Sie sind auf Seite 1von 12
SADDELL AND CARRADALE CHURCH FLOWER FESTIVAL AUGUST 4th 5th & 6th Thursday: 2.00pm - 4.30pm
SADDELL AND CARRADALE CHURCH FLOWER FESTIVAL AUGUST 4th 5th & 6th Thursday: 2.00pm - 4.30pm
SADDELL AND CARRADALE CHURCH FLOWER FESTIVAL AUGUST 4th 5th & 6th Thursday: 2.00pm - 4.30pm
SADDELL AND
CARRADALE CHURCH
FLOWER FESTIVAL
AUGUST 4th 5th & 6th
Thursday: 2.00pm - 4.30pm &
6.30pm - 8.00pm
Friday:
2.00pm - 4.30pm &
6.30pm - 8.00pm
Saturday: 2.00pm - 4.30pm
Entry £4 Children £2
including refreshments
Theme: Nursery Tales
PRODUCE STALL
THERE’S NO DUCKING OUT ON
SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 26
UNFORTUNATELY
THE NOTICE OF
THISEVENT
ARRIVEDTOO
LATEFORTHE
JULYISSUE
BUTITISHOPED
TOHAVE A
REPORTFOR
THEISSUE
OUT ON AUG 18.

ISSUE 225 AUGUST 2011

ISSUE 225 AUGUST 2011 ISSUE 225 AUGUST 2011

CARRADALE GOLF CLUB

THE SECRETARY IS MARGARET RICHARDSON, 2, OLD SCHOOLHOUSE CARRADALE PA28 6QJ TEL 01583 431788 FURTHER INFORMATION IS ON PAGE 5 & 11.

IS MARGARET RICHARDSON, 2, OLD SCHOOLHOUSE CARRADALE PA28 6QJ TEL 01583 431788 FURTHER INFORMATION IS ON

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

When difficult decisions have to be made it is increas- ingly common for authorities to consult those likely to be affected. Although many will welcome the move, others will see it as an attempt to avoid responsibility for cuts to services or reductions in funding. However three recent initiatives in East Kintyre have arisen from a real concern for the future life of the area. The public meeting to discuss the development of Carradale harbour was well supported and gave im- petus for the Carradale Harbour Users Committee to continue the long battle to rejuvenate the facility and to attract tourists to enjoy the undoubted delights of its hinterland Similarly the Community Council’s Village Survey is a serious attempt to resist the population decline and to provide much needed improvements both for residents and visitors. Hot on the heals of these moves two local resi- dents, running an internationally known mapping business, have thought deeply about employment prospects in the area and submitted a discussion document to the Community Council. (See page 9). All three moves require active consideration by residents and visitors and will not attract the success they so richly deserve unless commonly agreed goals are supported wholeheartedly. With a falling school roll and an increasingly eld- erly population the challenges are unlike any seen since Carradale developed from a small hamlet in the early nineteenth century. In the present financial and social climate, failure to tackle these problems will lead enthusiastic re- searching visitors to add Carradale East and West to the list of derelict townships.

NETWORK CENTRE & TEA ROOM

Open 10am to 5.30pm

Closed Thursday

MOD MACHRIHANISH BUILDING 81 MONDAY Adults 7- 8.30 WEDNESDAY Adults 7- 8.30 Children 6.30- 7.30
MOD MACHRIHANISH BUILDING 81 MONDAY Adults 7- 8.30 WEDNESDAY Adults 7- 8.30 Children 6.30- 7.30
MOD MACHRIHANISH BUILDING 81
MOD MACHRIHANISH
BUILDING 81

MONDAY Adults 7- 8.30 WEDNESDAY Adults 7- 8.30 Children 6.30- 7.30

FEES, £3 A SESSION,

to provide equipment and club activities Allan Reed (6th Dan) 01586 820474

IN THIS ISSUE

P2 Duncan Dunlop and the Vischers P3 Trees and the Wind-farm Trust. P4 School issues and life at 90. P5 The Plays, Golf & Network. P6 Going Dutch, David, Jen Owen. P7 Campbeltown Tours, planning. P8 Carradale Primary and Rainfall. P9 Jobs in Carradale, Diamond ‘do’ P10 Helen Owen on Colonsay. P11 Road issues & policy statement. P12 EKCC June minutes, Pool pic.

EDITORIAL CONTACT

01583 431281 or geoffreyf.page@homecall.co.uk

SUMMER QUIZ

QUIZQUIZQUIZQUIZQUIZ

CARRADALEVILLAGEHALL

SATURDAY6thAUGUST

7 FOR 7.30pm

HALLVILLAGECARRADALE

QUIZQUIZQUIZQUIZQUIZ

QUIZSUMMER

CARRADALE CAMERA CLUB

Exhibition

13th & 14th August, 11am - 4pm,

CARRADALE

VILLAGE

HALL

Primary School prints on show

Entry inc refreshments £2

Primary School prints on show Entry inc refreshments £2 CAMPBELTOWN MOTOR COMPANY Snipefield Industrial Estate,

CAMPBELTOWN MOTOR COMPANY Snipefield Industrial Estate, CampbeltownTelephone 01586 553200

Entry inc refreshments £2 CAMPBELTOWN MOTOR COMPANY Snipefield Industrial Estate, CampbeltownTelephone 01586 553200
MOBILE 07786 650937
MOBILE 07786 650937

DUNCAN JOHN DUNLOP

28/10/46 – 02/07/11 Duncan was born at 14 Stagpark, Lochgilphead on the 28th of October 1946, to Isabella and John Dunlop, one of six children, Flora, Tina, Jean, Nannie and Catherine. Duncan being the only boy, enjoyed a happy childhood in Lochgilphead. He then began his apprenticeship, at the trade he loved, as a mechanic in the Stag Garage. On completion of his apprenticeship he soon met Catherine MacKinnon at a dance in Kilmartin, the romance blossomed and after a few years they got married in The Church here in Carradale. Duncan continued his trade as a mechanic in Campbel- town. The happy couple settled to married life and lived in Torrisdale Square, where their first son Diarmid was born, they then got a house in Broomfield where their 2nd and 3rd sons were born Alasdair and Iain. At this point of time Duncan had a career change and joined Carradale’s fishing fleet. It was whilst at the fishing, that their daughter Rona completed the family in 1984 In 1990 Duncan’s mechanical career came calling again with Duncan leaving the ‘fishing’ for the last time, he returned to his fa- voured trade, which he remained at till he had to retire due to ill health recently. Duncan continued to live life to the full and was never happier than when he was at a Dance or Ceilidh, notably at Skipness, where he has left fond memories of being one of the Carradale contingent and was well known to be found outside the hall having a ‘wee’ puff when not on the dance floor. He was well known for his nimbleness on the dance floor. It would be wrong to not mention Duncan’s love for his family because that was his real love of his life, especially when his grandchil- dren arrived. Did you know that he went to Campbeltown twice a week on the bus to look after Morgan allowing Rona a chance to go to work? When he got home from hospital last Friday, he was ‘over the moon that his grandchildren appeared up to see him. Waving goodbye to him as they returned to their own homes, That MUST HAVE been a treasured and sacred memory for all the Family. I’m sure that there is a lot of things that folk don’t know about Duncan, errands of mercy, always a kind word from him, and the number of folk who got a lift to a bus or a lift when visiting people, Such was the man that he would leave home earlier than needed to catch a bus, starting work at 8 oclock, he would be in Campbeltown earlier if anyone needed to catch the 7-15, the same applied when he worked at Ardrishaig, he would also wait for folk going home. I myself can vouch for this ‘personal service’ on many occasions, and earlier in life during the seventies I used to give him a lift to Lochgilphead on a Monday morning when fishing out of Crinan at the time. He was ‘winching’ Catherine. There are so many stories of his escapades that are told; One time when coming from the town, dressed with a white shirt on, him and Catherine came on the Auchnasavil Land-rover broken down and Duncan jumped out of the Hillman Imp he had and climbed up on the front bumper to see what the problem was, meanwhile Catherine had to tow the land-rover (always a rope in the boot of his car!) and Duncan sticking out of the bonnet, he got the engine going much to the relief of brother in law Dunkie, His wife was a bit concerned about the state of his good clothes, but that became the ‘norm’ as his concern was always for others. Another time when coming down the single track there was a gale of wind and discovered a tree blocking his route home, he turned only to find his exit blocked the other way also. He ended tying the Hillman

2

TORRISDALE CASTLE ORGANIC TANNERY & CRAFTY SHEEP SHOP SUMMER GIFTS Sweaters, cardigans, belts, handbags, slippers,
TORRISDALE CASTLE
ORGANIC TANNERY & CRAFTY SHEEP SHOP
SUMMER GIFTS
Sweaters, cardigans, belts, handbags, slippers,
mugs, soft toys and so much more.
A sheepskin rug is a touch of luxury at any time of the year. Try
one on your new wooden floor, beside your bed, in your favour-
ite armchair or in the car - ‘pelt up & belt up’ at the same time!
TELEPHONE
01583 431233

Imp to a fence and waited on the gale abating. I know there are a lot more adventures that many of us can tell. One incident must be told, which sums up the true character of Duncan. During the extreme winter that we had, he felt compelled to help warm up the bin-men on their Friday rounds, he had started providing a much appreciated cup of tea and a bacon roll which he delivered and joined them in the cab. The bin-men sensed a few weeks ago that something was not right. They, Jimmy Thompson and Ian Mc Sporran, realized Duncan was ill and proceeded to take him to the surgery; owing to their quick actions they saved Duncan’s life, The Family are ever grateful to this deed, also Dr Elder & Eileen Black at the surgery for their valiant efforts. A UNIQUE FAMILY MAN has left us and we thank GOD for his unselfish life, Today we ask Almighty Gods safekeeping of his Beloved

family, Catherine his loving wife of 38 years, Diarmid, Alastair, Leyona

& Fallon, Iain & Nicky, Rona, Scott, Morgan & Abigail. Sisters Flora,

Tina, Jean, Nannie & Catherine, Mother-in-law Christine, and all the Dunlops & all the MacKinnons, all those who knew him and loved him. Matthew Ramsay.

A MESSAGE FROM THE VISCHERS

TO THE CONGREGATION OF SADDELL & CARRADALE CHURCH

This card is long overdue to thank you all for your incredible generosity

to us on our departure. We were overwhelmed by your kindness and

wish to thank you all for your gifts and support. We have settled in really well to the community here in Haddington and are encouraged by the good start the children have made at the school too. We miss Kintyre and all of you very much, but please know you are always welcome to ‘pop by’ here in Haddington, we would love to see you. We have taken our precious memories of ‘the Kintyre years’ with us and hold them dear. We plan to come back to see you all, sooner rather then later, and wish you every blessing in your journey forward with the church in Carradale. John, Elizabeth and the children.

LOCUM MINISTER APPOINTED

As of the first of July Matthew M. Ramsay of Portnastorm, Carradale, has been appointed Locum for one day per week to the parish of Saddell and Carradale, linked with St Brendan's Skipness. Anyone who wishes to get in contact with Matthew can do so at 01583 431381. This post is originally for 6 months, during the vacancy.

‘GRAMMAR’ RECTOR TO RETIRE

LETTER TO PARENTS OF STUDENTS AT CAMPBELTOWN CGS

"I write to confirm what you have no doubt heard by now through the

local ‘grapevine’, namely, that I will be retiring this summer after nineteen years as Rector of the Grammar School. While looking forward to retirement and to having more time for the things which will continue to keep me busy, I will in many ways be sorry to leave. Being Rector of the school in which I was a pupil has been challenging at

times, occasionally frustrating, but more than anything else fulfilling. I extend my thanks to you and to your children that this has been so. Mr Michael Casey, who has been senior depute since 1994, has accepted

a 23-month secondment as Rector in order to maintain stability in

management while further roll-drop staffing adjustments are made. I thank him for his outstanding support over the years and extend to him and my other senior colleagues, Miss Cameron and Mr Gallagher, my very best wishes for the future."

In a similar management operation Neil Brown’s retirement as Head Teacher at Dalintober Primary School will lead to the appointment of Mrs Watson, former Head of St Kieran’s Catholic School, to act as temporary head at Dalintober.

J. H. Hooper B.Sc., B.V.M & S., M.R.C.V.S VETERINARY SURGEON is pleased to provide veterinary
J. H. Hooper B.Sc., B.V.M & S., M.R.C.V.S
VETERINARY
SURGEON
is pleased to provide veterinary care for your pets
Please telephone 01586 552427 for an appointment
UGADALE COTTAGE by CAMPBELTOWN
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
KENNEDY’S SHOE SHOP 50-52 Longrow Campbeltown. Tel 01586 552644 Walking shoes, Dress shoes. Walking boots,
KENNEDY’S SHOE SHOP
50-52 Longrow Campbeltown. Tel 01586 552644
Walking shoes, Dress shoes.
Walking boots, Dress boots.
All your footwear needs under one roof.
Ladies & Gents wide fitting specialists.
Children’s fitting service.
‘K’ ‘CLARKS’ ‘LOTUS’ ‘ROHDE’

SALT & WIND DAMAGE TO TREES

A COMMON WEST COAST EXPERIENCE IN 2011 Martin Mears e-mailed the Antler about wind damage on the west coast of Scotland trees. He had been in contact with the Forestry Commission and its first response was that it could be wind damage and they would recover, however a second contact came from Joanne MacLean. Hi Martin I do believe it is salt affecting the leaves from the high winds two weeks ago. The winds carried salt from the sea which caused the leaves to have brown patches so you were right! Any other queries please get in touch. Many thanks, Jo MacLean, joanne.maclean@forestry.gsi.gov.uk. Subsequently the Editor received a news release from the Forestry Commission.

BROWNED TREES BATTERED BY STORMS

FORESTRY NEWS RELEASE No: 14690 Experts from Forestry Commission Scotland are allaying public fears over the ‘browning’ of many trees on the west coast of Scotland. Although the trees may look unhealthy, it is hoped that most will recover over time. Experts are citing the exceptionally strong winds and salt laden sea air of 23 May as the cause for 'scorching' the trees and turning them brown. Many broadleaved trees and larches have been affected and, to a lesser extent, pine and other conifers. The main geographical area affected appears to stretch from Dumfries and Galloway north to Fort Wiliam on the western seaboard. Hugh Clayden, Tree Health policy adviser for Forestry Commission Scotland said: "We've had a number of calls from worried members of the public who have seen large areas of trees turning brown for apparently no reason. Their first thought is that they are in bad health due to disease. We're very grateful for these calls but we are quite sure that what is being reported here is usually a result of the recent very strong winds coupled with salt-laden air on the coast. Basically the trees' delicate new leaves and needles have been dried out as well as physically damaged by the exceptional winds. Browning and leaf wilt is also apparent inland but does not yet appear to be anything like as severe. Other causes of extensive browning include the severe winter frosts”.

Mr Clayden added: "We will be examining trees to see if the buds and twigs are still alive. If they are, recovery should take place this year and next. If not, some die-back of branches is likely to occur - although we would still expect most trees to recover unless they suffer further extreme events. If for some reason trees continue to show signs of ill health in a month or two then Forestry Commission Scotland would welcome reports from the public. Media enquiries to Steve Williams, Forestry Commission 0131 314 6508. News coming from visitors to Northern Ireland suggest that the 23rd of May saw

similar damage to trees across the Province.

TREE GENE POOL

Ed.

Environment & Climate Change Minister, Stewart Stevenson visited the Forest Festival at Scone Palace on Saturday (18 June) to launch the National Tree Collections of Scotland (NTCS).A partnership project, led by Forestry Commis- sion Scotland and Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, NTCS will serve as Scotland’s national arboretum. The collections – at sites around the country - will raise awareness of Scotland’s world-leading role in tree conservation and also highlight the rich history of Scottish plant collectors, whose legacy shapes modern forestry - and its significant contribution to Scotland’s rural economy. The National Tree Collections Scotland inaugural sites are:

• Benmore Botanic Garden, Argyll

• Dawyck Botanic Garden, near Peebles

• Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

• Kilmun Aboretum, Argyll

• Scone Palace Pinetum, near Perth.

TREE SAVED FOR FORTY YEARS

Apart from the accident at the Network Centre several other trees came down in the recent winds including one at River- side Cottage, Torrisdale, which the Roads Dept insisted unnecessarily impaired ‘sight lines’ in 1971.

EAST KINTYRE COMMUNITY COUNCIL WIND-FARM TRUST

The Wind-farm Trust met on Thursday, 12 May to review grant applications in the Spring tranche. There were 14 applications from which none were rejected, four were grant- ed less than the amount applied for and nine were granted the full amount of their application. The total distributed

amounted to £16,050. The following is a list of the successful

grants: -

£

Supporting Homeless

25

Peninver Village Hall

70

Campbeltown Cinema

1000

Carradale Harbour User’s Group

4000 *

EKCC Lochpark right of way repair

750

Kintyre Link Club

500

Argyll FM

1000

Kintyre Amenity - Bunk House

1000

Kintyre Amenity - Kintyre Steamer

500

Carradale Surgery - patient transport

600

Kintyre Way

2250

South Kintyre Development

1500

EKCC - path clearing, etc

800

Network Carradale

1200

The grant to CHUG was in the form of an immediate grant of £500 and a ‘draw down’ facility towards further costs. JSI

MURIEL CARRIER

How nice it was to see Muriel back in the village for a few weeks both at the Abbeyfield and at her house in Port Righ. We wish her well. We remember the encouragement she gave to several local projects over the years and hope to see her back in Carradale at sometime in the not too distant future.

FIT THE BEST
FIT THE BEST

FIT THE BEST

UP TO 40% off

WINDOWS and DOORS, CONSERVATORIES, GARAGE DOORS, ROOFLINE PRODUCTS, FLAT ROOFS, DRIVEWAYS,SECURITY SYSTEMS,

ROOFLINE PRODUCTS, FLAT ROOFS, DRIVEWAYS,SECURITY SYSTEMS, FREE QUOTATION NO OBLIGATION To arrange an

FREE QUOTATION NO OBLIGATION

To arrange an appointment, Contact

Sandy McPherson Tel 01586 552776

3

TORRISDALE CASTLE

Superb self-catering accommodation in Castle or Cottage in absolutely fabulous surroundings Ideal for a relaxed holiday. Bird watchers paradise. Colour brochure from:

Carradale Campbeltown Argyll PA28 6QT

TELEPHONE 01583 431233

Web-site: www.torrisdalecastle.com e-mail: machall@torrisdalecastle.com

e-mail: machall@torrisdalecastle.com See Smell Savour Quality catering to arouse your senses
See Smell Savour Quality catering to arouse your senses Kilbrannan Catering We cater for parties
See Smell Savour
Quality catering to arouse your senses
Kilbrannan
Catering
We cater for parties large and small, at your
home, at your business or other location of
your choice –
we promise you stress free entertaining.
Book your SUMMER event with us today –
you won’t be disappointed.
Visit our website: www.kilbrannancatering.co.uk
Telephone Anne on 01583 431581
or Jennifer on 01583 431632

SCHOOL ISSUES

CAMPBELTOWN GRAMMAR & CARRADALE PRIMARY NEWS The Editor wishes to apologise for incorrect references in the July issue of The Antler to the development plans for educational building in Campbeltown, and in particular to the very active plans for a new Campbeltown Grammar School. Information from a very reliable source confirms that the plans for a new building in Campbeltown are well advanced with money committed by the Scottish Government for a new secondary school in the town; Argyll and Bute Council are already engaged in planning for the school and arrangements are said to be well under way. The suggestion that primary education in Carradale might be affected is therefore also incorrect although some years ago consideration was given to a plan for a combined secondary and primary school on part of the Grammar playing field. If this proposal were considered at the present time the funding of the primary sector would need to be found from the Council itself. Additionally some parents of Campbeltown primary children were not in favour of the propos- al as it was thought that it might lead to an increase of bullying by secondary pupils. The whole issue of school amalgamation is still very much in the news,

particularly in the light of falling school rolls and the need to conserve financial outlay, but with six primary schools within 15 miles of Campbeltown, with three within 4 miles of the town, there are sound educational and financial reasons for

a combined campus in Kintyre’s main town. Although such a prospect is not ideal

for those rising four years old, education authorities in other parts of the UK have taken steps to mitigate the problem and have seen educational advantages in avoiding the stepped transfer from primary, through secondary to sixth form colleges. No doubt educational and financial considerations will continue to concern parents, teachers, councillors and education departments for some time to come.

Apologies are also offered to Carradale Primary School in that information about end-of-term activities from Friday 24th June to Wednesday 29th of June were received by the Editor two days after the July issue went to print on Thursday 9th of June.

‘TRY BEFORE YOU BUY’ ‘A small area of Campbeltown Grammar School is being refurbished as part of a

trial national project, which will last for five years. It could see schools designed

in a new way in the future which would complement the Curriculum for Excellence.

An area on top of the south block of the school will be used for the project. Work’s expected to start in October. It’ll see a number of classroom areas combined to form a large multi-purpose teaching space that would be ideal for the new teaching methods associated with Curriculum for Excellence. One of the key changes will be a team of teachers teaching a whole year group at a time. This isn’t possible in the current school layout. The Government funded body, Architecture and Design Scotland have offered their services free of charge to create the new teaching space as part of research they are doing. They’ll provide specialist design services and look into getting specialist furniture and fittings free of charge on a trial basis. Spokesperson for Third Sector and the Communities and Kintyre Councillor Rory Colville said ‘School pupils, teachers and the local community will be very involved in the design process. There’ll be a series of workshops held with architects from the end of May and throughout June. Pupils and staff will also visit James Gillespie’s High School in Edinburgh. They’ve just finished a similar design exercise for their refurbished school. I hope involving pupils in the process will inspire them to consider careers they may never have thought of before.’ The current group of first year pupils at Campbeltown Grammar are being taught under the ‘Curriculum for Excellence’ and it will have been implemented through- out all year groups once the new school is open. If the exercise is successful it could determine how the brand new secondary school in Campbeltown will look

when it’s built in 2015’.

ABC press report.

will look when it’s built in 2015’. ABC press report . LIFE CONTINUES TO SPARKLE AT

LIFE CONTINUES TO SPARKLE AT 90

How many men over the age of 90 are still piloting an aeroplane, driving their own car and skipping around the world on holidays? Well there was one called George visiting Carradale this week with his companion, Joan Trott. This lovely couple were spotted having a pleasant evening at the Ashbank with Joan’s son Malcolm Trott and his wife Kate and under intense interrogation George’s adventurous life- style eventually emerged. Seen here sporting a San Francis- co T-shirt it was hard to believe this sprightly 90-year old was the age he said. It was only his remarkable resemblance to HRH Prince Philip, another sprightly 90-year old, that gave a clue to his age’. ‘George and Joan have known each other for more than 50 years but got together as a couple more recently after their respective spouses passed away. They both travel extensively and have come up from the south of England where Joan lives in the village of Ticehurst, the name coming from the Anglo Saxon meaning ‘goat wood’. (Surely there is some connection with Carradale here!) ‘George still regularly takes a small plane on hops over the English Channel to France where he treats Joan to a gourmet lunch before flying home again to the airfield in Headcorn in Kent. He is a shining example of how age really doesn’t matter. You are as young as you feel and the num- bers don’t count for anything’. Report from the Carradale Goat, courtesy of Johnny Durnan. (incidentally Kate Trott is the new Secretary of the Hall Committee)

‘INFORMAL CARERS’ TRAINING

This is an 11 week course which started in June . It is being held between 1.30pm and 3.30pm on Wednesdays in Camp- beltown Hospital. The course is for any informal carer looking after a family member or friend. These sessions will provide an opportunity for establishing supportive networks and the chance for carers to participate in awareness sessions and to discuss any problems that they may have.

20th July Legal issues 27th July Welfare rights 3rd Aug Nutrition

10th Aug Moving & handling Louise Kerr (nurse)

17th Aug Stress & anxiety 24th Aug Communication

For further information please contact: Mairi Brown, Staff Nurse, Integrated Care Team, 01586 555852

Jan McCorkindale James McCorkindale Jackie ? (dietician)

Helen Chinn (occ.therapist) Ferlyth ? (speech & lang.ther.)

4

Need a repair or a small job done? Can’t get a tradesman to come out?
Need a repair or a small job done? Can’t get a tradesman to come out?
DIY
Phone
KeeF
Tiling
Joinery
Fencing
Decking
01583
431614
Shelving
Decorating
07786
838996
Path
laying
Domestic
repairs
Dry-stone
walling
Your local handy
who won’t let you
-man
Flat-pack
assembly
down
& won’t charge the earth
No job too small

A BEAN-TRUSS SUPPORT EVENT

TWO ONE-ACT PLAYS WITHOUT A GARDENING THEME Vegetable and fruit growers are experiencing problems this year. First there were two unseasonably warm days at Easter, then a barrage of wind and salt spray and latterly a return to a plentiful supply of rain without a hoped for rise in temperature. Grapes are still waiting the call and beans will be ‘has beans’ without adequate ‘trussed’ support. Thank heaven then for the evergreen artistic endeavours of the play- wright Stephen Bean, the author Lynne Truss, Carradale Drama Club and Mad Cow productions; without them frustrated Saturday night TV gardeners on June 25th would have be faced with an attack of the ‘Wimbledons’ and ‘Glastonburys’. The alternative evening embraced an unlikely story of a suicide leap from a block of ‘Dedham’ flats (I hope John Constable was at hand to take control of the watching crowd), while two distraught women, and an amateur sleuth tried to persuade a reluctant male to give up reading his outdated copy of ‘The Antler’ - a ‘rubbish magazine’, and to indulge in a web of intrigue and concern over the contents of a cardboard box. The ‘B’ side of the evening involved a bright, posh delusionist who, while addicted to health farms and its attractive staff, worries about Janey - her daughter and Janey’s boyfriend. Predictably the performance by the members of Carradale Drama Club, Mary Macalister Hall, Pauline Burrows, Joanne Paterson, Torrisdale’s grass-cutting Harry Wheatcroft and Carradale’s iconic surgery ‘flower’ Margaret Rutherford was magnificent and fully up to the standard which won them praise at two recent festivals. Not to be outdone Jane Dunbar gave a highly professional one- woman performance of Lynn Truss’s ‘The Mother’. Superficially unlike the author’s reputation as a stickler for punc- tuation and phrasing in ‘ Eats, Shoots & Leaves,’ Truss’s sexual innuendos remain amidst a flurry of emotional ploys designed to fascinate those of a particular female persua- sion and elicit a sustained sigh and a release of air from a few of the opposite gender. With the accompanying ‘draw’ and bever- ages, this was certainly an evening not to be missed and drew patrons from far and wide. Congratulations to all involved. G.P.

from far and wide. Congratulations to all involved. G.P. EILA’S ‘UP, UP AND AWAY’ Eila Durnan

EILA’S ‘UP, UP AND AWAY’

to all involved. G.P. EILA’S ‘UP, UP AND AWAY’ Eila Durnan and several others had an

Eila Durnan and several others had an opportunity of a free helicopter flight in June, courtesy of visitor Rob Jones and his pilot ‘Johnnie’.

5

TOMMY For all your Travel and Holiday Arrangements put your trust in your own Travel
TOMMY
For all your Travel and
Holiday Arrangements put
your trust in your own
Travel Adviser
MILLAR
TOMMY MILLAR
Tel: 0845 0587589
TRAVEL
e-mail tommy.millar@travel
counsellors.com
www.travelcounsellors
.co.uk/tommy.millar
COUNSELLOR

CARRADALE GOLF CLUB

The prize winners in the monthly draw for May and June were:

1st £30

MAY Mrs A Borthwick

JUNE Sandy Thomson

2nd £18

Mrs C McFadyen

Mrs J Brown

3rd £12

Mrs Betty Thomson

Mrs F Martindale

4th

£

6

Bob Jeffrey

Mrs A Paterson

NETWORK NEWS

CHARITY DAWN WALK OF 3-4 MILES on SUNDAY 26 JUNE

Photo from the Carradale Goat, courtesy of J.D
Photo from the Carradale Goat, courtesy of J.D

THANKS FROM JOSE, HEATHER AND IRENE The organisers would like to say a huge thank you to all 31 walkers who turned out for The Dawn Tartan Walk on Sunday 26th June 2011, and to Cheryl Strang who donated tea and coffee. The event, in aid of Macmillan Cancer Support and the Mhairi Semple Fund for Cancer Relief and Research, started at 5am, attracted 31 walkers. Next year’s event begins at the same time on Sunday 24th June 2012. Another very worthy event which failed to take advantage of Antler free adver- tising was the sale of baking and plants for ‘Erskine Week’ which raised

£95.

to take advantage of Antler free adver- tising was the sale of baking and plants for
HARDWARE STORES 15 LONGROW CAMPBELTOWN Cleaning materials, House wares, Ironmongery & Hardware, Hand tools, Power
HARDWARE STORES
15 LONGROW CAMPBELTOWN
Cleaning materials, House wares, Ironmongery &
Hardware, Hand tools, Power tools, Key cutting,
Locks, Wooden mouldings
DIY supplies
01586 552954
We make the best Scottish tablet you have ever tasted Looking for the perfect Summer
We make the best Scottish tablet
you have ever tasted
Looking for the perfect Summer gift? Then look no further than our selec-
tion. Our Hampers, full of delicious Kintyre produce and our Scottish Tablet
Gift Boxes make excellent presents. We have gifts to suit all budgets.
Our tablet is available in local shops.
You can also order all our products on-line. Just visit our web-site ;
www.scottishtabletcompany.co.uk
or telephone 01583 431594 or 431581 and speak to Trish or Anne.

OH! ITS YOURSELF!

THE AUTUMNAL HAZE While Kintyre is not often renowned for its Indian summers when students, after a disappointing summer, return to school just as the sun decides that it had better make up for its past demeanours. When this does happen, the windless days and warm sunshine are welcomed by mothers free of their extra holiday responsibilities and by those entering their autumn years. Unfortunately some of the older generation have to deal with a haze of a different kind which affects their hearing and their vision. Whether its cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macula degeneration, or increasing deafness, contact with friends and neighbours becomes more difficult. David Currie, like many others, relishes contact with those he has got to know, but is concerned to reassure those who appear to believe that he is not aware of them, that he would welcome being brought to a halt on his ‘buggy’ and invited to renew contacts with those he has ‘mist’.

D.McNAIR & SON Fuel Merchant KINLOCH ROAD CAMPBELTOWN PA28 6EG FAX: (01586 552039) TELEPHONE (01586)
D.McNAIR & SON
Fuel Merchant
KINLOCH ROAD
CAMPBELTOWN PA28 6EG
FAX: (01586 552039)
TELEPHONE
(01586) 552020
552039
QUALITY HOUSE COALS
SMOKELESS & COOKER FUEL
CENTRAL HEATING OILROAD
DIESEL & TRACTOR FUEL
FREE DELIVERY
(MONDAY TO FRIDAY)
“Even if we are now unofficially a ‘limited company’ there’s no harm in us lying
“Even
if we are now unofficially a
‘limited company’ there’s no harm
in us lying alongside each other
in our rest periods.”

GOING DUTCH AT CARRADALE BAY

other in our rest periods.” GOING DUTCH AT CARRADALE BAY DUTCH MOTOR-HOMES & CARAVANS VISIT THE

DUTCH MOTOR-HOMES & CARAVANS VISIT THE BAY CAMPSITE. Netherlands Caravan Club members arrived for a three day stop-over in June. The group have been touring part of England and most of Scotland over five weeks. Carradale Bay site is their third last stop before returning back to Holland via the Hull ferry service. A buffet and barbecue was laid on by Kilbrannan Catering for the the Dutch visitors. We in turn sampled one of their speciality sweets of barbecued banana drizzled with brown sugar, sultanas, avocado sauce, whiskey, rum and a dash of scoushy cream ( I’m not very good at minding ingredients) but it was very tasty. The evening turned out fine for all with music, some dancing, a wee dram and a bottle or two of wine to quench the thirst. Report and pictures from The Carradale Goat web-site courtesy of JD

and pictures from The Carradale Goat web-site courtesy of JD JEN OWEN - AWAY FROM IT

JEN OWEN - AWAY FROM IT ALL

FROM PAISLEY TO QUAY BRAE VIA ‘THE MULL OF KINTYRE’ ? Yet another tale of relatively local success is described and pictured on Johnny Durnan’s Carradale Goat web-site. Jennifer Owen, twin daughter of Maureen and Bob Owen, has started her own driving school in Paisley, After six years dealing with vehicle claims, qualifying as a ADI in August 2009 and working for the British School of Motoring, she has gone independent. On her web-site she confides that - “Away from the ‘L’ plates, you will find me in the Mull of Kintyre - where my sister and parents now live”. - Is that another house on Quay Brae up for sale or is Jen’s sat-nav malfunctioning?

6

OPENING TUESDAY TO SUNDAY 12pm - 2.pm. Evening meals: 6pm - 8pm Booking advisable Bar
OPENING TUESDAY
TO SUNDAY
12pm - 2.pm.
Evening meals:
6pm - 8pm
Booking advisable
Bar open12-2pm &
4pm to late.
Quiz on Thursdays
at 8.30 prompt
Tracy & Fiona would like to welcome you to the Ashbank Hotel, Carradale
Now fully licensed - drop in for a drink or two.
En-suite rooms with sea & golf course views
New Lunch & a'la carte menu every 2 months - Eat in our newly contemporary
restaurant or cosy lounge. Daily specials - Sunday Lunches
Monthly theme nights - Indian, Italian, Chinese & Tapas.
Take away menu plus all items from the main menu, just order before 1 pm
Parties, Events & Outside Catering available to suit your needs
E-mail: ashbankhotel@tiscali.co.uk
Internet: www.ashbankhotel.com
For further details please call 01583 431 650
SELF CATERING ACCOMMODATION LOCHAIN IS A SEMI-DETACHED PROPERTY SET IN THE COASTAL VILLAGE OF CARRADALE.
SELF CATERING ACCOMMODATION
LOCHAIN
IS A SEMI-DETACHED PROPERTY SET IN
THE COASTAL VILLAGE OF CARRADALE.
The property has views of
the 9-hole Golf Course.
This cosy cottage is com-
fortably furnished. Three
Bedrooms, twin, King size
and single. All kitchen utili-
ties, bed linen and towels
provided. Pets allowed,
small garden and car park
for two cars.
Enquiries
Phone 01583 431612

CAMPBELTOWN HERITAGE TRAIL

The Campbeltown Heritage Trail Group have announced the dates for this year’s tours. The group, made up of volunteers, was formed last year as part of the Campbeltown Town Centre Regeneration Project and aims to provide people with an interesting insight into the area’s historic past, ensuring our heritage is not lost.This year’s tours will take place every Wednesday in July and August, departing from Campbeltown Tourist Information Centre at 1pm. Pilot tours will also be held on Saturday 9th July and Saturday 6th August at 1pm from the Tourist Information Centre. The tours are completely free of charge and will last approximately 50 minutes. If you would like any more information, please contact Cara Browning at the Town Centre Regeneration Office on 01586 559048. Main Tours are at 1pm on Wednesdays 20th July, 27th July, 3rd August, Satur- day 6th August, Wednesday 10th August, Tuesday 16th August (Music Fest.) and Wednesdays 17th August (Music Fest.), 24th August and 31st August.

CAMPBELTOWN ARCHITECTURAL TOURS

The Campbeltown Heritage Trail Group has also announced that 2 architectural tours of Campbeltown will take place this summer, led by David McEwan. The purpose of the tour is to learn about simple architectural terms whilst gaining an insight into some of Campbeltown’s finest buildings and the history behind these. The tours will take place on Friday 15th July and Friday 5th August, leaving at 1pm from Campbeltown Tourist Information Centre. These tours will only be held if there is a demand and therefore pre-booking is essential. For further information or to book your place, contact Cara Browning at the Town Centre Regeneration Office on 01586 559048. These initiatives are funded via the Campbeltown THI whose funders include the Heritage Lottery Fund, Argyll and Bute Council and Argyll and the Islands Leader. Cara Browning, Campbeltown Townscape Heritage Initiative (THI) Tel: 01586 559048 (int ext - 2248) 3 Harvey's Lane, Burnside Square, While the first Architectural Tour will be past by the time the Antler is published, the second is on Friday 5th August at 1.00pm

PLANNING APPLICATIONS

Reference: 11/00894/ Proposal: Replacement of hip roof with gable roof, installa- tion of roof-lights and alterations to openings on rear elevation Location: East- wood, Lochpark, Carradale, Campbeltown, Argyll & Bute, PA28 6SG Applicant:

Mr & Mrs Paul Davis, 66 East Craigs Rigg, Edinburgh, EH12 8JA. Agent: Gillian Wright, Lochside, Low Askomil, Campbeltown, PA28 6EP Development Type: 01 - Householder Development Grid Ref: 181871 – 638508. Reference: 11/00889/PP Proposal: Erection of extension to dwelling-house Location: Grianan Cottage, Lochpark, Carradale, Campbeltown, Argyll & Bute, PA28 6SG Applicant: Miss Sandra Galbraith Grianan Cottage, Lochpark, Car- radale East, Campbeltown, PA28 6SG. Agent: Equillo Shurig, Peninver, Campbel- town, PA28 6QP Development Type: 01 - Householder Development Grid Ref:

181722 - 638503. Reference: 11/00971/PPP Proposal: Site for the erection of a dwelling-house Location: Land North West of Mingulay, Port Righ, Carradale, Campbeltown, Argyll & Bute, PA28 6SE Applicant: Mr Lorne Cousin C/o Lawflat House, Dud- dingston, South Queensferry, EH30 9SU Agent: Niall Macalister Hall, Touch Business Centre, Touch Estate, Cambusbarron, Stirling, FK8 3AQ Development Type: 03B - Housing – Local Grid Ref: 181688 - 637918.

COLLOQUIALLY SPEAKING

QUOTE OF THE MONTH: BBC NEWS 28 JUNE “Space is a very ‘cool’ place” - Steve Lindsey Commander of the last American vehicle to enter space for five or more years. Internet quote: ‘Temperature is the vibration of atoms, in space there are really no atoms so space doesn’t really have a temperature. If you put a thermometer in space away from sources of radiation such as the sun it would slowly cool to 2.7K (-454.54 Deg F) that’s the heat or energy left over from the big bang’. - Cool man, Fantastic, Absolutely Fabulous.

7

(-454.54 Deg F) that’s the heat or energy left over from the big bang’. - Cool
(-454.54 Deg F) that’s the heat or energy left over from the big bang’. - Cool
Mobile Fish Fresh fish Have your favourite photographs delivered to your door enlarged to A3
Mobile Fish
Fresh fish
Have your favourite photographs
delivered to your door
enlarged to A3 or A4 size
Haddock, Whiting, Sole, Cod Fillets, Fresh Salmon,
Prices tiered depending
Rainbow Trout, Kippers Smoked & Peppered Mackerel.
on quantity required
TELEPHONE: 01586 554338
JR ARGYLL CHIMNEY SWEEP A KINTYRE BASED COMPANY INSURED: REGISTERED INSTITUTE OF CHIMNEY SWEEPS INSPECTION
JR ARGYLL CHIMNEY SWEEP
A KINTYRE BASED COMPANY
INSURED: REGISTERED INSTITUTE OF CHIMNEY SWEEPS
INSPECTION OF YOUR CHIMNEY WITH OUR CCTV CAMERA
SMOKE AND DRAW TEST OF YOUR CHIMNEY
DECOMMISSION OF CHIMNEYS
ON COMPLETION OF JOB YOU WILL BE GIVEN
A CHIMNEY SAFETY CERTIFICATE
PLEASE PHONE JOHN ON
OR ROBERT ON
MOBILE
01583 431522
01583
431128
07582 744321
38 Tormhor Carradale East, Campbeltown PA28 6SD
744321 38 Tormhor Carradale East, Campbeltown PA28 6SD Alasdair McPhee IFA FINANCIAL SERVICES REVIEWING YOUR
Alasdair McPhee IFA FINANCIAL SERVICES REVIEWING YOUR FINANCES? Areas of Financial Planning Protection - Personal,
Alasdair McPhee
IFA
FINANCIAL SERVICES
REVIEWING YOUR FINANCES?
Areas of Financial Planning
Protection - Personal, Mortgage,
Business and Income.
Savings / Investments - Annual ISA
Allowance / Low interest rates, there
are alternatives offering potentially
greater Capital Growth and or Income.
Pension Planning - Plans should be
reviewed on a Annual Basis.
Under the current Economic Climate
reviewing your Finances should be
seriously considered. We offer, in the
privacy of your own home, a free
Personal Review covering all the
above, meetings can be arranged by
calling:-
Contact numbers are 01586-552598 /
0779 857 4890 / or 0141 887 6778.
Alasdair McPhee, Financial Consultant
was born in Carradale, lives and works
in Campbeltown.
Financial Planning Made Simple
e-mail: amcphee@hotmail.com,
St James Business Centre,
Linwood Rd, Paisley PA3 3AT
Tel: 0141 887 6778 Fax: 0141 887 6344
Alasdair McPhee Financial Services is an ap-
pointed representative of Personal Touch Finan-
cial Services Limited which is authorised and
regulated by the Financial Services Authority
Principal Alasdair M. McPhee
Cert.PFS MLIA(dip)
Elliot Gemmil & Lauren Burns
Elliot Gemmil & Lauren Burns
Niall Gemmil, Bethany Paterson & Shauna Brown to in a ol ior ly
Niall Gemmil, Bethany Paterson & Shauna Brown
to
in
a
ol
ior
ly
Shauna brown & Niamh Baxter
Shauna brown & Niamh Baxter

CARRADALE PRIMARY SCHOOL

funds from the sale of books at the Post Office. We would like to thank Mrs Angela Arkell for her contin-

ued support for this venture. All of the above is due

HEAD TEACHER’S LETTER TO PARENTS Carradale Primary School has enjoyed yet another successful Kintyre Music Festival and I would like to offer my congratulations to all the pupils who took part. Our Pre 5 and P1-3 performed ‘Super Singers’. The adjudicator said of them, “I love your outfits. You sang this very well and held your breath beau- tifully. You have worked hard to learn the actions so well and to sing so clearly. I loved the ending – Yeah! Very well done.” Congratulations to the individual winners who were: Elliot Gemmill: 1st Pr 5 and under Vocal Solo.Niall Gemmill sang in Pr 6 & 7 Vocal Solo and played his chanter in the March section. Shauna Brown and Shannon Arkell played their recorder in the Junior Recorder Solo. What talented pupils we have – Well done everyone. I would like to take this opportunity to thank most sincerely Mrs Morag Allan for her invaluable musical tuition of our singers and recorder players. As you know, we have been busy improving our school grounds. and we were dismayed to discover that our outdoor classroom is already requiring repair. This would appear to be the result of vandal- ism. However, on a brighter note, I would like to thank the following for their hard work, enthusiasm and commitment to our gardening project : Ray- mond Gosling, Charles McMillan, Craig McCallum; Glynn Arkell; Lachie McAllister, Iain and Adam Gull, Eleanor Sloan, Andy Lawton, Morag Burns & John Linn, Shelagh Cameron & John Brown. A huge thank you to all parents and friends who supported our Soup and Sandwich Charity Event which raised £342.75 for Macmillan Cancer Sup- port. Much fun and enjoyment was had with our ‘Mock Wedding’ and we raised £94 for school funds. Our end of term service raised the fine total of £174.60. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Mr Mike Hurst of Wallis Hunter, for the most generous donation of the Mathew Neil MacDougall Memorial medal. £70 was also raised for school

the wonderful support and inherent generosity of

the community. Next session we would like to wel- come Ms Julie Brown and Ms Emily Johnstone to our teaching staff. Ms Brown will be teaching for 2

days and Ms Johnstone will be instructing the pupils

Music for half-days. Next session, school lunch

will cost £2 per day. Due to budget cuts, free fruit for P1-3 will cease.

Finally, on behalf of the pupils and staff of Car-

radale Primary School, I would like to wish everyone

very pleasant and hopefully sunny summer

holiday! Head Teacher: Mrs Anne Marie Elliott Miss Lynn Galbraith sent in pictures of the main prizewinners and information below:

Harlow Award for Citizenship (P7 Award voted by P7 pupils): Niall Gemmil, Matthew Neil MacDougall

Memorial Prize (P7 Award): Bethany Paterson, Car-

Anderson Memorial Quiach for Citizenship (P1-7

Award voted by all pupils): Shauna Brown P7. CPS. Personal Achievement Award: Shauna Brown P7 CPS. Creativity Award: Niamh Baxter P5. CPS Jun-

Sports Champion: Elliot Gemmill P3. CPS Senior

Sports Champion: Lauren Burns P7. Clan Shield (awarded to clan relay winners): Carradale Glen. Henry McGougan Memorial Prize for Perfect At- tendance: Raymond Gosling P7.

JUNE RAINFALL

June felt cold and wet. We experienced low temper- atures brought on by predominantly Northerly winds and with many overcast days it was more like dreary misty bleak November than the heady hot summer days we might have hoped for. The total rainfall for June was 125mm (about 5 inches) which is a slight-

above average rainfall for the month. Half the

days (fifteen altogether) were dry, with no rainfall recorded. Most recordings were less than 13mm but notably 18mm was recorded on the 6th and 24mm (nearly an inch) on June 18th . Overall June was a disappointing month weather-wise but a distinctly drier and warmer end to the month perhaps sig- nalled more typically summery weather ahead? ML

8

Carpet, Upholstery & Window Cleaning Service Mobile 07799395709
Carpet, Upholstery &
Window Cleaning Service
Mobile 07799395709

JOBS IN CARRADALE -

TIME TO GET REAL? There are plenty of things which Carradale is not: it is not a compact, picturesque little settlement that day-trippers flock to see; it is not a natural harbour; it does not have a "front" for trendy shops and eating places; it does not have historic buildings and artefacts; it is not a centre for mountaineering, energetic hill walking or surfing; it does not have a lively night-life. On the other hand, there are plenty of things going on in Carradale:

golf, cricket, bowling, camera club, women's guild, amateur dramatics

- plenty of pastimes for the inhabitants, or at least the older inhabitants.

But what these activities do not do is create jobs. If Carradale is to have any kind of future it needs jobs.

In the past, as we all know, Carradale lived on fishing, forestry and

summer visitors. All three have declined dramatically with little prospect of return. With effort there may well be some scope for increasing tourism but the cold reality is that tourism alone will never be enough. The season is short and it coincides with the midges. The competition

is stiff and visitor expectations higher than ever before. Nostalgia is not

a viable strategy. We need to reinvent ourselves.

In attempting to get real we need to ask what is the essence of Carradale? Once it would have been described as a fishing village with summer visitors. No more. The defining characteristic of the village is that the population is increasingly old. Our natural instinct is to shy away from this inescapable fact as a depressing problem -but could it not also point to a solution? If Carradale is elderly then surely our challenge is to determine how we can make it the best elderly village in Scotland and, above all, generate sustainable year round jobs for the young in the process. Until now Carradale people generally cared for their own. Thankful-

ly many of those carers are still with us but they are growing older and

the generation that would have cared for them is increasingly scattered. Neither natives of Carradale nor in-comers who have retired here should be forced out of the village because they cannot be cared for in it.

We are repeatedly told that the costs of the NHS and the Social Services are disproportionately spent on the needs of the elderly. Not wishing to sound mercenary, but if there is money spent on the elderly then there is money in the elderly. We oldies are golden oldies. Rather than the NHS and Argyll and Bute spending money on Carradale how can we encourage them to spend money in Carradale? If an elderly person needs a bathroom modification, why does a builder or a plumb- er need to come out from Campbeltown or Lochgilphead? Why shouldn't that kind of work be done by people in the village? If an elderly person needs help taking a bath, why does a carer need to drive out from Campbeltown? Cannot all our caring needs be met from here? If we could demonstrate that one pound spent in the village could save two pounds spent in a care home, or ten pounds in a hospital, then the people holding the purse strings ought to be falling over themselves to give us money. This should mean that there are oppor- tunities for creating and paying for imaginative new services to support independent living. If there is a problem getting groceries due to the lack of home delivery from supermarkets then perhaps there is an opportunity for a delivery service organized from here, preferably one which builds on and amplifies the role of our village shops. It would be

a tragedy if Carradale were to lose the good neighbourliness which is

its greatest strength. But neighbours themselves grow old and need support. Could we set up village schemes to enable people to remain safely and comfortably in their own homes? We need ideas, technolog- ical and organizational, to build into a coherent package exciting

9

organizational, to build into a coherent package exciting 9 enough to attract the politicians and budget

enough to attract the politicians and budget holders. Above all we need ideas from the senior citizens of Carradale. We know that the social and health care services are in the process of being restructured and reduced. If we do not act to ensure that our taxes are spent on the kind of care we want, we will have to put up with whatever ‘they’ give us. Not only do we need to take control, we are being urged to do so. From April of this year a system of ‘Self-directed support’ is in place ‘designed to meet your care needs in creative and flexible ways’. (Information from Council and Care: 23) This govern- ment mission statement could become reality but only if we ourselves choose to become self-directed. In the press we often hear calls for the NHS and Social Services to work together more closely. In a remote rural context such as ours does it not make sense for the village as a body to act as a third party in the discussion? If the village can deliver services for less then why shouldn't it? Could Carradale become a pilot for developing a village- based model for cost-effective and dignified elderly care in the remote rural areas of Scotland. There is no doubt that such a model is needed. It is in our interest to get in on the ground floor. One of the most successful community initiatives in Carradale in recent years was that which resulted in the Abbeyfield home. In retro- spect, could this be just phase one of a larger process of making the village fit for purpose in the 21st century, a century characterized by an aging population? Making the village grey-friendly would encourage grey tourists - and their young relatives. Carradale may not be a centre for mountain- eers but it has excellent credentials as a place for people who want gentle walks and spectacular views. This is one of our natural strengths and we should build upon it. Trying to make Carradale a good place to be old does not mean making it a bad place to be young. If meeting the needs of the elderly can generate jobs then that means more children, more security for the school, and more prosperity.

Eric Dudley and Catharine Forbes.

DIAMOND CELEBRATIONS

“Just to let everyone know we had a wonderful day on the anniversary of our Diamond Wedding. We would very much like to thank all our family and friends for their gifts, cards and best wishes. We really appreciated your caring and kind generosity in making it a very special day.” Jim and Isobel Williamson, Mingaladon, Carradale. Several other residents including two ‘new’ octogenarians have given credence to the popularly held belief that ‘we’ are living longer, but would prefer not to be reminded of the fact. However its no good keeping quiet because we know who you are !

JOHNNY DURNAN Servicing Motor and Commercial vehicles, Repairing & Servicing Garden machinery & Outboards
JOHNNY DURNAN
Servicing Motor and Commercial vehicles,
Repairing & Servicing Garden machinery & Outboards
Garden maintenance, Grass cutting
Hedge trimming & Fencing
Small building work undertaken
GIVE ME A CALL ON 431365
CARRADALE’S ODD JOB MAN
PATERSON’S BAKERY & POST OFFICE Licensed Grocers, Bakers & Newsagent Try our freshly baked morning
PATERSON’S BAKERY & POST OFFICE
Licensed Grocers, Bakers & Newsagent
Try our freshly baked morning rolls, crusty bread, tea bread
and cakes, all baked in our old-fashioned stone oven
TELEPHONE 01583 431725
THE SHOP IS OPEN
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday & Saturday
8am to 1pm & 2pm to 5pm. Thursday 8am to 1pm.
Sundays: One hour only from 10am to 11am
THE POST OFFICE IS OPEN Monday to Saturday 9am-1pm

COLONSAY 2011

It started with a paragraph in 'The Courier'; Colonsay was holding a

Spring Festival in May. Interesting

Telephone 01583 431725

I went online to find out more. A

series of themed walks, wildflowers, birdwatching, archaeology, foraging and cooking; a range of activities from painting to bridge; a ceilidh, slide shows, art exhibition. Even golf. It sounded a perfect way of exploring an island I'd always wanted to visit, with local guides who had expert knowledge to pass on. Within a week, I had three friends interested, we'd checked out ferries, found a self-catering cottage, and booked for a week on the island. For anyone who hasn't been, it's a beautiful, peaceful place with one hotel, a few B & B's, and a range of self-catering properties spread throughout the island. Both the general store and the bookshop are extremely well-stocked considering the size of the island and population. We were told Colonsay was flat, well, for a flat island it's remarkably bumpy. None of the hills are high, but they tend to be steep. Because there is no public transport and the walks we wanted to do all started from different places, we decided to take a car. The alternative would have been to hire bikes, but as pensioners none of whom had ridden a bike in many years, we decided to do it the easy way. Two of the highlights, Oronsay with it's ruined priory, and Balnahard Bay, would have been impossible otherwise. The Festival was in its first year, so may well develop and change in the future. It was built round themed walks with knowledgeable leaders, all either local or regular visitors to the island over many years. For us, this was an opportunity to see parts of the island we might not have discovered on our own, with the added advantage of expertise on hand when our interest exceeded our knowledge. Two walks, wildflow- ers and foraging and cooking, involved transport by land-rover from the car park to the start of the walk some distance away, allowing us to see places our elderly legs might not have reached. Everybody would have different highlights; we all particularly enjoyed 'Foraging and Cooking' – first find your wild food, then cook it, then eat it, with the addtional ingredients being of the highest quality; 'Wildflower walk' which took us to the wild and remote Balnahard Bay [via the Whale] and has enriched local walks in Kintyre as we can now name many of the flowers we see; and the guided walk through Colonsay house gardens. A self-catering apartment in Colonsay House could be worth booking another time if only for the chance to spend time relaxing in this glorious garden. The walk across the Strand to Oronsay was not part of the Festival programme, but well worth doing if low tide is at a suitable time. The [ruined] Priory with its carved stones is well kept and interesting, and it's a beautiful walk. And I have to mention the animals; lambs and calves may not be novelties to us, but the lambs were curious and cheeky; and it's not often that you return 'home' to find a new-born calf struggling to its feet for the first time. Would I go again? Almost certainly, particularly if it is still as reasonably priced. It will be interesting to see if more publicity brings a wider age range of participants, this year most were over forty; but during school term-time this is perhaps inevitable. Helen Owen.

school term-time this is perhaps inevitable. Helen Owen. CAMPBELL KEYTE OF ‘THE HIELAN DOG BURGER VAN’

CAMPBELL

KEYTE

OF

‘THE HIELAN DOG BURGER VAN’ AT MACHRIHANISH.

A mobile catering service in West Kintyre recommended by Peter Morrison.

10

41 Longrow, Campbeltown Argyll PA28 6ER Tel: 01586 554727 Fax: 01586 551727 TOM GRANT 24
41 Longrow,
Campbeltown
Argyll PA28 6ER
Tel: 01586 554727
Fax: 01586 551727
TOM GRANT
24 Argyll St.
PARTNERSHIP
A
R
C
H
I
T
E
C
T
S
Lochgilphead
Argyll PA31 8NE
Tel: 01546 603050
Mobile 07770 538 661
Tom Grant Dip.,Arch., R.I.B.A., R.I.A.S

HYDROCARBON REMOVAL

KINLOCH ROAD (PARK SQUARE) SITE, CAMPBELTOWN ‘Work has started at the former Kinloch Road, Roads Depot site to remove hydrocarbon contamination. Hydrocarbons include petrol and diesel, and this work will address reports about the smell of petrol in the area. This is the next phase of the plan to regenerate the Kinloch Road area of Campbeltown which will allow ACHA to go ahead with their planned housing development. ‘The work, which is part of the council’s CHORD programme is being undertaken by AJC Civils Ltd. The Kin- loch Road regeneration is a key aspect of Campbeltown’s CHORD project as it will allow construction of the new road through Park Square. This is part of the infrastructure improvements which will allow the transportation of wind turbine tower components from the manufac- turing base at Machrihanish’.

CAMPBELTOWN MUSEUM UPDATE

‘The main focus of recent work at Campbeltown Museum has been ‘behind the scenes’, preparing the various elements of the Council's re-submission seeking full Accreditation for the museum. This included the preparation of a Forward Plan covering the period 2011-12 to 2013-2014: the content of this is as discussed at departmental level, and as broadly agreed with the Spokesperson. The Plan itself should receive DMT approval later this month, and sets out a series of costed objectives for museum activities over the next three years, including an ongoing programme of building and display refurbishments for which modest annual capital allocations will be sought. The Council should hear in July if its application for Full Accred- itation has been approved. Museums Galleries Scotland have awarded the Council a grant of £20,000 towards the cost of refurbishment works on the museum due to take place this year - 50% of a project costing £40,000 which will see replacement of the gallery heating system, new display lighting, and the installation of blackout blinds to reduce natural light. Future reports will note progress with this project. The Council continues to work with the Friends of Campbeltown Museum, who are responsible for opening the building to visitors on summer Saturdays. This locally-based community group is a great support, and their activities are greatly appreciated. Work has proceed- ed well on recovering the damage to the collections that took place when the store was flooded in 2010, and is now nearly complete. Negotiations have taken place with the Trust that controls the photo- graphic output of the late Lady Linda McCartney. It now appears very possible that late this year Campbeltown Museum will receive a dona- tion to its collections of a number of Linda McCartney photographs, for future display as the Council sees fit. The museum continues to be curated by staff from Kilmartin House Museum and Auchindrain, under the terms of Service Level Agree- ments that provide the Council with the professional museum services it requires. These arrangements, which have been in place since 2007, have just been renewed for 2011-2012 and continue to provide the Council with excellent value-for-money. The arrangement has attracted very positive attention at national level, where it is regarded as a model of innovative good practice’

A.A.B.C.C. & A.S.C.C. PROBLEMS

Following the review of community councils two years ago a state of lethargy has followed. Unfortunately, with his own business to run, the new AABCC Secretary has decided to resign. With few community councillors prepared to spend time helping run the Association, Ccs will be without help or guidance: no AGM was held in 2010. In a similar vein the national association, the ASCC, is short of Government funding and is closing for at least a year.

THE PICTURE HOUSE Sat 16 July 2011 for 6 days at 8.00pm KUNG FU PANDA
THE PICTURE HOUSE
Sat 16 July 2011 for 6 days at 8.00pm
KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG)
Sat 23 July 2011 for 6 days at 8.00pm
GREEN LANTERN (12A)
Sat 30 July 2011 for 6 days at 8.00pm
BRIDESMAIDS (15)
Sat 6 Aug 2011 for 6 days at 8.00pm
TRANSFORMERS:
DARK OF THE MOON (12A)

A NEW ROAD CONTRACT SIGNED

SUMMERTIME WITH BREDON With apologies to A.E.Housman.

In summertime with Breedon

The spades they sound so clear;

Round Kintyre and Islay they ring them On poor roads far and near,

A happy noise to hear,

Here of a weekday morning My love and I would lie, And see the coloured lorries, And hear the craic so high About us bye and bye

The ‘phone would ring to call them

In valleys miles away:

'Come to us, good workmen; Good workers, come our way.' But here my love would stay.

And I would turn and answer Among the spreading grime, 'Oh, put tar on our road, And we will bear the fine,

And come to vote in time.'

But when the snows at Christmas On Beinn-an-Tuirc were strown, My love rose up so early And stole out unbeknown And went to town alone.

They filled the one hole only,

Many more were seen, The traffic followed after, And so to town went she, And would not wait for me.

The plaudits will sound for Breedon, And still the roadsides hum. 'Come all to vote, good people,' Oh, noisy men, be dumb; On election day, I will come.

‘Argyll & Bute Council has signed a three year £7 million partnership agreement with Breedon Aggregates Scotland to carry out road improvements on Islay, Jura, Mull and in Kintyre. Work starts this month and will include road reconstruction, resurfacing, patching and markings as well as surface dressing which keeps out rain water and keeps rot at bay’. ‘Spokesperson for Transport and Infrastructure at Argyll and Bute Council, Councillor Duncan MacIntyre said: “This partnership agreement will ultimately mean that we can ensure good maintenance of the routes in Islay, Jura, Mull and Kintyre over a long period of time at a competitive rate. It will make a real difference to the communities in these areas of Argyll and Bute. We are committed to improving the area’s roads for local people, businesses and tourists. Breedon Aggregates have proved that they are able to deliver time and again. We are looking forward to working with them”.’ ‘Chief executive of Breedon Aggregates Scotland, Alan Mackenzie said: "This is great news for Breedon Aggregates Scotland and for the local authority, as this approach allows them to maximise their budgets at a time when funding is under pressure. We have a good working heritage in this area and the fact this is a long-term deal and a partnership agreement is testament to our experience and ability to deliver good quality results”.’

A PENNSYLVANIAN CONTRACT

KITCHEN POETRY FROM ‘THE EVERGREEN’ MAGAZINE FOR THOSE WHO LIKE TO BE ‘IN CONTROL’ Please stay away from my kitchen, From my dishwashing, cooking and such, You were kind to have offered to help me, And I want to thank you so much. I hope you won’t think me ungracious When I ask you to leave me alone, For my kitchen is not very spacious And my system is strictly my own. So please stay out of my kitchen, It might help to prevent a few wars, And when I’m invited to your house, I promise to stay out of yours.

11

CARRADALE GOLF CLUB Welcomes visitors Juniors Adult Round £8.00 £17.00 Daily £10.00 £20.00 Weekly -
CARRADALE GOLF CLUB
Welcomes visitors
Juniors
Adult
Round
£8.00
£17.00
Daily
£10.00
£20.00
Weekly
-
£80.00
Two weeks
-
£105.00
Country
£40.00
£132.00
(May play in Club Competitions)
Affiliated Club Members £10.00
For further information contact The Secretary, Margaret Richardson,
2 Old Schoolhouse Carradale, PA28 6QJ Tel: 01583 431788

A POLICY STATEMENT

Sometimes readers e-mail the Editor about the Antler’s policy on a number of issues - publication dates, advertising charges and free personal adverts. Other correspondents ask about the failure to report sports events, marriages, births, silver, golden and diamond events and visits to East Kintyre by celebrities and returning former residents and holiday-makers. The Editor’s dual rôle in reporting local events and commenting on them is sometimes mentioned. To put the record straight once again I have tabulated replies to the more frequent enquiries. (1) Publication date is a Thursday, one week after the issue reaches Krisp Print in Campbeltown - usually slightly earlier than the middle of the preceding month. This issue, for example, went to print on the 14th of July and was assembled in late June and early July with the latest submissions inserted by Tuesday 12th July. (2) Minutes and reports are included without alteration. (3) No submissions are refused unless they are offensive, might lead to legal action or are not from a clearly identified source. (4) With the cooperation of Johnny Durnan, items and photographs from the Carradale Goat web-site are inserted when it is thought that readers without Internet access would welcome their inclu- sion. ‘The ‘Goat’ and the ‘Antler’ are free and complementary information sources welcoming all kinds or items but they rely on a ready supply of reports and comments. It is virtually impossibly for Johnny as a working man to attend every meeting and the Editor’s youthful interest may not be matched by his inability to follow charity events over hill and dale. (5) Subscriptions are £10 a year. Adverts cost £7 a month for approx- imately 53 square centimetres (or pro rata) and there are no charges for setting-up or changing content. (6) Although the ‘Carradale Goat’ has a facility for viewers to record their comments, there is no reason for readers of the ‘Antler’ to hesitate to make their views known by writing to the Editor at Benbecula, Waterfoot, Carradale, Campbeltown Argyll PA28 6QX, e-mailing him at geoffreyf.page@homecall.co.uk or tele-

phoning him on 01583 431281.

Ed.

Campbeltown Argyll PA28 6QX, e-mailing him at geoffreyf.page@homecall.co.uk or tele- phoning him on 01583 431281. Ed.
THE ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND ‘Where people matter’ P.O.BOX 13, 11 CASTLEHILL CAMPBELTOWN ARGYLL PA28
THE ROYAL BANK
OF SCOTLAND
‘Where people matter’
P.O.BOX 13, 11 CASTLEHILL
CAMPBELTOWN ARGYLL PA28 6AP
CARRADALE BRANCH OPEN
THURSDAY 10am - 11am
BROTHERS The Complete Service HAMILTON BROS. (ENGINEERING) LTD. Groundcare & Agricultural Equipment Sales,Service
BROTHERS
The Complete Service
HAMILTON BROS. (ENGINEERING) LTD.
Groundcare & Agricultural Equipment
Sales,Service & Hire. MOT & MOT Repairs
Local Service Depot
- Roading, Campbeltown. Tel: 01586
MASSEY FERGUSON
Head Office: Greenock Road, Bishopton PA7 SAP Tel: 01505 862010.
Fax: 01505 862221 Email: info@hamiltonbros.co.uk Web Site: www.hamiltonbros.co.uk

EAST KINTYRE COMMUNITY COUNCIL

MINUTES OF THE MEETING HELD ON JUNE 2ND 2011

Present: Shelagh Cameron, Ronnie Brownie, Andrea Hopkins, Elizabeth McMillan Apologies: Lachie Paterson, Tom Adams, Stuart Irvine, Councillor Robin Currie Conven- or Shelagh Cameron welcomed everyone present. MINUTES OF LAST MEETING:

• Correction - should be Alan Walker not Alan Parker.

• Proposed by Ronnie Brownie seconded by Andrea Hopkins.

UPDATE FROM MINUTES dated 7 April 2011

• Goat management - Andy (forest ranger) has agreed to set up a goat management plan, more details later. MATTERS ARISING FROM LAST MINUTES:

• No quote for road as yet.

• Not heard back from Alan Walker. Convenor Shelagh Cameron to approach Robert Strang at golf club to see if they would be willing to use tractor to fill in holes.

• No plans by West Coast Motors to cut transport to Carradale.

• Treasurer report - same as last time.

• Planning - none.

• Village survey - not all survey forms collected, update next month.

• Harbour plans - Alan Milstead from Carradale Harbour User Group (CHUG) gave an

update on the meeting that was held on 20 May 2011. 47 members of the public attended, a questionnaire was handed out. Those that were filled in gave a positive response. Nothing was actually decided, but was agreed that the status quo was not acceptable, tt was agreed that a short meeting should be held every three weeks to give an update. Next meeting Thursday 16 June. Malcolm McMillan from South Kintyre Development Trust to attend, Convenor Shelagh Cameron stated that the Community Council had also been in touch with Malcolm McMillan re the Village Community Plan and did not want this jeopardising, but that the harbour plans could be worked in with this. What plans are being looked into: 1. Moorings - to north, outside harbour, Crown Estate been approached - waiting for reply; 2. Conceptual architect - to look at ideas brought up at meetings to see if feasible; 3. Buildings - shower, update toilets, flats?. No questions were forthcoming, Convenor Shelagh Cameron thanked Alan Milstead for attending.

CORRESPONDENCE:

• Argyll and Bute Main Issues Report Appendices - large booklet.

• West Argyll Forest Design Plan - Grogport, CD.

• Argyll and Bute Community Council Bi-Elections - letter.

• Argyll and Bute - Strathclyde Police Internet Hacking - letter (to be put in Antler and on Carradale Goat web-site).

• Roads - Julian Green - letter.

• Councillor Robin Currie - email - funding for War Memorials, funding for Community Ownership Report.

• NHS mental health - leaflet.

• Argyll and Bute Area Committee Meeting - response to natural marine plan - email

• Committee for Older Peoples Services - email. ANY OTHER COMPETENT BUSINESS: none

Convenor Shelagh Cameron thanked everyone for attending.

A.H.

01583 431362 & 07814767813 Landscaping and maintenance Patios and Paving Drainage and Fencing Turfing and
01583 431362 & 07814767813
Landscaping and maintenance
Patios and Paving
Drainage and Fencing
Turfing and Monoblocking
All tree work
Established
1989
Free estimates
All excavations undertaken
CARRADALE GARDEN
SERVICES

12

All excavations undertaken CARRADALE GARDEN SERVICES 12 POOL TROPHY THE 2011 DUGALD JOHN CAMPBELL EVENT Missing

POOL TROPHY

THE 2011 DUGALD JOHN CAMPBELL EVENT Missing from the July issue was this photo with the donors, the winners & Matthew Ramsay receiving a cheque of £1076.56 on behalf of RNMDSF.

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION

The Freedom of Information Act 2000, and its Scottish

equivalent, The Freedom of Information (Scotland)

Act 2002, introduced a public ‘right to know’ in relation

to public bodies. While the full provisions of the Acts,

which didn’t came into force until 1 January 2005, do

not apply to a range of voluntary bodies, the general

feeling was that FOI would allow a free flow of infor-

mation throughout the whole range of human activities.

Unfortunately the spirit has still to be kindled in

parts of Kintyre amongst some local organisations

and has encouraged individuals and committees to

either restrict the release of information or to refuse to

divulge anything about their plans or activities.

Although one pseudo-Government agency was

an early member of the Kintyre non-conformist chap-

ter in 2008, with the premise that ‘no news is good

news, the latest group to become clandestine has

decided that while information about some meetings

may become available, minutes of ordinary committee

meetings are ‘not in the public sphere’ - I wonder if

those who attended the public meeting ten months

ago would have bothered if they knew they were to be

kept in the dark about its activities

So in terms of an open and free society what

comes next - secret hand-shakes, cryptic phrases,

special articles of clothing and induction rights - or do

we simply agree these organisations would be easier

for the elected to manage if they refused entry to

users, residents, and the media? The oft-quoted

statement by older embittered male teachers -

“schools would be perfect places to work if there were

no students” - is becoming a recognised ideal for most

public bodies and an increasing number of voluntary

G.P.

organisations.

A COLOUR VERSION OF ‘THE ANTLER’ IS AVAILA- BLE ON ‘THE CARRADALE GOAT’ WEB-SITE AND ON ‘THE KINTYRE COMMUNITY FORUM’ WEB-SITE THROUGH THE AGENCY OF ‘SCRIBD’.