISTRATION

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


chat room for communication with the students.

Reformed Theological Association


The Reformed Theological Association is a program for men who have earned the Master of Theology degree, its equivalent, or a doctorate degree, and are willing to develop a medium for exchange in oral and written communication, in order to advance theological and biblical scholarship. For additional information, write to the Seminarys RTA Chairman.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY


PROFESSIONAL DEGREES

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAMS

Master of Divinity / Bachelor of Divinity / Master of Theology Doctor of Theology


Study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that need not be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth (2 Timothy 2:15). The Whitefield Graduate School of Theology offers various degrees in Theological and Historical Studies, including a variety of doctoral degree programs. All courses shall be taken under the direction of a mentor. Courses are offered through the following method of study, The Media Program. This program utilizes CDs, reading, research, and writing. The degrees offered are listed in the following sections.

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES
Master of Divinity (M.Div.) Pastoral Ministry (Presbyterian. Baptist, and Episcopal)
The Master of Divinity in Pastoral Ministry with a Presbyterian Emphasis is a three-year study program designed specifically to train men for the office of minister. The degree requirements are based on the rules for examination for ordination as set forth by the Westminster Assembly in 1645, as stated in The Form of Presbyterian Church Government: He shall be examined touching his skill in the original tongues, and his trial to be made by reading the Hebrew and Greek Testaments, and rendering some portion of some into Latin [now English]; and whether he hath skill in logic and philosophy. What authors in divinity he hath read, and is best acquainted with; and trial shall be made in his knowledge of the grounds of religion, and of his ability to defend the orthodox doctrine contained in them against all unsound and erroneous opinions, especially these of the present age; of his skill in the sense and meaning of such places of scripture as shall be proposed unto him, in cases of conscience, and in the chronology of the scripture, and the ecclesiastical history. Acceptance into this degree program requires an acceptable bachelor degree or a first theological degree from an approved graduate school of theology. This track is designed for those students who plan on entering a Presbyterian, Baptist, or Episcopal ministry. Required Courses for Presbyterian ministry: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


Church History; Presbyterian Church History; Historical Theology; New Testament Greek; Old Testament Hebrew; Introduction and History of the Old Testament; Introduction and History to the New Testament; Homiletics; Presbyterian Pastoral Theology; Pastoral Counseling; Presbyterian Church Administration and the Law; Biblical Worship (Reformed Presbyterian); Cults and Heresies; Reformed Evangelism and Missiology; Presbyterian Pastoral Practicum; Master Thesis. Required Courses for Baptist ministry: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Baptist Church History; Historical Theology; New Testament Greek; Old Testament Hebrew; Introduction and History of the Old Testament; Introduction and History to the New Testament; Homiletics; Baptist Pastoral Theology; Pastoral Counseling; Baptist Church Administration and the Law; Biblical Worship (Reformed Baptist); Cults and Heresies; Reformed Evangelism and Missiology; Baptist Pastoral Practicum; Master Thesis. Required Courses for Episcopal ministry: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Episcopal Church History ; Historical Theology ; New Testament Greek; Old Testament Hebrew; Introduction and History of the Old Testament; Introduction and History of the New Testament; Homiletics; Episcopal Pastoral Theology; Pastoral Counseling; Episcopal Church Administration and the Law; Biblical Worship (Reformed Episcopal); Cults and Heresies; Reformed Evangelism and Missiology; Episcopal Pastoral Practicum; Master Thesis. Pastoral Counseling (Presbyterian, Baptist, and Episcopal) The Master of Divinity in Pastoral Counseling is a three-year study program designed specifically to train men for the office of minister with a counseling emphasis. Acceptance into this degree program requires an acceptable bachelor degree or a first theological degree from an approved graduate school of theology. Required Courses for Presbyterian: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Presbyterian Church History; Historical Theology; New Testament Greek; Old Testament Hebrew; Introduction and History of the Old Testament; Homiletics; Pastoral Theology; Pastoral Counseling; Marriage and Family Counseling I; Marriage and Family Counseling II; Advanced Biblical Counseling I; Advanced Biblical Counseling II; History and Methodology in Counseling; Theology of Counseling; Counseling Internship; Master Thesis. Required Courses for Baptist: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Baptist Church History; Historical Theology; New Testament Greek; Old Testament Hebrew; Introduction and History of the Old Testament; Homiletics; Pastoral Theology; Pastoral Counseling; Marriage and Family Counseling I; Marriage and Family Counseling II; Advanced Biblical Counseling I; Advanced Biblical Counseling II; History and Methodology in Counseling; Theology of Counseling; Counseling Internship; Master Thesis. Required Courses for Episcopal: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics;

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAMS

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Episcopal Church History; Historical Theology; New Testament Greek; Old Testament Hebrew; Introduction and History of the Old Testament; Homiletics; Pastoral Theology; Pastoral Counseling; Marriage and Family Counseling I; Marriage and Family Counseling II; Advanced Biblical Counseling I; Advanced Biblical Counseling II; History and Methodology in Counseling; Theology of Counseling; Counseling Internship; Master Thesis. Bachelor of Divinity (B.D.) Without Undergraduate Degree A student without an undergraduate (bachelor) degree may complete the Master of Divinity (M.Div.) program of Study in any of the Pastoral Ministry programs (Presbyterian, Baptist, or Episcopal) and be awarded the Bachelor of Divinity degree. If the student later completes an undergraduate degree, the Bachelor of Divinity degree may be upgraded to a Master of Divinity degree, for a designated fee upon application by the student.

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAMS

Bachelor of Divinity (B.D.) Without Biblical Languages Students who desire to take the Master of Divinity degree program, but do not want to complete the Greek and Hebrew requirements, may receive a Bachelor of Divinity degree which will be designated as a major in English Bible only. Master of Theology (Th.M.) The Master of Theology (Th.M.) degree is a three year program of study offered in the two following areas: Reformed Theology and Interpretation and Reformed Theology and Biblical Languages. The degree requires the completion of a Bachelors degree from an approved institution of higher learning. The Following courses are required for the completion of the degree. Reformed Theological Interpretation Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Presbyterian Church History; Historical Theology; New Testament Greek; Old Testament Hebrew; Introduction and History of the Old Testament; Advanced Interpretation and Exegesis: History of the Reformation; History of Christian Thought; Westminster Confession: History and Theology; Larger Catechism (Westminster); Current Theological Issues I: Justification; Master Thesis Reformed Theology and Biblical Languages Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; Historical Theology Introduction to New Testament Greek I; Introduction to New Testament Greek Syntax; Intermediate Greek I Rapid Greek Reading/Translation; Intermediate Greek II - Introduction to the Septuagint; Exegetical Methodology and Tools; Exegetical Practicum; Introduction to Biblical Hebrew; Intermediate Hebrew I - Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Syntax; Intermediate Hebrew II Reading/Translation; Hebrew Exegesis; Hebrew Exegetical Practicum. Master Thesis. Doctor of Theology (Th.D.) The Doctor of Theology is the highest professional degree awarded by the Seminary. It is a

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


four-year degree awarded in Pastoral Ministry or Pastoral and Ecclesiastical Theology that is built on the curriculum of the Master of Divinity degree with an additional year of study in applied theology. Students must be capable of demonstrating ability to obtain excellence in all phases of the program with strong academic competence. The student must complete the required post-graduate core courses, and then select one area of study in ministry, which must be approved by the Doctoral Committee. A dissertation is required to complete this degree program. Pastoral Ministry Admission to this program requires the Bachelor of Arts degree or its equivalent. Students who enroll in the Th.D. degree can be awarded the Master of Arts in Christian Studies, Master of Arts in Religion, and the Master of Divinity degrees upon completing the required courses of study that lead to the Th.D. degree. Only students who have taken all their seminary studies (M.A.C.S., M.A.R., M.Div., or B.D.) with WTS will be admitted into the Th.D. program for Pastoral Ministry. Any student who does not complete the dissertation requirement for the Doctor of Theology degree in Pastoral Ministry will be awarded the Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.) degree as an alternative degree. Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Presbyterian Church History; Historical Theology; New Testament Greek; Old Testament Hebrew; Introduction and History of the Old Testament; Homiletics; Presbyterian Pastoral Theology; Pastoral Counseling; Presbyterian Church Administration and the Law; Biblical Worship (Reformed Presbyterian); Cults and Heresies; Reformed Evangelism and Missiology; Presbyterian Pastoral Practicum; Marriage and Family Counseling I; Marriage and Family Counseling II; Advanced Biblical Counseling I; Advanced Biblical Counseling II; History and Methodology in Counseling; Theology of Counseling; Counseling Internship; Doctoral Dissertation. Pastoral Theology The Doctor of Theology in Pastoral Theology degree is a three year study program. All courses of study directly relate to preaching, worship and sacraments. A student must possess a Master of Divinity degree from an approved seminary or its equivalent in order to enroll in this degree program of study. Required Courses: History of Reading and Preaching in Worship I; History of Reading and Preaching in Worship II; Puritan Worship; Reformed Ministry and Preaching; History of Revival and Revivalism; The Lords Supper in Worship; Doctoral Dissertation.

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAMS

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY


ACADEMIC DEGREES
Master of Arts / Master of Arts in Religion
Master of Arts (M.A.)
The Master of Arts in Theological Studies degree is a sixteen month program of studies in one of the following areas of emphasis: Theological Studies; Theology and Church History; or Theology and Apologetics. Acceptance into this program requires an acceptable bachelors degree.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


Theological Studies
Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; Master Thesis.

Theology and Church History


Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Historical Theology; Master Thesis.

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAMS

Theology and Apologetics


Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Church History I; Church History II; Cults and Heresies; Historical Theology; Master Thesis.

Master of Arts in Religion (M.A.R.)


The Master of Arts in Religion is a two-year program of study offering studies in Theology, Apologetics, and Church History. Acceptance into this degree program requires an acceptable bachelors degree.

Theology, Apologetics, and Church History


Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Presbyterian Church History; Historical Theology; New Testament Greek (First Year); Old Testament Hebrew (First Year); Master Thesis.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY


LAY STUDIES PROGRAMS AND DEGREES
Diploma in Theology / Master of Ministry in Theological Studies Master of Ministry in Pastoral Studies

LAY STUDIES DEGREES


Diploma in Theology (Dip. Th.)
The Diploma of Theology is a 32 credit-hour course designed for the layman to advance his theological knowledge, and may be used as preparation for the training of a deacon. There are no academic requirements for enrolling in this program. Each course of study is taken for two or three credit-hours.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


Required Courses: Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Presbyterian Church History; Historical Theology I; Historical Theology II; Introduction and Survey of the Old Testament; Introduction and Survey of the New Testament. Thesis.

Master of Ministry (M.Min.)


The Master of Ministry in Theological Studies is a 67 credit-hour course designed for men who desire to master both the theological and practical skills necessary for their calling as a Ruling Elder. There are no academic requirements for enrolling in this program. Each course of study is taken for two or three credit-hours. Required Courses: Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Presbyterian Church History; Historical Theology I; Historical Theology II; Introduction and Survey of the Old Testament; Introduction and Survey of the New Testament; Homiletics; Pastoral Theology; Pastoral Counseling; Church Administration; The Church and Law; Biblical Worship; Cults and Heresies; Reformed Missiology and Biblical Evangelism; Pastoral Practicum.

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAMS

Master of Ministry (M.Min.)


The Master of Ministry in Pastoral Studies is the M.Div. degree program lightened by of the requirements for individuals who are seeking ordination with churches that do not require the amount of study normally assigned to the Master of Divinity. Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; American Church History; Presbyterian Church History; Historical Theology; New Testament Greek; Old Testament Hebrew; Introduction and History of the Old Testament; Homiletics; Pastoral Theology; Pastoral Counseling; Presbyterian Church Administration and the Law; Biblical Worship (Reformed Presbyterian); Cults and Heresies; Reformed Evangelism and Missiology; Presbyterian Pastoral Practicum; Master Thesis.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF COUNSELING


ACADEMIC DEGREES
The Whitefield Graduate School of Counseling has been established to better equip ministers and other Christian workers in the field of Biblical Counseling. With the onslaught of humanism in our society, the effects of sin have been far reaching within the Christian Community. Many churches have sought to counter this degenerating condition within American Christianity by turning to the secular theories of psychology and counseling methods. Rather than the church confronting the sins of our people with the Word of God, by the power of the Holy Spirit, through the mediatorial work of Jesus Christ (our Great High Priest), they have allowed professional counselors to enter into the ministry with a calling to counsel. In doing this they have allowed untrained and ill-equipped individuals to assume positions of ministry in the church. As a result, the Gospel is synthesized with secularism. This integration has placed

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF COUNSELING

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


humanistic views of man on par with Holy Scripture. Psychology has thus replaced theology in the church and psychologists have replaced God-Ordained ministers. This has allowed heretical doctrines and practices within the church, which have had an adverse effect on its members. Such modernism can no longer be tolerated if the church is to be faithful to Jesus Christ.

Biblical Counseling Philosophy


Whitefield Theological Seminary believes that Holy Scripture is the foundation for all of life, faith, and practice. Therefore, Gods Word is our only source of authority in counseling. As our basis for counseling, this Word is absolutely sufficient; it is superior to any and all other sources because there are no other sources of truth. It is abundantly practical in its application. To be an effective biblical counselor requires effective and faithful handling of the Word of God. Biblical counseling is an integral part of, and not a replacement for, theological training. Accordingly, WGS requires that all students complete a minimum number of courses in theological studies. WGS also believes that counseling is an integral part of the ministry of the local church and is committed to seeing Gods people trained to effectively counsel.

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAMS

Biblical Counseling Theology


Man must be viewed in light of Holy Scripture. He is created in the image of God as a rational being, endued with knowledge, righteousness and holiness. After the fall of Adam, all men came under the effects of Original Sin. Thereby, man has a sinful nature. It is the effect of this Original Sin and resulting sins that has affected our world. The means of effecting change is by redemption in Christ and the application of the Bible to our lives. Redemption is accomplished only by the sovereign act of Gods Grace. Therefore, our view of God, man, sin, Christ, redemption, sanctification, and the Church is essential to any counseling that refers to itself as biblical. Whitefield maintains that it is the Reformed theological interpretation of Scripture alone that establishes the basis for confronting sin and correcting sinful practices. No other theology will effectively deal with man and sin in a biblical model.

Biblical Counseling Methodology


WTS is committed to the Nouthetic Counseling method as developed by Dr. Jay Adams. This method was developed based upon biblical principles that require the counselor to confront sin in the life of the individual. It recognizes that sin is fundamental in problems that occur in life, and unless we deal with the sin in the counselee, we will not resolve the problems that have developed as a result of sin. This method does not use modern psychological treatment theories for analyzing behavior. Rather, it seeks to understand behavior as a result of sin in the life of the individual. The answer to sinful behavior is found only in the Holy Scriptures. Thus, we are required to confront the individual in Christian love, with the demands of the Scriptures that they repent from their sins and put on the new life in Christ Jesus, by the power of the Holy Spirit, according to the Word of God. Whitefield Graduate School of Counseling offers Masters, Doctoral, and Post-Doctoral degrees in Biblical Counseling.

Master of Arts in Religion (M.A.R.)


This is a two year degree program. The first year is a major in theological studies that are fundamental to the study of Biblical Counseling. The second year is an emphasis in the area of Nouthetic Counseling. The student is required to complete the following courses for this degree program of study: Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I;

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF COUNSELING

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; Fundamentals of Christian Counseling; Marriage and Family Counseling I; Marriage and Family Counseling II; Advanced Counseling Methods I; Advanced Counseling Methods II; History and Methodologies in Counseling I; History and Methodologies in Counseling II; Theology of Counseling; Master Thesis.

Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.)


Prospective students who already posses a Master of Divinity degree in Pastoral Ministry may enroll in the Graduate School of Counseling and upon completing the following courses receive the Master of Sacred Theology Degree. Required Courses: Fundamentals of Christian Counseling; Marriage and Family counseling I; Marriage and Family Counseling II; Advanced Counseling Methods I; Advanced Counseling Methods II; History and Methodologies in Counseling I; History and Methodologies in Counseling II; Theology of Counseling; Master Thesis.

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAMS

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION


ACADEMIC DEGREES
Master of Arts in Religion
Christian Philosophy of Education
The whole concept of Christian education is based on the prospect that there is but one truth, the truth of the self-revelation of God as set forth in the Bible. The very concept of the term Christian as applied to education assumes that it is impossible to understand the process of education apart from the revelation of God as set forth in the Bible. We believe that the pursuit of knowledge must be established upon this very foundation if our educational theory and methodology is even to resemble anything remotely Christian. The sacred Scriptures alone give certainty to our efforts to correctly educate students concerning life and academic disciplines. Unity in education is bound by this principle: that every fact of life is given purpose and meaning and can only be understood in relation to Scriptural authority. Education, which is truly and distinctly Christian, must be founded upon the principle of an authoritative and sovereign God who has spoken truth that encompasses all areas of life. There is nothing in this universe upon which human beings can have full and true knowledge unless they take the Bible into account. It is by necessity, then, that we must have a definite interpretation of the Scriptures to produce the desired philosophy of education. We believe there can be only one theological interpretation which will place a bibliocentric postulate in our philosophy, that is, the interpretation set forth in historical Christian theology. If God is to be central in our educational process, then His Word and its proper interpretation must be essential. This interpretation is based upon the Reformed tradition. The necessity of a correct theological interpretation of Scripture can easily be understood as to its importance in developing a theocentric (God centered) philosophy of education, as opposed to an anthropocentric (man centered) philosophy.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


We believe then, as Christians of the Reformed faith, we must seek to bring all aspects of creation and mans life into a fundamental understanding of the Bible. For the Bible alone presupposes the intelligibility of any part of the universe in which man lives. Gods standard of truth is the proposition as set forth in His Word. It is the standard of truth to which all claims of knowledge must be brought, so as to establish their validity. Philosophy may be defined as a systematic view of life and the world. Rightfully stated, it is mans relationship to the world around him. Biblical theism begins with a presuppositional belief that philosophical truth must be formulated from the only source of truth available to man, the Holy Bible. A Reformed Christian educational philosophy espouses a world and life view devoted to the development of the students spiritual, academic, and physical welfare. It seeks to enable the student to understand his place, meaning, purpose and responsibilities in his present existence under the providence of a sovereign God.herein lies the meaning to the unity of the universe. A world and life view must be established upon this foundation. Therefore, at every point in our educational process we are confronted by the necessity of bringing every department of study under the authority of Gods Word. If we are to have consistency in our teaching in the academic areas in the arts and sciences, and establish the unity of various fields, we must have theology as our basis. There is but one system of truth resulting from one source. The Bible is the main text in the curriculum of every academic subject.

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAMS

Master of Arts in Religion (M.A.R.)


This is a two year degree program. The first year is a major in theological studies that are fundamental to the study of Christian education. The second year is an emphasis in the area of Christian Education. The student is required to complete the following courses for this degree program of study: Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; Christian Education; History of Christian Education; Christian Philosophy of Education; Curriculum: Philosophy and Development; The Arts of Christian Teaching; Guidance and Special Education; Public Education: Analysis and Critique; Supervision and Leadership; Master Thesis.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF CHURCH & STATE RELATIONS


ACADEMIC DEGREES
Master of Theology
There is a growing need in our current generation to more closely examine the relationship between church and state. Through out the history of the Church, Christianity has actively been involved in a direct relationship with the civil magistrate. The history of church-state relations has been a topic of much theological and philosophical discussion throughout the history of our nation. Today new issues continue to rise and the questions on church and state relations return to center stage. What is the biblical relationship between church and state?

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


What can history teach us about church and state relations and their effect on each governmental sphere? How far can the church and state invade each others realm of jurisdiction without one dominating the other? These questions and others will be answered in this program of study.

Educational Objectives
The Graduate School of Church-State Relations shall endeavor as the grace of God enables it, to explore the relevant passages of Scripture relating to issues of church and state in the areas of culture, advocacy and public policy. The program will also explore the extant literature relevant to Church-State relations in history and the current milieu, and expound ways and means to bring current Church-State relations into more biblical parameters. The pedagogy of churchstate relations shall involve a conference format whereby a student will proceed through a tailormade annotated bibliography as a map, with continual conferencing to encourage, guide and refine the students understanding and skill in church-state thought.

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAMS

Master of Theology (Th.M.)


This is a three year degree program. The first year is a major in theological studies that are fundamental to the study of Christianity, Culture, and Law. The second year is an emphasis in the area of Christian culture. The third year emphasizes a study in the area of American Law. The student is required to complete the follow courses for this degree program of study: Required Courses: Theological Research and Reading; Hermeneutics; Systematic Theology I; Systematic Theology II; Systematic Theology III; Systematic Theology IV; Biblical Theology; Covenant Theology; Apologetics I; Apologetics II; Biblical Ethics; Biblical View of Culture; Church History I; Church History II; Christian Political Philosophy; Christianity and the State; Christian Economics; Christianity and Culture I; Christianity and Culture II; Christianity and Culture III; Christianity and Culture IV; Legal Reasoning; Legal Research and Writing; History and Introduction to Law; Constitutional Law; First Amendment Law; Conflict of Law; Legislative Law and Administrative Law; Church and State Law; Civil Law and Procedures; Criminal Law; Criminal Procedures; Tort Law; Evidence; Family Law; Master Thesis.

DOCTORAL DEGREES
PROFESSIONAL AND ACADEMIC DEGREES
Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Theology Doctor of Education / Doctor of Literature
History of the Doctorate Degree
The term doctorate comes from the Latin word doceo meaning I teach. The doctorate appeared in medieval European universities as a license to teach, from the Latin phrase licentia docendi. The concept of doctor can be traced back to the Early Church when the term referred to the Apostles and Elders of the Church whose calling was to teach church doctrine and defend the faith of the Church. Later the term was applied to the Church Fathers and other Christian authorities who taught theology and bible interpretation. The right to grant a licentia docendi (license or doctor to teach) was originally reserved to the organized Catholic (universal) Church of Jesus Christ. In order to receive the distinction the applicant was required to pass theological and biblical exams. Candidates were also required to take oaths of allegiance to the Church, its leadership, and dogma as officially interpreted and settled. This right of granting a

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF CHURCH AND STATE RELATIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


doctorate degree became a contentious issue between the Church authorities and those universities seeking to award the degree independently of the Church. The nature of the degree was licentia ubequie docendi the universal license to teach. In 1213 the Pope finally granted the right to the University of Paris to convey the doctorate independently of the Church. However, it should be noted that the university was owned and operated by the Church. Nevertheless, this was a major milestone in university education. The view of the doctorate by the university originally took on a form of apprenticeship directly related to a religious order or guild. Students were required seven years of study prior to being admitted to an order or guild as master. Students entered the university as bachelors and then matriculated towards receiving the Masters degree (having mastered their field of study) thus completing their education. Later the university enrolled students who eventually completed a bachelors degree and then continued towards the completion of the masters degree. In the early times of the universitys existence the term masters and doctor were almost considered synonymous, but over time the doctorate was elevated as a higher qualification than the masters degree. The doctorate has gone through various changes over time in both its usage and meaning within the university/seminary system. The German universities began the practice of requiring prospective lecturers to have completed a research doctorate prior to filling a faculty position. The doctorate was originally awarded in theology, law, medicine and philosophy (Arts and Sciences). This tradition caught on rather quickly and research oriented doctorates became the standard in university education, in particular for academic careers within the universities. The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D. or D.Phil) from the Latin philosophiae doctorate, meaning teaching in philosophy is the highest academic degree awarded by collegiate institutions.

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

Research Doctorates
Although the research doctorate is almost universally accepted as the standard qualification for an academic career, its standards are a relatively new invention primarily in American universities. The European research type doctorates were based solely on research, writing, examinations, dissertation and its oral defense. Even to this day, many European doctorates are based on this methodological approach. This doctorate program normally requires qualifying entrance exams, completion of assigned doctoral courses and/or colloquies and research seminars. Requirements may vary as a result of the degree major and/or university requirements. The research doctorate is more academic and theoretical than practical. Upon the completion of the core prerequisites, the student is given an oral examination in order to qualify to continue his dissertation. The dissertation is normally directed by the institution, and faculty advisors are assigned to oversee the dissertational research and writing. Upon completion the candidate is required to orally present and defend his dissertation before a committee appointed by the institution and upon successful completion, the student is awarded the doctorate degree. It normally takes about five years to complete this type of doctorate (or six years without a masters degree).

Higher Doctorates
There was, in the older universities, what is now called Higher Doctorates which required an extended period of study in a particular field wherein candidates must show themselves to be leading experts in their subjects. These doctorates do not have course, colloquia, or seminar lecture requirements.

Post-doctoral Studies: Habilitation


The habilitation is the higher academic qualification awarded by the university. Earned after

DOCTORAL STUDIES

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


obtaining a research doctorate, the habilitation requires the candidate to write a professorial dissertation or publication based on independent scholarly accomplishments, reviewed by and defended before an academic committee in a process similar to that for the doctoral dissertation. However, the level of scholarship has to be considerably higher than that required for a Doctor of Philosophy dissertation, i.e. in particular, the research not only has to be of special quality and quantity, but also has to be accomplished independently of any other academic form of supervision. The habilitation normally requires ten to thirty scholarly research articles published during the habilitation period of four to 10 years. Sometimes a major book publication is required for the defense. Sometimes, the teaching ability of the habilitation candidate is evaluated by the committee as well. The candidate is awarded either a particular doctorate degree reflecting this advanced academic scholarship, or a certification is offered. Many universities today offer post-doctoral research studies for individuals who have completed their doctorate degree. This often leads to a certification or degree. In the United States it is also used for gaining a tenure-track faculty position.

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

Purpose of the Degree Program


The doctoral degree is an advanced postgraduate program with a view to intellectual development in the field of theological and philosophical studies that will advance the field of religious academia by written contribution to that body of knowledge that will be a benefit to the ecclesiastical community. The nature of the program is designed to increase scholarly research through a rigorous study by comprehensive analysis and critical evaluation leading to additional specialized research and creative theological methodology as developed by the student.

Program Requirements
1. This program normally takes four to eight years of research and writing in the completion of the core requirements and the doctoral dissertation.

2. There are twelve courses of study that will contribute to the students primary or secondary concentration.

Each course requires 2,000 to 4,500 pages of reading and research. A few textbooks require chapter summaries and others text books require interactive

thesis papers (analysis and critique). The course requires a completed thesis of 20 pages (5,000) type written double spaced.

3. Students will be required to complete the orientation seminar for the doctoral degree. Orientation instruction is recorded on CD as an mp3 file. 4. Students must maintain an accumulative 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. Students who fail to maintain this grade point average will be placed on probation for one semester. Failure of the student to increase the grade point average to the 3.0 will be terminated from the program. 5. Students must have a proficiency in Biblical Greek and Hebrew. Degree programs that require additional studies will require the student to demonstrate a proficiency in that particular field.

One year of New Testament Greek (Except when degree has additional prerequisites

listed.) One year of Old Testament Hebrew. (Except when degree has additional prerequisites listed.) Proficiency examination may be required of students in Greek, Hebrew, or other foreign language.

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6. Preliminary oral examinations will be required of students covering the departments of theology, church history and historical theology, philosophy, apologetics, and biblical studies. Students who have less than a 3.25 grade average will be required to pass preliminary oral or written examinations. Students graduating from Whitefield Theological Seminary will not be required to take the proficiency exam. 7. A thesis will be submitted by the student to demonstrate the students competence to complete coursework at this advanced level of study. The thesis shall be no less than 5,000 (minimum) and 10,000 (maximum) words. Prior academic thesis papers are acceptable.

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

8. An oral review of all core course studies demonstrating the students knowledge is required prior to advancing to commence their studies in the courses required for the students major. The examination will consist of a 2 to 3 hour oral examination. 9. An oral review is required of all major course studies demonstrating the students knowledge prior to commencing his research and writing of the dissertation. 10. The student must, at this time, determine if he will proceed to complete a dissertation or opt for the Doctor of Arts in Religion degree (D.A.R.). The Doctor of Arts in Religion degree does require a 100 page thesis paper and the oral review of the major courses of study. 11. The dissertation requires a minimum of 75,000 to a maximum of 100,000 words (300 to 400 pages).

The dissertation must be double spaced, type written. The dissertation must be typed on 24lb bond paper. The dissertation must be edited with

minimal typos or grammatical errors. Dissertation may be returned to the student for additional editing.

12. The student must submit for the dissertation: Dissertational topic for approval. An outline of the dissertation with chapter summaries. The dissertation when completed must have two seminary approved readers with degrees related to the students field of study approve the project. Readers must be non-affiliated with Whitefield Theological Seminary. Letters of recommendation must be submitted to the seminary by the approved readers prior to the oral examination. 13. The student must submit a first copy of the dissertation for review by the seminary. Upon approval the student shall submit 5 published copies of the dissertation to the Doctoral Committee for oral review. (See the Whitefield Weekly for information on binding and publishing the dissertation). 14. The student shall present an oral defense of the dissertation that shall consist of a minimum of 3 hours with a maximum of 5 hours. 15. The student must submit a monthly report on the progress of his doctorate studies. 16. Dissertations may be published with written permission of the seminary. All published dissertations must note that they were originally submitted for the doctorate degree at

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Whitefield Theological Seminary. 17. A minimum of doctoral credits may be transferred from other postsecondary educational institutions after a review of course requirements and student work submitted for completion. This will be based on a course by course evaluation only. 18. No academic credit will be awarded for previously submitted work in which academic credit was awarded. 19. Advanced or Higher Doctoral degrees are based on the applicant already having completed their first research doctorate from an approved and/or recognized institution of higher learning.

Doctoral Examiners

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

The doctoral commission will serve as examiners during the students oral defense of his dissertation. There are two categories of examiners: (1) Visiting Commissioners those with doctoral degrees from other postsecondary institutions, of which one (1) was invited by the student and approved by the administration; one (1) invited by the seminary; and (2) Staff Commissioners those with doctoral degrees from Whitefield Theological Seminary. The Seminary President (or individual appointed by him in his absence) shall preside as Moderator at all examinations. It is required to have a minimum of three commissioners to approve the students dissertation and defense.

Whitefield Doctorates
Whitefield Theological Seminary offers doctoral degrees in several different fields of study. After a student has passed the entrance examinations, he will be required to complete the required six core courses and then take another oral examination covering the material that was studied prior to matriculating to the students major emphasis of study.

Core Courses
The purpose of the six core courses is to ensure that students have been properly prepared in Reformed theological thought prior to matriculating to their major area of study. The student may, upon the completion of the doctoral core courses and oral review, apply for the Master of Sacred Theology degree (S.T.M.) The following are the required core courses for the doctorate degree. DCC 900 Advanced Interpretation and Exegesis DCC 901 History of the Reformation DCC 902 History of Christian Thought DCC 903 Westminster Confession: History and Theology DCC 904 Advanced Reformed Studies: Current Issues in Justification DCC 905 Advanced Reformed Philosophy

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY


The Graduate School of Theology offers advanced studies leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and Doctor of Theology (Th.D.) degrees.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Systematic Theology This major is designed to develop a greater understanding of interpretive systems and their

DOCTORAL STUDIES

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impact on theological studies, with a view toward the development of a systematic method in Reformed theology. SYS 911 History and Method of Hermeneutics SYS 912 History of Theologians and their Theologies SYS 913 Theology of John Calvin SYS 914 Current Theological Issues I: Justification SYS 915 Current Theological Issues II: Resurrection SYS 916 Post-Reformation Dogmatics Doctoral Dissertation (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew) Historical Theology

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

This major is designed to develop the students understanding of the nature and purpose of history, the development of Christian thought, and a thorough understanding of Church history. HCH 901 Historiography HCH 902 Historical Theology and Christian Thought HCH 903 The Early Church: History, Councils, and Creeds HCH 904 The Church of the Middle Ages HCH 905 The Reformation Church HCH 906 The Modern Church Doctoral Dissertation (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew) Reformation History and Theology This major is designed to develop the students understanding of the nature and purpose of history, the development of Christian thought and theology during the time of the Reformation. HCH 901 Historiography HCH 902 History and Theology of the 16th Century HCH 903 History of the Reformation in the 16th Century HCH 904 History of the Reformation in the Time of Calvin HCH 905 Theology of John Calvin HCH 906 Reformation and Post Reformation Dogmatics Doctoral Dissertation (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew) Exegetical Theology The emphasis of this program is to develop the students understanding in Old and New Testament exegetical studies in history and context. ETS 901 Historical and Contemporary Interpreters ETS 902 Exegetical Theology: Old and New Testament ETS 903 Advanced Old Testament Studies I ETS 904 Advanced New Testament Studies I ETS 905 Advanced New Testament Studies II ETS 906 Advanced Old Testament Studies II Doctoral Dissertation (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: The student must have completed a Th.M. in Exegetical Theology, or a M.A.R. or M.Div. with 4 years of Greek and 4 years of Hebrew studies, and 1 year of Biblical Aramaic, from Whitefield or an approved institution.

DOCTORAL STUDIES

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


Puritan Theology and Literature This major expands the students knowledge of the history and theology of the Puritan movement, with emphasis in literary writings and their influence. PHL 901 Puritan History I PHL 902 Puritan History II PHL 903 Puritan Theology and Thought I PHL 904 Puritan Theology and Thought II PHL 905 Readings in Puritan Literature PHT 906 Westminster Confession: History and Theology Doctoral Dissertation: Translation of a Puritan book from Latin (including the Greek and Hebrew) in to English. Prerequisite: The student must have completed a Th.M. in Exegetical Theology, or a M.A.R. or M.Div. with 4 years of Greek and 4 years of Hebrew studies, and 1 semester of Biblical Aramaic, and two years of Latin from Whitefield or an approved institution. Puritan History and Theology This major expands the students knowledge of the history and theology of the Puritan movement, with emphasis in theology and worldview. PHT 901 Reformed Theology Before the Puritans PHT 902 Puritan History I PHT 903 Puritan History II PHT 904 Puritan Theology I PHT 905 Puritan Theology II PHT 906 Westminster Confession: History and Theology Doctoral Dissertation (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew) Presbyterian History and Theology The major develops a students understanding of the nature and interpretation of history as it relates to the development of the Presbyterian Church and its Confessional Theology. PCH 901 Historiography PCH 902 History of the Scottish Presbyterian Church PCH 903 History of the Presbyterian Church in America PCH 904 History and Government of Presbyterian Churches PCH 905 Westminster Confession: History and Theology PCH 906 Theology of John Calvin Doctoral Dissertation: (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew) Eschatological Theology This program seeks to develop the students understanding of eschatological thought from the Holy Scripture, with a view to various historical theories and Kingdom of God. BPS 901 Historical Millennial Views BPS 902 Reformed Eschatology BPS 903 New Testament Prophetic Teachings BPS 904 Old Testament Eschatology BPS 905 Book of Revelation BPS 906 Current Issues in Prophecy

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

DOCTORAL STUDIES

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


Doctoral Dissertation: (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew) Calvinist Theology This study is designed to expand the knowledge of the student in the teachings of John Calvin, his theology and thought. Emphasis will be given to the systematic nature of Calvins theology. CAL 901 The Swiss Reformation CAL 902 The Life of John Calvin CAL 903 John Calvins Thought CAL 904 The Theology of John Calvin I CAL 905 The Theology of John Calvin II PHT 906 Calvin as Pastor and Teacher Doctoral Dissertation: (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew) Edwardsian Theology This major is designed to expand the knowledge of the student in the teachings of Jonathan Edwards, his theology and thought as it related to American Puritan theology and philosophy. EDS 901 History of New England Puritanism and Its Theology EDS 902 The Life and Times of Jonathan Edwards EDS 903 Edwardsian Thought EDS 904 The Theology of Jonathan Edwards I EDS 905 The Theology of Jonathan Edwards II EDS 906 The Theology of Jonathan Edwards III Doctoral Dissertation: (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew) Christian Intellectual Thought This major seeks to develop an in-depth understanding of the students Reformed historical, theological and philosophical thought based on Scriptural interpretation. CIT 901 Theology of John Calvin CIT 902 Theology of Jonathan Edwards CIT 903 History and Theology of the Puritans CIT 904 Contemporary Theology CIT 905 Current Theological Issues: The Doctrine of Justification CIT 906 Current Theological Issues: Postmodernism and the Emergent Church Doctoral Dissertation: (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew) Christian Philosophy and Apologetics This is a program of study that develops the students awareness of the history and key elements of Christian philosophy in the development of Christian thought. Special emphasis will be given to defending the Christian faith. PHL 901 History of Western Thought PHL 902 History of Christian Thought PHL 903 Reformed Philosophical Thought PHL 904 Advanced Christian Apologetics PHL 905 History of Apologetics PHL 906 Advanced Christian Philosophy

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

DOCTORAL STUDIES

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


Doctoral Dissertation: (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew)

DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY
Pastoral Theology This major covers the history and development of preaching and ministry in the Church. Special attention is given to the Pastoral Ministry from a Reformed theological perspective. DPT 901 History of Reading and Preaching in Worship I DPT 902 History of Reading and Preaching in Worship II DPT 903 Puritan Worship DPT 904 Reformed Ministry and Preaching DPT 905 History of Revivals and Revivalism DPT 906 Pastoral Practicum Doctoral Dissertation: (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (1 Year of Greek and Hebrew)

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

DOCTOR OF LITERATURE
The Doctor of Literature (Litt.D.) degree is based on a major research dissertation that has never been submitted for academic credit. The dissertation must consist of a high academic quality to qualify. The applicant must: (1) have been in the ministry (pastoral or academic) for a minimum of 20 years; (2) submit other written projects for review; (3) take an oral exam in Reformed theology and philosophy; (4) possess the M.A.R., M.Div., or Th.M. degree; (5) insure that the dissertation consists of a minimum of 120,000 words; (6) submit 5 copies, hard bound, to the seminary; (7) complete oral defense of the written project; (8) have two outside readers review and endorse the research project as doctoral quality. Note: This program requires special permission for admission and the student must submit both an application and ministerial portfolio for review by the seminary administration in order to determine the qualification of the individual for admission. The portfolio includes one copy of the dissertation project.

ADVANCED DOCTORAL STUDIES


Those prospective students who have first doctorates may apply for the Doctor of Literature (Litt.D.) degree with a view to additional advanced studies but must: (1) a earned first doctorate from a recognized postsecondary institution; (2) write a 120,000 (minimal) word dissertation; (3) have the project endorsed by two qualified readers who have doctorates in a related field; (4) submit 5 hard bound copies submitted to the seminary; (5) make an oral defense of the dissertational project. Doctoral Dissertation (120,000 words minimum to 150,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: The student must have completed a first research doctoral degree prior to enrollment into this program of study.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION


The Graduate School of Education provides training in Christian education in both the elementary, secondary and postsecondary administration. The following degree programs represent the current offerings in Doctoral studies.

DOCTORAL STUDIES

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Christian School Administration This major consists of studies that will train the student in the field of Christian School Administration with a view towards leadership in elementary and secondary education. CED 901 Management in Christian Education CED 902 Leadership and the Board of Education CED 903 Finance and Fund Raising CED 904 Communication and Conflict Management CED 905 Supervision, Leadership, and Teacher Development CED 906 Marketing and Public Relations in Education Doctoral Dissertation (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (Christian Education Major)

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION
Christian Postsecondary Administration This major does include the core doctoral courses. The program consists of courses that will develop a Christian philosophy of the collegiate academy, its function and practices. EDD 901 History of Postsecondary Education EDD 902 Christian Collegiate Education EDD 903 Postsecondary Administration EDD 904 Theological Education in Higher Education EDD 905 Faculty as Scholars EDD 906 Developing Curriculum for Higher Education Doctoral Dissertation (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: A doctoral degree.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF COUNSELING


The Graduate School of Counseling offers the student training in Nouthetic Counseling within the context of the Christian ecclesiastical community. The following degree programs represent the current offerings in Doctoral studies.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Christian Counseling The student will receive advanced training in Nouthetic techniques and applications in particular areas of behavioral issues. This program is designed in particular to reinforce the biblical principles of Nouthetic teaching. BNC 901 Counseling: Old and New Testament Studies BNC 902 Substance Abuse and Counseling BNC 903 Medical Issues in Counseling BNC 904 Anger, Depression, and Abuse BNC 905 Sexual Addiction and Abuse BNC 906 Counseling Issues Doctoral Dissertation (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Master of Arts in Religion (Christian Counseling Major)

DOCTORAL STUDIES

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF CHURCH AND STATE RELATIONS


The prospective student must currently possess a Juris Doctor (J.D.); or its academic equivalent in order to be admitted into this program of study. Whitefield students who hold the Master of Theology (Th.M.) in Christianity, Culture, and Law shall qualify for admission.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Church and State Studies The student will be trained in the basic principles of the historical development of church and state throughout the history of Western Civilization. Special emphasis will be given to a biblical and theological view of the relationship between church and state. The major will also offer advanced studies in First Amendment Constitutional Law. The doctoral core courses are required as a prerequisite theological foundation. The courses offered for this study are: CSR 901 Christian Political and Legal Thought CSR 902 Church, State, and Law in Scripture CSR 903 Theological Studies in Church and State CSR 904 Classical Studies in Church and State CSR 905 Doctrine of Church and State: Middle Ages and Reformation CSR 906 Church and State in Europe, Scotland, and America CSR 907 History and Litigation of the First Amendment Doctoral Dissertation (75,000 words minimum to 100,000 words maximum) Prerequisite: Doctorate in Jurisprudence or the Master of Arts in Religion (Christian Culture and Advocacy Major from Whitefield)

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

DOCTORAL STUDIES

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MASTER DEGREES SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
Master of Arts in Theological Studies / Master of Arts in Religion Master of Divinity / Master of Theology
Theological Studies
SYS 500 Theological Research and Reading This course introduces the student to the various tools and resources that are available for biblical and theological studies, such as, commentaries, dictionaries, encyclopedias, biblical language grammars and lexicons, etc. SYS 501 Hermeneutics

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

The student will be introduced to the science of sacred interpretation. Emphases will be given to the grammatico-historical method as it relates to language and historical context. Students will study the various rules on interpretation as it relates to etymology, syntax, context and narrative. Special emphasis will be given to typological and prophetical interpretation. SYS 502 Systematic Theology I This course will cover the basic doctrines of Scripture and theology proper (doctrine of God). The student will be introduced to the Scriptures inspiration, infallibility, inerrancy, perspicuity, and authority concerning all matters relating to life, faith, and practice. The doctrine of God will examine the nature of the Being of God, His attributes, the trinity, decrees, providence and creation. SYS 503 Systematic Theology II A continuation of systematics examining the teachings of Gods covenants, anthropology, Christology and soteriology from a theological perspective as developed both in the history of the Church, but also as it came to be correctly understood during the Reformation. SYS 504 Systematic Theology III The student will be introduced to the history and development of ecclesiastical doctrine. Attention will be given to the nature of the Church as visible and invisible; the three marks of the Church; the Churchs mission; membership; sacraments; and community. SYS 505 Systematic Theology IV An introduction into millennial theology and the various theories developed throughout the history of the Church. The student will especially examine the purpose of God through the ages as expressed in the Kingdom of Christ, and those events leading up to the consummation of the ages. SYS 506 Biblical Theology The student will be taught about the development of progressive revelation as it relates to redemptive history as taught in the Old and New Testaments. Emphasis will also be given to the various theories postulated about the nature of biblical theology as it relates to systematics.

MASTER DEGREE COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


SYS 507 Covenant Theology This is a study in the redemptive history of Gods people as expressed in the various covenants God made with man. Particular emphasis will be given to the covenant of works in the garden before the fall and its abiding validity. The student will also be taught about the covenant of Grace wherein the elect are covenanted with God in Christ who, acting as the federal head of the Church, brings redemption through His death, burial, and resurrection. SYS 801 Advanced Interpretation and Exegesis The student will be trained in the history of interpretation, advanced hermeneutics, and exegetical skills. The import of this course is to develop the students understanding of both grammatico-historical method and specialized rules of interpretation in typology, prophecy, and parabolic interpretation. SYS 802 History of the Reformation This course will examine the events leading up to the Reformation, the interpretive and theological issues related to the Reformation, as well as, the study of important individuals who were influential and affected the transformation of the Church and its theology in the tradition of Apostolic doctrine and practice. SYS 803 History of Christian Thought A study in the historical development of theological and philosophical principles that shaped the thinking of Christianity in its doctrinal and practical outcomes through the various stages of chronology. SYS 804 Westminster Confession: History and Theology This course will introduce the student to both the historical events leading up to the commissioning of the Puritans of Church of England to engage in the revision of the 39 Articles of the Church; the debates, revisions, and the eventual development of a new system of theology which resulted. SYS 805 Larger Catechism (Westminster) An in-depth study of the Puritan Divines work in advanced catechistical teaching on the theological system of the Westminster Confession of Faith. Emphasis will be given to comparative explanations of the Catechism by both contemporary and subsequent generations. SYS 806 Current Theological Issues I: (Justification) The student will be introduced to the historical teaching on the doctrine of Justification by faith from the early church to the apostasy of the Scholastics and the response developed during the Reformation as to a greater specificity on the nature and function of this doctrine in soteriological thought.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Apologetic Studies
PHL 501 Apologetics I The student will be taught the presuppositional method of apologetics within the context of the historic Reformed confession (Westminster) as it relates to philosophically defending the faith over-against non-Christian truth claims. An emphasis will be given to epistemology, ontology, cosmology, and historiography.

MASTER DEGREE COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


PHL 502 Apologetics II This is a continuation of PHL 501 Apologetics I. PHL 503 Biblical Ethics The student shall be introduced to the basic principles of ethical guidelines of acceptable behavior within the context of Gods moral law. This study will also examine the three fold nature of Gods Law, with emphasis given to the general equity thereof. PHL 504 Biblical View of Culture This course will examine various issues of modern culture, the necessity of transforming all of life into biblical conformity to the Creation mandate as given by God to man after his creation. A variety of issues will be considered as it relates to socio-cultural development according to biblical guidelines. PHL 505 Christian Political Philosophy

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

A course that will instruct the student in the biblical perspective of what God sets forth as the proper construction of government and its functions as taught in Scripture. PHL 506 Christianity and the State The student will be instructed in the contrast between a Christian perspective of government and humanistic statist ideology. Emphasis will be given to critical analysis of the driving philosophical foundations of statism and the Christian response and principles. PHL 507 Christian Economics This course will train the student in the basic principles of what the Scripture defines as acceptable principles of trade and monetary exchanges within a biblical context. PHL 508 Christianity and Culture I The student will engage in the critical analysis of society and culture as to the contrast between humanistic thought versus Christianity as the governing principles for developing a Christian world and life view. A variety of topical areas will be considered. PHL 509 Christianity and Culture II A continuation of PHL 508. PHL 601 Christianity and Culture III A continuation of PHL 509. PHL 602 Christianity and Culture IV A continuation of PHL 601.

Church History Studies


HCH 501 Church History I The student will be instructed in the historical development of the Church and events that mark

MASTER DEGREE COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


out its characteristics from the establishment by Christ and the Apostles through to the late Middle Ages and the defection of Scholastic teaching from apostolic doctrine and practice. HCH 502 Church History II This course takes up the study of the Reformation, the transformation of return to apostolic teaching with greater specificity in doctrinal purity and its impact upon the post-Reformation Church. HCH 601 American Church History A course of study concentrating on the founding, expansion, and development of the Church into the New World; its theological roots and influence upon the developing nation, its society and the rest of the world. HCH 602 Presbyterian, Baptist, or Episcopal Church History A course offered reflecting the historic development and contribution of the students denomination both in European and American history. Special attention is given to the doctrinal teachings and influence. HCH 603 Historical Theology The student shall be taught the basic theological conflicts that were essential in developing the theology of Christianity and its influence and applications. Special emphasis will be given to the rise of heretical thought throughout the history of the Church.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Hebrew, Greek, and Latin Studies


GRK 500 New Testament Greek A study of basic Greek grammar, vocabulary, syntax, declensions, verbs, nouns, pronouns, voice, participles and reading of New Testament Greek. HEB 600 Old Testament Hebrew A study of basic Hebrew grammar, vocabulary, orthography, morphology and syntax, with various exercises in translation. A reading course with special attention given to grammar, syntax and textual criticism. GRK 501 Introduction to New Testament Greek An inductive/deductive approach to learning the Koine of the New Testament with the goal of practical use in ministry. Basic grammar is presented within the context of biblical passages so that from the first day, students are translating verses directly from the Bible. Utilizing the natural language learning process is the basic approach to this methodology. Mounce's approach keeps the student encouraged, the learning process profitable, and the goal of understanding the Word of God a priority. GRK 601 New Testament Greek Syntax The relationships between words, and how that relationship affects meaning is what syntax is concerned with. A text with workbook covers the essentials peculiar to Koine to equip the intermediate student with the tools to not only translate properly, but interpret meaningfully.

MASTER DEGREE COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


GRK 602 Intermediate Greek I - Rapid Greek Reading/Translation Rapid Greek reading of texts from the New Testament, Septuagint, Apocryphal literature and extrabiblical literature develops proficiency and confidence in ones ability to translate accurately, build vocabulary, and recognize grammatical and syntactical anomalies. Increasing sight reading skills saves time, energy, and frustration when it comes time to do a full exegetical study of a text. GRK 603 Intermediate Greek II - Introduction to the Septuagint The Septuagint was the bible of Jesus' time. An exploration of the language nuances of the LXX text relative to translation accuracy is the focus. Most quotes of the Old Testament in the New testament are closer to the LXX than the Masoretic text. The need for acquaintance with the Greek of the LXX is therefore necessary for accurate hermeneutical and interpretive results. GRK 604 Exegetical Methodology and Tools Grassmicks exegetical manual requires a thorough study of the book of Colossians employing a methodology that is both exhaustive and detailed. Step by step instruction engages the student to appreciate the need for, and the results of, such an in-depth approach. Analysis of the text , structure, grammar, history and theology are presented in such a way as to bring the student from simply an observer, to a semi-skilled interpreter. GRK 605 Exegetical Practicum The exegetical practicum is where the student brings all the skills he has learned to bear upon a selected text. Evidence of the tools used in 604 is the emphasis. The final exegetical product will be evaluated on the thoroughness of research, accuracy of grammatical and syntactical analysis, orthodoxy of theological conclusions, and practical applicability. HEB 701 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Basic Biblical Hebrew covers the essentials of Hebrew phonology, morphology, and syntax. The first year course is designed for those who anticipate a calling to the ministry where Gods Word is central to their calling. The book/workbook covers the basics of Hebrew writing, nouns and nominals, Hebrew verbs and the Qal Stem, derived verb stems and copious amounts of graduated reading from the Hebrew biblical text. Vocabulary is expanded in a student friendly manner, and the use of special chapter sections called biblical theological reflections, or exegetical insights help to promote and solidify recently acquired technical information. HEB 702 Intermediate Hebrew I - Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Syntax First year Hebrew is of necessity expanded upon here by the study of Biblical Hebrew syntax. A verse by verse examination of sections of the books of Jonah and Ruth are analyzed grammatically, syntax is inductively discovered, and the results applied theologically. Acquaintance with the syntax of the noun, verb, particles and clauses are covered in the texts. HEB 703 Intermediate Hebrew II Reading/Translation Reading proficiency builds confidence for the later and hard work of exegesis. Texts ranging in difficulty from the BHS (Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia) are sight read and significant points of grammar are discussed. HEB 704 Hebrew Exegesis An exegetical methodology specific to Old Testament study is presented in Stuarts Handbook.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MASTER DEGREE COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


The need for historical background research, as well as grammatical and lexical studies is emphasized with a view to availability of OT resources. A biography of computer programs, lexicons, dictionaries, and other computer tools adds significant value to this book. HEB 705 Hebrew Exegetical Practicum The proficiency of all of one's Hebrew study will be revealed in this project. An approved Old Testament text will be exegeted and graded for research, analysis, theological conclusions and personal relevance. The final product will be written and presented in a sermonic format. HEB 801 Aramaic, Ugaritic, and Akkadian Basic vocabulary and sentence construction to enable the student to navigate the Aramaic portions of Old Testament Scripture. Introduction to Ugaritic and Akkadian historical background to better understand the evolution of the Hebrew Language. LAT 801 Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Basics of Church Latin as opposed to Classical Latin, emphasis is on phonology, morphology, and syntactical differences between the two; with reading exercises solidifying Church Latin comprehension. LAT 802 Intermediate Ecclesiastical Latin Ecclesiastical Latin is selected texts from the Vulgate with a view towards identifying significant grammatical constructions and vocabulary recognition. LAN 901 LXX/HEB/Latin: Synthesis of selected texts A comparison of passages found in all three versions with a view towards accuracy in translation.

Biblical Studies
OTS 601 Introduction and History of the Old Testament This is an intensive course of study examining the introduction to each Old Testament book and its history. Emphasis will be given to content and chronology of events and their meanings. NTS 601 Introduction and History of the New Testament This is an intensive course of study examining the introduction to each New Testament book and its history. Emphasis will be given to content and chronology of events and their meanings.

Practical Theology
PTH 701 Homiletics A course of study that will teach the student the basic principles of sermonic research and development. The student will be instructed in presentation skills that are essential to preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ. PTH 702 Pastoral Theology (Presbyterian, Baptist, Episcopal) The student will be trained in the basic principles of biblical pastoral duties with a view

MASTER DEGREE COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


towards developing nurturing skills with church members from their denominational perspective. PTH 703 Pastoral Counseling This course of study will introduce the student to the basic principles of Nouthetic Counseling. The student will be encourages to consider the importance of counseling from a biblical perspective as it relates to the ministry of the Word corporately and privately. PTH 704 Church Administration and the Law A study in the principles of church management and leadership; emphasis is given to how those principles intersect with State rules and regulations. The student will be taught in basic legal areas that affect the nature and state of the Church by government. PTH 706 Biblical Worship (Presbyterian, Baptist, Episcopal) The student will examine his denominations distinctives as they relate to the nature and structure of corporate worship. There will be an emphasis on the nature of Reformed and Puritan thoughts on worship. PTH 707 Cults and Heresies Students will be given an overview of the various cults and heretical teachings that have plagued the Church throughout its history. Emphasis will be given to the importance of developing an apologetic method in responding to these doctrines and practices. PTH 708 Reformed Evangelism and Missiology The student will be instructed to the nature of Biblical evangelism and missions from a Reformed perspective. Historical considerations are examined as they relate to the Churchs mission. PTH 711 Pastoral Practicum The student will be required to complete various activities related to the pastorate. This course will be completed under the oversight of the students pastor and elders. Areas of ministry may include: membership visitation, visitation of the sick, crisis management, teaching, preaching, session work and practice, preaching at jails, retirement centers, and prison ministries, etc.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Christian Counseling
BNC 801 Fundamentals of Christian Counseling The student will be introduced into the principles of Nouthetic Counseling; its theological and philosophical implications, as well as, the conflict with humanistic counseling methods. BNC 802 Marriage and Family counseling I This course examines the biblical principles of marriage and family. The student will be instructed as to the nature of premarital counseling, conflicts that arise in marriage, issues of divorce, and the nature and function of the family and its dysfunctions. The principles of Nouthetic Counseling will be the methodology utilized in resolving the issues. BNC 803 Marriage and Family Counseling II This is a continuation of BNC 802.

MASTER DEGREE COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


BNC 804 Advanced Counseling Methods I A course of study that will further develop the biblical method of Nouthetic Counseling. Emphasis will be given to analysis and application of the biblical method in other areas of life that create issues of conflict resulting from sinful behavior and faulty habits. BNC 805 Advanced Counseling Methods II This is a continuation of BNC 804. BNC 806 History and Methodologies in Counseling I The student will examine various counseling methods that were developed and their historical context. Emphasis will be placed on a critical analysis of these humanistic methods and their failures to resolve basic issues that people face in life as a result of their depravity, as well as, the ability to deal with the nature of the Christian in his struggle with sanctification of life. BNC 807 History and Methodologies in Counseling II

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

This is a continuation of BNC 806. BNC 808 Theology of Counseling This course will demonstrate the basic relationship between theology and counseling as to developing an understanding of the nature of God, man, and redemption in the life of a believer. Foundational to Nouthetic Counseling is Reformed theology, without which, Nouthetic Counseling is only a pragmatic approach to counseling issues.

Christian Education
CED 601 Christian Education The student will be introduced to the basic principles of the biblical nature of Christian education, its necessity and method basic on theological principles. This is a foundational course of study that contrasts humanistic educational teachings and methods in light of Christianity and the requirement to educate its children in biblically sound institutions. CED 602 History of Christian Education A study in the development of Christian education and its institutions and structure throughout the history of Israel and the Christian Church. CED 603 Christian Philosophy of Education This course will train the student in the basic principles of Christian philosophy towards the development of a biblical world and life view. Emphasis will be given to the necessity of developing a biblically based world and life view as essential to any educational method that considers itself Christian. CED 604 Curriculum: Philosophy and Development The student will be trained in the nature and application of the various departmental studies as they relate to education and the underlying philosophy behind each area of consideration. This course requires the student to first complete CED 603 which is essential in theory and application.

MASTER DEGREE COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


CED 605 The Art of Christian Teaching A course laying out the principles for developing the necessary skills for teaching and training students in the classroom. Emphasis will be given to the biblical nature of the pedagogical approach as expressed in Scripture. CED 606 Guidance and Special Education The student will be trained in the basic principles of guidance as it relates to education, analysis of educational issues that often occur, and a Christian approach to developing a special educational methodology. CED 607 Public Education: Analysis and Critique A course designed to study the historical foundations, practices, and methods used in public education. Emphasis will be given to the humanistic philosophies that govern the public education system and its outcomes, over-against the Christian approach to education.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CED 608 Supervision and Leadership This course will teach the student the basic principles that are essential to good leadership in education, as well as, the nature of supervision in education, both of the educator and students.

Legal Studies
LJP 601 Legal Reasoning A study in the processes of logical deduction within the context of the American legal system with an emphasis on the rational of judicial determinations and case applications. LJP 602 Legal Research and Writing This course demonstrates how the student researches the law, develops legal reasoning as to the meaning of the law, and presents the findings in a written presentation that reflects a legal brief. LJP 603 History and Introduction to Law This course begins with a history of Anglo-American Law. It covers the development of our legal system and its various functions such as courts, juries, judges, lawyers, of religion, and the free exercise thereof. Considerations are viewed in light of the U.S. Constitution with special attention given to questions of equal protection before and after the Fourteenth Amendment. It also introduces the student to the basic judicial process. LJP 604 Constitutional Law This course presents a view of the U.S. Constitution as it relates to the federal, state, and individual legal standings. Consideration is given to the political, economic, and legal structures and procedures. LJP 605 First Amendment Law This course examines the nature of civil rights of the individual as they relate to free speech, freedom of religion, and the free exercise thereof. Considerations are viewed in light of the U.S. Constitution with special attention given to questions of equal protection before and after the Fourteenth Amendment.

MASTER DEGREE COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


LJP 606 Conflict of Law This course deals with the conflict that arises between federal jurisdiction and state jurisdiction. It analyzes the federal jurisdiction and the limits on the federal courts involvement in interstate and intrastate laws. LJP 607 Legislative Law and Administrative Law This is a study of administrative and legislative law as it applies to procedures and putting the laws into practice. It explains the legislative process, choosing the proper court for civil and administrative law. It covers the scope of judicial review and procedural process that is necessary in dealing with such laws. LJP 608 Church and State Law This is a course of study dealing with the nature of Church and State relations and how the two institutions intersect within the American civil system of law and government. LJP 609 Civil Law and Procedures

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

This is a study of civil law and procedures as it applies the principles of constitutional and statutory laws in the federal judicial system of American law. LJP 701 Criminal Law This course is a succinct exposition of substantive and criminal law. It gives an overview of crime and punishment in the court system of the U.S. such as homicide, battery, assult and kidnapping among others. It also surveys the many defenses used to defend the accused. It also stresses criminal law regarding the policy of sentencing and the policy of corrections. LJP 702 Criminal Procedures This is a course of study dealing with constitutional limitations regarding criminal procedures. It covers a variety of criminal offenses and the proper procedure for arrest and prosecution to try the case in court. It also reviews the constitutional constraints on police investigations and proper procedures when the arrest has been made. LJP 703 Tort Law This course presents an overview of Tort Law. The student will learn the purpose and functions of Tort Laws. It covers several defenses regarding liability, damages for physical harm, non-physical harm, misrepresentation, defamation, and privacy. It also covers the increasing number of cases involved in toxic torts and the liability of those who expose innocent people to toxic substances which cause physical or mental damage and the various defenses used to protect individuals or companies. LJP 704 Evidence The goal of this course is to provide a clear roadmap through the vast array of obstacles dealing with the handling of evidence and using it properly in court. It also deals with the vast number of federal regulations that need to be taken into consideration while collecting evidence for judicial use. LJP 705 Family Law In Family Law, the student will examine the nature and civil understanding of American Law as it relates to the family and all its rights and tort actions within the legal system. Emphasis will be on the nature of jurisdiction as it relates to family versus the state.

MASTER DEGREE COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
DOCTORATE DEGREES
Doctor of Philosophy / Doctor of Theology / Doctor of Education / Doctor of Literature
Doctoral Core Courses
DCC 901 Advanced Interpretation and Exegesis The student will be trained in the history of interpretation, advanced hermeneutics, and exegetical skills. The import of this course is to develop the students understanding of both grammatico-historical method and specialized rules of interpretation in typology, prophecy, and parabolic interpretation. DCC 902 History of the Reformation

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

This course will examine the events leading up to the Reformation, the interpretive and theological issues related to the Reformation, as well as, the study of important individuals who were influential and affected the transformation of the Church and its theology in the tradition of Apostolic doctrine and practice. DCC 903 History of Christian Thought A study in the historical development of theological and philosophical principles that shaped the thinking of Christianity in its doctrinal and practical outcomes through the various stages of chronology. DCC 904 Westminster Confession: History and Theology This course will introduce the student to both the historical events leading up to the commissioning of the Puritans of Church of England to engage in the revision of the 39 Articles of the Church; the debates, revisions, and the eventual development of a new system of theology which resulted. DCC 905 Current Theological Issues I: (Justification) The student will be introduced to the historical teaching on the doctrine of Justification by faith from the early church to the apostasy of the Scholastics and the response developed during the Reformation as to a greater specificity on the nature and function in soteriological thought. DCC 906 Advanced Reformed Philosophy This is a course of study that will equip the student with a system of philosophy that is Reformed in its approach to the various departmental areas of philosophical thought.

Doctoral Major Courses


Due to the continuous changing of required reading texts and resources, no course descriptions covering the courses of the Major Courses of study in the doctoral programs will be listed. The Seminary administration recommends that the prospective student to call the Seminary and make arraignments for current course descriptions in the major area of interest by the student.

DOCTORAL COURSE DISCRIPTIONS

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

THE REVEREND GEORGE WHITEFIELD LIFE OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

In the last days, God says, I will pour out my Spirit on all people. Your sons and daughters will prophesy, your young men will see visions, your old men will dream dreams. Even on my servants, both men and women, I will pour out my Spirit in those days, and they will prophesy. (Acts 2:17, 18) George Whitefield lived from 1714 to 1770. In his adult life he was as famous as any man in the English- speaking world. From 22 years of age he was the foremost figure in a religious movement that held the attention of the entire English-speaking world-the Great Awakening. Perhaps only the Reformation or even the apostolic age itself could surpass the spiritual fervor God poured out at that time. George Whitefield preached in England, Scotland, Wales, Gibraltar, Bermuda, and the American colonies. As we look back on this era, it seems that so many of the preachers of the time were men of doctrine, and men of fervor who strove to give their lives 100% to Christ Jesus. To understand Whitefield, we must think about the spiritual and moral conditions in England before the revival. In 1730s and 1740s England was foul with corruption and crippled by spiritual decay. The ruling classes were primarily deists, if they were religious at all. The church in England was the Church of England. The preaching from the pulpit at that time was quite cold, and the primary concern was that none should show any sign of being enthusiastic about religion. Meanwhile, public behavior had become so outrageous that importing liquor was banned (1689). The result was the gin craze, where everyone made their own liquor. The effect, according to the Bishop of London, was that gin made the English people what they never were before, cruel and inhuman. In those days, the rich got richer and the poor got poorer. Street children and the insane were cruelly treated, the London Underworld thrived, gambling was everywhere, and stage productions were obscene even by todays standards. The only solace for Christians was in the formation of small private societies. The Church had sanctioned and even encouraged their formation, and by 1730 nearly one hundred existed in London, and a hundred more scattered throughout England. The Societies did not actually do much, but their very existence was both providential and meaningful for they would be the cradle of the Great Awakening. At the very time when revival seemed impossible all of England was stirred by the voice of a preacher barely 22 years old, George Whitefield. He began to speak from the pulpit with fervor and power and soon no church could hold the multitude that flocked to hear him. No one could preach or even sound like Whitefield. His voice was like a trumpet, which could be muted or

BIOGRAPHY OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


played to its full power. It was excellent in melody and range, and his messages were emphasized with graceful gestures. The voice of George Whitefield also had phenomenal carrying power. One author simply concluded, he preaches like a lion. The voice of George Whitefield was soon joined by many others. Starting with Whitefield, a tremendous chorus of praise and preaching rang throughout the land, and was sustained for at least fifty years. The revival changed the entire temper of English society. The church was restored to life and activity. The people had a fresh zeal that purified their literature and their manners. The Boy of the Bell

LIFE OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

Although a number of George Whitefields relatives had gone to Oxford and become members of the clergy, his grandfather was a businessman and his father was proprietor of the Bell Inn in Gloucester. It was the largest and finest establishment in town, and its main hall had two auditoriums, one of which was used to stage plays. But when he was only two tragedy struck this young prosperous family. Georges father died. For the next few years his mother ran the business with the help of her eldest son. For the first sixteen years of his life, George must have seen both the frivolous and the terrible side of life at the Bell Inn. While the other children worked, Georges mother saw his ability and made sure he attended school from the age of 12 in the local parish. He was a gifted speaker, had an excellent memory, and often acted in the school plays. By 16 he was proficient in Latin and could read New Testament Greek. When George was 8 years of age his mother remarried. The marriage was tragic, and the inn was almost lost due to financial difficulties. At age 15 George had to drop his studies and work for a year and a half to help support the family. It seemed tragic, but it was a good experience for George to experience real life. He learned to associate with people from all ranks of society as he poured liquor for them and cleaned up after them. George worked hard by day and at night he read the Bible and dreamed of going to Oxford. In time his stepfather left and his older brother regained control of the inn. However, there was no longer any money to send George to college. For a time he and his mother were heartbroken, but in time they learned that he could go to Oxford as a servitor, and so in 1732, at age 17, he left for the University with great eagerness. Studies at Oxford University Meanwhile, in America, the Puritan era had passed and religious fervor died down-some would say it had fallen asleep. But from just this time to the Revolutionary War itself came the Great Awakening. It began with Jonathan Edwards, a preacher in the Puritan mold from Massachusetts. He was the most learned and respected theologian America had yet produced, and although brilliant in mind, his sermons were reserved and dry. In 1734 he began to preach against the popular notion that man by his own effort could accomplish the purposes of God. Edwards taught that all we accomplish is by Gods grace. With this simple Biblical message a revival began that surprised even Edwards. Within a year a great revival was spreading throughout the towns of Massachusetts. Two years before the Massachusetts revival began Whitefield entered Oxford University. He was extremely devout and he busily visited prisoners and poorhouses with a mind to earn Gods approval. As a servitor he lived as a butler to 3 or 4 highly placed students. He would wash their clothes, shine their shoes, and do their housework. A servitor lived on whatever scraps of clothing or money they gave him. He had to wear a special gown and it was forbidden for students of a high rank to speak to him. Most servitors left rather than endure the humiliation. Initially, other students tried to get George to join their party life, but he resisted, and they soon left him alone. Whitefield plunged ahead in his studies, but he longed for some spiritual fellowship. His mates at Pembroke College had begun to call Whitefield a Methodist, which was the derogatory word they used to describe members of the Holy Club. The Holy Club was a small meeting at of Oxford students led by a University fellow named John Wesley. To other

BIOGRAPHY OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


students their disciplined way of life looked foolish, and the word Methodist implied that they lived by a mindless method like windup robots. George had never met them, and being a servitor he could not introduce himself to them. But Charles Wesley heard of this devout and industrious student, and breaking traditional boundaries approached George and invited him to breakfast. The friendships made among the core members of the Holy Club and the many casual associates were the most important friendships for all of them throughout their life. The Holy Club members rose early, had lengthy devotions, strove for self-discipline, and ensured there was no moment left throughout the day that was wasted. At night they kept a journal to review their life and to root out sin. They celebrated the Eucharist on Sunday, fasted Wednesday and Friday, and used Saturday as a Sabbath to prepare for the Lords feast. The Holy Club was strongly devoted to the Church of England and knew its history and rules better than almost anyone. They also visited prisons and poor houses, and contributed to a relief fund for the needs of inmates and especially their children. The Holy Club also took great pains to shepherd younger students, teaching them to avoid bad characters and encouraging them to live a sober and studious life, even helping them when they got stuck in their studies. The Holy Club was a fine group to belong to, however they had a problem, theirs was a works based righteousness. All their work brought them little joy because the nature of their salvation was still a distant mystery. In short, they had not experienced or learned of the true grace of God present in the gospel of Jesus Christ. Whitefield became aware of his inner yearning to know God more and more, but did not know where to turn. In his voracious reading he chanced upon a book written long ago by an obscure Scot, the Rev. Henry Scougal, entitled The Life of God in the Soul of Man. From this book he learned that all his good things he thought earned him Gods favor were of no account at all. What he needed was to have Christ formed within him, that is, to be born again. Scougal taught that Christianity is not about external duties to perform, nor is it an emotion or feeling one has. He defined true religion as the union of the soul with God-a participation in the divine nature, living according to the image of God drawn upon our soul; or in the apostles phrase, it is to have Christ formed within us. From this teaching Whitefield learned what an amazing thing it is that God wants to dwell in our heart and do his work through us. What an amazing grace it is, that it is possible for the life of God to dwell in the soul of man. This wonderful book exasperated Whitefield because he did not know how to be born again. He redoubled his efforts, he stopped eating certain foods and gave the money saved to the poor, he wore only a patched gown and dirty shoes, he would spend all night in fervent sweaty prayer, and he would speak to no one. To deny himself he quit the only thing he enjoyed, the Holy Club. His studies faltered and he was threatened with expulsion. He became subject to strange and terrible emotions and students threw dirt at him, concluding he was mad. At Lent in 1735 Whitefield decided to eat only a little bread and sage tea. He prayed outdoors even on the iciest mornings until part of one of his hands turned black. Finally he was so sick, emaciated, and weak, he could not even climb the stairs to leave his room. A physician was sent for and he was confined to bed for 7 weeks. Amazingly, it was during this time of rest and recuperation where he was finally changed. He kept simple devotions as his strength allowed. He began to pray simply, he dropped all of his own ideas and efforts, and began to really listen to God. At one point he simply threw himself on the bed and cried out, I thirst! It was perhaps the first time he had called out to God in utter helplessness, and it was the first time in over a year that he felt happy. At this moment of total surrender to Almighty God a new thought now came to his heart, George, you have what you asked! You ceased to struggle and simply believed and you are born again! It was so simple, almost absurdly simple, to be saved by such a simple prayer that it made Whitefield laugh. And as soon as he laughed the floodgates of heaven burst and he felt Joy, joy, unspeakable joy thats big with glory!

LIFE OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

BIOGRAPHY OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


At home in Gloucester Whitefield kept to the scheduled life of the Holy Club but it now had a new meaning, not to win Gods favor or to be righteous, but to focus him and the time he spent on serving God. In recuperation he was very diligent to do his Daily Bread. He would read a passage of the Bible in English, then in Greek, and then read Matthew Henrys commentary. He would pray over each line he read out of these three books until he received it, understood it, and it became a part of him. He even founded a small society that met nightly. The Bishop of Gloucester took notice of this exceptional young man and offered to ordain him as soon as the orders came, but because Whitefield was afraid of being ordained too young and growing proud he made a Jacobs vow that he would be ordained if, by some miracle, money was supplied for him to return to Oxford and graduate. Soon money did come in drop by drop. An old vicar asked him to preach, and enjoyed the sermon so much he gave him a pound. One of his brothers had become a sea captain and upon returning to port gave him some money. He was given a horse by one person and some clothes by another. Then news came from Oxford that the John and Charles Wesley had gone to Georgia as missionaries, and someone was needed to lead the Holy Club. So Whitefield returned to Oxford, graduated, and was ordained. He tried to live quietly there for a while. His one word was that each student there was indeed a legion, but that in converting one, the equivalent of a whole town was converted. But there was a problem. From the time he opened his mouth to give his first sermon, everyone wanted to hear more. The four weeks he had spent giving inaugural messages in Gloucester, Bristol, and Bath had caused a small revival already, and near the end of that short time, the churches were packed full, and the streets were mobbed with people trying to get in. He was only 22. A Lion Begins To Roar At Oxford, Whitefield studied for a Masters degree and presided over the Holy Club, and soon many former members of the Club invited him to come and speak. Before long several of the other religious societies began to invite him to come and speak; his hand was set to the plow and there was no turning back. At this time Whitefield was struggling with another question, whether or not to follow the Wesleys example and be a missionary to Georgia. He had received a good offer to preach in London. He struggled to accept and live a nice life, or to suffer hardship in an American Colony. As he was considering his call, a letter of appeal from John Wesley arrived. Wesley wrote of adults from the farthest parts of Europe and Asia and the inmost kingdoms of Africa; not to mention the countless native nations present, who were a vast multitude without a shepherd, begging for spiritual help. Whitefield was resolved to go, but had to wait a year until the next ship was ready to set sail for Georgia. It was during this year that Whitefield startled the nation awake. He returned to Gloucester and preached twice each Sunday, and thousands began to flock to hear him. At Bristol he preached each day of the week, and for the four weeks he was there the people nearly rioted to see him. His sermons were fresh and full of spiritual joy. He spent much of his day giving advice to those who, as he called it, had become awakened souls. Whitefield also received donations and began to make a large offering for the settlers, especially the poor in Georgia. His messages were simple, direct, and taught the basic doctrines of being born again or being justified by faith. But to people who had not heard this clearly explained before, it was like a lightning shock to the heart. He was declaring, not his own message, but Gods, Ye must be born again. On days he did not preach he was still busy from 7 a.m. to midnight with those who sought his prayer or guidance. As soon as his preaching became nationally recognized some in the Church began to persecute him as an enthusiast. The Church of England was comfortable with the message that if you are good, quiet, and show up to church you are saved. Whitefield was not, and disturbed the church even more through his prayer that the preachers themselves might be born again. Just prior to his departure for Georgia, Charles Wesley returned and declared, The whole nation is in an uproar. Another said, All London and the whole nation ring of the great things

LIFE OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

BIOGRAPHY OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


of God done by his ministry. So at this very time, when thousands flocked after him, George Whitefield set sail for America. A Missionary Life In all, George Whitefield made seven trips to America, lasting from six months to four years. Much of his reputation rests on the sensation he created in the colonies during his second journey, where he, along with Edwards and Gilbert Tennant, served the Great Awakening at its peak. The Wesleys fared poorly in Georgia-perhaps they were too refined to endure the pioneering life, but Whitefield, who knew real life very well from his childhood at the inn, thrived. The large audiences in England allowed him to bring many provisions, medicines, and foods with him, and his work to distribute them to the poor, and especially to help the orphaned children, made a lasting impression on the colony. Georgia was only five years old, and many of the settlers were debtors released from prisons. They were a poor class of settlers with no education, no knowledge of farming, and poor health. Many onlookers thought the colony would fail, but Whitefield believed otherwise. He brought two teachers with him to establish a school, and urged others to be raised as well. Mission life was a great blessing, but soon he returned to England. Hearing of the controversies which raged about his ministry while he was gone, he felt like Daniel heading for the lions den. On his return to London Whitefield found that five churches were now closed to him, yet four kept their doors open to him, and so he returned to his demanding preaching schedule. He spoke at a number of societies each day, in addition to services throughout the week and on Sunday in churches he visited or was invited to. The revival he had ignited in the Bristol and Gloucester area continued, and at this time even those in the nobility invited George Whitefield in order to hear his messages. But whether he preached to commoners or in private audiences in the exclusive drawing rooms of England, his message was the same. And at the top of society, the results were mixed. Many lords and ladies believed, while others took offense at the suggestion that they were sinners who needed to repent. As the revival grew beyond imagination, more and more churches closed their doors to him, Whitefield began to entertain a new idea, that of preaching in the open fields. He knew it would provoke a strong reaction against him, but he wanted to be free of depending on a church or society room being available. In February 1789, Whitefield set out for Kingswood, near Bristol where there was no parish or school. The district was home to thousands of coal miners who existed in deplorable conditions. Men, women, and children worked long hours in the dark earth amidst death and disease, and they were famous for being vicious to strangers and occasional pillaging and terrorizing of the nearby town of Bristol. Whitefield saw them as a sheep without a shepherd. Field preaching was sanctioned by the church when no building was available, and another clergyman before him had indeed taught the miners in the open air. Whitefield was resolved to try. In February it was freezing cold, but when he went through the settlements and huts he found 200 people willing to come and hear him. Whitefield spoke graphically about how much Jesus loved them and how by cruel crucifixion he died for them just to save them from their sins. As he preached Jesus love and salvation to them, he began to notice pale streaks on the blackened faces of a few miners. Soon all of their dark faces were streaked with white gutters formed by tears as the gospel of Christ convicted them one by one. Three days later Whitefield was summoned before the chancellor of the dioceses who forbade him to preach in Bristol again. The next day he preached at the coal mine, and this time, 2000 individuals were listening. The next Sunday there were 10,000, and the townspeople began to far outnumber the coal miners. On Sunday March 25, 1739, the crowd was estimated at 23,000. The Great Awakening could now make an exponential leap, through the unorthodox and controversial approach of preaching in the open; there seemed no limit.

LIFE OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

BIOGRAPHY OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


At Bristol, Whitefield began a young peoples meeting starting with 50 people in his sisters house. However, within six weeks, this meeting filled a nearby bowling green with 5,000 people. All told there were around 30,000 people who came to hear him in open spaces around Bristol each week. Whitefield was perplexed about how to shepherd them while he prepared to leave for his second missionary journey to America. It was then that he was finally able to prevail on John Wesley to leave the society rooms and enter into the open air. Later he did the same with Charles Wesley. In this way shepherds for the thousands were raised up, and the Wesleys were set at the head of Englands greatest revival. However, it should be noted that under John Wesley the revivals began to wane, and it was clear that the revivals of Whitefield that resulted from his preaching did not continue with John Wesley. Whitefield preached all over England, and that summer it is estimated that he preached to over two million people. His bold field preaching had shaken for good the weak and timid Christianity of the times. In August 1739 he set sail once more for America. On his arrival in Philadelphia, the paper proclaimed that George Whitefield had preached to more people than any other man alive, probably more than any other man in history. Yet he left his ministry in England and came to the colonies because he had a burden for them, and a prayer that they may not live as thirteen scattered colonies, but as one nation under God. When Whitefield arrived in America, a number of regional revivals were under way. In New Jersey and Pennsylvania William Tennant and his four sons preached the new birth to Presbyterians. Tennant was unhappy with the resistance of Yale and Harvard Administrators to the new evangelical fervor, and he founded his own school to train preachers. Derisively called the log college, it would lead to the formation of Princeton University. In New Jersey Theodore Frelinghuysen spread revival throughout the Dutch Reformed Church. In Virginia there was the minister and hymn writer Sam Davies. In the backwoods of Pennsylvania, Connecticut and New Jersey, the missionary David Brainerd traveled on horseback spreading the word to Native Americans. They all served wonderfully within geographic or denominational boundaries, but it was George Whitefield whom God would use to tie them all together. When revival in Jonathan Edwards congregation died down he invited Whitefield to speak, and he found himself was moved to tears by his preaching. Edwards wife Sarah wrote, It is wonderful to see how he casts a spell over the audience by proclaiming the simplest truths of the Bible In Philadelphia, William Tennant welcomed him warmly and he preached from the courthouse steps to streets that were packed with 78,000 people. While in Philadelphia Whitefield met and befriended a famous agnostic named Benjamin Franklin. Franklin, who loved to hear him speak, wrote about him with glowing praise and became his American publisher. So amazed was Franklin at the carrying power of his voice, he calculated that in an open space as many as 30,000 people could hear his voice. He was thus convinced that the legendary crowds who had gathered in England could indeed hear him. Whitefield followed a punishing schedule and never let up for an instant. He was either traveling to preach or actually preaching. Few realized at first what God was doing through him, but his endless travel was uniting the nation spiritually as community after community were moved by his sermons. Whitefield preached to Presbyterians, Congregationalists, Episcopalians, Catholics, Quakers, and Moravians. He was the first man to so clearly cut across all denominational barriers by preaching the simple truth of the gospel. America had been populated by numerous sects, each trying to live a purer life to the Lord than did their parent church, and each sought to maintain their distinctives by eschewing the others. George Whitefield seemed to be reversing this trend, and huge crowds gathered to hear him from Providence to Baltimore. Many people were gathering together and discovering their common joy in the gospel of Jesus Christ. Soon the regional mentality of Europe and the sectarian spirit that brought them to America was being lessened as they found themselves united a common experience of faith. In their joy in their new life in Christ, few realized the incredible toll that the ceaseless traveling and preaching was taking on their beloved preacher. George Whitefield died on September 30, 1770 in Newburyport, Massachusetts, thirty miles

LIFE OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

BIOGRAPHY OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY


north of Boston where just a few months before British troops had opened fire on a mob killing five in what would become known as the Boston Massacre. Even as his health was failing the crowds who came to hear him were larger than ever. His last message was preached on Exeter Green in New Hampshire, where he preached about the incomparable excellencies of Christ. It was noted that all the while he seemed to look straight into heaven. Finally he cried out, I go! I go to rest prepared. My sun has arisen and by the aid of heaven has given light to many. It is now about to setNo! It is about to rise to the zenith of immortal gloryO thought divine! I shall soon be in a world where time, age, pain, and sorrow are unknown. My body fails, my spirit expands. How willingly I would ever live to preach Christ! But I die to be with Him! Early the next morning, his words came true. __________________________ Based upon an original essay written by Dr. Rimas J. Orentas.

LIFE OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD


BIOGRAPHY OF REV. GEORGE WHITEFIELD

WHITEFIELD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

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