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2 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011

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Issue No. 2011-192
3 NEWS
Page 6 Group looks for funding for Drazba monument
Page 7 DPW work on private property questioned
Page 9 Officer in bar fight continues preliminary hearing
Page 12 Citizens learn S.W.A.T. tactics
19 ARTS
Page 19 Dolls set to rock at Montage concert
Page 23 Internet shows rise in popularity
Page 27 Deathly Hallows: Part 2 an instant classic
32 SPORTS
Page 32 Dream Game time approaches
Page 33 Green Ridge rises to the top of Legion ranks
Page 35 Wilkes-Barre/Scranton introduces lacrosse team
Page 37 Abington National takes control of tourney
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COVER PHOTO: RICH HOWELLS/
FOR GO LACAKWAANNA
JASON RIEDMILLER/
FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Abingtons Tyler Maddock
drives in two runs on a
double. Abington National
completed a dominant
run through the District
17 Little League baseball
tournament by finishing
off West Scranton early in
Monday final. See more,
PAGE 37.
SCRANTON City Council
approved final passage of sever-
al important pieces of legisla-
tion on Tuesday, including two
that will continue to put themat
odds with city administration.
Following a public hearing on
the matter before the regular
meeting, council established
new rules and regulations for
the West Scranton Skate Park,
which is currently maintained
by the Hyde Park Neighborhood
watch and surrounding neigh-
bors in West Scranton.
After holding a public caucus
withNortheast Revenue Service
LLC last week to answer coun-
cils questions about the Wilkes-
Barre companys collection
methods, council passed an
amended contract with NCC on
Tuesday to collect the citys de-
linquent real estate taxes from
2004 through 2010 with a 4-1
vote. Council Vice President Pat
Rogan dissented. It is a two-year
contract with the option of a
one-year renewal.
We hammered out a contract
that helps the city with its debt
and current deficit and makes
payments of tax delinquencies
more fair, affordable, efficient
and accountable, Council Pres-
ident Janet Evans said.
Next, council unanimously
passedanamendedlist of autho-
rized towing companies for the
city and an establishment of
rules, qualifications and stan-
dards to be followed by the com-
panies as well as fines andpenal-
ties for towing and fees.
Councilman Jack Loscombe
said the city will receive more
revenue under councils amend-
ments and provide a more fair
process for towing companies
by separating authorized tow-
ers, salvage towers and heavy
duty towers on separate lists
and adjusting the towers fees
accordingly. Councilman Bob
McGoff said that towers he
spoke to felt the changes were
legitimate and acceptable.
Then council unanimously
overrode Mayor Chris Dohertys
veto of legislation drafted by
council solicitor Boyd Hughes
to transfer funds fromthe Urban
Development Action Grant sec-
ond repayment account to an-
other account to pay for life-
guards and the purchase of pool
chemicals and supplies so that
the Novembrino pool could be
reopened.
In a letter addressed to City
Clerk Nancy Krake, the mayor
said that council violated the
Home Rule Charter and Ad-
ministrative Code by not dis-
cussing changes with him
first. He wrote that council il-
legally and improperly at-
tempted to create a special
city account to deposit the
UDAG repayments and that
use of UDAG funds falls com-
pletely under his discretion,
adding that the Department of
Housing and Urban Develop-
ment does not allow these
funds to be used for those
items.
He fails to provide any cita-
tions to support his reasons for
veto, Evans responded, ad-
dressing what she felt were the
mayors inaccuracies.
She saida special city account
was established, as evidenced
by vouchers from the city con-
troller. The citys Office of Eco-
nomic and Community Devel-
opment has no legislative au-
thority over council and there is
no documentation to prove that
SCRANTON CITY COUNCIL
Council passes agreements, overrides UDAG veto
See COUNCIL, Page 5
By RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
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Sunday, July 17, 2011 GOLackawanna 3
S
ince Bruce Small-
acombe was sworn
intooffice onJune 28,
he has already met with
more than half the depart-
ments in Lackawanna
County government, start-
ing at 7 a.m. each morning.
He works a full day in the of-
fice from8:30a.m. until 4:30
or sometimes 5:30p.m., and
then attends borough and
township meetings at night
to introduce himself in be-
tween the five softball
games on his schedule this
week alone.
He also hopes to change the
way county government works
in 187 days.
I get about five hours of sleep
a night, Smallacombe admitted
with a smile.
The ambitious 57-year-old
now fills the seat of former Re-
publican Minority Commission-
er A.J. Munchak, who was con-
victed on eight counts of public
corruption in federal court and
stepped down on June 22. While
he feels some maybe skeptical of
his intentions after witnessing
such a historic trial, Small-
acombe also believes his person-
ality and record will justify his
appointment by the county
court en banc in the eyes of citi-
zens.
Anybody who knows me is
not skeptical of why Imhere be-
cause I am such a people person
and I believe in our area. I love
this area, he said.
I havent been given a silver
spoon, said Smallacombe, who
recently served 10 years as may-
or of Jermyn. I worked my way
up from a ditch digger and pipe
layer to a county commissioner
with a high school education.
Ive worked hard at being the
best mayor I could be. Weve
made tremendous strides in Jer-
myn.
During his term as mayor,
Smallacombe handled flooding
issues, built a Little League field,
started a historical society, up-
datedtechnology inthe borough
building, set up a public events
committee, remodeled the po-
lice station and purchased new
equipment for the officers while
improving their pay, and set up a
website for the borough.
Im an idea person. I brought
a lot to the table in that town ...
There are a lot of things that I
thinkwe candodifferently inthe
county, especially in our park
system, our road system, our
amphitheater, our airport, our
stadium those are thing that I
have a pretty good general
knowledge of, Smallacombe
said.
Smallacombe begins interim term
By RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
RICH HOWELLS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Democratic Majority Commissioners Mike Washo and Corey OBrien are pictured at a meeting with
Bruce Smallacombe, who was sworn into office on June 28.
SCRANTONLackawannaCountywasted
no time painting over former Republican Mi-
nority Commissioner A.J. Munchaks name
on signs for McDade Park and other county
property, but his legacy of alleged corruption
may be much harder for sitting commission-
ers to erase.
On June 21, Munchak was found guilty of
eight of the 21 public corruption counts he
was charged with by the federal government,
forcing himto step down. Former Republican
Majority Commissioner Robert Cordaro was
also found guilty of 18 of the 33 charges
against him, though both maintain their in-
RICH HOWELLS PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
The name of former Republican Minority
Commissioner A.J. Munchak was painted
over on this McDade Park sign.
Corruption trial on
countys mind
By RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
See TRUST, Page 5
See SMALLACOMBE, Page 17
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PAGE 4 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011
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Sunday, July 17, 2011 GOLackawanna 5
UDAG repayments can only
be used by the mayor, she
continued. UDAG funds can
be used for any city pur-
pose, she contended.
Additionally, Evans listed
the mayors wasteful and
personal spending of funds,
saying that the money should
always be spent onimproving
citizens quality of life.
Finally, council passed leg-
islation that prohibits the
Scranton Recreation Author-
ity from charging city resi-
dents an admission fee to
swim at Nay Aug Park, citing
children and families who
cannot afford the fee as their
primary reason for the
change. The vote was 4-1,
with Councilman Bob
McGoff dissenting.
The legislation asks that ci-
tizens showproof of their res-
idency to enter the pool for
free, though Scranton-Lacka-
wanna County Taxpayers As-
sociation member Bill Jacko-
witz suggested in a letter to
city officials that all children
ages1-15 shouldbe allowedin
automatically, and those 16
and older should provide a
valid license or ID.
Providing free swimming
for the children of Scranton
not only takes away some of
the financial burden from the
families, but it also takes
away the possible safety risk
of swimming in the (Nay
Aug) gorge or swimming in
streams or rivers, Rogan
said.
McGoff said that other
pools in the city provide free
swimming and that he views
the Nay Aug pool as a sepa-
rate entity where a charge is
necessary to maintain the
pool and the park itself.
COUNCIL
Continued from page 2
SCRANTON Council
President Janet Evans gave
a brief update on the status
of the StreetSmart parking
meter program, which has
hit another snag that will
again delay its implementa-
tion.
StreetSmart parking me-
ters use sensors under the
pavement and radio teleme-
try to detect vehicles mov-
ing in and out of parking
spaces, making a city em-
ployee aware when a vehi-
cle is in violation via a PDA
handheld device.
After learning more
about the possible new rev-
enue source from John Mis-
kell, account manager for
StreetSmart Technology
LLC, council agreed to a
free test of 100 spaces in
December of last year, esti-
mating $300,000 of addi-
tional revenue in its 2011
budget from the meters
once they were fully imple-
mented.
While Wilkes-Barre be-
gan a free 50-meter trial
more than three months
ago, the city of Scranton
has yet to start its own. A
sole source contract was
granted to StreetSmart in
cities such as Easton, but
after receiving calls from
competing companies, the
Scranton Parking Authority
felt it was not the sole
source provider of the tech-
nology and opted to put out
a request for proposals.
After receiving bids from
both StreetSmart and IPS
Group, Inc., however,
Evans said council rejected
both bids and will re-bid
the project, delaying its im-
plementation until at least
September.
The administration does
not wish to implement this
program because it propos-
es instead to sell the park-
ing meters to the Scranton
Parking Authority which
will, in turn, take a $10 mil-
lion loan to purchase the
meters, Evans said.
This is another example
of an asset owned by the
people which is sold or
leased to an authority and
then paid for a second time
by the people.
Parking meter project
hits another roadblock
By RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
nocence.
While Democratic Majority
Commissioners Mike Washo and
Corey OBrien talked extensively
the following morning about the
measures theyve taken since
2008 to assure that similar pay
to play schemes with county
contracts could not occur, some
may not be convinced the good
old days are over just yet.
Ray Nearhood, the Republican
candidate for Scranton city con-
troller, asked OBrien at Wednes-
days commissioners meeting if
Paul Woelkers had ever contrib-
uted to his political campaigns.
Woelkers is the owner of a facility
located at 1302 Madison Ave. in
Dunmore that is set to house the
county coroners office. The 20-
year lease, at monthly rate of
$6,595, was approved later in the
meeting.
OBrien said he was not sure
of the answer to that, but ex-
plainedthat informationcouldbe
found in his campaign finance re-
ports. According to those re-
ports, Friends of Washo &
OBrien has received $6,760 from
Woelkers and Woelkers Realty.
Friends of OBrien & Mariani re-
ceived$1,200 fromWoelkers, and
he also contributed $1,500 to
Friends of TimRowland, the cur-
rent county coroner.
Kenneth Acker, a key witness
in the Cordaro/Munchak corrup-
tion trial and an owner of former
civil engineering firm Acker As-
sociates, also donated $2,400 to
OBriens Congressional cam-
paign, as did his wife, Diane, who
gave an additional $2,400, ac-
cording to the Federal Election
Commission. Both contributed
again to OBriens re-election
campaignearlier this year, but be-
fore the trial began and Ackers
testimony involving contract
deals was made public.
OBrien felt it would not be a
conflict of interest to vote for the
lease agreement unless county
solicitor John OBrien had any
objection. The commissioner
made clear that he has no person-
al or business relationship with
Woelkers.
All contributions need to be
made publicly and reported pub-
licly, and if thats the case, weve
advised you not to go back and
check every time because that
makes it look as if you were look-
ing to see if they contributed to
you before you voted on it, John
OBrien said, adding that he also
did not see the lease as a conflict
of interest.
While Nearhood claimed he
was not accusing the commis-
sioner of misconduct, he said
government officials must be
careful of the appearance of im-
propriety after all that weve
been through.
I think its accusatory, so lets
call a spade a spade, Corey
OBrien replied. You are assum-
ing that I act or have acted or will
act in a similar manner to previ-
ous commissioners who may or
may not be in difficult positions.
Washo asked Nearhood to clar-
ify that he was running for public
office, which he said adds some
perspective to your appearances
around election time. Nearhood
denied his questions were politi-
cally motivated.
Changing the process
Political or not, the questions
spurred a consistent dialogue
about corruption throughout the
rest of the meeting.
As the agenda progressed and
a letter of agreement with Teles-
pond Senior Services was dis-
cussed, Washo verified with Co-
ordinated Transportation Man-
ager John Tomcho that Tomcho
himself recommends all hires he
makes in his department while
the commissioners simply ap-
prove his top choices.
In years past, a person would
showup on my doorstep and say,
Im here for the job. Thats how
it was handled. Since you gentle-
men have taken over, there has
been an openness and the oppor-
tunity for us to actually see and
interviewand recommend all the
employees that weve had, Tom-
cho said.
Washo said he is proud of this
change and feels that newly ap-
pointed Republican Minority
Commissioner Bruce Small-
acombe shares the same philoso-
phy.
Government shouldnt get in-
volvedinthehiringprocess at the
top levels the way its been done
inthe past. I thinkthat the people
that are utilizing these workers
need to have some input on the
people that theyre going to be
working with, Smallacombe
said at his first official meeting
since he was sworn in on June 28.
When it comes to vendors,
weve adopted a federal standard
for how these things are imple-
mented. Was there one prior to
this? No. Was there any process?
No. Should people be skeptical
based on the past? Absolutely.
Thats why its important for us to
explainwhat it is sothat (people)
understand it, Corey OBrien
added.
OBrien then detailed the cur-
rent hiring process. A committee
is formed, consisting of members
of the department that is hiring,
and they score proposals. Next,
they negotiate with the top
scored applicant, and if the direc-
tor of that department does not
choose the number one appli-
cant, they must provide the rea-
son in writing. The committee
members are not allowed to com-
municate directly or indirectly
with any county or authority offi-
cial, employee or elected, until
this process is over. The agree-
ment then comes before the com-
missioners, who have not yet
been involved, for questions and
final approval.
We have taken the commis-
sioners out of that process, and
weve been doing that, OBrien
said. Whenwe arrivedhere, peo-
ple were just paid no contracts
on file. Nobody had a contract.
People turned in a bill and they
were just paid.
Many vendors, he said,
couldnt even provide a contract
when asked.
All of a sudden, expenses just
started going down because peo-
ple couldnt provide the contract
because some of them didnt
even have them. Thats account-
ability.
Additionally, he addressed
why the countys Chief Financial
Officer Tom Durkin is still serv-
ing the county. Durkin was the
treasurer of the previous admin-
istrations campaign and served
as a witness in the corruption
trial.
Why is he here? Hes here be-
cause hes a professional. Hes an
expert. Thats why hes here not
because of some party affilia-
tion, OBrien asserted.
Have we come a long way
since four years ago? Absolutely.
Washo and OBrien said they
are confident Smallacombes ex-
perience as the mayor of Jermyn
and his consistent new ideas will
also help themmove forward as a
governing body.
I believe political contribu-
tions reallyshouldnot beapart of
government in any wayI just
feel that sometimes political con-
tributions couldblur the visionof
some types of decisions that are
made, Smallacombe said.
Werenot goingtoagreeonev-
erythingBut I think if were
working for the peoples busi-
ness, I think we can work togeth-
er. I dont see any problemat all.
TRUST
Continued from page 3
6 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
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Awoman was arrested in Scranton on Ju-
ly 9 for allegedly attacking another woman.
Jennifer Graham, 33, North Everett Ave-
nue, was charged with stalking, loitering,
harassment, trespassing, public drunken-
ness, disorderly conduct and criminal mis-
chief.
According to the affidavit:
Joya Sparacinocalledpolice as Graham, a
woman she feared, was waiting on Sparaci-
nos porch for her to come home on Satur-
day.
Sparacino is friends with Clevans Char-
les, a man who has a child with Graham.
Grahamhad made threats earlier in the day
to Sparacino.
As Sparacino returned to her home and
sawGrahamontheporch, shepanickedand
called police. In the meantime, Graham al-
legedly kickedthroughthe glass of the front
door, knocked over a mailbox and threw a
cell phone at Sparacinos car.
Whenpolice arrivedonscene, they found
that Graham had suffered wounds on her
feet fromkicking in the door. She was trans-
ported to Community Medical Center for
blood alcohol testing.
The arresting officer was Ptlm. Jill Foley.
Graham was released arraigned the same
day. She is currently being held for a lack of
$5,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for
July 18.
Woman charged
with stalking
By MATT MORGIS
Go Lackawanna Intern
A Scranton resident was taken into police
custody after a domestic dispute between a
brother and a sister on July 8.
Robert Hindmarsh, 29, Bryn Mar Street,
faces charges of simple assault and harass-
ment after allegedly fighting with his sister.
According to the affidavit:
PoliceweredispatchedtoHindmarshsres-
idenceinthemiddleof thedayafter hissister,
ChristineOwens, notifiedpoliceof his behav-
ior.
According to Owens, her brother starting
drinking alcohol early inthe morning. Hours
later, as hewas still drinking, thetwogot into
a fight about a lighter.
Hindmarsh allegedly grabbed a lighter
from his sister, nearly pushed her down a
flight of stairs, then slammed a door on her
arm. Owenssufferedbruisingfromtheinjury.
Pltm. Steven Lavin was the arresting offi-
cer on scene. Hindmarsh was arraigned and
releasedon$10,000unsecuredbail. Aprelim-
inary hearing is set for July 18.
Scranton man accused
of assaulting sister
By MATT MORGIS
Go Lackawanna Intern
The Dunmore Police De-
partment teamed up with
the Lackawana County Drug
Taskforce inthe arrest of Do-
reen Diaz on charges she
sold prescriptions pills from
her house.
Diaz, 41, of East Scott
Street faces five counts of a
possession charge and one
count criminal use of a com-
munications facility for al-
legedly selling Oxycodone
pills.
According to the affidavit:
Policestartedaninvestiga-
tion on June 1, using a confi-
dential informant as a drug
buyer. Police said they were
able to observe full deals be-
tween the C.I. and Diaz on
three different occasions.
On July 7, police used the
evidence from the deals to
execute a search warrant at
Diazs apartment where they
found drugs, and marked
money the C.I. used to pur-
chase the narcotics.
Diaz was arraignedonJuly
8. She is currently being held
for lack of $50,000 bail. A
preliminary hearing is set for
July 14.
Woman jailed on prescription drug-selling charges
By MATT MORGIS
Go Lackawanna Intern
A planned monument for the first
American woman killed in Vietnam
needs community support in order to
be unveiled as scheduled in October.
Second Lieutenant Carol Ann Draz-
ba, R.N., a 1961 graduate of Dunmore
High School, was killed in Vietnam on
Feb. 18, 1966 when the helicopter in
whichshewas ridingwithsixother peo-
ple became entangled in high tension
wires and crashed outside of Saigon. A
local veterans advocacy group, The
Friends of the Forgotten, has been
working since February 2010 to raise
money to erect a monument in her hon-
or along Dunmores Blakely Street ad-
jacent to the borough building.
This is a young woman who grewup
in Dunmore; she did not come from a
wealthy family but she workedhardand
she committed herself to a life of ser-
vice, saidAnne Domin, Drazbas friend
and nursing school classmate. This is
somebody that the community can be
proud of because she dedicated her life
to serving other people in the capacity
of nursing. To think that the communi-
ty would want to honor someone like
this who really loved people and life is a
great thing. It was her goal to be of ser-
vice to others.
A groundbreaking ceremony was
held on April 27 and the major fundrais-
er for the monument was held on Nov.
20 of last year when Chris McIntyre, di-
rector of the film21and a Wakeup, an
American war drama shot in Vietnam
detailing the lives of Army nurses, held
a screening of his film at Lackawanna
Colleges Mellow Theater. All proceeds
from the event were to go toward the
monuments construction.
When I saw how much this [film]
touched people and how emotionally
affected they were by it, it occurred to
me that I might be able to use the pro-
ceeds to make a substantial difference
in peoples lives from a charity stand-
point, McIntyre said in the Nov. 14,
2010 edition of Go Lackawanna. For
this woman [Drazba] not to have a stat-
ue is just wrong, I want to help.
However, McIntyre may not be able
to contribute the money needed for the
monument in time for the scheduled
dedication date of Oct. 8. McIntyre and
his brother, for whomhe cares, are both
in treatment for severe forms of cancer.
I wouldlove tohelpas muchas I pos-
sibly can and certainly I can help to
some degree financially and, with a lit-
tle luck, I might be able to help to an
enormous degree financially, McIn-
tyre said. It all depends on my health
and my brothers health because that is
what is unknown. I amstill 100 percent
committedtoit but my healthhas taken
a muchquicker turnfor the worse thanI
had anticipated when I started this.
According to McIntyre, costs for the
monument, originally slated to cost
$50,000 are now estimated at $65,000,
and fundraising efforts have fallen
short.
I amhappy to donate frommy pock-
et whatever is not raised by Friends of
the Forgotten or through the movie
screening in November, which raised a
lot less than what we had anticipated;
wehadhopedfor thebest, hesaid. My
own participation in this was predicat-
ed on substantial local community sup-
port fromapractical matter, not froman
emotional standpoint. I have not lost
one bit of enthusiasm for the project, it
is just a question of practicality because
of my health.
Kim Atkinson, the member of The
Friends of the Forgotten who came up
with the idea for the Drazba monu-
ment, is now asking local businesses
and members of the community to help
raise funds needed for its completion.
I have been in touch with so many
organizations and people in the last few
weeks and, after having spoken to other
members of the Friends of the Forgot-
ten, I believe that we can raise the need-
ed money ourselves, she said. We
dont have to rely on one single bene-
factor. Members of the community and
members of the nursing profession, the
people who knewCarol Annpersonally,
and the veterans organizations fromall
across the country are pulling together
and we will do this ourselves.
One such way that Atkinson hopes
people will rally behind the Drazba me-
morial is by purchasing pavers to line a
walkway leading to the monument
from Blakely Street. The pavers were
initially included in the project as a way
to offset the extra $15,000 added to the
project sotoaddmorepavers tothearea
surrounding the monument for people
to commemorate their loved ones who
served in our countrys armed forces.
People arent just donatingthe paver
towards Carol, they can donate the pav-
er inmemory or inhonor of their father,
their grandfather, their uncle, their ne-
phew anyone who served, who was
lost in war or who is still serving, At-
kinson said. Joanne Katula, Drazbas
sister, also expressed her desire to see
the community support this monument
because her sisters model can serve as
an example to others.
Carol was a resident of Dunmore for
the short lifespan that she had; I would
hope that the community would want
toget involvedandsee this completed,
she said.
A lasting tribute
Call goes out to get funding for monument of Vietnam nurse
By STEPHANIE LONGO
For Go Lackawanna
To purchase a paver, which are available
for a tax-deductible donation of $100 for
four lines with 15 characters per line,
checks can be sent to Carol Ann Drazba
Memorial Fund, c/o Friends of the Forgot-
ten, 527 E. Scott St., Olyphant, Pa. 18447.
For more information, call Kim Atkinson
at (570) 383-9552.
HOW TO HELP
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S
CRANTON The
burial Tuesday of
Sister M. Coleman
Nee in St. Catherines
Cemetery in Moscow
closed the door on the life
of a religious woman who
opened the paths to high-
er education for thou-
sands.
President of Marywood
University from 1970-88,
Sister Coleman is credit-
ed with launching the
universitys Gillet
School in 1981, allowing
men for the first time to
earn undergraduate de-
grees through Marywood.
Coleman, who died July 9
in Scranton at age 93, also
worked to balance the
schools budget while setting
up an endowment fund to sta-
bilize income.
And she coped with a devas-
tating fire in February 1971
that destroyed the Mother-
house of the Sisters of the Im-
maculate Heart of Mary, the
religious order that establish-
ed the Roman Catholic school
in 1915.
They say she sat on a chair
outside, to see to the students
and calm everything, said
Sister Michel Keenan, who
knew Sister Coleman from
her earliest days studying to
join the religious order in the
1940s. Though Sister Keenan
worked at Marywood at the
time of the fire, she was away
when the flames broke out.
She had a good sense of
humor but was always a
straight shooter, recalled Mi-
chael Foley, dean of the col-
lege of liberal arts and sci-
ences at Marywood. She was
honest and direct, and I found
her engaging.
Foley recounted his early
days at the school in 1974,
when Sister Coleman took
over an office he occupied. I
said something to the effect
of Sister, I guess Ill leave be-
cause its you, and she said,
Well, thats very kind of you.
As if I had a choice.
Coleman is credited with
creating a centralized aca-
demic computer system, add-
ing 11 undergraduate and six
graduate programs and over-
seeing major expansions, in-
cluding the $2.4 million Vi-
sual Arts Center.
Keenan said that Coleman
was always open to new ideas
proposed by her administra-
tors.
In a statement posted on
the Marywood website, cur-
rent President Sister Anne
Munley said Sister Colemans
steadfast spirit in the face of
challenges helped Marywood
stand above the rest.
Noting Coleman endured
debilitating problems that
made it painful to walk, Kee-
nan said She bore her suffer-
ing very bravely and it didnt
deter her great Irish wit or
her devotion to community
life.
Foley said that, after Cole-
mans retirement, she taught
math at what was then Bishop
Hannan High School, a return
to her first job in education.
She had style and grace,
Foley said.
SISTER M. COLEMAN NEE
She helped school
stand above rest
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
SCRANTON The recent
demolition of a privately own-
ed property located on the cor-
ner of South Main Avenue and
Washburn Street has come into
question, as it appears the work
was performed by the citys De-
partment of Public Works.
Local political activist Jo-
seph Pilchesky filed a Right-to-
Know request in June to Mark
Seitzinger, director of Licens-
ing, Inspections and Permits,
after he said he observed city
workers demolishing the build-
ing located next to the Carl J.
Savino, Jr. Funeral Home at 157
S. Main Ave.
According to copies of docu-
ments obtained by Go Lacka-
wanna, Seitzinger sent a letter
on June 30 to Business Admin-
istrator Ryan McGowan, ask-
ing for his assistance inanswer-
ing the inquiry.
n July 6, Pilchesky received a
response fromMcGowan deny-
ing his request, stating that
the City of Scranton does not
have any documents respon-
sive to this request.
The matter was then
brought to the attention of
City Council. City Clerk Nan-
cy Krake sent a letter to Mayor
Chris Doherty and Linda Ae-
bli, executive director of the
citys Office of Economic and
Community Development, on
June 22, asking for a list of
properties demolished by city
employees from Jan. 1, 2010
through June 21, 2011. If city
employees and equipment
were not used, council re-
quested the name of the com-
pany hired to perform the
eight demolitions conducted
in 2011.
On June 23, Krake sent an-
other letter on behalf of council
to Doherty, city solicitor Paul
Kelly, Jr., and Department of
Public Works Director Jeff Bra-
zil, asking if the City of Scran-
ton is demolishing properties
for private owners. Enclosed
was a photographthat depicts a
Department of Public Works
vehicle being loaded with de-
bris fromthe demolishedbuild-
ing.
Council has learned that
this property was purchased by
Carl Savino, Jr. prior to demoli-
tion; therefore, it is a private
property, Krake wrote.
While council asked for a
written response on or before
July 5, Councilman Jack Los-
combe said council has yet to
receive an answer from anyone
within the city. Brazil did not
return a request for comment,
and Savino declined a report-
ers request for comment.
As far as I understand, I
cant say that the land owner is
at fault. Whoever authorized
our Department of Public
Works to do it is definitely at
fault. Were not doing that for
any private individuals, and in
most cases, were bidding out
all our demolition projects,
Loscombe said.
COURTESY PHOTO
This photo allegedly shows workers from the Department of Public Works using equipment to
demolish a privately owned property.
Activist questions whether city worked on
PRIVATE DEMOLITION
By RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
8 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
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Students will soonhaveanoth-
er place to call home thanks to a
landdevelopment planapproved
during the Dunmore Borough
Council meeting Monday night.
Council voted unanimously to
pass a resolution granting High-
er Education Services, LLC, Or-
wigsburg, Pa., the
right to develop a 2-
acre parcel of land
on University Drive
in Dunmore adja-
cent to the Penn
State Worthington/
Scrantoncampusin-
to a student apart-
ment complex, ten-
tatively named The
Commons at Uni-
versity Drive.
The land was
originally part of
Grace Bible Church.
Higher Educa-
tionServices is apri-
vate company and,
before they bought
it, the land wasnt
taxable land be-
cause it was part of
the church, Coun-
cil Vice President
Paul Nardozzi said
after the meeting. Because this
private company bought the
land, it will nowbe taxable. That
is great for the school and it is
great for us because it means ad-
ditional tax revenue, not only for
the developed land, which will
give us more tax money but also
in building fees, among other
things. It is another win-win for
Dunmore Borough.
The Commons at University
Drive will be comprised of two
three-story buildings with 76
apartments. Although it is in the
vicinity of Penn State Worthing-
ton/Scranton, students from
other universities can also live
there. Higher Education Solu-
tions, LLCplans tostart clearing
the landnext monthonce all per-
mits are in place and the first
phase of construction is set to be
completed in early 2012.
In other news, council passed
a resolution authorizing Dun-
more-based ATS Computers to
design and update the boroughs
website, www.dunmorebo-
rough.com.
Our website has been out of
date for years and for the past
two years Ive been trying to get
this pushed through, Nardozzi
said. The site wasnt updated
since 2007 and if you went on it
and looked the gymschedule for
the Dunmore Community Cen-
ter for Marchof 2007
is on there so it is ve-
ry far behind.
Were planning
on expanding the
website to include
minutes of the meet-
ing, meeting sched-
ules, thebudget, and
any other additional
information that
might be beneficial
to the residents,
Nardozzi added. It
is another part of
openness to the resi-
dents on our part so
they can see whats
going on in the bor-
ough.
Council also ap-
proved Earned In-
come Tax (EIT) col-
lection resolutions
designating Berk-
heimer Associates
as the collector and administra-
tor of local earned income taxes
and appointing Sarah Judge as
confidential officer for the bor-
ough beginning in the 2012 tax
year.
The change is a result of state
legislation(Act 32)that required
the consolidation of the collec-
tion of earned income to a coun-
ty-wide tax collection district.
Tax rates and filing dates will re-
main the same.
The Dunmore tax office will
still be responsible for fourth
quarter 2011 earned income tax-
es, whichareduebyJan. 31, 2012
and2011final earnedincome tax
returns, which are due by April
15, 2012. TheDunmoretaxoffice
will remainresponsible for all lo-
cal service taxes and business
privilege taxes.
Council also voted unani-
mously to appoint JosephOccul-
to as a crossing guard for the
Dunmore School District begin-
ninginthe2011-2012school year.
DUNMORE CITY COUNCIL
Dunmore approves plan
for new student housing
By STEPHANIE LONGO
For Go Lackawanna
Higher
Education
Services is a
private
company
and, before
they bought
it, the land
wasnt tax-
able land
because it
was part of
the church.
Council Vice
President Paul
Nardozzi
S
CRANTON Brian-
na ORourke had
never ventured far
from her Forty Fort home,
and conceded Im a little
nervous as she waited
early Monday to board a
van taking her to catch a
Newarkflight toLouisiana.
But the idea of aiding the
poor and the struggling
had proven powerful
enough to pull her beyond
her comfort zone.
Ive always wanted to help
people, the soon-to be high
school senior saidas she waited
outside St. Peters Cathedral. I
thinkthis is a great opportunity
totouchother lives andlearnto
be a better person.
ORourke and eight other
teens from the Diocese of
Scranton were heading to the
Pelican State for two weeks.
Along with eight adult chap-
erones, they are working with
Mother Teresas Missionaries
of Charity Sisters at a summer
camp for children, and going to
NewOrleans toaidelderlypoor
in a nursing home and help
with reconstruction in flood ar-
eas.
The trip was organized by
The Pontifical Mission Socie-
ties office of the diocese, spear-
headed by Director Deacon Ed-
ward Kelly, Education Coordi-
nator MiriamHeverline and of-
fice coordinator Sharon
Warunek.
Weve been organizing trips
for 18 years, Heverline said as
the teens posed for a photo on
the Cathedral steps with Bish-
op Joseph Bambera. We try to
do two trips a year.
One of those trips used to be
to another country, but that
ended a few years ago. We
hope to start going overseas
again soon, Warunek said.
These trips started because
the kids asked if they could do
something other than give
money, Warunek said.
Which is easy to believe
when you talk to them. Erin
Gruber, a classmate with
ORourke at Holy Redeemer
High School in Wilkes-Barre,
saidshe decidedtotake the trip
because I just really wanted to
help people.
Gruber was motivated by an
older brother who went on a
Pontifical Missionbefore his se-
nior year.
The things he told me about
why he did it inspired me.
Students raise money for the
trip, Heverline said, often with
help from a school or parish.
Gruber and ORourke have
one other thing in common be-
sides a desire to help. Both are
contemplating careers in cos-
metology.
Gruber said she has enjoyed
styling hair since she was a tot,
beginning on a model head of
hair and working her way up to
styling for friends.
ORourke said she wants to
be either a beautician or a spe-
cial educationteacher, I havent
decided.
This sounds like a trip that
couldhelpwithsuchadecision.
Teens off to Louisiana to lend helping hands
NIKO KALLIANIOTIS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Bishop Joseph Bambera says a prayer in front of St. Peters Cathedral in Scranton for students
leaving for a Pontifical Mission to Louisiana.
ON A MISSION
By MARK GUYDISH
For Go Lackawanna
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SCRANTON City police arrest-
ed a Scranton man on July 7 after
receiving a call of a suspicious male
at the Jewish Community Center,
601 Jefferson Ave.
DavidJohnMalewich, 39, of 1712
StaffordAve, Scranton, faces charg-
es of defiant trespassing and theft
by unlawful taking after he was al-
legedly caught on a surveillance
camera entering the Jewish Com-
munity Center and going through
lockers once inside.
According to the affidavit:
A witness informed police of a
suspicious white man entering the
Jewish Community Center behind
another person. After entering the
building with his two-year old son
in a stroller, Malewich allegedly
proceeded downstairs to the locker
roomwherethewitness heardlock-
ers opening and closing, police say.
The witness told police that Ma-
lewich seemed nervous as he left
the room. The witness then no-
ticed his diamond ring and wallet
missing from his locker.
Using pictures provided by secu-
rity camera, police foundMalewich
at a bus stopat the corner of Wyom-
ing Avenue and Mulberry Street
with his child, where he was arrest-
ed.
While he admitted to being in
the JCC, police say he told themhe
was there to get water. His son was
taken by his mother before Malew-
ich was arrested.
It was only after being escorted
to the Scranton police headquar-
ters that Malewichallegedly admit-
tedtotakingthe victims wallet and
diamond ring.
He told police he threw the ring
in a garbage can at the JCCand the
wallet in a nearby dumpster. The
ring was not located, but the wallet
was found in the specified dump-
ster. Police say Malewich admitted
to them that he is a heroin addict
and requested help for his addic-
tion.
He was arraigned on July 8 and
was scheduled for a preliminary
hearing on July 13. His bail was set
at $20,000.
Man faces
charges
in JCCC
incident
By TYLER MILES
Go Lackawanna Intern
SCRANTON A prelimina-
ry hearing for a city police offi-
cer began July12 to determine
if the charges he faces after an
alleged incident on June 12 at
The V-Spot bar and nightclub,
906 Providence Rd., will be
forwarded to court.
Mark Miller, 32, faces charg-
es of terroristic threats, official
oppression, disorderly con-
duct and harassment and two
charges of simple assault after
allegedly fighting with Robert
Ruddy, an off-duty employee
of the bar in the parking lot,
and Ruddys cousin Michelle
Smolskas.
Brian Gannon, Christopher
Kahanic and Sean Manley all
face similar charges for their
alleged involvement that
night.
The four-hour long hearing,
which will continu next week
at a date andtime still to be an-
nounced, startedwithtestimo-
ny from Matthew Sobieski,
who was working security at
the V-Spot the night of the in-
cident.
According
to Sobieski,
the club has
two main
rules: one
cannot be
visibly intox-
icated, and
everyone
must abide by a dress code. So-
bieski testified that Miller,
Gannon and Kahanic all tried
to enter the club under-
dressed, and intoxicated with
open containers of alcohol.
Their eyes were bloodshot,
breath smelled of alcohol and
they had a glass of beer, So-
bieski said on the stand. I
pulled them aside and told
them they couldnt come in
and thats when they told me
they were cops.
Sobieski said Miller and
Gannon then told him they
were Scranton Cops, and
Gannon allegedly showed him
a fake badgeSmolskas and
Ruddy also took the stand for
the prosecution, stating that
when they were in the parking
lot, Miller started yelling at
them and started the alterca-
tion. The reliability of the their
testimony was questioned as
Smolskas replied, I dont re-
call to many of the questions
andRuddycouldnot tell exact-
ly who hit him that night.
The defense also asked Rud-
dy several times if any Scran-
ton police officers indicated to
him that Miller was trouble
or a badcop, andif any of the
officers pressured him into
cooperating with the prosecu-
tion. Ruddy denied both alle-
gations.
When Detective John Mun-
ley, the final witness for the
prosecution took the stand, a
video from a security camera
at the club was entered into
evidence. Defense lawyers re-
quested to view the recording
several times before Munley
took the stand. In fact, each
witness admitted to having
seen the video beforehand,
andSobieski swore everything
he testifiedto couldbe seenon
the tape.
Munley did say that Smol-
skas testimony in court may
be different than when he in-
terviewed her.
The defense then called
Mark Kosko, an off-duty police
officer who was also at the V-
Spot and helped identify Mill-
er and get him out of the club
along with Officer Gary
McPhillips, the first patrolman
to arrive on scene.
Both Kosko and McPhillips
said they did not see Miller
make any threats to anyone.
Miller is accused of telling So-
bieski he would make his life
a living hell and kill him af-
ter he called police.
Officer Kosko also said on
the stand that he did not see
Miller strike anyone when the
brawls broke out.
After all witnesses were
called, Gannons attorney ar-
gued that there was never any
reason for Gannon to show a
fake badge since there was no
special treatment afforded law
enforcement at the bar.
He also was unhappy of be-
ing tried with Miller, as he
stated, If Mark Miller wasnt
here, half of these charges
wouldnt behereandwewould
have nothing more than a $100
fine.
JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Officer Mark Miller and his Atty. Jason A. Shrive leave the Lackawanna County Court House.
By MATT MORGIS
Go Lackawanna Intern
Sobieski
Preliminary hearing continues
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10 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
SCRANTON Federal prose-
cutors on Wednesday filed court
documents opposing disgraced
Lackawanna County Commis-
sioner A.J. Munchaks request
for a new trial overturning his
conviction on bribery, extortion
and other corruption charges.
Munchak on July 5 requested
a new trial or for U.S. District
Court Judge A. Richard Caputo
to not enter the decision against
him, effectively acquitting him,
because he was found guilty of
both extortion and bribery for
accepting the same kickback
payments.
His attorney, Christopher T.
Powell Jr., contends that a per-
son cannot commit bribery and
extortion in the same instance
unless the person took a bribe
then asked for more, and that
those charges should have been
ruled inconsistent by Caputo.
The charges concern pay-
ments made by Don Kalina of
Highland Associates in May, Ju-
ly and November of 2005, ac-
cording to court documents.
U.S. Attorneys argue in their
brief inoppositionto Munchaks
motion that bribery and extor-
tion charges may be mutually
exclusive in cases where the ex-
tortion involved threats or vio-
lence, but that Munchakwas not
charged with making such
threats, using violence or other-
wise using fear to extort kick-
backs. Rather, he used his politi-
cal power to commit extortion
under color of right, and that
form of extortion is not mutual-
ly exclusive with bribery, prose-
cutors said.
They also argued that incon-
sistency in a jury verdict is not
grounds to set the verdict aside.
Munchak was found guilty on
June 21of conspiracy to commit
theft of bribery concerning pro-
grams receiving federal funds,
briberyconcerningprograms re-
ceiving federal funds, conspir-
acy to commit extortion under
color of right, extortion under
color of right and tax offenses.
He resigned his post as Repub-
lican minority commissioner
the next day.
His co-defendant, former
commissioner Robert Cordaro,
was found guilty of bribery con-
cerning programs receiving fed-
eral funds, extortionunder color
of official right, money launder-
ing, racketeering, tax evasion
and other charges.
Caputo will issue a ruling on
Munchaks motion for a new
trial at a later date.
Munchaks sentencing is
scheduled for Sept. 28. He faces
up to 93 years in prison and
more than $2 million in fines.
New Munchak trial opposed
Feds detail opposition to overturn corruption counts
GO LACKAWANNA FILE PHOTO
Former County Commissioner AJ Munchak speak to the media
after the verdicts were read against him in his corruption trial.
By MATT HUGHES
For Go Lackawanna
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E
ight middle school stu-
dents attendedthenew
Kids Forensic Camp at
Lackawanna College on Mon-
day morning where they stud-
ied basic forensic techniques
such as fingerprinting and
analyzing blood, hair and
handwriting. The camp, open
to local sixth-, seventh- or
eighth-grade students, ran un-
til July 14.
Scranton Police Detective
Joe Castellano, a 27-year vet-
eranof the citys police depart-
ment, also attended the camp
and brought his mobile of-
fice to the parking lot of the
college where he showed the
students equipment generally
taken to a crime scene.
We have everything from
big lights to flashlights to
keep the scene lit, Castellano
said. Were always out in the
winter, at night, in someones
basement places that arent
bright sunlight all of the time.
Then we have all different
types of rulers, markers, GPS
equipment and cameras to
help us recreate the scene if
we ever needed to, even years
later.
Castellano set up shop from
a body bunker, a shield-like
barrier that provides privacy
to disturbing scenes, to cam-
eras that help capture every
detail, making sure he had ev-
erything he normally takes to
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Prof. Lynn DeSanto explains a mock crime scene to
campers at Lackawanna College.
TOP: Det. Joseph Castellano demonstrates the compo-
nents of the CSU van to camper at Lackawanna College.
Students learn forensics firsthand
MATT MORGIS
Go Lackawanna intern
See SCENE, Page 14
12 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
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Scranton
Marquis Johnson, 24, South
Webster Street, Scranton, is
faced with charges of delivery
of a controlled substance and
criminal use of a communi-
cation facility after city police
used a tip from a confidential
informant that Johnson was
selling crack cocaine from a
barber shop. Police then used
the informant to buy cocaine
from Johnson, who is known
on the street as Rico.
Johnson was arraigned on
July 8 and a preliminary hear-
ing was set for July 13.
Joseph Stanseski, 28, Wales
Street, Scranton, faces charges
of device fraud, theft, receiving
stolen property and forgery
after allegedly signing his de-
ceased mothers name to a
check and then attempting to
cash it at Noones Market.
Det. Jeffery Jones was the
arresting officer. Stanseski was
arraigned on July 8 and re-
leased on $10,000 unsecured
bail. A preliminary hearing is
set for July 18.
Corey Griffith, 36, Ashville,
North Carolina, is faced with
drug possession charges from
Scranton police. The arresting
officer, patrolman Kyle Kemp,
stopped Griffith for not using a
turning signal. During the
traffic stop, Kemp found Grif-
fith smoking marijuana.
Griffith was arraigned on
July 8 and released on $10,000
unsecured bail. A preliminary
hearing was on July 13.
Jannies Diaz, 26, Front
Street, Scranton, was charged
by summons for retail theft.
Diaz allegedly stole over $100
worth of merchandise from
Boscovs in the Steamtown
Mall.
The arresting officer was
patrolman Eric Jordan. A pre-
liminary hearing is set for Aug.
10.
Carbondale
Jamie McManamon, 33,
Belmont Street, Carbondale,
was arrested for theft and re-
ceiving stolen property after
allegedly stealing a purse filled
with $400 cash, seven credit
cards and a checkbook in Mo-
rans Tavern on South Main
Street.
The arresting officer was
Pltm. Jeffrey Arthur. McMana-
mon was arraigned on July 18,
and released on $5,000 bail. A
preliminary hearing is set for
July 18.
- Compiled by Matt Morgis
POLICE BLOTTER
SCRANTON Students
were given a comprehensive
look at the cops who the cops
call on Wednesday during the
Scranton Police Departments
Citizens Police Academy.
The S.O.G (special oper-
ations group) was the focus of
the lesson.
S.O.G. specializes in and was
created for handling intense,
high-level situations. It consists
of the bomb unit, K-9 unit,
S.W.A.T. and snipers, two of
whom taught the first half of
the class. One of the teams
snipers, Corporal Thomas
McDonald, said he wants the
people who attend to know
about the tactical side of things
and the training the city puts
them through.
I want them to know they
have highly qualified and
trained officers handling these
delicate situations, McDonald
said.
That training prepares offi-
cers for incidents such as barri-
cade and hostage situations.
The grueling training process
spans 16 hours a month; the
sniper units are required to
complete an additional eight
hours of training. Aphysical fit-
ness test is administered every
six months to ensure the offi-
cers are capable of completing
their duties at the highest level.
The officers even have
trained with the Vegas Metro
S.W.A.T. team, Navy Seals and
New York Air Marshalls.
Students were also intro-
duced to the Bearcat, a highly
defensible, state-of-the-art
S.O.G. vehicle, duringthe class.
The vehicle weighs nine tons
andhas bullet-proof sides, a tur-
ret opening on the roof and an
attachment for a battering ram
underneath its grill.
Equipment used by both
snipers and negotiators was
brought in and the students
were able to get an up-close
look at items such as a Reming-
ton 700 sniper rifle, shields,
bullet-resistant vests, helmets
and multiple-thrown weapons
like flashbangs and tear gas
canisters. Under the supervi-
sion of officers, students han-
dled the weapons and tried on
the gear after it was inspected
and approved by the officers.
Suitingupintheofficers vest
and handling the weapons was
Blanca Rosenthals favorite
part of Wednesdays class. She
said shes glad to see there are
some newtactics that are more
effective than they were in the
past. Shes also happy there is
a crisis intervention team that
diligently develops its skills to
minimize accidents.
Algiers Horton of West
Scranton thought it was a very
interesting class. All of it is fas-
cinating, said Horton. You
learn something new every
week.
INSIDE THE POLICE ACADEMY
TYLER MILES PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Algiers Horton, center, tries on S.W.A.T. body army at the Citizens Police Academy.
Students get an intense look at Special Operations unit
A crowd examines a S.W.A.T. vehicle parked outside the police
department.
By TYLER MILES
Go Lackawanna Intern
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14 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
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a real crime scene. The detec-
tive also explained that, with
just one van, police can cover
anything from a burglary or
theft to a high-profile homicide
case.
Professor Lynn DeSante, who
teaches Forensic Science and
several types of Biology at the
college, organized the camp
with the intention of giving chil-
dren who have an interest in fo-
rensics a real-life look into the
career.
There is so much hype with
forensics from television shows
like CSI, DeSante said. Hope-
fully, this camp serves a dual
purpose where they have a lot of
fun, but at the same time learn
there is a lot more science that
goes into solving a crime.
A mock crime scene was then
set up in one of the college lab-
oratories where the students
worked with Detective Castella-
no to solve a fake murder. Cas-
tellano stressed the forensics
process is a lot different from
what is shown on television.
Castellano thinks the camp is
a great way for young people to
get a head start. Some student,
he said, may not like finding out
howmuch work goes into foren-
sics, but those who do will be
ahead of the game.
Brooke Coon, a sixth-grade
student at All Saints Academy,
attended the camp to get a jump
on her career as a detective. Her
favorite television show is CSI:
New York.
Its a lot fun, saidCoon. It is
a lot different than TV, but its
still something I want to do.
SCENE
Continued from page 11
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S
CRANTON The long-
time president of Lacka-
wanna College an-
nounced his resignation Tues-
day, leavingbehinda17-year leg-
acy of academic growth and
expansion across the county.
Raymond S. Angeli was
named president of the college
in December of 1994, having
previouslybeena member of the
Board of Trustees from1989 un-
til 1992. A decorated Army offi-
cer whoattainedtherankof lieu-
tenant colonel, Angeli served
two combat tours in Southeast
Asia as commander of a helicop-
ter company and as a Depart-
ment of Defense Inspector Gen-
eral and Foreign Area Officer in
the U.S. Embassy in Paris.
He also served as secretary of
the states Department of Com-
munity Affairs in Governor Bob
Caseys cabinet before assuming
his current position at Lacka-
wanna College. His retirement
is effective June 30, 2012.
Ray Angeli, you will be diffi-
cult to replace, said Dominick
DeNaples, chairman of the col-
leges Board of Trustees, at
Tuesdays press conference.
Lackawanna College will cer-
tainly miss you.
Angeli, 68, said his decision
didnt come quickly, since he
first considered stepping down
three years ago. He saidhe want-
edtobesurethetransitionof the
new Commonwealth Medical
College in Scranton went
smoothly first before retire-
ment.
I have the best job in the
world. Anybody who comes in
after me will probably say the
same thing, Angeli said.
By RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
RICH HOWELLS/FOR
GO LACKAWANNA
The long-time
president of
Lackawanna
College an-
nounced his
retirement
Tuesday.
See PRESIDENT, Page 16
16 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
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We are, in effect, the commu-
nity college of Northeastern
Pennsylvania. We dont have
that label and we dont have that
financing, but we offer the same
programs as everybody else. Its
been my opportunity, really, to
be able to lead this organization
to get where it is today.
Angeli feels his proudest
achievement in 17 years is the
awarding of two straight accred-
itations by the Commission on
Higher Education of the Middle
States Association of Colleges
and Schools, something a lot of
people arent managing to do
these days. He also found it re-
warding to watch his students
grow and succeed over the
years, which added to his
mixed emotions over retire-
ment.
It has been great ride. Ive en-
joyed working at the college. It
has been 17 years, and I think
most college presidents last
about seven, so I feel privileged
to have it this far. It has been a
great experience, Angeli said
after the press conference.
Once he leaves next June, he
said he is considering starting
his own business.
Jack Truschel, Ed.D., Psy.D.,
who serves on both the colleges
faculty and Board of Trustees,
will serve as the chairman of the
search committee to replace An-
geli. The committee will be
made upof four boardmembers,
two faculty members, three ad-
ministrators, one student, and
possibly a sitting college presi-
dent, he said.
The search is set to begin in
July and is expected to com-
mence in January, when two to
threecandidates will beselected
for final consideration.
College came a long way
Chris Kucharski, Lackawanna
Colleges Executive Director of
Marketing and Communica-
tions, also discussed the chang-
es and rapid growth that oc-
curred under Angelis tenure.
When President Angeli took
over the college, we had one
building on the South Side,
Scranton, and a couple small
satellite buildings. Today, we
have four satellite centers locat-
ed in Hawley, Hazleton, New
Milford and Towanda, Kuchar-
ski said.
Many of the buildings used to
expand were restoration pro-
jects, including the former
Scranton Central High School
whichhas servedas the colleges
main building since 1996. Ku-
charski said that the president
felt it was important to preserve
the historical significance of
these locations and give new
purpose to the sometimes
blighted structures. New addi-
tions inthat time include the En-
vironmental Institute, the Mel-
low Theater, the Moffat Estate,
the Student Union Gymnasium,
and the launch of the communi-
ty concert series.
From1994 to 2011, Lackawan-
na College went fromthree loca-
tions tosix, fromthree buildings
to 12, and from one to seven
Scranton campus buildings. De-
gree offerings increased from12
to 33, and enrollment grewfrom
820 to 1,460 students.
Wed like to be able to double
in sizeWed like to have 2,400
students full time.
PRESIDENT
Continued from page 15
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Sunday, July 17, 2011 GOLackawanna 17
He feels his experience as a
small town mayor will help him
to better address the needs of
outlyingareas that mayget over-
lookedfor fundingor assistance.
I think I can bring a lot of the
small municipalities needs to
the county, address those situa-
tions and try to help them. The
municipalities are getting
tapped with unfunded man-
dates fromthe state such as new
signage, he observed. Im a
firm believer in not spending
taxpayers money foolishly and
spending it on things that are ni-
ceties but not necessities.
He has also been looking for
feedback from county employ-
ees, visiting them daily and ask-
ing for their open and honest in-
put somethinghe was toldoth-
er commissioners havent done
in years.
To me, to be a hands-on com-
missioner, youve got to be in-
volved with every form of gov-
ernment and every department
find out their needs, find out
who the people are andsee what
theyre doing and how we can
improve their departments.
"Yes, you have department
heads that do that, but the com-
missioners also have to have
that input not just from the de-
partment heads, but from the
employees, he explained.
Creating an equal
partnership
The seemingly ineffective
role of the minority commis-
sioner has been called into ques-
tion many times over the years,
particularly by Munchak and
current Majority Commissioner
Mike Washo, who served as a
minority under Munchak and
Robert Cordaros administra-
tion.
One of Smallacombes main
goals is tobreakdownthose par-
ty lines.
I dont thinkthecommission-
ers workedhardenoughtotry to
change that position. Its sup-
posed to be three equal partners
working for one goal.
"I understand the political
part of it, where theres a major-
ity politically and a minority po-
litically, but take politics out of
government and put three peo-
ple together withthe same ideas
and the same goals and you
change government, Small-
acombe said.
If I can change the role of the
minority commissioner to an
equal partner in six months, Ive
accomplished something great
for the people of Lackawanna
County.
This isnt Smallacombes
first foray into county govern-
ment, either. He serves as vice
president of the Lackawanna
County Association of Bor-
oughs and was the director of
the Roads and Bridges De-
partment for the county for
four years.
After beingfiredin2008when
Washo and Corey OBrien took
office, Smallacombe filed a law-
suit, alleging he was let go for
political reasons.
Refusing to discuss the suit as
it is still in litigation, he said he
would abstain from voting on
any issue related to it that may
arise and doesnt feel it will im-
pede his ability to work with his
fellow commissioners.
We get along like equal
partners so far in this process.
As long as that litigation
doesnt come into play, I think
we can work together and ac-
complish some good things. I
dont see it as being a prob-
lem, he said.
I can get along with any-
body. Ill disagree with them
when I have to, and Ill work for
them when its for the better-
ment of the county I would
make a tough political decision
for the people, even if it meant
that I was never going to be
elected again. If we can get poli-
tics out of government, maybe
government will work.
If we can get politics out of government, maybe government will work.
Bruce Smallacombe
RICH HOWELLS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Bruce Smallacombe was made a Scranton Commissioner on June 28. He formerly spent 10 years as the mayor of Jermyn.
SMALLACOMBE
Continued from page 3
18 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
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S
CRANTON A prop
drop for the hit tele-
vision show The Of-
fice, held by the citys
Chamber of Commerce last
Tuesday, saw local busi-
nesses donating items that
may be get national recog-
nition.
Many businesses have
beena part of the event for a
long time, donating things
whenever a prop drop is
heldandmost of their items
have made it to the show.
First-time businesses alsi
vied for that opportunity at
Tuesdays event.
Mari Potis, Membership Di-
rector and liaison for The Of-
fice, has been involved with the
show since its launch. The
shows first prop drop, held af-
ter Season Three during which
the show won an Emmy award,
was held at the Mall at Steam-
town.
Thousands of companies
came out. We had to rent a truck
because we couldnt Fed Ex ev-
erything, said Potis.We even
had people bring us things like
scooters and office chairs so we
had to hire a packing company
because it was so crazy.
They can get out of control,
but theyre always fun.
Potis said the events are al-
ways a success. The producers
inCalifornianeeditems tofill up
the show and using authentic
items from Scranton is a way to
keep the show real, even more
so for those who are from here.
Its neat to see real stuff from
home, especially for people who
are from the area, said Hilary
Steinberg, whoworks at Jaya Yo-
ga and Pilates specialty fitness
studio in Clarks Summit. She
donated mugs and magnets for
her first prop drop.
Amy Gruzesky, Coordinator
of Community Relations and
Communications for Penn State
Worthington, is a regular at the
prop drop events. A big fan of
the show, shes excited for the
newseason and all of the chang-
es. She dropped off Penn State
water bottles, magnets, Santa
hats, bumper stickers, pens and
key chains.
Profitable Office prop drop
TYLER MILES/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
The Scranton Chamber of Commerce hosted a prop drop for local items that could be used onthe
show The Office.
By TYLER MILES
Go Lackawanna Intern
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S
ome may find the
current tour with
Motley Crue and
Poison a throwback to clas-
sic rock n roll, but it will be
the NewYork Dolls that will
truly take audiences back to
the roots of modern rock
this summer.
All three bands will play at
the Toyota Pavilion at Mon-
tage Mountain on Sunday,
July 31.
Formed in 1971, the New York
Dolls are credited with laying the
foundations of punkmusic, shaping
the New York rock scene, influen-
cing the glamand hair metal move-
ment, and serving as an inspiration
for countless other bands. When he
hears such high praise, founding
guitarist Sylvain Sylvain enjoys the
compliment but questions the
payoff.
It makes me feel great. I never
became rich at this, so if thats the
only way theyre going to pay me
and reward me, I appreciate it, he
said with a laugh.
Weve made it tobe successful fi-
nancially in terms of getting by and
to live a goodlife, but we never real-
ly sawthose huge, huge paychecks,
when the bank calls you and says,
Man, go out and spend some mon-
ey! Youre rich! I never got that
phone callMyreal name is Sylvain
Sylvain, but usually they call me
Complain Complain.
When we came out, it was a re-
belliontowhat was goingon, which
was stadium rock, where the song
became an opera instead of like a
three-chord, cool, sexy, little swing-
ing riff, you know? We couldnt
standall those drummingsolos and
all that kindof stuff. Theguitar play-
er is just showing off instead of real-
ly turning you on, Sylvain ex-
plained.
I dont do too much
practicing. I learn my
craft right in front of
the audience because the audience
makes it the reason why they call it
a performing art.
When asked about his legacy, he
talks about how he invented the
two-note power chord and the
bands consistent refusal to con-
form to record companies and so-
ciety in general, but he feels its true
trademarkis its oddsenseof humor.
I think the legacy is going to be
our sense of humor that no one still
gets through our songs. I mean,
cmon, we dared you to have sex
with Frankenstein right off the bat
on our first album, he said.
Were still doing it. Like
Cause I Sez So or
Dolls thrive on musical, not monetary, success
By RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
What: Motley Crue
and Poison with
special guests the
New York Dolls
Where: Toyota Pavil-
ion at Montage Moun-
tain
When: Sunday, July
31, 7 p.m.
Cost: $29.50 $99
IF YOU GO
See DOLLS, Page 20
20 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
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Enter a bar or club any night of the
week in NEPA and its likely youll
hear a local band playing amazing,
mostly original music.
The staff at the Albright Memorial
Library beganrecognizingthat talent
several years ago when it began col-
lectingandofferingCDs by area mus-
cians.
Library cardholders canaccess and
borrowfor free anything fromthe Lo-
cal Music Collection.
The library has put out the call to
musicians and begun adding to its al-
ready extensive collection of more
than 10,000 CDs. Selections include
music from such local groups as
Mighty Fine Wine, And the Money-
notes, the Swims, and Okay Paddy.
Recent additions include CDs from
Cabinet as well as the initial solo ef-
forts from musicians Pappy Biondo
and Mike Quinn.
Area musicians who want their
professional-style CD added to the
collectioncancontact AnnaKilcullen
at 348-3000, ext. 3041 or by email at
akilcullen@albright.org.
MusicianCharles Havira has sever-
al CDs in the librarys collection. I
know for a fact people have come up
tome andsaidI got your CDfromthe
library, Havira said. That has hap-
pened multiple times.
Havira has first-hand knowledge of
the librarys vast collection, as he has
used it many times to find local mu-
sic. The small act of donating a CDto
the library has the potential to reach
an entire community.
Anyone interested in listening to
local music can look for the Local
Music sticker when browsing the
collection. The sticker is located on
the spine of the CD and includes a
picture of a guitar. Library visitors
can also search the librarys online
catalog for favorite local artists from
smart phones or computers at
www.lclscatalog.org. If you do not
see a bandlistedinour collectionand
think they should be included, please
let themknowhoweasy it is for them
to donate a CD. The Albright Memo-
rial Library is dedicated to support-
ing local music industry and local tal-
ent and will continue to provide the
community with access to this won-
derful art.
These resources and more are free
at the Albright Memorial Library
with a library card. If you dont have a
library card, come in and sign up for
one today.
CDs testament to talent
500 VINE
500 Vine focuses on library system
services and events. The column aapears
bi-weekly in Go Lackawanna.
Dance Like a Monkey on
our first reunion album, if
you want to call it that, in
2006. Dance Like a Monkey
isabout that wholeevolution
debate thats still goingon. Is
it Godor is it science? Andso
we still sock it you in a way,
like the beat poets influence
that is in us.
Things have changed very
little musically for the band
since its 1973 self-titled de-
but album. After following
up with Too Much Too
Soon in 1974, the Dolls
brokeupin1976, anddespite
many offers to get back to-
gether, turnedthemall down
until the time was right.
That time came in 2004
when The Smiths Morris-
sey, an admitted fan, asked
the surviving members to
play the Meltdown Festival
in London.
Theminutewegot onthe
stage the very first night, I
think a big rush came, Syl-
vain recalled.
The songs werent just
wishy washy. They were im-
portant forever, not just for
that particular moment.
Then, of course, the phone
didnt stop ringing and it
hasnt stopped yet, thank
God.
Tragically, bassist Arthur
Kane died soon after the re-
union show, but Sylvain and
iconic singer David Johan-
senwent ontoproducethree
new studio albums, more
than they had in their youth.
This came from a strong de-
sire to continue writing and
performing music, and Syl-
vain believes their latest re-
cord, Dancing Backward in
High Heels, is actually their
best release yet, already out-
selling their 2006 comeback
as well as their 2009 follow-
up.
When you go out and buy
a NewYorkDolls album, just
like the very first one, its a
surprise to everybody. Call it
shock or whatever it is. I
think thats one of the ingre-
dients that I really dig about
this last album. Its a sur-
prise, too.
On this tour, Sylvain and
Johansen are joined by Ken-
nyAaronson, whohasplayed
withBobDylanandJoanJett
andtheBlackhearts, onbass;
Earl Slick, who has perform-
ed with both David Bowie
and Robert Smith, on guitar;
and Jason Sutter, formerly of
Smash Mouth, on drums.
The irony of opening for
Poison and Motley Crue,
both of which they influen-
ced, is not lost onthenow60-
year-old guitarist, but Syl-
vainmayactuallybehavinga
bit more fun on tour than his
younger colleagues.
Theyre all Born Again
Christians and theyve got
family andkids. Ive got kids,
but mine are all grown up
and they moved out, so I can
fool around again, he
cracked.
They have to behave, but
were still as nutty as ever.
DOLLS
Continued from page 19
Formed in 1971, the
New York Dolls are
credited with laying
the foundations of
punk music, shaping
the New York rock
scene, influencing
the glam and hair
metal movement,
and serving as an
inspiration for
countless other
bands.
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22 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
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he 7th Annual Fes-
tival of Unity was
celebrated at Nay
Aug Park in Scranton on Ju-
ly 9.
The event, sponsored by
Melanian Publishing Co.,
kicked off at noon and fea-
tured live performances by
local artists and bands, eth-
nic cultural cuisine vending
and uplifting messages
from members of the com-
munity.
The event provided an at-
mosphere of safe andfunac-
tivities for families and
friends to enjoy together.
The festival began in the
summer of 2005 when foun-
der Diane V. Boone hada vi-
sion of unity among all cul-
tures.
Amidst much adversity
and skepticism in her vi-
sion, Diane continued be-
lieving in her idea, having
her most successful out-
comelast year at the6thAn-
nual Festival of Unity at-
tracting more than 2,000
people throughout the day
in fellowship as One True
Community.
BRADLEY LANPHEAR
PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKA-
WANNA
Vendor Roger
Stoute of DJs
Corner in NJ.
Cuby Oxley, Briana Williams, Tym-
el Miles and Joelquaia Ferguson.
Vendor Brenda Cramer of Ter-
rappyn Gifts in north Scranton.
Sisters Edmarie, 6, and
Malisha, 3, of Taylor.
Antonio Boone and his 10-
month-old son Xavier.
Sunday, July 17, 2011 GOLackawanna 23
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After a long
workday, most
people come
home, plop down
on the couch,
relax and watch
their favorite
television shows. I, however, find
myself spending more and more
time sitting in front of the comput-
er to do basically the same thing.
And no, this isnt yet another
article about the wonders of Hulu
and other on-demand websites
offering streaming TV shows. I
want to talk about some original,
independent programming that
you wont find on cable or
satellite that is, in many
ways, vastly more entertain-
ing than the slew of generic
reality TV or singing/danc-
ing competitions bombard-
ing the airwaves these days.
The first show of this kind
that I ever watched was The
Angry Video Game Nerd, a
series created by indie film-
maker James Rolfe during
which he reviews old video
games from his childhood. As
he is only three years older
than me, I immediately
related to his frus-
trations with
cheap 8-bit
Ninten-
do
games and their impossibly hard
levels, but what hooked me was
his unique presentation. Unlike
most reviewers, James never dis-
cussed newer games on the mar-
ket, and instead of speaking on his
own behalf, he created the charac-
ter of the pocket protector-wearing
Nerd, who has since become an
Internet icon.
His colorful rants and over-the-
top slapstick made his videos
hilarious and memorable, and once
I started to browse his website,
Cinemassacre.com, I found short
films, movie reviews and other
shows similar to AVGN that
displayed the many facets of this
talented actor/director/writer. His
updates became increasingly fre-
quent, so I found myself turning
on the TV less and less to tune
into his five to 30-minute videos.
As his series progressed, so did his
ambitions, and now Rolfe is work-
ing on a full-length movie starring
the bitter, raving gamer that I
anxiously await.
This led me to discover The
Nostalgia Critic, another Web
series starring comedian Doug
Walker. It has a similar premise,
except he reviews old movies
instead of games. Also like James,
his titular character usually choos-
es entertainment of the lowest
quality to review so that he can
pick apart every ill-conceived fac-
et. His show is far from a rehash of
AVGN, though, as he has taken it
in a much different direction with
its own kind of growth.
On ThatGuyWithTheGlas-
ses.com, youll find all kinds of
other shows, each starring
their own humorous charac-
ters played by video cre-
ators across the world. Under the
production company Channel
Awesome, Doug and his brother
Rob have recruited diverse talent
with similar creative visions to
craft a regular schedule of daily
content, and to encourage a sense
of community, many of the charac-
ters cross over into each others
programs. This culminates in an
annual event where almost all the
reviewers meet in person to film a
movie made almost entirely for
fans of the website. Thats dedi-
cation.
My most recent favorite site of
this variety is RedLetterMedia-
.com, named after its video pro-
duction company. In addition to
short films, they offer the review
series Half in the Bag, where
filmmakers Mike Stoklasa and Jay
Bauman play VCR repairmen who
talk more about recent movies
they saw than actually repair any-
thing. Stoklasa is best known for
his other character, Mr. Harry S.
Plinkett, who reviews an odd varie-
ty of sci-fi and childrens films in a
peculiar voice with an even strang-
er personality. Plinkett reveals
throughout his reviews that he is a
serial killer who also has a pen-
chant for pizza rolls, and while he
is clearly insane, he ends up mak-
ing such valid points about the
Star Wars prequels and Star
Trek films that his extensive vid-
eos have gone viral.
Each of these websites and their
respective shows put a distinctive
spin on internet entertainment,
and like most things on the web,
theyre free and completely sup-
ported by short ads that run before
INFINITE
IMPROBABILITY
R I C H H O W E L L S
COURTESY PHOTO
James Rolfe poses in front of a green screen as the "An-
gry Video Game Nerd," a popular web series that com-
ically reviews old games.
See COMEDY, Page 24
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24 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
each episode or other sponsors.
In fact, both Rolfe and Walker
produce their shows as their
full-time jobs due to their over-
whelming popularity.
As such, their often give
back to their fans in a big way,
listening to their requests and
delivering what people actually
want to see, as opposed to
whatever theyll settle for on
cable television.
Most recently, James took
viewers behind the scenes in
his last AVGN episode, show-
ing everyone just how much
time and effort goes into mak-
ing an average video.
Despite having 10 times the
budget, I doubt anyone spends
even a quarter of the time
producing an episode of Jersey
Shore.
This allows viewers to have a
vested interest in what theyre
watching. Many of these cre-
ators take time to post updates
about their lives or answer
peoples questions through
separate videos, so after a
while, you really feel like you
know these guys.
You may relate to a charac-
ter on network TV on occa-
sion, but I cant think of one
star at the moment that Id
enjoy having a beer with who
would actually have a beer
with me.
Corporate TV only seems to
allow the beautiful people
to star in their own shows,
unless the point of said shows
is to make them look dumb,
but anyone can establish their
own web series, which makes
me want to see them succeed
all the more.
Without the constraints of
fickle, out-of-touch executives
and overbearing advertisers,
these programs are allowed to
tackle any subject they like
exactly as theyd like to, mak-
ing videos that are more genu-
ine and honest.
When was the last time you
watched G4, for example, and
saw a host that actually looks
like they play video games?
How many seasons of the
same uninspired schlock must
we endure before traditional
programming starts catching
up to the times?
None if this keeps up. As
television and the internet
slowly become one through
burgeoning technology, I be-
lieve that its only a matter of
time before one replaces the
other.
What big studios need to
realize is that its not the
amount of money you spend on
a show or how many publicity
stunts you can stage that re-
tains viewers its simply al-
lowing creative people to just
be creative.
While bad television will
never go away, we can certainly
help it become less frequent, at
least in our own lives.
While I cant tell you who
won the last American Idol, I
can recall the last comic book
discussed in Atop the Fourth
Wall.
While I may not be able to
participate in that rousing
water cooler discussion
about it the next day, Ill sacri-
fice mediocrity for quality any
day.
COMEDY
Continued from page 23
COURTESY PHOTO
Doug Walker stars as "The Nostalgia Critic," a web series about
an irritable critic of films he recalls mostly from his childhood.
Each of these websites
and their respective
shows put a distinctive
spin on internet enter-
tainment, and like most
things on the web,
theyre free and com-
pletely supported by
short ads that run be-
fore each episode or
other sponsors.
S
CRANTON The addition of free poetry and open mic nights at
The Vintage Theater is providing area residents with yet another
reason to visit the downtown.
Since the theater at 222 Wyoming Ave was established three years ago,
its main focus has been to showcase and cultivate local artists through
events such as concerts, plays, theatre acts and films.
The open mic night provides every performer with an opportunity to
showcase their work for us and the public, said co-founder and Program-
ming Director Conor OBrien. Its always a fun night and it gets people to
appreciate the local arts without really having to pay for it.
Open mic events take place the last
Thursday of every month. Musicians, ac-
tors, poets and comics are all invited to
attend and perform original works. Reci-
tations of someone elses pieces are also
accepted as long as credit is given.
OBrien said the events have become
more popular with each passing month.
Junes event was the most successful to
date, with15performers takingthe stage.
Poetry nights will be held the third
Thursday of each month.
These will be strictly for those who
want to recite or attend a show based
solely on poetry.
The majority of performers at these
events attend the theaters writer work-
shop, which meets every Saturday from
noon to 2 p.m.
We highly encourage anyone who has
the slightest interest in poetry to come.
There are very talented and experienced
people there, but anyone can come and
feel welcomed, OBrien said. If you just
want to come and watch, what do you
have to lose?
Any time you allow people to show-
case their talents for others, no matter
howsmall or large the audience, it allows
them to connect to the community, like-
minded people, and fellow artists. It
brings people downtownona night when
they might not be doing anything.
Since the Cafe Metro closed in Wilkes-
Barre last year, the The Vintage Theater
remains one of the few venues for con-
certs and events for local youths.
OBrien hopes places such as The Vin-
tage Theater may encourage visitors to
explore other downtown destinations.
By attendinga local event andwatchinga
movie, doing some shopping, or grab-
bing a bite to eat afterward, he feels the
theater canhelpother local artists andlo-
cations, promoting overall growthfor the
city.
Im a firm believer in anything that
brings people into downtown Scranton
and does well for the community,
OBrien said.
STEP UP TO THE MIC
Vintage Theater offering free poetry, open mic nights
By TYLER MILES
Go Lackawanna intern
What: Open mic and poetry nights
Where: The Vintage Theater, 222 Wyoming
Avenue, downtown Scranton.
When: Poetry night, July 21st at 8 p.m.
Open mic, July 28th at 7 p.m.
Cost: Free
More Info: Contact The Vintage Theater by
phone at 589-0271 or at www.scrantons-
vintagetheater.com
IF YOU GO
Sunday, July 17, 2011 GOLackawanna 25
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JASON RIEDMILLER
PHOTOS/FOR GO
LACKAWANNA
Weekender
humor writer
Justin Brown
with his partner
Catherine Julius
received a perfect
score from the
judges.
D
ancers will heat up the ballroom
floor of the Scranton Cultural
Center at the Masonic Temple
in the second round of Dancing
with the NEPA Stars July 29.
Selena of Froggy101, LibraryManager of
the Times-Tribune Brian Fulton and Cor-
porate Executive of Advanced Imaging
Specialists Rosemary Broderick will take
to the floor to show off their dance moves
and try to two-step their way to the final
competition Aug. 19.
Each round audience votes will deter-
mine who will advance. A professional
dance instructor will be on hand at the
event to teach any guests inspired to take
to the floor.
New this year, those interested can vote
prior to the event by visiting www.Scran-
tonCulturalCenter.org.
Tickets for the show are $16 and can be
purchased by calling Ticketmaster at
1.800.745.3000, visiting the Scranton Cul-
tural Center box office in advance or the
night of the show.
The Scranton Cultural Center is located
at 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton.
For more information, visit www.scran-
tonculturalcenter.org.
Newswatch16s Sofia
Ojeda and Art Golem-
beski performthe salsa.
Peggy Hart and her
partner Walter Paduck
perform the foxtrot.
26 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
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W
innie the Pooh, Disneys
latest film revival of A.A.
Milnes willy, nilly, silly
old bear, is longer on charm than on
laughs. But its a treat for childrenmaking
their first trek to the multiplex and for
parents and grandparents with fond me-
mories of the Hundred Acre Wood.
This Pooh is a musical homage to the
1960s Poohshort films, addingnewsongs
(by Book of Mormon composer Robert
Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez) and
a lovely revival of the Winnie the Pooh
title tune, winsomely sung by Zooey Des-
chanel.
And if the animation doesnt have quite
the hand-colored warmth of those older
cel-animated classics, it more than does
justice to the worlds favorite tubby little
cubby all stuffed with fluff.
Co-writer/directors Stephen J.
Anderson and Don Hall, with the
help of five other credited screen-
writers, emphasize Poohs litera-
ry roots, making Winnie work his
way through paragraphs and pag-
es of words literal words that
collapse into piles of letters at
Poohs bidding.
Is there honey in this para-
graph?
There had better be, because I
ama bear of very little brain, and
long words bother me, he sighs.
Voice actor Jim Cummings does
a great impersonation of the late
Sterling Holloway, the original
Pooh, as well as Paul Winchell,
the original voice of Tigger.
The story is as simple as any
Pooh picture. The bear is out of
honey and a Pooh bear takes
care of his tummy.
But Pooh also has a very im-
portant thing to do. Sad old
Eeyore (Bud Luckey) has lost his
tail and the manic Rabbit (Tom
Kenny) and verbose Owl (Craig
Ferguson) make various plans
and proposals for rounding up a
replacement.
Eeyore is all about the puns. A
balloon as a substitute tail?
Imstill up in the air about it.
Theres a lovely little chalk-
board animation interlude,
some mild moments of alarmas
Owl misreads Back Soon on
Christopher Robins note as
Backson, a beast that must
have kidnapped the little boy
who usually solves their prob-
lems for them. And Pooh sings,
especially when he halluci-
nates about his favorite treat
Everything is Honey.
Its a funnier, more sophisticat-
ed and more nostalgic trip to the
woods than Poohs Heffalump
Movie or the most recent Tigger
and Piglet pictures.
The messages sink in about
childish forgetfulness and put-
ting the needs of others ahead of
your own honey lust.
Mainly, though, its nice to see
that Disney wants to introduce
tykes to the magic of going to the
movies with family fare this gen-
tle and warm.
As always, Pooh stars in a ve-
ry short movie, the idea being
that like his youngest fans, he
doesnt havetheattentionspanto
carry a full-length feature. But
this Winnie the Pooh is aug-
mented by a delightful 2-D ani-
mated short, The Ballad of Nes-
sie, a fanciful version of howthe
Loch Ness Monster came to cre-
ate Loch Ness. Nessie is narrat-
ed in Dr. Seuss-style rhymes by
Scottish comic Billy Connolly.
ROGER MOORE
The Orlando Sentinel
What: Winnie The Pooh
Starring: Jim Cummings (Winnie
the Pooh, Tigger); Craig Ferguson
(Owl); John Cleese (narrator);
Kristen Anderson-Lopez (Kanga)
Directed by: Stephen J. Anderson,
Don Hall
Running time: 67 minutes (in-
cluding the short cartoon The
Ballad of Nessie)
Rated: G

IF YOU GO
Sunday, July 17, 2011 GOLackawanna 27
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ith its haunted vis-
tas, clankingbattles,
inspired effects, he-
roism, treachery, fragile allianc-
es and moral ambiguity, the
blockbuster finale of the Harry
Potter saga achieves a super-
natural splendor. The series
has sputtered here and there
over the last decade, losing its
focus and tempo, but this cli-
max is a triumph of spectacle
and well-earned sentiment.
Potter is the anti-Transfor-
mers, high adventure with heart
and soul to spare.
Daniel Radcliffe has matured into
a solid actor, impressive in tense
scenes of deadly combat and quiet
moments of subtle, shifting emo-
tion. He puts those skills to gooduse
in Harrys showdown with Lord Vol-
demort, the snake-faced tyrant who
killed Harrys parents and aims to
crush the world beneath his heel.
With Hermione (Emma Watson, her
iron-jawed self-confidence draining
away) and Ron (Rupert Grint,
whose befuddled expression suits
his overwhelmed character) Harry
returns to Hogwarts to find and de-
stroy the remaining Horcruxes, the
containers in which Voldemort has
hidden fragments of his malignant
soul.
Howthe school has changed from
the joyous theme park of old. De-
mentors float above the courtyard,
their tattered shrouds trailing like
jellyfish tentacles. Students march
in prison camp formation. Oversee-
ing it all from a high window is Vol-
demorts ally, Prof. Snape (Alan
Rickman, delivering each line of dia-
log as if savoring a plum). His ex-
pression is stoic but ... could that be
a flicker of regret?
The story has an epic war-movie
COMIN COVERT
Star Tribune
What: Harry Potter And The Deathly
Hallows Part 2
Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Emma
Watson, Rupert Grint, Ralph Fiennes
and Alan Rickman
Directed by: David Yates
Running time: 130 minutes

IF YOU GO
See POTTER, Page 30
Second part of Hallows has heart and soul to spare
COURTESY PHOTOS
Daniel Radcliffe stars as Harry Potter in Harry Potter and the Deathly
Hallows: Part 2.
28 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
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1. Fans watch Every Avenue perform on the Weekender Deck
at the Vans Warped Tour.
2. Street Dogs perform on the Weekender Deck during
Thursdays all-day concert.
3. Jessica Lefnefski rides the slip and slide
a great way to stay cool.
4. Fans rush into the Toyota Pavilion to
get good seats as the gates to the
Vans Warped Tour open.
5. Hayley Williams of Paramore
performs.
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Kyle OBrien, Rich Abbazio and
Bry Harvey of Pocono Lake.
Krystle Murphy of Wilkes-Barre
and Robbie Kutney of Scranton.
Shelbi Ritsick and Kristy
Komrowski of Harveys Lake.
Caitlin Fay, Duryea, Stefanie Chicoski
and Cassondra Colella of Pittston.
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feel, as Voldemorts army strikes
back against Harrys student and
staff rebellion. Director David Yates
keeps the ebb and flow of combat
clear; for all its blitzkreig energy, the
battle never feels incoherent.
What distinguishes this from oth-
er summer shrapnel-fests is the way
it follows individuals that we care
about through the conflict. Second
fiddles Neville Longbottom (Mat-
thew Lewis) and Prof. McGonagall
(Maggie Smith) stepforwardtoplay
pivotal roles. The film creates a
world where heroism and deceit
spring fromunexpected sources. Its
one of the glories of the Potter series
that it candeliver a childlike sense of
wonder without requiring a childish
black-and-white worldview.
And what wonders are on display!
The power bolts, spells andinvisibil-
ity cloaks are beautifully realized,
absurd yet persuasive. The brutish
ogres and giant tarantulas Volde-
mort unleashes in the final battle in-
spire genuine shivers of fear. And
there are witty miracles; the dragon
demolitionof Gringotts goblinbank
is a riotous image of a corrupt finan-
cial firms collapse. When Hermione
transforms herself into a double of
Bellatrix Lestrange (Helena Bon-
ham Carter) for a spy mission, Bon-
ham Carter plays Watson imperson-
ating Bellatrix to hilarious effect.
Near the climax, Harrys mentor
Albus Dumbledore (Michael Gam-
bon) returns in a vision to advise the
young wizard that words are potent
forms of enchantment, rich with the
power to hurt or heal. Here the se-
cret of the series is revealed.
If the Potter franchise had been
cooked up in a studio pitch meeting
with storyboards and visual-effects
demos, it could never become the
generation-defining phenomenon
that it is. It capturedthe imagination
of an era like no cultural event since
Beatlemania because it stands on a
solid million-word foundation creat-
ed by J.K. Rowling. She put story
and character front and center, and
when theyre succeeding, the Potter
films do, too.
For all the movies dazzle and
flash and Hippogriffs, the characters
are more vivid than the special ef-
fects. It is our emotional involve-
ment withthethree-dimensional he-
roes andvillains, sidekicks andback-
ground players that draws us back
time after time. The final chapter
ends with an epilogue that puts a
lump in your throat and makes you
want to watch them all again from
the beginning. Thats the definition
of a classic.
POTTER
Continued from page 27
SCRANTON Fans of all sorts braved
the heat and flooded the Toyota Pavilion
at Montage Mountain Thursday for the
Vans Warped Tour an annual day-
long music festival.
Warped Tour was filled with music
from almost every genre, covering elec-
tronic, hip-hop and punk. Even Scranton-
based metal band Motionless in White
was a part of the seven stages and 70
acts that performed.
The top acts included Paramore, Sim-
ple Plan, A Day to Remember and Pep-
per among others.
Rob West of Mountain Top, who made
his first Warped appearance, said he
came to see 3OH!3, but found a lot of
other performances he enjoyed.
Kyle Demko was one that really stuck
out to me; it just was cool to always be
able to see that much music, he said.
You werent confined to one place and
you have a lot of freedom.
It was a never going to quit attitude
all day as vendors, charity organizations
and bands were at the venue before 6
a.m. preparing to take on the day. In
addition to sponsors of the tour promot-
ing their company, charity organizations
like To Write Love On Her Arms promot-
ed awareness for cancer, depression and
other diseases.
The show lasted just over eight hours
and early records reported over 10,000
people were in attendance.
Warped Tour is more than a great
place for fans to experience a festival
without traveling far, and the bands love
it just as much. Less Than Jakes vocalist
Chris DeMakes, who has been on
Warped Tour since the 90s, said its the
best way to connect with fans.
You can look someone in the eye,
shake their hand and say Hey, thanks for
buying my record, DeMakes said. That
still means something to someone.
The performers had much more than
30-minute sets to worry about as well.
Interviews, autograph signings, acoustic
performances and contests were held by
dozens of organizations.
Returning Warped fans Tim Duncan
and Roger Best have made the trip to
Scranton for the past five years.
Its always a good time here, Duncan
said. We came with about six bands we
wanted to see, and were able to see so
many more.
The crowds always seem to be much
better in Scranton as well, Best added.
Dunkin and Best werent the only ones
traveling to see the show, as many bands
hailed from other countries like the
United Kingdom, Canada and Australia.
The Vans Warped Tour makes its next
stop in Mississauga, Canada tomorrow.
The next show slatted for the Toyota
Pavilion is Lil Wayne on July 19.
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Fans wait for the gates to open at Vans Warped Tour.
Wall-to-wall bands at Warped
By MATT MORGIS
Go Lackawanna Intern
Scrantons own Motionless In White perform at Vans Warped Tour.
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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011 PAGE 31
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32 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
1,000 yards as a senior.
We have Kempa and Tyler
Hughes, so were going to just let it
go, Donato said. I think were go-
ing to be in the gun a little bit.
Hughes made the use of two run-
ning backs irrelevant when he
threwfor 2,320 yards and 23 touch-
downs while running for 1,406
yards and 20 touchdowns from the
spread offense to lead West Scran-
ton into the District 2 Class AAA
championship game.
Im going to let Tyler operate
out of the gun, Donatosaid. I talk-
ed to Kempa. Hes going to play a
little tailback for us and a little
quarterbackandwell seewhat hap-
pens from there.
S
CRANTON Nick Dona-
to is faced with one of
those problems that can
come up when rosters are put
together for a high school foot-
ball all-star game.
ScrantonPreps Donatohas just
one player with nearly full-time
experience at tailback on the ros-
ter of the City teamthat will take
ontheCountyonJuly27at Scran-
ton Memorial Stadium in the
77thannual ScrantonLions Club-
sponsored Dream Game.
Its the second time, really, that
Ive beenshort at the tailback, said
Donato, who was 1-1 as a City
Dream Game coach while at North
Pocono and 1-0 as a County assist-
ant coach while a member of the
staff at Abington Heights. When I
had the game in (1989), we took
Jackie Brier, who was a flanker for
us at North Pocono, and he played
tailback.
Its the same now that (Jimmy)
Pichariello from Dunmore is the
only kid with real tailback experi-
ence.
Donato, however, has an uncom-
mon solution.
The City roster features a pair of
quarterbacks, West Scrantons Tyl-
er Hughes and Susquehannas Dan
Kempa, whoeachranfor more than
Scranton Prep readies a from the gun offense in Dream Game
BRADLEY LANPHEAR PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
DreamGame player/coach liaison Jerry Preschutti discusses the game with players fromthe City and County Thursday night at Scranton Memorial Stadium.
GAME TIME APPROACHES
By TOMROBINSON
For Go Lackawanna
See DREAM GAME, Page 36
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JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Cory Nidoh of West Scranton
tags Green Ridges Kyle
Booth as he slides into
second base during last
Saturdays Legion
game.
SCRANTON
There have been
many years
when District 11
was allowed two
entries in the
Region 5 Amer-
ican Legion baseball tournament.
The district, made up of teams
from Lackawanna County, gets
just one this season. That is a
shame because it has two cham-
pionship-caliber teams.
West Scranton showed it was
clearly one by going 16-0 in the
regular season for what was a
rare unbeaten finish.
Green Ridge established its
credentials by winning the last
two games of a best-of-three
championship series after West
Scranton had used three playoff
wins to improve its district win-
ning streak to 19 games.
The playoff victories made
Green Ridge the team that is
representing District 11 in the
Region 5 Tournament, which
started Saturday in Bloomsburg.
We had a great run, West
Scranton manager George Ros-
kos said. They won two out
of three games.
They deserve it.
West Scranton opened the
championship series with a 3-0
win July 9 and had a 3-0 lead
again in the second game Sun-
day.
Green Ridge took over from
there with a six-run fourth inning
to pull out a 6-5 victory at Scran-
ton High School before winning
the decisive game, 4-2, Monday
night at Battaglia-Cawley Field.
The pitching combination of
Tim Forsette, Tanner Schmidt,
Casey Reed and Kyle Booth held
West Scranton to well under half
its usual production during the
series.
Nobody has been able to do
anything like our pitchers did as
far as managing that lineup,
Green Ridge manager Cal Shea
said.
The district championship was
about more than just pitching,
however.
Green Ridge turned two diffi-
cult double plays in key situa-
tions in the deciding game and
showed off an offense that made
efficient use of the chances it
had.
Third baseman Mike Miller
went to the line in the third in-
ning to start a double play when
West Scranton had runners on
the corners with a 1-0 lead.
West Scranton was trying to
cut into a 3-1 deficit in the sixth
when Danny Repshis started the
KEEPING SCORE
T O M R O B I N S O N
See SCORE, Page 41
PAGE 34 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011
Sunday, July 17, 2011 GOLackawanna 35
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PLAINS TWP. The newest pro-
fessional sports francise in North-
eastern Pennsylvania will pay hom-
age to the areas Irish-American heri-
tage.
The previously unnamed indoor
lacrosse teamwill go by the moniker
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Shamrocks,
team officials announced Thursday
at a press conference.
The Shamrocks logo a clover-
riddled shield bearing Irelands na-
tional colors was also unveiled at a
press conference at the Woodlands
Inn & Resort.
We have a very strong Irish-
American heritage in this area, said
Shamrocks president and owner Jim
Jennings. We could not have picked
a more appropriate name.
The Shamrocks begin play in the
North American Lacrosse League in
January 2012 at the Mohegan Sun
Arena at Casey Plaza.
Owners chose the Shamrocks mo-
niker over the Haymakers and Bul-
lies. Team officials liked the nick-
name in the early stages of the orga-
nizations development and reached
out to local college marketing class-
es and focus groups for their input.
Everyone seemed to love the
name, said Jennings. We didnt get
any negative feedback on it. We
looked at some other names but this
one kept on coming back to us.
Jennings stated that the inspira-
tion for the teams logo drew from
the simpler designs of Major League
Soccer teams, specifically the Phila-
delphia Union.
The teams shield design is based
on a modified version of the shield of
arm from Ireland, said the logos
creator Chris Lochinski, of Lock De-
signs in Columbus, Ohio. In the
crest, the shamrock design is
morphed into a lacrosse stick on the
top clover leaf.
We wanted something thats a lit-
tle progressive, said Jennings. We
didnt want a cartoon character. We
wanted to get away from that.
A uniform design will not be un-
veiled until after the league signs a
jersey deal.
The popularity of Scrantons St.
Patricks Day Parade and the strong
Irish culture in the area was a deter-
mining factor in choosing the Sham-
rock name.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton is the first
team to unveil its name and logo.
Charlotte, N.C. joins it as the only
two NALL franchises to have been
announced.
The NALL, according to Jennings,
will disclose four more teams by the
end of the month.
The Shamrocks plan to boost
youth lacrosse development in the
Wyoming Valley. Only four Wyom-
ing Valley Conference schools Dal-
las, Delaware Valley, Lake-Lehman,
Tunkhannock, WyomingSeminary
sport lacrosse programs.
Fifteen years ago, when the Pen-
guins came to the area there were ve-
ry few hockey teams in the area at
the high school level, said Luzerne
County Commissioner TomCooney.
Now, hockey is being played
throughout the whole area. I believe
that is going to happen with la-
crosse.
Lacrosse fans on hand were enthu-
siastic about the team logo and de-
sign.
I like the logo, saidJohnVanDer
Wal, of Blairstown, N.J. I think it
looks fresh and the name fits the ar-
ea.
New Wilkes-Barre/Scranton lacrosse team will be called the Shamrocks
PETE G. WILCOX/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Luzerne County Commissioners Maryanne Petrilla and Thomas Cooney unveil the logo of NEPAs new professional lacrosse team the Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton Shamrocks at Thursdays press conference at the Woodlands Inn & Resort in Plains Twp.
The luck of the Irish?
JAY MONAHAN
For Go Lackawanna
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36 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
Nyeem Wartman, who will
enter his senior season as a
linebacker at Valley View, has
given his verbal commitment
to accept a football scholarship
from Penn State University.
Wartman made more than
100 tackles while helping Val-
ley View to a 7-5 record in
2010.

Ken Sames, a member of the


North Pocono High School golf
team, finished tied for fourth in
the Pennsylvania Junior Ama-
teur July 6-7 at Hershey Coun-
try Club.
Sames shot 1-over-par, 73 in
each round to finish just two
shots behind Reilly Erhardt.
David Pompey Jr., a Country
Club of Scranton member and
Scranton Prep player, shot
74-81155 to finish tied for
28th.

The NEPA Miners intercept-


ed four passes July 9 to hold off
the Red City Outlaws, 14-7, in a
semi-pro football game.
Justin Piontkowski hit five of
10 passes for 140 yards and a
touchdown while carrying 11
times for 58 yards.
Nate Bowden caught four
passes for 118 yards and a
touchdown.
- Tom Robinson
SPORTS BRIEFS
B
y the time the
24th Triple-A All-
Star Game came
around Wednesday
night, the Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre Yankees
had just one representa-
tive.
Right-handed pitcher
Adam Warren made sure
the Yankees still had a
significant impact on the
game.
Warren was one of just two
pitchers to throwtwo innings
during a combined three-hit
shutout that helped the In-
ternational League to a 3-0
victory over the Pacific Coast
League in Salt Lake City.
Hazleton Area graduate
Russ Canzler accounted for
all the scoring with a three-
run homer in the second in-
ning and was named IL Top
Star.
All three runs were un-
earned in an inning that
started with Charlottes
Dayan Viciedo reaching on
an error by Salt Lake third
baseman Jeff Baisley.
Canzler, a third baseman
for the Durham Bulls, hit a
two-out shot to left-center
field.
The IL pitching staff dom-
inated to the point where Da-
vid Cooper was named PCL
Top Star for getting a single
and a walk.
Columbus pitcher Zach
McAllister got it started, al-
lowing just a hit in the first
two innings.
Warren overcame an error
to hold the PCL scoreless in
the third and fourth innings.
He threw 22 of 30 pitches for
strikes and had one strike-
out.
Seven pitchers followed
Warren, combining to hold
the PCL to one hit over the
final five innings.
The Yankees originally had
three players selected for the
game catcher Jesus Monte-
ro, first baseman Jorge Vaz-
quez and relief pitcher Kevin
Whelan.
When injuries led to them
being among the players who
were unavailable, Warren
was in the list of players add-
ed to the IL roster.
Pitcher Warren helps lift IL stars
PETE G. WILCOX FILE PHOTO/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Right-handed pitcher Adam Warren was one of just two pitch-
ers to throw two innings during a combined three-hit shutout
that helped the International League to a 3-0 victory over the
Pacific Coast League in Salt Lake City.
Staff Reports
Its a multiple offense. I
wouldnt say its a spread, but
were going to be in the gun and
one back quite a bit. Imgoing to
try tomake Tyler as comfortable
as I can.
Kempa was the top running
threat as the quarterback in a
veer option game at Susquehan-
na. His third straight 1,000-yard
season, when he ran for 1,190
yards and 17 touchdowns,
helped the Sabers to the 2010
Lackawanna Football Confer-
ence Division 3 championship.
Hughes and Kempa are just
two of three quarterbacks in the
game who rushed for 1,000-plus
yards last season.
When Lackawanna Trails
Steve Jervis made up his roster
for Thursdays Media Night, he
omitted Riversides Corey Taler-
ico, whomhe thought was going
to have to drop out of the game.
Jervis learned before the gather-
ing, however, that the West
Chester recruit is going to be
available.
Talerico was named state
Class A Player of the Year after
leadingDistrict 2championRiv-
erside to an appearance in the
state Class A championship
game. Talerico passed for 1,995
yards and 30 touchdowns while
running for 1,044 yards and 16
scores.
Jervis will stick with the of-
fense his staff coaches at Lacka-
wanna Trail.
Were going to run exactly
what we run at Lackawanna
Trail, a version of the wing-T,
something we believe in, Jervis
said. I think the one positive
about it is the series approach.
You can run a decent number of
plays as long as the kids under-
stand the series.
All-star game rules generally
limit blitzingandrequireonede-
fensive approach in order to
make it possible for teams to
teach offensive plays, with limit-
ing adjustments in the two
weeks of available practice.
The coaches have agreed to
switch fromyears of a 5-2 defen-
sive approach to 4-3 alignments
this year.
Tolerico is able to play but
both teams had several adjust-
ments to make when players
were removed from the roster
for a variety of reasons, includ-
ing injuries, work commitments
and other schedule conflicts.
The County lost Matt Boyar-
sky and Al Tuzze of Lakeland,
John Paul Abda of Abington
Heights, Jamie Rowe of Valley
View and Alex Dietrich of Ho-
nesdalewhileaddingtwo-wayli-
neman Bobby Coulthard of Val-
ley View.
Boyarsky was a second-team
Class AAall-state defensive line-
man for his role in Lakelands
LFC Division 2 championship.
The City lost John Mariotti of
Scranton Prep, Josh Reynolds of
Delaware Valley, Ben Goldman
of Dunmore and Mason Grif-
fiths of Montrose.
Media Night also included
team meetings and the ex-
change of necessary medical
information in order to allow
the teams to begin practice Fri-
day. They will continue work-
outs this week with the City
practicing at Scranton Memo-
rial Stadium and the County
practicing at Lackawanna Trail
High School.
DREAM GAME
Continued from page 32
BRADLEY LANPHEAR/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Lackawanna Trail coach Steve Jervis, left, will lead the County
while Scranton Prep coach Nick Donato, right, guides the City in
the July 27 Dream Game at Scranton Memorial Stadium.
Sunday, July 17, 2011 GOLackawanna 37
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bington National
completed a dom-
inant run through the
District 17 Little League base-
ball tournament by finishing
off West Scranton early in
Monday nights final at Acker-
ly Field.
Matt Hughes threwa five-in-
ning, no-hitter with 11 strike-
outs and doubled twice to
drive in four wins in the 13-1
romp.
Ryan Harvey had a home run and
single while also driving in four
runs. Kyle Porpiglia contributed
three hits, including a double, and
two RBI. Sam Arnold had two hits,
including a home run.
Abington National advanced to
Section 5 play by outscoring its op-
ponents, 89-9, and winning seven
straight games in the tournament.
Abington National got through
its toughest game in the winners
bracket final when it defeated Con-
nell Park/East Scranton, 13-6.
West Scranton defeated Abing-
ton American, 4-2, then eliminated
Connell Park/East Scranton, 14-2,
to earn its second shot at Abington
National in the final.
DISTRICT 17 JUNIOR
BASEBALL
J.P. Walsh, Josh Misura and win-
ning pitcher Jonathan Boruta each
hadthreehits, includingadoubleto
lift North Pocono over Christy
Mathewson, 15-8, in the July 10
championship game.
TimPacini had three hits, includ-
inga double, andMike Kearney had
two hits for Christy Mathewson.
Christy Mathewson reached the
final when it held West Scranton
without a hit in a 10-0, five-inning
victory.
Liam Daugherty, Tim Pacini and
Cooper Rosiak each had two hits in
support of winning pitcher Jason
Guthrie.
DISTRICT 17 SENIOR
BASEBALL
North Pocono needed two shots,
but was able to finish off West
Scranton on July 9 and claim the
tournament championship.
West Scranton emerged fromthe
elimination bracket needing two
straight wins to take the champion-
ship. It managed to win the first
meeting with North Pocono before
losing the second.
DISTRICT 17 10-11 BASEBALL
Abington National defeated Old
Forge, 8-4, in Thursday nights win-
ners bracket final.
Old Forge still had a chance to
work back through the elimination
bracket against Abington Ameri-
can, which got past North Pocono,
3-1, earlier Thursday.
North Pocono went 4-0 and
Abington American 3-1 to finish
first and second in the five-team
Pool A. Abington National was 3-0
and Old Forge 2-1 in the four-team
Pool B.
AbingtonNational andOldForge
then used one-run victories in
By TOMROBINSON
For Go Lackawanna
See LEAGUE, Page 42
Abington Nationals
Tucker Schimelfinig hits a
walkoff double in the sixth inning.
JASON RIEDMILLER/
FOR GO LACKAWANNA
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38 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
C
ory Spangenberg, Kyle McMyne and Ray Black were
teammates on the Moosic Mets in the fall of 2007,
trying to improve developing baseball careers.
Those efforts paid off as each of them moved on to Divi-
sion I college careers that led to their selections in this
years Major League Baseball Draft.
Were showcasing kids in front of college coaches and
also some pro scouts, Moosic Mets general manager Bill
Nelson said.
In its 26-year existence, the Mets programhas produced
about 20 professional players.
Spangenberg has his profes-
sional career off to a flying start
while McMyne is trying to
bounce back from being briefly
detoured by injury.
Black and Michael Papi, a
member of the 2009 Moosic
Mets, each still have the choice
of signing professionally or con-
tinuing as college players. Black
went from Coughlin High
School to the University of Pitts-
burgh where the San Francisco
Giants made him a seventh-
round pick. Papi, who led Tunk-
hannock to this years state
Class AAA high school baseball
championshipgame, was picked
in the 30th round by the Los An-
geles Angels, but also has a Uni-
versity of Virginia scholarship
waiting for him.
Instant success, early strug-
gles and uncertainty are the
range of results for players with
local ties drafted by pro baseball
teams last month. They also
sumup the experiences of those
fromLackawannaCountyteams
whomade their prodebuts earli-
er but are still trying to find the
right path to Major League
Baseball.
Spangenberg, who led Abing-
tonHeights toa 2009state Class
AAA championship, joins Old
Forges McMyne and Lackawan-
na Trails Jacke Healey as gradu-
ates of county high schools who
are active in pro baseball.
Five former Keystone College
players and two fromLackawan-
na College are also playing.
Spangenberg, who also
played for the Moosic Mets in
2008, is the early success story
out of this years draft class.
Selected 10th overall by San
Diego in the first round, the sec-
ond baseman jumped fromIndi-
an River State College, a junior
college in Florida, and quickly
signed with the Padres.
Spangenberg was seen by
VMI at one of our showcases,
Nelsonsaid. The rest is history.
Hewent there, thentotheJUCO
and to the 10th pick.
Spangenberg was the Player
of the Week for the Northwest
League in each of the first two
full weeks of the season and
earned a promotion in less than
a month.
Following Monday nights
game in Eugene, Ore., Spangen-
berg was promoted from the
short-season Class A Northwest
League to the Fort Wayne (Ind.)
TinCaps of the full-season Mid-
west League.
We check in on our old play-
ers a couple of times a week and
try to post their stats on our
Facebook page, Nelson said.
Spangenberg put up many im-
pressive numbers.
When he left Eugene, Span-
genberg led the Northwest
League in on-base percentage
(.545) and walks (31) and tied
for the lead in runs scored (20)
and doubles (10).
The kids destined to be a
big-leaguer, Emeralds manager
Pat Murphy told the Eugene
Register-Guard. He plays the
right way all the time.
Spangenberg went 0-for-2
with a walk, a hit by pitch and a
stolen base in his Midwest
League debut Wednesday night.
Through two games, he was 0-
for-6.
McMyne struck out the first
three batters in his first pro
start, but left each of the first
two games early and, after hav-
ing stiffness in his shoulder
while warming up for the sec-
ondgame, was restedby the par-
ent Cincinnati Reds.
The former Villanova Univer-
sity pitcher was scheduled to re-
turn to action Thursday night
only to have the game rained
out. In the first two starts,
McMyne does not have a deci-
sion. He has a 6.75 earned run
average with five hits, two walks
and six strikeouts in four in-
nings.
Healey was hitless in 23 at-
bats over seven games through
Wednesday night. That dropped
the former YoungstownState in-
fielder to 1-for-35 (.029) in 11
games to start the New York-
Penn League season with the
Houston Astros Tri-Valley Val-
leyCats farm team in Troy, N.Y.
A shortstop, Healey also
played with Tri-Valley last sea-
son when he batted .170 with
five homers in 44 games.
The Lackawanna Trail gradu-
ate was part of a 2010 draft class
that alsoincludedfour Keystone
College players.
Yazy Arbelo has made the
most progress of the former Gi-
ants.
Arbelo played in the Midwest
League All-Star Game and is
leadingthe league with22home
runs and 69 RBI while playing
for theSouthBendSilver Hawks
in the Arizona Diamondbacks
system.
Arbelo also gainedall-star rec-
ognition last season. After being
selected in the 26th round, he
went to the Yakima Bears where
he hit .285 with 13 doubles, 14
homers and 55 RBI in 68 games
to make the year-end, all-star
team.
The midseason selection
made Arbelo the starter at first
base for the East Division. He
went 0-for-2 in an 8-3 loss; how-
ever, a recent slump has drop-
pedhis seasonaverage to .240 in
88 games.
Eric Groff, Victor Lara and
Sean Murphy are also still play-
ing after leaving Keystone when
they were drafted in 2010.
Groff, a third baseman, and
Lara, a relief pitcher, are with
Arizonas Pioneer League team
in Missoula.
After batting .341 for the first
10 games of July, Groff has his
season average at .304 with 11
extra-base hits through 19
games. He jumped up from
Class A to Class AAA Reno for
the final five games of the 2010
season.
Groff hit three homers in a
gamefor aMissoulateamrecord
last season. He had three extra-
base hits again Thursday with
two doubles and a triple against
the Casper Ghosts.
Lara is just 1-8 in two seasons,
but his other numbers this year
are respectable. He is 0-3 with a
save, a 3.75 ERA and 20 strike-
outs in 12 innings through eight
appearances.
Murphy is in his second stop
of the season. After winning his
seasonopener at Stocktonof the
California League to improve to
4-0 as a professional, he is 0-3
with a 7.48 ERA in five starts
with Burlington in the Midwest
League
In 21 2/3 innings, Murphy al-
lowed 31 hits for the Bees but
walked just four while striking
out 13.
Bryan Henry gave Keystone
three players on the Missoula
roster after Arizona drafted him
last month.
Henry is 4-for-18 (.222) in six
games, after going 2-for-5 with
his second homer Thursday
night.
Henry also homered in his
first professional at-bat, but has
hadlimitedopportunities as one
of three catchers on the Osprey
roster.
Blaine OBrien, a 6-foot-7
pitcher, was drafted in the 34th
round by the Philadelphia Phil-
lies as a Massachusetts high
school player in 2008 and again
in the 48th round this year by
the Cleveland Indians. He has
not signed with the Indians.
Dan Winnie, a right-handed
pitcher from Danville, is 7-2 in
parts of two pro seasons since
being drafted out of Lackawan-
na College last year.
Winnie worked six innings, al-
lowing a run on three hits
Wednesday, to improve to 3-0
witha1.50earnedrunaveragein
four starts this season at Dan-
ville, Va. of the Appalachian
League. He has allowed 15 hits
and 13 walks while striking out
15 in 20 innings.
Chris Sedon, aninfielder from
Coughlin High School, was
picked by Detroit in 2009 out of
the University of Pittsburgh
where he became a Big East all-
star following his career at Lack-
awanna. He is withthe Lakeland
Flying Tigers of the Florida
State League but has not played
yet this season.
Sedon has struggled offen-
sively. He batted .137 in 49
games for Oneonta as a rookie
and hit .221 combined in 60
games for three different teams
last season.
Lackawannas Chris Kirsch, a
left-handed pitcher selected in
the 21st round by the St. Louis
Cardinals in June, has not yet
signed.
PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL
Area players in minors enjoy success
By TOMROBINSON For Go Lackawanna
Kyle McMyne
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PAGE 40 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011
Sunday, July 17, 2011 GOLackawanna 41
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Only. Not valid on holidays. Not valid with any other promotions. EXP. 7/31/11
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inning with a single. Mike
Cebulko ranged far to his right
to get to a ball that seemed
headed through the middle,
starting another double play.
Thats the play of the
game, maybe the play of the
season, Shea said. That
saves the game right there.
And the turn, for Tanner
(Schmidt) to be able to get a
lot on that throw, its a game
changer.
Playing without standout
outfielder Joe McCarthy,
Green Ridge still found a way
to produce enough offense to
win the series.
We were persistently pa-
tient, Shea said.
West Scranton pitching was
offering just enough chances
for the bottom of the Green
Ridge order to work out walks
while counting on the top of
the order for the big hits.
When a certain part of the
order is struggling a little bit,
you dont want to go up there
swinging the bats, Shea said.
A lot of those walks paid off
for us.
We ended up getting timely
hitting when we needed it.
The bottom of the lineup did
their job. We wound up get-
ting walks and turning the
lineup over.
Schmidt and Booth each
had two-run singles in the
six-run outburst Sunday.
D.J. Navoczynski and Miller
had RBI hits in the four-run
fifth to break a shutout Mon-
day and Schmidt later singled
in a run.
That left it up to Forsette,
who gave up only one un-
earned run in five innings of
relief against a team made up
almost entirely of former
teammates of his when he
played at West Scranton High
School.
I went to school with all
these guys, Forsette said. Its
tough, but I had to do it.
I had to pitch well.
He did and as a result, Dis-
trict 11 has a different top
team in the playoffs than it did
in the regular season.
They were the best until
these two games, Forsette
said.
SCORE
Continued from page 33
JASON RIED-
MILLER/FOR GO
LACKAWANNA
Stephen
Sunday (33)
slides in to
steal second
base as Mike
Cebulko tries
to apply the
tag.
N
E
W
S
A
R
T
S
S
P
O
R
T
S
42 GOLackawanna Sunday, July 17, 2011
Wednesdays games to reach the
winners bracket final.
Abington National pulled out
a 10-9 victory over Abington
American in the bottom of the
sixth inning. Old Forge edged
North Pocono, 11-10.
DISTRICT 3210-11
BASEBALL
Kyle Pillar struck out eight in
Wallenpaupacks 5-1 win over
ThroopThursday, but the teams
were set to meet again Saturday
with the championship on the
line.
In another Thursday day,
Nick Borgacci was the winning
pitcher in Dickson Citys 7-6 vic-
tory over Green Ridge.
Throop defeated Green
Ridge, 14-5, and Wallenpaupack
downed Dickson City, 8-2, Tues-
day.
R.J. Gouldsbury had three
doubles to lead the Throop of-
fense.
Winning pitcher Brendan Ku-
charski had a triple. J.J. Glinsky
had three hits and Colin Hazel-
ton had two while Shane Rosen-
crans tripled and Matt Donaghy
and Joe Chylak each doubled.
Matt Vaughn and Colin Reap
had two hits each for Green
Ridge.
MacBrennan Peet had three
hits andthree RBI while striking
out sixtohelpWallenpaupackto
its win.
Kenny Paltzer, who had two
hits, and Peet each had doubles.
Danny Hinton and John Zator
each doubled for Dickson City.
Earlier, Throop had defeated
Dickson City, 12-1, and Wallen-
paupack had ripped Green
Ridge, 12-0, in four innings.
Donaghy had three hits and
drove in five runs for Throop.
Gouldsbury threw a one-hit-
ter and also had three hits, in-
cluding a triple.
Hinton had Dickson Citys on-
ly hit.
Peet went 2-for-3 and Paltzer
drove in three runs.
Bob Olecki had the only hit
for Green Ridge.
SECTION 5 9-10 BASEBALL
Plains reached the final when
it improved to 2-0 in the four-
team tournament with an 11-6
victory over North Pocono
Wednesday night.
Tony Egidio went 2-for-4 with
three RBI in the win while P.J.
Wozniak had three hits, includ-
ing two doubles.
James Lampartner had a sin-
gle, triple and three RBI for
North Pocono.
Host North Pocono defeated
Back Mountain American, 7-3,
and Plains topped Wallenpau-
pack, 4-3, when the tournament
opened Tuesday night.
DISTRICT 17 9-10
BASEBALL
North Pocono defeated Con-
nell Park/ East Scranton, 12-5,
in the July 7 championship
game to finish the tournament
unbeaten.
STATE LITTLE LEAGUE
(11-12) SOFTBALL
North Pocono dropped all
three games in pool play at Ex-
ton and was eliminated Thurs-
day.
North Pocono fell to Lehigh,
9-1; Caln Township, 10-8; and
Drexel Hill, 5-4.
SECTION 5 LITTLE LEAGUE
(11-12) SOFTBALL
North Pocono defeated Carbi-
noClub, 13-2, inthe July 8cham-
pionship game.
SECTION 5 9-10 SOFTBALL
Winning pitcher Lauren Caw-
ley had three hits and three RBI
to lead Duryea/Pittston Town-
ship into the championship
game while eliminating North
Pocono, 7-6, Thursday.
Duryea/Pittston Township
scored five times in the bottom
of the sixth to rally for the win.
Earlier, Greater Wyoming Area
defeatedNorthPocono, 9-2, onits
way to the championship game.
JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA
Abington Nationals Joey Beyrent celebrates after scoring the winning run with Tucker Schimelfenig who drove in the winning runs.
LEAGUE
Continued from page 37
North Poconos Cory Wall looks to throwhome after tagging out Old Forges Pat Donovan at first base.
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011 PAGE 43
THE ARGYLE SWEATER
FAMILY CIRCUS
STONE SOUP
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
DRABBLE
CLASSIC PEANUTS
PAGE 44 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011
Open House Directory
Te Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS

, Inc.
612 N. Sumner Ave., Scranton
Nasser Real Estate
Dir: From Main Avenue in West Scranton turn onto Pet-
tibone Street and make a right on N. Sumner.
MLS#11-1805
12-2PM $138,000
417 Powell Ave., Clarks Summit
Nasser Real Estate
12-2PM $129,900
417 Lillibridge Street, Peckville
Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties
18 Collins Ave., Jefferson Twp.
Nasser Real Estate
Dir: From Main Street Peckville, left on Lillibridge home
on left. MLS#10-5922
Dir: From Rte 348, turn onto Cortez Rd, continue approx.
4 miles to right on Maplewood Drive, then left onto Col-
lins, properties on right (signs). MLS#11-2242
12-1:30PM 12:30-2PM $204,800 $125,000
509 Colfax Ave., Scranton
Prudential Preferred Properties
Dir: Up Mulberry St to Colfax (by CMC), take left, go 2
blocks, house on left. MLS#11-2818
1-2:30PM $129,900
105 Sturbridge Rd., Clarks Summit
Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties
12:30-2:30PM $300,000
110 Stanton L 7 Dr., Clarks Summit
Prudential Preferred Properties
125 Kimberly Cir., Clarks Summit
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate
Dir: From 6 & 11 Chinchilla, up Layton Road one mile,
right on Stanton Drive property on the right.
MLS#11-1644
Dir: Winola Road past Clarks Summit State hospital right
on Camelot, right on Kimberly, house is on left.
MLS11-1413
1-2:30PM 1-2:30PM $224,900 $299,000
923 Fairview St., Peckville
RE/MAX Home Team
Dir: From Peckville, rt 247 North, bear right on Gino
Merli Drive, right on Everson, 2nd left on Fairview.
MLS#11-2395
1-3PM $122,500
1105 Cedar Ave., Scranton
Prudential Preferred Properties
12-1PM $69,500
700 Morgan St., Dickson City
Prudential Preferred Properties
515 Leach St., South Abington
Prudential Preferred Properties
Dir: 1828 Prospect, South Scranton. MLS#11-2954
Dir: From Route 6 & 11 Chinchilla, Turn Up Shady Lane
Road, Just After Tunnel Left Turn On Bailey St., Stay To
Your Right Follow Bailey To The Top. Property At Top Of
Hill In Front Of You. MLS#11-2508
1-2:30PM 1-2:30PM $125,000 $184,900
500 Spring Run Ln., Madison Twp.
RE/MAX Home Team
Dir: I380S Moscow Exit 22 L on 690/Church St L 690/
Market St R on Brook St R on Haas Pond Rd L on Major
Rd to Spring Run lane, up hill on right. MLS#11-1919
1-4PM $239,900
104 Amity Avenue, Old Forge
Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties
1-2:30PM $229,000
81 Jones St., Spring Brook Twp
RE/MAX Home Team
2 Ale Lane, Tunkhannock
ERA Brady Associates
Dir: I380 Moscow Exit/Rt 690 to Left at Light on Rt 307
to a Right at Light at Rt 502. Follow Rt 502 to a right on
Laurel Road. Left on Jones to end of street. House on
left. MLS#11-2540
Dir: From Tunkhannock, Rt6W to Tyler Hospital, right to
Kim Dr, bear right to Grace Dr, 2nd right to Alfe Lane,
house on right with sign. MLS#11-2574
1-4PM 1-3PM $239,900 $239,900
SUNDAY, JULY 17
SUNDAY, JULY 24
Visit timesleader.com & Click Buy A Home to see the most up to date list of Open Houses
Dir: From Grove Street turn right on Miles to left on
Powell. Property on right. MLS#11-920
Dir: Thru CS on 6-11N, bear R. onto Oakford Rd; Right
onto Old Post Rd to end;Left onto Sturbridge to prop-
erty on the left. MLS#11-3214
Dir: One property off the corner of E Elm on Cedar in
South Scranton. MLS#11-1278
Dir: Main Street Old Forge to right on Vinet St. (Vine is
just past Powell) turn right on Church St. Take 3rd left
on Winter St. Take 3rd right on Amity Ave in Old Forge
Estates. MLS#11-3154
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011 PAGE 45
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classied ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classieds@golackawanna.com
golackawanna.com
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
JMA DEVELOPMENT, LLC, Plaintiff vs.
WILLIAM H. SURDIVAL, ELIZABETH SURDI-
VAL a/k/a ELIZABETH SURDOVEL, THE
ESTATE OF WILLIAM A. SURDOVEL,
GRACE E. SURDOVEL, MARY DONNA
NEWMAN, MICHAEL SURDOVEL, GRACE
SURDOVEL, MARGARET SURDOVEL, ALI-
CIA SURDOVEL and WILLIAM SURDOVEL,
Defendants
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the Defen-
dants and to their heirs, successors, per-
sonal representatives, assigns, creditors,
and all other persons claiming by, through,
from or under said Defendants or their
Estates, and all other persons having or
claiming an interest in the hereinafter
described property, that on December 16,
2010, JMA Development, LLC, com-
menced an action against you filed to No.
8964-2010 in the Court of Common Pleas
of Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania,
which you are required to defend, to
QUIET TITLE to lands described as follows:
PIN: 04509-030-011
Loc: 4 Hart Place, Carbondale, Lack-
awanna County, Pennsylvania
NOTICE
If you wish to defend, you must enter a
written appearance personally or by attor-
ney and file your defenses or objections in
writing with the court. You are warned
that if you fail to do so the case may pro-
ceed without you and a judgment may be
entered against you without further notice
for the relief requested by the plaintiff. You
may lose money or property or other
rights important to you.
YOU SHOULD TAKE THIS PAPER TO YOUR
LAWYER AT ONCE. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE
A LAWYER, GO TO OR TELEPHONE THE
OFFICE SET FORTH BELOW. THIS OFFICE
CAN PROVIDE YOU WITH INFORMATION
ABOUT HIRING A LAWYER.
IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO HIRE A
LAWYER, THIS OFFICE MAY BE ABLE TO
PROVIDE YOU WITH INFORMATION
ABOUT AGENCIES THAT MAY OFFER
LEGAL SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE PERSONS
AT A REDUCED FEE OR NO FEE.
Northern Pennsylvania Legal
Services, Inc.
108 N. Washington Ave. 12th Floor
Scranton, PA 18503
570-342-0184
Lawyer Referral Service
Lackawanna County Bar
Association
338 N. Washington Ave.
Scranton, PA 18503
570-969-9161
ARMAND E. OLIVETTI, JR., ESQ.
OLIVETTI LAW FIRM, LLC
426 Mulberry St. Suite 104
Scranton, PA 18503
(570) 207-5000
LEGAL NOTICE
TKO Realty, LLC, Plaintiff vs. Carol Bryer,
Defendant
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the Defen-
dant and to her heirs, successors, person-
al representatives, assigns, creditors, and
all other persons claiming by, through,
from or under said Carol Bryer, Deceased,
and all other persons having or claiming an
interest in the hereinafter described prop-
erty, that on April 8, 2011, TKO Realty, LLC,
commenced an action against you filed to
No. 2268-2011 in the Court of Common
Pleas of Lackawanna County, Pennsylva-
nia, which you are required to defend, to
QUIET TITLE to lands described as follows:
PIN: 13101-010-003
Loc: Church Hill Rd, Newton Twp, Lack-
awanna County, Pennsylvania
Being the same premises conveyed to
Carol Bryer, Widow, by Michael Leondi and
Eleanor Leondi, his wife, by deed dated
October 11, 1991.
NOTICE
If you wish to defend, you must enter a
written appearance personally or by attor-
ney and file your defenses or objections in
writing with the court. You are warned
that if you fail to do so the case may pro-
ceed without you and a judgment may be
entered against you without further notice
for the relief requested by the plaintiff. You
may lose money or property or other
rights important to you.
YOU SHOULD TAKE THIS PAPER TO YOUR
LAWYER AT ONCE. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE
A LAWYER, GO TO OR TELEPHONE THE
OFFICE SET FORTH BELOW. THIS OFFICE
CAN PROVIDE YOU WITH INFORMATION
ABOUT HIRING A LAWYER.
IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO HIRE A
LAWYER, THIS OFFICE MAY BE ABLE TO
PROVIDE YOU WITH INFORMATION
ABOUT AGENCIES THAT MAY OFFER
LEGAL SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE PERSONS
AT A REDUCED FEE OR NO FEE.
Northern Pennsylvania Legal
Services, Inc.
108 N. Washington Ave., 12th Floor
Scranton, PA 18503
570-342-0184
Lawyer Referral Service
Lackawanna County Bar Association
338 N. Washington Ave.
Scranton, PA 18503
570-969-9161
ARMAND E. OLIVETTI, JR., ESQ.
OLIVETTI LAW FIRM, LLC
426 Mulberry St. Suite 104
Scranton, PA 18503
(570) 207-5000
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
FOUND: Black
Cocker Spaniel.
Red flea collar. No
tags. Found near
Hillside Ice Cream
on 7/11/11. Please
call (570) 779-5701
LOST LOST CA CAT T
Tan/gray Siamese.
Light blue eyes.
Answers to Stuart.
Area of S. Main,
Plains. Call 570-
466-7850 or
570-819-3185
leave message
120 Found
FOUND EYEGLASS-
ES: Pr escr i pt i on
glasses found on
Reynolds St in
Kingston. Call to
describe.
570-287-1780
RAT TERRIER
F O U N D : W e l l
Trained. White, with
black markings.
Pittston Area. Call
570-655-8071
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
ADOPT
Loving family offers
your precious child
a life time of love
and happiness.
1-888-600-6341
ADOPT: A t r ul y
happy, devoted,
married couple will
give your newborn
endless love,
warmth & a bright
future. Expenses
paid. Call
Christine & John
1-855-320-3840
ADORING FAMILY OF 3
hoping to become 4
promises your new-
born a bright,
secure future filled
with endless love.
Denise & Tony
1-888-515-9347
150 Special Notices
ADOPT: Adoring
Mom, Dad, Big
Brother would like
to share a lifetime
of hugs & kisses
in our loving home
with a newborn.
Please Call
Lynda & Dennis
888-688-1422
Expenses Paid
Adoption Adoption is a
choice youve
made out of
love. We dream
of giving your
newborn a safe,
secure lifetime
of love. Expens-
es paid. Please
call Theresa &
Steve @ 1-877-
801-7256 or visit
The r e s a AndSt e v e
. s hut t e r f l y. c om
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
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new apartment?
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you compare costs -
without hassle
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FREE CONSULTATION
for all legal matters
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
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on an automobile?
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Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD 02
FOCUS ZTS
2 door.
Hatchback.
Emerald green.
New inspection.
$4,495
To place your
ad call...829-7130
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $12,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `03 325 XI
Low mileage,
57,000 miles, auto-
matic, all-wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
power seats,
cruise control, CD
player, keyless
entry, leather inte-
rior, moon roof,
rear defroster.
$11,500
(570) 239-6752
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $20,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
BMW `99 M3
Convertible with
Hard Top. AM/FM. 6
disc CD. 117 K miles.
Stage 2 Dinan sus-
pension. Cross
drilled rotors. Cold
air intake. All main-
tenance records
available. $16,695
570-466-2630
412 Autos for Sale
CADILLAC `02 DEVILLE
84K miles. Charcoal
with tan leather
interior. Recent
head gaskets &
water pump. Drives
great. $3,750. Call
570-417-5979
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
412 Autos for Sale
CADILLAC 06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,000
570-881-2775
412 Autos for Sale
CHRYSLER `05
SEBRING LX
Low mileage, blue,
2 door, automatic.
Excellent condition
$7,000
(570) 740-7446
To place your
ad call...829-7130
412 Autos for Sale
CHRYSLER 06
300C HEMI
Light green, 18,000
miles, loaded,
leather, wood trim,
$24,000.
570-222-4960
leave message
To place your
ad call...829-7130
PAGE 46 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
BUYING JUNK VEHICLES
$300 and Up
$125 extra if driven,
pulled or pushed in.
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-pm
Happy Trails!
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
FORD SALEEN 04
281 SC Coupe
1,000 miles
document. #380
Highly collectable.
$28,500
570-472-1854
LINCOLN `88
TOWN CAR
61,000 original
miles, garage kept,
triple black, leather
interior, carriage
roof, factory wire
wheels, loaded,
excellent condition.
$5,500. Call
Mike 570-237-7660
MERCEDES BENZ
`74 450 SE
SOLID CAR!
Interior perfect,
exterior very good.
Runs great! New
tires, 68K original
miles.
$5,500 FIRM.
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $31,000. Call
825-6272
OLDSMOBILE `68
DELMONT
DRASTICALLY
REDUCED!!
This model only
produced in 1967
& 1968. All
original 45,000
miles, Color
Burgundy, cloth
& vinyl interior,
350 rocket
engine, 2nd
owner. Fender
skirts, always
garaged. Trophy
winner at shows.
Serious inquiries
only, $7,500.
570-690-0727
421 Boats &
Marinas
CUSTOM
CREST 15
Fiberglass
boat with
trailer. Out-
board propul-
sion. Includes:
2 motors
Erinmade,
Lark II series
PRICE
REDUCED!
$2,400
NEGOTI ABLE
570-417-3940
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424 Boat Parts/
Supplies
LADDER Folding
boat ladder, three
steps, in excellent
condition, $10 Call
570-328-5611 or
570-328-5506
RIGGERS: 2 can-
non uni troll down
riggers - swivel
bases & weights
avail. - $250.
FISH FINDER -
hummingbird wide
100. $40 firm.
GAS TANK:
3 gallon quicksilver
plastic gas tank with
fuel line $20.
570-262.0716
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
FORD 99 E350
BUCKET VAN
Triton V8. 2 speed
boom; 92,000miles;
$9999 or best price.
Great condition. Call
570-675-3384 or
570574-7002
439 Motorcycles
BMW 07 K1200 GT
Low mileage. Many
extras. Clean.
$9,500
(570) 646-2645
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$18,000. OBO
570-706-6156
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON `07
Road King Classic
FLHRC. Burgundy /
Cream. Driver &
Passenger back
rest, grips, battery
tender, cover. Willie
G accessories. 19k
miles. $14,400 or
best offer. Call
262-993-4228
HARLEY DAVIDSON 80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$8,500
570-905-9348
Kawasaki` 93
ZX11D NINJA
LIKE NEW
8900 Original
miles. Original
owner. V@H
Exhaust and Com-
puter. New tires.
$4,100.
570-574-3584
Q-LINK LEGACY `09
250 automatic. Gun
metal gray. MP3
player. $3,000.
Great first motorcy-
cle. 570-696-1156
YAMAHA `04 V-STAR
1100 Custom. 5800
miles, light bar,
cobra exhaust,
windshield, many
extras, must sell.
$4,900. Call
570-301-3433
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI `07 C50T
CRUISER
EXCELLENT
CONDITION
Windshield, Bags,
Floorboards,V&H
Pipes, White
walls,Garage Kept.
6K Miles $5,200
(570) 430-0357
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT
TRAILER
Brand new 2010
tandem axle, 4
wheel electric
brakes, 20 long
total, 7 x 16 wood
deck, fold up ramps
with knees, remov-
able fenders for
oversized loads,
powder coat paint
for rust protection,
2 5/16 hitch
coupler, tongue
jack, side pockets,
brake away switch,
battery, 7 pole
RV plugs, title &
more!! Priced for
quick sale. $2,995
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels,
water purifier,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
raised panel fridge
& many acces-
sories & options.
Excellent condition,
$22,500.
570-868-6986
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras, includ-
ing hitch equipment
and sway bars.
Reduced. $12,500.
Call 570-842-6735
SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
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new apartment?
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TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft
Rear queen master
bedroom, Walk
thru bathroom.
Center kitchen +
dinette bed. Front
extra large living
room + sofa bed.
Big View windows.
Air, awning, sleeps
6, very clean, will
deliver. Located in
Benton, Pa. $4,900.
215-694-7497
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS CX
HARD TO FIND!!
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
20,000 miles.
Small 6 cylinder.
New tires. Like
new, inside &
out. $14,900. Call
(570) 540-0975
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVR0LET`02
EXPRESS
CONVERSION
VAN
Loaded. Low
miles. Excellent
condition.
$18,900
570-674-3901
CHEVROLET `09
EQUINOX LS
Low mileage,
16,000 miles, auto-
matic, all-wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
Sirius radio, On-Star,
cassette player, CD
player, keyless
entry, rear de-
froster, rear wind-
shield wiper, tinted
windows.
REDUCED PRICE
$16,500.
(570) 954-9333
Call after 9:00 a.m.
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 00 ASTRO
CARGO VAN
Automatic, V6
1 owner
Clean Work Van!
$3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 05 BLAZER
2 Door. Auto. V-6.
CD. Extra Sharp.
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
DODGE 06 DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT 4X4
Automatic, CD
Tool Box
Like New!
$8,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD `04 FREESTAR
Limited. Leather. 7
passenger.Remote
doors. DVD player,
premium sound.
Rear A/C. 57,800
miles. $8,995. Call
570-947-0771
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 97 F-150 4X4
Automatic,
4.2L V6, AC
Economical
Work Truck!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD `03
EXPLORER
Low mileage,
63,500 miles,
automatic, all-wheel
drive, 4 door,
anti-lock brakes,
air conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
power seats, all
power, cruise
control, AM/FM
radio, CD changer,
keyless entry,
leather interior, sun/
moon roof, rear
defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
tinted windows.
$12,500.
(570) 362-0938
FORD `04 FREESTAR
Automatic, front
wheel drive, 4 door,
anti-lock brakes, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
power seats, cruise
control, AM/FM
radio, CD player,
rear defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
tinted windows,
new starter, just
inspected, $3,900.
570-594-4992.
Call after 4:30 p.m.
FORD `99 E250
Wheelchair Van
78,250 miles. Fully
serviced, new bat-
tery, tires & rods.
Seats 6 or 3 wheel-
chairs. Braun Millen-
nium lift with
remote. Walk up
door. Front & rear
A/C. Power locks &
windows. Excellent
condition. $7,500.
570-237-6375
TRUCKS FOR SALE
Ford, GMC,
International-Prices
starting at $2,295.
Box Truck, Cab &
Chassis available.
Call U-haul
570-822-5536
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD `06
EXPLORER
78,400 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
power seats,
cruise control, AM/
FM radio, CD
changer, DVD play-
er, keyless entry,
leather interior,
moon roof, rear
defroster, rear
windshield wiper.
$16,000
(570) 954-5462
Call after 9 a.m.
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GMC `99
SUBURBAN
Champagne
exterior,
leather interior,
power windows
& locks, 4 wheel
drive. $3,685.
Call
570-362-4080
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
GMC `99 TRUCK
SLE PACKAGE
2 wheel drive
84,000
original
miles
$5,900.
or best offer
570-
824-3096
INTERNATIONAL 95
DUMP TRUCK
Refurbished, rebuilt
engine, transmis-
sion replaced.
Rear-end removed
and relubed. Brand
new 10 dump. PA
state inspected.
$12,900/best offer.
570-594-1496
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
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new apartment?
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HYUNDAI `05
TUCSON
61,000 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, cruise
control, AM/FM
radio, cassette play-
er, CD player, key-
less entry, sun/
moon roof, rear
defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
new towing pack-
age, auto start.
$10,000
(570) 762-4543
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 99
GRAND CHEROKEE
6 cylinder,
automatic,
sunroof, CD
Excellent runner!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
JEEP `02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Triple black, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder.
4x4 select drive.
CD, remote door
opener, power win-
dows & locks,
cruise, tilt wheel.
108k highway miles.
Garage kept. Super
clean inside and out.
No rust. Sale price
$6,895. Scranton.
570-466-2771
NISSAN `03 XTERRA
Black with grey inte-
rior. 196k highway
miles. 4x4. Power
windows & locks.
New tires, brakes,
rotors. Great condi-
tion. $4,850. Call
570-574-7140
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011 PAGE 47
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
1954 MERCURY
MONTEREY
WOODY WAGON
100 point restora-
tion. $130,000
invested. 6.0
Vortec engine.
300 miles on
restoration. Cus-
tom paint by
Foose Automo-
tive. Power win-
dows, a/c, and
much more!
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$75,000
$71,000
$69,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
CHEVROLET 06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,300
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET `00
CORVETTE
V-8. 5.7 liter.
345 Horse Power.
Automatic.
56,000 miles.
Pewter metallic.
Hatch Back.
Glass top.
Air conditioning.
Leather interior.
Power seat,
locks & windows.
Bose AM/FM
stereo.
Cassette/CD Player.
Very good to excel-
lent condition.
$19,700
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
(570) 696-0424
CHEVY `05 EQUINOX
LT (premium pack-
age), 3.4L, 47,000
miles. All wheel
drive, power moon-
roof, windows, locks
& seats. Leather
interior, 6 cd chang-
er, rear folding
seats, keyless entry,
onstar, roof rack,
running boards,
garage kept.
$13,750.
570-362-1910
10 DODGE
CARAVAN SXT
32K, Power sliding
doors, Factory
warranty!
$18,399
09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$13,899
08 HONDA
RIDGELINE RTL
32K, Factory
Warranty, Leather
Sunroof
$24,399
08 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
34K, Red
$16,399
08 CHEVY
IMAPALA LS
4 door, only 37K! 5
Year / 100K
Factory Warranty!
$13,599
07 CHEVY IMPALA
LS
4 door, only 45k / 5
Year 100K Factory
Warranty!
$11,499
01 LINCOLN
TOWN CAR,
Executive, 74K
$6,899
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W W E E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
412 Autos for Sale
FORD 02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $18,500
570-760-5833
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI 03
ELANTRA
4 cylinder,
automatic, cd,
1 owner.
Economy Car!
$3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
412 Autos for Sale
HYUNDAI `04
TIBURON GT
Blue, 5 speed
manual, CD, Air,
factory alarm,
power windows &
locks. 38K.
$7,500 negotiable.
Call 570-540-6236
LEXUS `08 IS 250
AWD Sedan. 17,200
miles. No accidents.
Perfect condition.
Black with leather.
V6 Automatic.
Moonroof. 27 MPG.
Never seen snow.
$26,800
(570) 814-1436
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
$9,000 or best
offer. 570-706-6156
412 Autos for Sale
LEXUS `08 IS 250
AWD Sedan. 17,200
miles. No accidents.
Perfect condition.
Black with leather.
V6 Automatic.
Moonroof. 27 MPG.
Never seen snow.
$26,800
(570) 814-1436
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MAZDA 2 `11
Low mileage, 197
miles. Selling due to
death in family. Lime
green. Loaded.
$15,500. Call
570-788-4354
MERCEDES-BENZ
`02 SLK-320
Red with black
interior, hardtop/
convertible.
REAL SHARP!
Accepting Offers
(570) 740-8900
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition, No
Accidents. Classy
Car. Price
Reduced!
$13,995
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
412 Autos for Sale
MINI COOPER`08
CLUBMAN S
Sparkling silver
metallic. Roof and
mirror caps in black.
Black leather interi-
or. Automatic step-
tronic paddles. Dual
moon roof. Cold
weather package.
Dynamic stability
control. Excellent
Condition. 33,600
miles. Just Ser-
viced. 30 MPG City.
Factory warranty to
50K miles. $20,995
(570) 472-9909
(570) 237-1062
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412 Autos for Sale
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
PONTIAC 03 VIBE GT
4 cylinder,
6-speed, cd,
sunroof, 1 owner.
Sharp Sharp Car!
$5,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
PONTIAC 69 FIREBIRD 400
CONVERTIBLE
Blue/white top &
white interior.
Recent document-
ed frame-off
restoration. Over
$31,000 invested.
will sell $21,500.
570-335-3127
VOLVO `01 XC70
All wheel drive,
46,000 miles, bur-
gundy with tan
leather, complete
dealer service histo-
ry, 1 owner, detailed,
garage kept, estate.
$9,100.
570-840-3981
412 Autos for Sale
PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER
S
Great convertible,
black top, 6 speed
manual transmis-
sion, carbon fiber
dash, leather interi-
or, front & rear
trunk, fast & agile.
$18,000 or best
offer. Call
570-262-2478
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new apartment?
Classified lets
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412 Autos for Sale
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
SATURN 05 ION
4 cylinder,
automatic, cd,
1 owner.
Extra Clean!
$3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
To place your
ad call...829-7130
VOLKSWAGEN `04
BEETLE
CONVERTIBLE
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Reduced
$14,000
570-822-1976
Leave Message
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `80
COUPE DEVILLE
Excellent condition,
$3,000 located in
Hazleton.
570-454-1945 or
561-573-4114
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
Very Good
Condition!
Low miles!
$7500. FIRM
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
CHEVROLET `81
CORVETTE
Very good condi-
tion. 350 engine,
classic silver with
black bottom trim,
all original, regis-
tered as an antique
vehicle, removable
mirror tops. 66,000
miles, chrome
wheels & tires in
very good shape,
leather interior,
garage kept. Must
see to appreciate.
Asking $9,000 or
willing to trade for a
newer Pontoon
boat.
Call 570-545-6057
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
STUDEBAKER 31
Rumble seat,
Coupe
Good condition.
Call for details
(570) 881-7545
To place your
ad call...829-7130
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
1949 DESOTO CUTOM
4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In its
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
shes beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
penntech84th@
gmail.com
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FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
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PAGE 48 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
545 Marketing/
Product
545 Marketing/
Product
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
Mericle Construction, Inc. is seeking experi-
enced drivers, skilled laborers & heavy equip-
ment operators for full time, local, year-round
work with full benefits. Only skilled, depend-
able professionals need apply.
Experienced on-road/off-road truck drivers
must possess current CDL-A license. Tri-
axle, dump trailer or low-boy experience help-
ful. Also seeking experienced fuel oil delivery
truck driver with CDL-B with Tanker & Hazmat
endorsements to deliver fuel to construction
sites within the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton/Hazle-
ton areas. Any dozer, excavator or grader
operators should have 5 years experience in
commercial excavation.
EXCAVATION
POSITIONS
Submit resume to:
Mericle Construction, Inc.
100 Baltimore Dr., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
or via Email: hr@mericle.com or
download application at www.mericle.com
SOCIAL MEDIA SPECIALIST
AD AGENCY - FULL TIME
Top integrated advertising agency in North-
eastern PA is seeking a Social Media Special-
ist. Our ideal candidate has current social
media experience and a strong understanding
of the strategies and related planning tactics
necessary for harnessing a multitude of new
media options and putting them to work for
our clients.
Can you build a Facebook page that will max-
imize our Likers, drive Comments and
produce Leads for our clients? Do you have
an entrepreneurial spirit and a strong inde-
pendent work ethic? If the answer is yes,
please consider joining our team! Multi-task-
ing skills are a must with the ability to devel-
op new client strategies and monitor existing
clients on a daily basis. The ability to develop
results-driven content for Facebook, Twitter,
YouTube and Yelp that will increase client vis-
ibility is a must.
Additional position requirements:
Advertising agency experience a plus.
Familiarity with syndicated research and
social media monitoring tools to measure
results and outcomes of efforts.
Client communication, strong analytical
and presentation skills.
Ability to supervise the social media team.
Bachelor's degree in advertising, marketing,
communications, or equivalent, relevant
experience
The Social Media Specialist reports to the VP
of Marketing and is also responsible for assist-
ing in the development and execution of the
agencys social media and online community
strategies.
Qualified candidates need only apply.
Forward resume with cover letter to
prminc14@aol.com.
Alzheimers Association-
Greater Pennsylvania Chapter
Family Services Coordinator,
Northeast Regional Office,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
Seeking a professional with two or more years
experience in the human service field, prefer-
ably with the aging population. Primary
responsibilities include coordination of
regional support groups, care consultation
with families and presentations of educational
programs within the community. Knowledge
of dementia and healthcare delivery systems
and issues such as: Medicare, Medicaid, man-
aged care, HMOs ect. A Bachelors degree
with experience in social work, gerontology or
related field is required. Position involves
travel throughout service area. Interested can-
didates should forward a cover letter with
salary requirements & resume to Alzheimers
Association Greater Pennsylvania Chapter,
3544 North Progress Avenue, Suite 204, Har-
risburg, PA17110, Attn: Erica Hood or e-mail
to Erica.Hood@alz.org No phone calls. EOE
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
MAZDA 04
TRIBUTE LX
Automatic, V6
Sunroof, CD
1 owner
Extra Clean!
$5,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
MERCURY `07
MARINER
One owner. garage
kept. Showroom
condition fully
loaded, every
option 34,000 mi.
$16,500
(570)825-5847
MITSUBISHI `95
MONTERO SR 4WD
177,102 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
seats, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
changer, leather
interior, sun roof,
rear defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
new Passed inspec-
tion, new battery.
$2,500
(570) 868-1100
Call after 2:00 p.m.
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
TRACTOR
TRAILERS
FREIGHTLINER
97 MIDROOF
475 CAT & 10
speed transmission.
$12,000
FREIGHTLINER
99 CONDO
430 Detroit, Super
10 transmission.
Asking $15,000.
88 FRUEHAUF 45
with sides. All
aluminum, spread
axle. $6,500.
2 storage trailers.
570-814-4790
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
462 Auto
Accessories
AUTOMOTIVE 12 volt
back up camera kit
$40. 12 volt blue
tooth $40. 12 volt
travel refrigerator
holds 6 six packs
$35. 570-675-7024
TRUCK CAP for
small pickup truck,
excellent condition.
$275.570-760-4830
468 Auto Parts
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
503 Accounting/
Finance
ACCOUNTING CLERK
A local business has
an opening for an
Accounting Clerk.
Duties include
AP/AR, data entry,
filing, operating
office equipment
such as copier and
fax machines, sort-
ing and distributing
mail as well as other
duties as assigned..
Successful candi-
date will be profi-
cient in basic word
processing, spread-
sheet and database
programs and have
strong interpersonal
skills.
We are an equal
opportunity employ-
er who provides a
competitive salary
and benefit package
which includes
healthcare benefits,
401(k) as well as
paid vacation/holi-
days.
All qualified individu-
als are asked to
forward their
resumes to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 2635
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
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506 Administrative/
Clerical
FILE CLERK
A local company
has an opening for a
File Clerk at our
Wilkes-Barre loca-
tion. Duties include
filing documents,
data entry, operat-
ing office equipment
and distributing
mail. Additional
duties include cov-
ering the switch-
board and other
duties as assigned.
Successful candi-
date will be profi-
cient in basic word
processing, spread-
sheet and database
programs and have
strong interpersonal
skills.
We are an equal
opportunity employ-
er who provides a
competitive salary
and benefit package
which includes
healthcare benefits,
401(k) as well as
paid vacation/holi-
days.
All qualified individu-
als are asked to
forward their
resumes to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 2630
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
507 Banking/Real
Estate/Mortgage
Professionals
RENTAL MANAGER
Vacation rental dept
manager, PA real
estate license
required. Salaried
position plus bonus.
Benefits. Call
Pocono Resorts
Realty
800-444-3721 x 11
or send resume to
beckyacct@prr1.com
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CABINET
MAKERS
NEEDED
An architectural
woodworking
company
located in
Kingston, PA
is looking for
experienced
custom
woodworker
and shipping &
receiving person
Great pay and
benefits.
Only solid,
mature, and
positive people
should apply.
Call:
570-283-5934
or email:
agata@
4daughters.net
CARPENTERS
NEEDED
Call 570-654-5775
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
GAS DRILL SITE
APPARATUS/
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
Immediate Opening
24 Hour Operation
located on gas
drilling sites is seek-
ing a qualified indi-
vidual to operate
excavator and
maintain a piece of
machinery. Individ-
ual must be willing
to work outside for
all day & night shifts,
as well as weekend.
Valid drivers license
required.
Contact Brian @
Harvis Interview
Service for
application or Qs
570-542-5330 or
susquehanna.harvis
@gmail.com. E.O.E.
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518 Customer
Support/Client Care
CUSTOMER SERVICE/
INSIDE SALES
Full-Time. Growing
Medical Equipment
Sales & Svc. com-
pany.Greater W-B
Area. Responsibili-
ties include: Clerical
Duties, Customer
Svc. & Inside Sales.
Must be detail ori-
ented and possess
strong computer
(MS Office) & phone
skills. Competitive
Salary and Benefits.
Send resume to:
c/o Times Leader
Box 2645
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
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521 Editorial/
Writing
FREELANCE SPORTS /
NEWS
CORRESPONDENTS
Abington Journal
Clarks Summit
The Abington
Journal has
immediate open-
ings for freelance
writers/news and
sports correspon-
dents to attend
and report on
local meetings
and sports events
in the newspaper
coverage area.
Gain clips and
valuable experi-
ence for your
future in journal-
ism or writing.
Report and write
byline stories con-
cerning sports,
local government,
school board and
other public
meetings. Pay
commensur at e
with experience.
Writing experi-
ence preferred.
Please send
resume and
writing samples
to:
The Abington
Journal
Attention:
Kristie Grier
Ceruti, Editor
211 South State St
Clarks Summit
PA 18411
Email: kgrier@
theabington
journal. com
Fax:
570-586-3980
No phone calls
please.
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522 Education/
Training
EDUCATION
CKLC IS HIRING! CKLC IS HIRING!
Full & Part Time
Positions.
Call for details.
570-824-7635
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533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AUTO COLLISION SHOP
Now taking
applications for an
Auto Body Painter.
Set up and painting.
Must have valid PA
license & minimum
of 3-5 years
experience. Call for
appointment.
823-2211; 8:30a-5p,
Monday-Friday.
EXPERIENCED GARAGE
DOOR INSTALLER
Growing local com-
pany needs polite,
honest, customer &
quality oriented,
self-motivated team
player. Full Time
Crew Leader posi-
tion with benefits &
salary based on
your experience.
Contact
Rowe Door Sales @
570-655-7701
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN
2nd shift opening
for experienced
maintenance tech
with strong
mechanical skills
set to troubleshoot,
repair and maintain
factory production
equipment.
*Also available
Maintenance
Apprentice position
Send resume to:
Kappa Graphics,
50 Rock Street,
Pittston, PA 18640.
Fax: 570-655-8379
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011 PAGE 49
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Automation/Controls Technician
Advanced Automated Controls, Inc., a leader in the industrial automa-
tion industry, has openings for Electrical Controls System Technicians.
One (1) full time & one (1) part time position will be available and will
be offered out of our Greater Scranton Corporate Office. Applicants
will work closely with project leaders and managers and be responsi-
ble for the programming, installation, and commissioning of electrical
controls and automation systems in the manufacturing industry.
The position will include off-site development and engineering assis-
tance at our Greater Scranton Facility and on-site installation services
at our customer facilities throughout Eastern PA.
Applicants must possess a basic knowledge of Variable Frequency
Drives, HMIs and PLCs. SCADA system knowledge is a plus.
Responsibilities Include:
Interfacing with customers and AAC project managers to assure
successful development and implementation of projects.
Capability of editing ACAD drawing utilized in the project design
phase.
Development and modifications to new and existing control
systems programs utilizing PLC, HMI, & Drive Systems software.
Field installation and design modifications of control systems.
The individual must also possess strong communication skills and
work well with others in a team environment. We offer competitive
benefits including Blue Cross/Blue Shield, dental, vision, 401K, and
vehicle reimbursement.
AAC, Inc. is entering its 13th year of operation and has grown signif-
icantly on a consistent basis as our reputation for supplying high qual-
ity automation solutions to the manufacturing industry has made us a
leader in the industry. Interested candidates should submit their resume
and compensation requirements to info@aac247.com.
Visit us on the web www.AAC247.com
Inside Claims Adjusters
GWC Warranty, a national vehicle contract
service provider located in Wilkes-Barre, is
looking for an Inside Claims Adjuster. Qual-
ified candidates must possess knowledge
of the automotive repair industry, excel-
lent communication and negotiation skills,
and demonstrated ability to set priorities.
The Company offers a competitive starting
salary and benefits package including
medical benefits and 401(k).
Interested applicants should send
their resume, along with references
to careers@gwcwarranty.com
or fax to 570-456-0967.
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
MAJOR APPLIANCE
REPAIR PERSON
Subcontractor. Must
have experience.
Neat in appearance.
Call 570-287-9631
Ask for Nancy or Pat
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533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
MECHANICS
Mavis Discount Tire/
Cole Muffler is
actively hiring expe-
rienced A or B level
Mechanics. Must be
PA certified inspec-
tor, have own tools
and be experienced
in brakes, suspen-
sion, front-end work
and alignments.
Call 914-804-4444
or e-mail resume to
cdillon@
mavistire.com
To place your
ad call...829-7130
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
SERVICE MANAGER
Opening for Experi-
enced Service Man-
ager- 2nd shift. We
Offer Top Wages &
Benefits Package.
Call For Interview
and Ask for Jon:
Falzone Towing
Service, Inc.
271 N. Sherman St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
570-823-2100
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TRUCK MECHANIC
Opening for Experi-
enced Full time Truck
Mechanic. Must
Have Own Tools/PA
Class 8 Inspection
License a Plus. We
Offer Top Wages &
Benefits Package.
Call For Interview
and Ask for Jon:
Falzone Towing
Service, Inc.
271 N. Sherman St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
570-823-2100
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
TANKER
DRIVERS
Full-time and part-
time positions
open for CDL driv-
ers with a mini-
mum of 3 years
driving experience
and have tanker
endorsement.
Must be depend-
able, motivated,
hard working, and
have a clean driv-
ing record. Full
time position
requires night and
day shift, 7 days a
week, up to 70
hour. Benefits
available after 90
days.
TRUCK
TECHNICIAN
Full time Descrip-
tion: inspect, diag-
nose, adjust,
repair, and main-
tain heavy equip-
ment and trans-
portation vehicles
including cars;
light, medium and
heavy truck. This
position will func-
tion under indirect
supervision from
the Shop Superin-
tendent or Shop
Leader.
Please call 570-
836-3933 for
more information.
539 Legal
LEGAL SECRETARY/
RECEPTIONIST
Full time position.
Must have legal
experience and be
able to use a dicta-
phone. Salary &
benefits commen-
surate with experi-
ence.
Send resume to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 2650
15 North Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
542 Logistics/
Transportation
CDL CLASS B DRIVER/
LABORER
For commercial rear
load route. Experi-
ence preferred, but
will train the right
person. Paid BC/BS
and Dental insur-
ance. Paid Holidays.
EOE. Pre-employ-
ment drug screen.
Ellsworth Disposal
Inc. 570-693-1514
548 Medical/Health
CNAS
Full Time 3-11
CNAS & NURSES
Per Diem All Shifts
Competitive Salary
& Benefits Package
Golden Living
Center Summit
50 N. Pennsylvania
Avenue
Fax 570-825-9423
or pamela.smith2@
goldenliving.com
EOE M/F/D/V
548 Medical/Health
DENTAL HYGIENIST
Full time position.
No nights or
weekends.
Call 570-822-3040
DIRECT CARE WORKER
Allied Services In-
Home Services Divi-
sion has part-time
day shift hours
available in Luzerne
County. Minimum of
one (1) year home-
care experience
required.
If interested, please
apply online at:
www.allied-
services.org
or call Trish Tully at
(570) 348-2237.
Allied Services is an
Equal Opportunity
Employer.
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LPNS, RNS & CNAS
3-11/11-7 shifts
Call Bonham
Nursing & Rehab
Center 864-3174
Ask for
Linda or Lynette
MEDICAL SECRETARY
Cardiology back-
ground a plus. Front
desk duties includ-
ing typing reports.
Monday-Friday
7:30am to3:30pm
Send resume to:
Mary King, Manager
Cardiovascular
Diagnostic Center
1099 S. Township
Blvd., Pittston. PA
18640
548 Medical/Health
SERVICE REP
Lincare, leading
national respiratory
company seeks car-
ing Service Rep.
Service patients in
their home for oxy-
gen and equipment
needs. Warm per-
sonalities, age 21+,
who can lift up to
120 lbs should apply.
CDL with DOT a plus
or obtainable.
Growth opportuni-
ties are excellent.
Stop by our office to
fill out application:
Lincare, Inc.
1574 Highway 315
Plains Twp.PA 18702
Drug-free
workplace. EOE.
551 Other
FOSTER PARENTS
needed! FCCY is
looking for people
to help meet the
growing demand
for foster homes.
Those interested in
becoming foster
parents call 1-800-
747-3807. EOE.
GOLF COURSE
LABORERS
SEASONAL POSITIONS
Golf course
experience
preferred. Apply in
person at the
Wyoming Valley CC
To place your
ad call...829-7130
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
BUSINESS OPENER
Responsible, reli-
able person to open
business. Part time.
Apply in person
8am-2pm
CONVENIENT
FOOD MART
610 Main St., Avoca
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
A
Better
Career
Starts
Here!
Your chance to build
your own business with
a JAN-PRO Cleaning
Systems franchise.
Extensive Training
Guaranteed
Customers
Guaranteed
Financing
No Selling Needed
Just $950 starts your
career, so call
570-824-5774 today!
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Landscaping
Business For Sale
Must have 5 years
experience in land-
scape design,
retaining walls and
all aspects of paver
work. Includes
dump truck, mini
excavator, 2 skid-
sters, trailer & 2
snow plows with a
great current snow
contract. Serious
inquiries only.
570-233-6880
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER:
Gibson 13,500 btu 3
years old 110v w-
remote $125.
570-901-1084
To place your
ad call...829-7130
AIR CONDITIONER:
Gibson Low profile
6000 BTU Quiet
operation energy
efficient. Excellent
condition $115.
570-261-5161
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
COINS. Washington
Quarters 1934-D,
1836-0, 1937-D,
1939-D, 1940-D,
$115. 570-287-4135
COLLECTORS ITEM
Newspaper copies
of the 1972 flood in
Wyoming Valley.
Hundreds of pic-
turesand stories.
Quite a few copies.
Sell all for $100. call
Jim 655 9474
DOLL HOUSE
1960S tin doll house
made by Superior
Toy Co. Very good
condition, has some
furniture &original
assembly instruc-
tions. $150. or best
offer. 570-239-6622
SWING. Wicker, 72
hanging on original
enclosed porch
circa 1940s. Un-
touched by modern
chemicals, waiting
to be restored. Ask-
ing $180 or best
offer. Call.
570-477-0899
TROLLEY: San Fran-
cisco music box
company collectible
trolley, retired
$40. Authentic traf-
fic signals $50.
570-760-4830
WATERFALL BED-
ROOM FURNITURE
consists of war-
drobe, dresser, van-
ity with seat & small
wooden bedroom
chair Circa 1920-
1940. $400, or best
offer. 570-239-6622
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PAGE 50 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
YEARBOOKS:
Coughlin H.S. 1926,
1928, 1932, 1934,
1943, 1944, 1946,
1949, 1951, 1952,
1953, 1954, 1955,
1961, 1963; GAR
H.S.: 1934, 1935,
1936, 1937, 1945,
1946, 1955, 1956,
1961, 1972, 1973,
1975, 1976, 1984,
1980, 2005, 2006;
Meyers H.S.: 1935,
1936, 1937, 1938,
1942, 1943, 1944,
1945, 1946, 1950,
1957, 1960, 1974,
1975, 1976, 1977;
Old Forge H.S.:
1966, 1972, 1974;
Kingston H.S.: 1938,
1939, 1940, 1941,
1942, 1943, 1944,
1945, 1948, 1949,
1962, 1964; Ply-
mouth H.S.: 1930,
1931, 1932, 1933,
1938, 1960; Han-
over H.S.: 1951,
1952, 1954; Berwick
H.S.: 1952, 1953,
1956, 1957, 1958,
1960, 1967, 1968,
1969; Lehman H.S.:
1973, 1974, 1976,
1978, 1980; Dallas
H.S.: 1966, 1967,
1968; Westmore-
land H.S.: 1952,
1953, 1954; Nanti-
coke Area H.S.:
1976, 2008; Luzerne
H.S.: 1951, 1952,
1956, 1957; West
Pittston H.S. Annual:
1925, 1926, 1927,
1928, 1931, 1932,
1959, 1960, 1954;
Bishop Hoban H.S.:
1972, 1973, 1974,
1975; West Side
Central Catholic
H.S. 1965, 1975,
1980, 1981, 1984;
Pittston H.S.: 1963;
Hazleton H.S.: 1938,
1939, 1940, 1941,
1942, 1943, 1945,
1948, 1949, 1950,
1953, 1954, 1955,
1956, 1957, 1959,
1960, 1961, 1962,
1964; Hazle Twp.
Senior H.S.: 1951,
1952. 570-825-4721
To place your
ad call...829-7130
710 Appliances
DRYER: electric, 6.0
G.E. white, 4 years
old, works great
needs a timer knob,
asking $60.
570-762-1015
GENES
RECONDITIONED
APPLIANCES
60 Day Warranty
Monday-Friday
8:00PM-5:00PM
Saturday
8:00AM-11:00AM
Gateway
Shopping Center
Kingston, PA
(570) 819-1966
GRILL electric
ceramic 12x12
nonstick. Smoke
free. New in box.
$15. 570-655-2154
MICROWAVE
$20.
570-474-5188
710 Appliances
MICROWAVE: GE, all
options, with
turntable, excellent
condition. $30.
570-675-4383
REFRIGERATOR
compact Magic
Chef, used only one
month, great for
dorm room, small
freezer, shelves,
small on door stor-
age, crisper, etc.
$100. 570-824-1062
REFRIGERATOR.
office sized black,
like new, $45.
DEHYDRATOR,
Ronco food, like
new, $40. MICRO-
WAVE Amana, $30
570-824-7807
REFRIGERATOR:
small cube, very
good condition,
brown $35.
570-675-4383
712 Baby Items
BASSINETT off white
fabric with small ani-
mals on it. Can be
used for boy or girl.
good condition $20.
570-793-5499
LITTLE TYKES
shopping cart $8.
Little Tykes pink &
white doll high chair
$8. Todays kids
childs desk $15.
Little Tykes blue &
white childs rocker
$20. Call after 2pm
570-283-2920
716 Building
Materials
BATHROOM SINK
SET: Gerber white
porcelain bathroom
sink with mirror and
medicine cabinet.
Matching set. $80.
570-331-8183
CONCRETE
PAVERS: Red/Grey
Most pavers are 6
1/8 x 6 1/8 x 2 1/2.
Approximate 225 sq
ft. Removed from
backyard patio for
pool. $375.
570-474-9766
KITCHEN CABINETS
& GRANITE
COUNTERTOPS
10 ft.x10 ft., 1 year
old, Maple kitchen.
Premium Quality
cabinets, under-
mount sink. Granite
tops. Total cost
over $12,000.
Asking $3,890
570-239-9840
LIGHTS 3 emer-
gency power failure
lights, 2 lights on
each unit, 3 for
$125. 570-636-3151
PORCH RAILING.
New, solid wrought
iron, two 10 long
plus 2 gates with
plates $175.
KITCHEN SINK
heavy duty, stain-
less, excellent con-
dition $45. 570-
822-1227 after 1pm
SCREEN aluminum,
large, full roll 28
wide, new $25. 48
wide aluminum
screen about 15 roll
$15. GE flood lights
150 watts, 120 volts
case of 12, new
$20. 570-779-9791
716 Building
Materials
SINK, new bath-
room sink & vanity
33 wide white
$125. New Ameri-
can standard toilet
complete white $75.
570-693-1678
STORM DOORS
Forever, white, 1 left
1 right hand, good
condition 36 wide,
all hardware includ-
ed.$80. 814-4315
VANITY. Bathroom.
24 medium oak.
Sink, brass faucet
and drain. $60. Like
new. 570-817-8981
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
MEMORIAL SHRINE
CEMETERY
6 Plots Available
May be Separated
Rose Lawn Section
$450 each
570-654-1596
726 Clothing
BATHING SUITS
girls 2 & 3 year old
$1. each. 474-5653
LEATHER JACKET:
(Wilsons) Small. $50
570-262-1615 or
570-215-0215
LOOKING TO GET RID
OF OLD HALLOWEEN
COSTUMES?
Your donations
will go to under
privileged children
to enjoy a
halloween party
and a fun night of
trick or treating!
Please help bring
a smile to a childs
face!!!
Call Megan
570-674-30012
to donate!
PURSE - Liz Clai-
borne, white, 13W
x 10H, 2 handles, 3
zipper compart-
ments, pocket on
side, retails at $67,
asking $20.
570-333-4325
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
COMPUTER Gate-
way desk top 512
ram win xp $125.
570-991-8962
SPEAKERS: Gate-
way computer
speakers they work
like there brand new
$50. 570-288-2224
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
OIL BOILER
runs great $100.
570-760-4830
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
FIREPLACE, corner,
electric, heater or
no heat $300. neg.
Brass fireplace
accessories $25.
570-675-7024
HEATER Timberline
vent-free propane
gas heater with fire-
log, wall-mounted,
in excellent condi-
tion. E-mail photo is
available, 15,000 to
25,000 BTUs (Sells
for $250) asking
$99. 570-328-5611
or 570-328-5506
HEATER. Corona
Kerosene Portable.
Excellent for
garage. $30.
570-824-7807
HEATERS (3) elec-
tric, Lasko 3 base-
board type, digital
control, hardly used
$35. each.
570-675-3328
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ANTIQUE Wardrobe
Cabinet 1950s vin-
tage, light wood
color cedar lined
good used condition
$100. call 655-3197
BED: girls twin bed
with lighted doll-
house bookcase
headboard, good
condition $100.
Couch & oversized
chair. Light brown/
grey microfiber.
good condition, no
rips or holes, from a
smoke free home-
$220. 868-5863
BEDROOM SET
8 piece Governors
solid oak bedroom
set by Kincaid,
queen poster bed,
6 triple dresser with
triple mirror, mens
armoire, 2 night
stands, 1 lingerie
chest, 1 set of
steps. Downsizing
wont fit. $1,950.
A MUST SEE!
570-706-5140
BEDROOM SET
Rustic, dark wood,
twin captains bed,
dresser with mirror,
chest of drawers,
desk with hutch &
chair, very good
condition $300.
neg. 570-868-6613
To place your
ad call 829 7130
BEDROOM SET. 9
piece ivory color
lacquer color wood.
modern. $700. call
for sizes & details.
570-288-9843
CHEST OF DRAW-
ERS, solid wood
$125. 675-3328
COFFEE TABLE oval
[1]. End tables oval
[2]. Maple finish six
months old $79
each. 825-8289
DESK OSullivan
Corner work center
pine 5.5x 5.5, like
new, (sells for $250)
asking $99. E-mail
photo available.
570-328-5611 or
570-328-5506
DESKS drop down
top 3 drawers,
pecan finish, $85.
Computer with pull-
out for keyboard,
shelf for tower $15.
570-287-2517
744 Furniture &
Accessories
DINING ROOM SET
excellent condition
$150. or best offer
570-299-1538
END TABLE cherry,
traditional Queen
Anne style, may
want to refinish $10
& dark pine wooden
chair $10. Good
condition. 675-1277
END TABLES, 2
wooden. $25.
NIGHTSTAND, $20.
TV STAND, $10.
CORNER SHELF &
BOOKCASE, $20.
570-883-0568
or 570-239-2699
FURNITURE: Match-
ing Desk & Dresser
$50; Antique
Armoire $100; Oak
End Tables $50;
Dresser with 6
drawers $20
570-262-1615 or
570-215-0215
FUTON, steel frame
complete with
cover, nice condi-
tion $60. 474-6947
KITCHEN SET
maple, 4 chairs
good condition $50.
570-829-2778
KITCHEN TABLE,
medium colored
wood, 30X45 $20.
570-814-9845.
KITCHEN TABLES:
medium colored oak
with leaf $50. Wal-
nut colored kitchen
table with leaf $75.
Light oak twin bed
complete $25.
CEDAR CHEST $25.
570-287-8107
LAMPS (2) grey
metal & black. $25
each. 570-740-1246
LIFT CHAIR, dark
mauve excellent
condition $125.
570-693-1678
To place your
ad call...829-7130
PATIO SET - 36 in.
diameter table and
4 chairs, wooden,
foldable. Like New.
$50. 570-824-0591
PATIO TABLE with 4
chairs/cushions, like
a bronze brownish
frame with a nice
glass top with a hint
of green to the tem-
pered glass. $165.
Cash or Paypal.
570-735-2661
SOFA 90 sage/
green/beige $150.
PATIO SET 4 chairs,
2 lounges, round
table, umbrella &
matching cushions
for all $150.
570-474-5188
WICKER SET, 4
piece white, asking
$85. KITCHEN DIN-
ING SET 5 piece
walnut, table 60
round, cast iron &
wood, chairs, paid
$600. asking $200.
Both good condition
and you must see!
570-822-1094
744 Furniture &
Accessories
SUNROOM FUR-
NITURE beveled
glass top 1/2 thick
table, 31/2 x7 , rat-
tan base,cream, 8
parson custom cov-
ered chairs, high-
back, pleated bot-
tom,cream & yellow
$690. SOFA 7 x 3
cream & floral
$200. CLUB
CHAIR cream with
yellow stripes
$200. HIGHBACK
CHAIR with rattan
frame cream & floral
matching ottoman
$200. GLASS TOP
COCKTAIL TABLE,
rattan base, cream
$100. GLASS SIDE
TABLE, rattan
base, cream $50.
RATTAN, CREAM
SHELVES, 2
shelves 5 8 1 shelf
211 $100. 2
MASLAND AREA
RUGS 8 x 10
cream & yelllow pat-
tern $100 each.
570-654-8385
TABLE: 48 long
sofa table, medium
color wood $35.
2 seater child high
back bench $14. 2
country wood
shelves $4 each.
Chrome clothes
tree $5. Large
assortment of coun-
try sunflower items
including dishes,
pictures, shower
curtain set, flower
arrangements, tiny
tea set, metal bas-
kets and much more
$.25 to $8. each
item. PERFUME
SETS: Eternity
Calvin Klein $40.
Mackie Bob Mackie
$20., Mambo Liz
Claiborne $40.
Wings Giorgio $25.,
White Diamonds
Elizabeth Taylor $5.,
all new in boxes.
570-868-5275 or
301-8515
748 Good Things To
Eat
PICK YOUR OWN
BLUEBERRIES!
8am to 8pm
Closed Sundays
Sickler Blueberry
Farm - Vernon
570-333-5286
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
BLOWER GAS,
McCollough, runs
good. $40.
570-288-9940
CHIPPER,
SHREDDER
VACUUM Troy Bilt
4-in-one chipper,
shredder, vacuum
w/ hose, 5.5HP
(used 5 times) $250
MOWER John
Deere 6.5HP, self-
propelled lawn
mower (model JS
63C) $75.
570.262.0716
CHIPPER, shredder,
mulcher, bagger.
Craftsman 5 HP. 3
cutting stages. Very
good condition.
Recently serviced.
$350. 675-4383
YUCCA PLANTS
FREE YOU DIG EM
OUT. 570-675-7024
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
LAWNMOWER, Toro
20 mulcher, rear
bagger with bag,
4.5 H.P. Briggs &
Stratton engine,
rear wheel drive,
new spark plug, air
filter, oil change,
blade sharpened,
runs & looks new.
$115. 696-2008.
754 Machinery &
Equipment
Motor, 6HP Single
phase 220 electric
motor. $300. or
best offer.
570-239-6622
756 Medical
Equipment
DIAPERS adult size
XL originally $14 a
package on sale for
$5 a package.
570-696-2856
HOSPITAL BED
electric complete
$75. 570-287-8107
WALKER, maroon
chrome on wheels
with seat, $15. Also
raised toilet seat, $2
Call 570-823-4941
WALKERS( 1) new
$12. (1) folding $20.
(1) folding with
wheels $25. Com-
mode aid, like new
$20. 4 prong cane
$20. (2 other canes)
$10 & $15.825-2494
To place your
ad call...829-7130
758 Miscellaneous
BASKETS, planters
& vases, .25 & .50
cents. Dishes, 2
sets $10 each.
570-823-4941
BEDLINER: 89
Chevy S10 truck
bedliner, standard
cab $30. Four bar-
rel carb running
from Chevy motor
$50. 5 storm win-
dows $50.740-1246
BICYCLES ladies
26 $50. Girls 20
$40. large bicycle
seat $10.
570-822-4251
CANNING JARS
1 dozen quart with
rims $4. 1 dozen pint
jars $3. 474-5653
COFFEEMAKER-
Krups 10 cup. white
$10. TELEVISION-
color 13 with
remote $15. Both
excellent condition.
570-852-0675
COINS/ foreign
coins from all over
the world total of
120 coins in good
condition all for
$20. 570-735-6638
FISH TANK, 20 gal-
lon w/stand $50.
PICTURES, $10
each.
570-883-0568 or
570-239-2699
GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVER
ITEMS
DRILL PRESS
Grizzley $200.
DATYON, HEATER
TORPEDO & GAS
TANK $115. TOYOTA
TACOMA 2009 BED
COVER 6 box.
$250. 822-8658
758 Miscellaneous
GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVER
ITEMS
Antique claw foot
cast iron tub $100.
Hard plastic dog
crate $20. Plastic
coated medium dog
crate $20. Re-
placement window
rectangular, brand
new in box $25.
Antique wooden
beveled mirror $25.
Wooden antique
side mirrors 1 pair
$20. pair. Old wood-
en windows double
hung $8 each. Old
window weights $2.
each. Custom built
dog cage with
accessories, hinged
shingled roof, dou-
ble compartment,
insulated $50.
570-814-6443
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER
ITEMS
Womens clothing
size 6 .50 each.
Mens Chico
pants, size 38-40
$2. each. Boys
suits $8. each.
Boys navy blaz-
ers $5 each. Army
over coat $15
Glass vases .50
each. Green bath-
room sink with
mounts $3. 12 TV
color with remote
$5. Yahama digi-
tal percussion
instrument $35.
570-822-5560
GIRLS BICYCLES: 2
16 $17.00. Girls
bicycle 20 $25.00.
Negotiable.
570-457-3879
GLASS DOOR. 4
way glass door for
bath tub. $25
570-331-8183
HEATER small for a
bedroom or efficien-
cy apartment, brand
new, only used once
this past winter
$100. 288-2224
KNITTING machine,
used once. $25
Homedies sound
machine, $10.
Call 570-333-4539
LUMBER/USED 2
solid oak, ideal for
truck, side boards,
like new condition, 8
pieces $250. call for
sizes 570-466-0239
MINI BIKE old
school 3hp motor
runs good $200 firm
after 3pm 655-3197
MOTORCYCLE HEL-
METS: (3) $20 each
570-262-1615 or
570-215-0215
PORTAPOTTI for
trailer or boat, $10.
Call 570-328-5611
or 570-328-5506
SAW, 10 Miter, $40.
HEATER, Kerosene,
$50, TOW BAR,
folding, $50, BIKE
CARRIER, holds 3
bikes, fits 2 receiv-
er, $50, COM-
FORTERS, King (1)
gray, $30, (1) Black
& White. $10. MIR-
RORS, clip on
adjustable towing.
$40. 570-817-5289
TOMATO STAKES.
3-4.5, $.50 each,
TRUCKS, Hess, new
in box 2000-2008
$50-$90.
570-675-4383
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011 PAGE 51
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
39 Prospect St Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
10am
to 6pm
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
NEED TOP SOIL?
Screened & Blended.
Delivery Available.
Call Back Mountain Quarry
570-256-3036
758 Miscellaneous
TELESCOPE Bush-
nell Sky Tour 114
mm-#78-9945 new
in box with audio
tour talking handset.
Cost $250. will sell
for $99. 570-822
4787/570-510- 0587
Upholstery Shop
Liquidation Sale
Stripping Tanks,
Industrial Sewing
Machines, Material
& much more.
A LARGE VARIETY OF ITEMS!!
Call for Appointment
570-909-7334
VHS MOVIE LOT
reduced to $2. each
or all 22 vhs for $35
All have their covers
& most are the plas-
tic ones also a vhs
stand, black holds
many movies for $5.
Cash or Paypal
570-735-2661
WARMER Creators
brand counter top
warmer for pop-
corn, nachos etc.
44hx28dx36w,
lighted inside slide
doors front & back,
very good condition
$795. 570-636-3151
762 Musical
Instruments
ACCORDION
Excelsior white,
marbilized, multi
grand $650. Stand-
ing microphone
$150. 735-0289
DRUM KIT: 5 piece
Pulse drum set.
Great for beginners.
$250 or best offer.
570-735-6920
DRUM SET WJM
percussion 5 piece
set complete with
cymbals, throne,
metallic blue, slight-
ly used. $229. Radio
Shack MD-1121 syn-
thesizer with stand
like new $125.
570-574-4781
To place your
ad call...829-7130
ORGAN old reed
organ Mason &
Hamlin $150 or best
offer. 570-822-1227
PIANO: Kimbell con-
sole, excellent con-
dition with padded
bench, recently
tuned. $350.
570-497-9940
TRUMPET.
Yamaha, hard case
$675.
KEYBOARD $125.
call 570-675-9481
766 Office
Equipment
PRINTER scanner,
copier, printer, Lex-
marx used once call
for more info $25.
570-288-2224
772 Pools & Spas
POOL FILTERS Intex,
(disposable) type A,
brand new $6.
each. Filter for Intex
blowup pool $15.
570-696-4020
774 Restaurant
Equipment
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT
Bev Air 2 door
refrigerator/ sand-
wich prep table,
Model SP48-12,
$1300. For details
Call 570-498-3616
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT
SOMERSET TURN
OVER MACHINE -
Model # SPM45,
$500; ALSO, Bunn
Pour Over Coffee
Machine, Model #
STF15, $225
For more info, call
570-498-3616
To place your
ad call...829-7130
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT
Somerset Dough
Sheeter, Model
CAR-100. Only
1 available. $1,500
Call for more info
570-498-3616
776 Sporting Goods
BACK PACK. Hiking,
navy canvas, $40,
570-675-4383
BASKETBALL
HOOP; Great condi-
tion, asking $90.
Call 570-331-8183
BIKE, 26 girls bike.
Rode only 5 times.
Paid $120. Asking
$90. 570-883-0568
or 570-239-2699
BOOTS: Burton
snow board boots,
size 9. Excellent
Condition $60. Call
Mark at 570-301-
3484 or Allison 570-
631-6635.
CLEATS: mens
Under Armour base-
ball cleats, size 11,
almost new $20
Ladies softball
cleats, size 9 $15.
570-760-4830
DRYER, electric. 3
months old. $250
570-883-0568
or 570-239-2699
GOLF CART. Pull
along. $25
570-675-4383
GOLF CLUB travel
case. $10.
570-675-7024
GOLF CLUBS:
youth, complete -
5,6,7,8,9, SW, driv-
er, 3 wood hybrid,
putter, stand up
bag. $75.
570.262.0716
776 Sporting Goods
GOLF. Hybrids, Tay-
lor Made R7 Draw.
Senior/Ladies Flex
22,25,28, $30 each.
WEDGE Titleist
Vokey. 58, $35.
CHIPPER, Maxfli,
42, $10
570-735-4824
SUN TENT good for
beach or yard, 2
people, side win-
dows, open front.
$10 Firm.
570-255-6056
778 Stereos/
Accessories
KARAOKE SYSTEM
13 color TV, CD and
G player AM/FM
tuner & dual cas-
sette $75.
570-675-3328
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TELEVISION: GE.
28 works good,
needs remote $90.
570-740-1246
TV Daewoo 13 with
remote, works
great, $35.
570-899-7384
782 Tickets
Baseball Tickets
16 Tickets for SWB
Yankees against LV
Iron Pigs. August 1st
game. Includes Lux-
ury Box, Suite 11
with food & drink.
$500 or best offer.
(570) 332-2252
TICKETS: 2 Phillies
Tickets, August 28,
2011, Phillies vs
Florida, 1:35 pm
Sec 310 Row 5
Seats 13 & 14 $60.
570-498-4556
U2 TICKETS
MEADOWLANDS
Stadium, NJ
Wednesday
July 20th 4 Tick-
ets $445. Row 4
Section lower level
113, seats
11,12,13,14 Cash
only 570-954-2749
784 Tools
KENT, 15 floor buff-
ing & rug scrubbing
machine, heavy
duty 1740 RPM with
3 brushes. 40
Heavy duty cord.
Excellent condition.
$250. 570.881.1822
LAWN EDGER
Craftsman, runs
great, 4 cycle $75.
BANDSAW Crafts-
man 10 with table
mount, extra blades
& manual, like new!
$100. 878-2849
786 Toys & Games
LITTLE TIKES End-
less Adventures
Fold N Store picnic
table, ages 2-8.
$50. 570-696-4020
PINBALL: Pinball
two player electron-
ic $95.00
570-814-3673
786 Toys & Games
POOL TABLES:
2 Slate top pool
tables, disassem-
bled, $200 each or
best offer. Call
570-262-1615 or
570-215-0215
TRAIN SET: Lionel
Dodge Motorsport
Set LIO11933 O27
Gauge. Brand New,
$125. 570-574-4781
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
RADIO & CD PLAY-
ER Philips bass
reflex speaker sys-
tem $50. 654-6283
RECEIVER Direct Tv
Digital receiver with
remote brand new
$40. 570-288-2224
790 Swimming
Pools/Hot Tubs
POOL: Aluminum
24 above ground
vinyl covered fenc-
ing. All pool sup-
plies: auto-vacuum,
filter, Hayward
pump, etc.Will email
photos. $385. Vinyl
coated deck for
above ground pool.
No splinters, main-
tenance - water-
proof, lasts for 20
years. Will email
photos. $450
570-735-7468
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CAT - FREE. My
name is Zoie. My
master died from
cancer. They are
going to take me to
the SPCA - I dont
want to be eutha-
nized. Please give
me a home.
570-655-8382
CAT - Young Mom &
Kittens (2 tortoise-
shell females, 1 gray
tiger female & 1 light
gray male). Aban-
don in flood waters.
Free to good home.
(570) 239-8040
KITTENS - FREE.
Ranging from 8-12
weeks. Males &
Females. Long &
Short Hair. Vary in
color. 570-704-7214
Please leave a mes-
sage.
KITTENS 3 free for
adoption to good
homes. Born April
15th. Gentle, hand
raised. Orange tab-
bies with nice mark-
ings. 570-262-6560
KITTENS 6 beautiful
& playful kittens
available for FREE to
GOOD HOME only!
call 570-332-5705
810 Cats
KITTENS, fluffy
angora kittens. Free
to good home.
(570) 270-3811
KITTENS. Free to
good home 6 weeks
old, litter trained and
eating solid food.
570-735-2243
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
AKC Cocker Spaniel
Pups - chocolate &
black. Vet checked,
inoculated.
(570) 343-7386
BRAZILIAN MASTIFF
puppies. Fila. The
ultimate family
guard dog! 4 males,
3 females. Ready to
go! $600
570-328-2569
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES
Lots of color.
Adorable lap dogs.
Vet certified.
Females- $375,
Males- $350. No
papers. Will hold
with deposit. Ready
7/24. Please Call
570-648-8613
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
IRISH SETTER
PUPPIES
Extraordinary com-
panions/hunters
610-378-0121
or 610-488-9273
815 Dogs
NEWFOUNDLAND/LAB
Cross puppies.
Great water dogs.
Vet Certified. Will
hold with deposit.
Ready 7/31. $500.
Call 570-648-8613
Olde English Bulldogge
Puppies. CKC regis-
tered. Vet checked.
Parents on premis-
es. Ready for good
home. 570-637-0749
Weimaraner AKC Puppies
Grand Champion
Sire; Champion
mother + grandpar-
ents. Hunting, obe-
dience, agility, show
potential. Excep-
tional quality pups
for approved
homes. For informa-
tion: (267) 664-4941
845 Pet Supplies
FISH TANK. 29 gal-
lon includes stand &
everything needed
for a start up. Ask-
ing $100. 762-1015
FISH TANK: 45 gal-
lon with all acces-
sories $50.
570-287-8107
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DALLAS
DALLAS
67 Country Club Rd
Ranch, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath-
rooms, double car
attached garage,
fireplace, forced air
furnace, central air,
finished basement,
1/2 acre, 1/2 bath in
laundry room,
screened-in porch,
private well, shop
area. Walking dis-
tance to MU.
Move in condition!
Negotiable Price!
$150,000
Call (570)
675-0544 for a
private showing
HARDING
LARGE SPLIT LEVEL
ON 2.8 ACRES
3 bedrooms,
3 baths. $135,000.
570-760-0049
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
Baird St.
Ranch, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath
rooms, eat-in
kitchen, dining
room, living room,
bonus room, fin-
ished basement,
deck. Two car
garage. Double
Lot.
www.harveyslake
house.com
$189,900 Call
(570) 639-2358
INVESTORS SPECIAL
4 bedrooms, 1.5
baths. Priced to sell
at $17,000.
KELLER WILLIAMS
REAL ESTATE,
610-867-8888
Call Tai DeSa at
570-406-0857
NANTICOKE
129 Welles St
Lovely 2 story, 3
bedroom single
family home. Large
master bedroom
suite with walk in
closet and addition-
al closet and full
time bath. Wall to
wall carpeting
throughout. Addi-
tional 1 1/2 tile
baths. Modern
Kitchen with all
appliances including
laundry. Very large
dining / living room
area and extra first
floor room for office
or den. Nice back-
yard and deck.
Friendly neighbor-
hood. Immaculate
move-in condition.
Dont miss this
one! Asking
$137,500.
Please call
570-650-3358
for more info and
for an appoint to
see this beauty!
No Realtors
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
129 & 131 Matson Ave
Double Block, 6
rooms + bath on
each side. $79,000
Call 570-826-1743
906 Homes for Sale
PARDEESVILLE
SINGLE FAMILY
BUILT IN 2005
CORNER LOT
738 Pardeesville
Road
CORNER LOT
2.5 baths, 2 story
with attached
garage. Oil fur-
nace with central
air. 90x140 corner
lot. Kitchen with
center cooking
island, dining
room, raised ceil-
ing with glass door
entry & hardwood
floor. Carpeting
thru out home.
Tiled kitchen &
bath. Kitchen appl-
iances included.
GREAT PRICE!
$219,900
(570) 233-1993
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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with classified!
SWOYERSVILLE
2 story home fea-
turing 4000 sq ft.
5 bedrooms with
master suite. 4
baths. 2 story open
foyer & 2 car
garage. 15x30
kitchen with break-
fast bar. LR, DR,
office and finished
basement. Gas
heat & central air.
Pool, deck, patio
and nice yard
$272,000
(570) 881-7996
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY.
PAGE 52 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011
554 Production/
Operations
542 Logistics/
Transportation
554 Production/
Operations
542 Logistics/
Transportation
554 Production/
Operations
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
2
9
7
2
8
3
Dedicated Account Drivers
$62KAnnually, $2K Sign-On Bonus
Affordable Medical Plan options with
Eligibility First Day of Employment.
Co-Driver Positions -
Home Weekly and Every Weekend
Automotive Industry Gouldsboro PA
(Scranton Metro)
TeamOne a National Logistics Organization is
currently recruiting for dedicated account Team
Drivers for their new facility that will begin oper-
ation in mid June 2011. These fully benefited posi-
tions are well compensated. The route drivers will
be delivering auto parts to dealerships throughout
the Eastern portion of the US. Qualified candi-
dates should be 23 years of age and possess a
valid CDL A drivers licenses with a minimum of
two years OTR verifiable experience. Candidates
must possess an acceptable BI and MVR. Drivers
must possess doubles and Haz Mat endorsements.
TeamOne offer a competitive salary and afford-
able benefits inclosing choice of medical plans,
dental, vision, 401K, etc. Interested candidates
can call 866-851-9902 to set up an interview.
TeamOne is an equal opportunity Employer
M/F/H/V
906 Homes for Sale
TUNKHANNOCK
Almost new Colonial
at Lake Carey. 4
bedrooms. 2 baths,
deeded lake rights.
Large rooms, hard-
wood floors, front
porch with view of
lake. Garage. Treed
lot. Pull down stairs
to attic. Oil forced
air heat. View pho-
tos on
lakehouse.com
$329,500
Call 570-836-9877
for a showing
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
TOY TOWN SECTION
148 Stites Street
CHARMING
BUNGALOW
$74,500
On corner lot with
2 car garage.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
walk up attic & full
heated basement,
hardwood floors
with three season
room. Freshly paint-
ed & move in condi-
tion. 570-446-3254
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
FREE
informational
workshop on
how to
qualify for a
Habitat
house
Saturday
July 23
10:30 am to
12:30 pm
at Boscovs
downtown
Wilkes-Barre
Affordable newly
built 3 bedroom
home. 20-year
no-interest mort-
gage. Must meet
Wyoming Valley
Habitat for
Humanity eligibil-
ity requirements.
Inquire at
570-820-8002
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Large, stately brick
home in Historic Dis-
trict. Large eat-in
kitchen, dining room
2 fireplaces, 5 full
baths & 2 half baths.
Huge master with
office. Large 3rd
floor bedroom. 2
story attic. Custom
woodwork & hard-
wood floors.Leaded
glass, large closets
with built-ins. Needs
some updates. With
large income apt.
with separate
entrance. Call for
appointment.
ASKING $350,000
Call 570-825-3608
or 570-706-5917
To place your
ad call...829-7130
912 Lots & Acreage
HARDING
2.3 ACRES
Assesed $42,000
Sacrifice $38,000.
570-760-0049
POTENTIAL RESIDENTIAL
BUILDING SITES
ESTATE SALE
Dallas Heights
Lot 4 $35,000;
Lot 5 $28,000;
Lot 6 $45,000,
or all 3 lots for
$89,000.
Frontage 220x120.
Call 757-350-1245
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
1-2
BEDROOM
RENTALS
FORTY FORT.
PROFESSIONALLY
MANAGED,
EMPLOYMENT\
VERIFICATION/
APPLICATION
MANDATORY. No
pets/smoking/
lease. All modern
appliances, servic-
es. Details upon
request. Begin at
$550 + utilities.
Call For Availability
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
LUZERNE
Available August 1
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room & bath. Heat,
hot water & sewer
included. AC, wash-
er & dryer included.
Newly painted. No
pets, non smoking.
Security, lease &
references required.
$575/month. Call
(570) 288-4253
Leave message
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
72 E. 72 E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
2nd floor, located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living
room, dining room,
sun room, bath-
room. 2 large and 1
small bedroom, lots
of closets, built in
linen, built in hutch,
hardwood and car-
peted floors, fire-
place, storage
room, yard, w/d
hookup and new
stove. Heat and hot
water incl.
1 yr. lease + security
$900/month
570-406-1411
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 1st
floor, 2 bedrooms,
elevator, carpet-
ed, Security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $840.
570-287-0900
MOCANAQUA
3 bedroom 1/2
double, large
modern bathroom
and kitchen.
Pergo floors
throughout,
large yard.
$650/per month,
plus utilities,
security and
lease.
(570) 417-0137
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets.
Rents based
on income start
at $405 & $440.
Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity.
Call 570-474-5010
TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
PITTSTON
1ST FLOOR MODERN
2 bedrooms, no
pets, Newly painted
with carpet and tile.
$525/per month.
Call (570) 357-1383
PITTSTON
2 bedroom, bath,
kitchen, living room.
Heat & water
included. $560/
month. 1st month &
security. No pets
570-451-1038
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
2 bedroom. All
appliances included.
All utilities paid;
electricity by tenant.
Everything brand
new. Off street park-
ing. $750 + security
& references
570-969-9268
To place your
ad call...829-7130
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
Modern 1st floor, 1
bedroom, wall to
wall carpet, newly
painted, washer/
dryer hook-up, pri-
vate drive. Water,
sewer & garbage
included. No pets.
No smoking.
$400 + security.
570-883-9384
S. WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths, small yard,
front porch, off
street parking.
$465/month
security required.
Tenant pays
all utilities.
570-332-5723
Wilkes-Barre
Apartments
Available
SAI NT JOHN
APARTMENTS
419 N. Main St
Wilkes Barre
Spacious
1 bedroom.
Secured Senior
Building.
Applicants must
be over age 62 &
be income
qualified.
Rent start at $501
per month.
Includes ALL
utilities.
570-970-6694
Opportunity
Equal
Housing
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
116 Simpson St.
2 bedroom 2nd
floor, w/w, eat in
kitchen w/appli-
ances. Washer
incl. Dryer
hookup. Off street
parking, no pets,
no smoking.
Water included.
Tenant pays elec-
tric and gas heat.
$450 plus security
570-814-1356
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 ok.
570-332-5723
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
815 N Washington St
2nd floor. 3 bed-
room. Wall to wall
carpet. Eat in
kitchen with appli-
ances. Coin op laun-
dry. All utilities
included + standard
cable. No Pets.
$750 + security
Call (570) 814-1356
944 Commercial
Properties
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
2,000 SF
Office / Retail
2,000 SF
Restaurant/Deli with
drive thru window
4,500 SF Office
Showroom,
Warehouse
Loading Dock
4 Acres touching
I81 will build to suit.
Call 570-829-1206
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011 PAGE 53
944 Commercial
Properties
RETAIL
SPACE
(start $650.)
FORTY FORT
WYOMING AVE.
RETAIL SPACE
IDEAL FOR SMALL
BUSINESS, REPAIR
SHOP, ETC. HIGH
TRAFFIC, Profes-
sionally Managed.
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
STOREFRONT
500 square feet.
560 Carey Ave,
Wilkes-Barre, Busy
location. $500 +
utilities. Call
570-655-4915
To place your
ad call...829-7130
950 Half Doubles
FORTY FORT
Listed is a beautiful
half double in a very
desirable residential
environment. Only 5
minutes from the
Cross Valley. In
close proximity to all
public amenities
including employ-
ment, shopping &
schools. 1st floor
features a spacious
dining room and a
living room with
french doors lead-
ing to a sunroom.
Kitchen includes all
appliances, or bring
your own! In addi-
tion, theres a laun-
dry room & a pow-
der room to the rear
of the kitchen. 3
bedrooms & a full
bath on the 2nd
floor with lots of
storage on the 3rd
floor. Nice hedge-
lined yard with flag-
stone patio & off
street parking for 2
cars. 1 outside, and
one in the garage!
New sidewalks, new
roof, vinyl siding,
windows & a recent
driveway. $700 /
month + utilities. No
smoking, no pets.
Security & refer-
ences required. Not
Section 8 approved.
Call 570-287-2157
After 3pm
FREELAND
Large 1/2 double. 5
bedrooms. Water
and sewer included
$750 per month
570-443-0770
NANTICOKE
3 bedroom half dou-
ble. New carpet &
kitchen cabinets.
$600 + utilities. no
pets. Call
570-855-2790
950 Half Doubles
PITTSTON
3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath. Private park-
ing. yard. Washer /
dryer hookup. Cable
& Satellite ready.
Front & back porch.
Non smoking. $650
+ utilities, first, last,
Security, References
Call 570-239-4293
To place your
ad call...829-7130
PITTSTON TOWNSHIP
2 bedroom in
Great Location,
Off-Street Parking.
All appliances
included. No Pets/
No Smoking. $600 +
electric, security &
last months rent.
570-237-6000
953Houses for Rent
FORTY FORT
Listed is a beautiful
one bedroom, sin-
gle story home with
off street parking in
a very desirable
residential environ-
ment. Only 5 min-
utes from the Cross
Valley. In close prox-
imity to all public
amenities including
employment, shop-
ping & schools. This
home features a liv-
ing room, dining
room, full bath, eat
in kitchen and a
large laundry/ stor-
age room. All appli-
ances included.
Enjoy the front
porch overlooking
your large front yard
or relax on the patio
and pick vegetables
from your garden.
No pets or smoking.
Not approved for
Section 8. $600 +
utilities. Security
deposit & refer-
ences required.
Call 570-287-2157
after 3pm
HANOVER
TOWNSHIP
COZY HOUSE
FOR RENT
263 Rear Lynd-
wood Ave. Avail-
able 8/1/11. 2 bed-
rooms, 2 bath-
rooms, refrigera-
tor, stove and
washer provided,
no pets, Newly
renovated, tile and
hardwood through-
out, new kitchen
cabinets, large
family room, walk-
in attic and base-
ment storage. Bath
room/shower on
each floor. Quiet
neighborhood,
small yard with pri-
vate patio. $725/
per month/
Garbage, Sewer,
$1st/last/security/
security deposit.
Call 570-817-0129
to set an appoint-
ment or email
jjanick68@
hotmail.com
953Houses for Rent
NANTICOKE
2 bedrooms, 2
bath single home.
Freshly painted,
hardwood floors,
dishwasher, w/d
hookup, porch. No
pets or smoking.
$565/per month,
plus utilities, Call
466-6334
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$795 + electric
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
HOUSE FOR RENT
89 Dagobert St.
For lease with
option to buy, avail-
able August 1 , 3
bedrooms, 2 bath-
rooms, refrigerator,
stove and washer
provided, washer/
dryer on premises,
Small pets allowed,
Hardwood, tile, new
carpets, large deck,
$850/per month,
plus utilities, $500/
security deposit.
Call (570) 574-8153
before 10:00 p.m. to
set an appointment
or email
jenny.b.carlo@
gmail.com.
WILKES-BARRE
MONARCH RENTALS
3 bedrooms,
all appliances
provided.
Call 570-822-7039
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
FOR SALE OR RENT!
Adults Only Campground
Fleetwood Cimarron
5th wheel. 36.5C.
88 model. In good
condition. Located
in beautiful 150 acre
tree farm in Maine.
Swimming pools,
hiking trails, ponds,
rec halls, potlucks &
activities. Dogs wel-
come. Beautiful site
rental with huge
maple tree in front &
bubbling brook in
back. For Rent:
$350/weekly
$1,000/monthly
For Sale:
$6,500
(570) 762-3747
HARVEYS LAKE
Summer Rental.
Boat slip avail-
able. Weeks in
August still avail-
able! Accepting
applications for
college students
for September.
Free wireless
internet & cable TV
570-639-5041
for details.
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
Affordable General
Masonry & Concrete
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR TOO SMALL!
Masonry /Concrete
Work. Licensed &
insured. Free est.
John 570-573-0018
Joe 570-579-8109
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
NORTHEAST FLOORING
SYSTEMS, INC
Installing
& Refinishing
Hardwood floors.
We install laminate
flooring too!
570-561-2079
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER 2 GO, INC.
PA#067136- Fully
Licensed & Insured.
We install custom
seamless rain
gutters & leaf
protection systems.
CALL US TODAY ABOUT
OUR 10% OFF WHOLE
HOUSE DISCOUNT!
570-561-2328
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
Assisting the Elderly &
Disabled in their homes.
See ad in Elderly
Care Section 350
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
2
9
6
2
3
1
NEWPORT TWP.
PRIME APARTMENTS STILL AVAILABLE!
ST. STANISLAUS APARTMENTS
143-145 Old Newport Rd., Newport Twp.
Affordable, Accessible 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apartments
Income Eligibility* Required.
Rents: $455-$656 plus electric
(*Maximum Incomes vary according to household size)
High Efciency Heat/Air Conditioning
Newer Appliances Laundry Rooms
Community Room Private Parking
Rent Includes Water, Sewer & Refuse
For more info or to apply, please call:
570-733-2010
TDD: 800-654-5984
Apply Today!
Great, Convenient
Location!
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; laundry on site;
Activities!
Curb side Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
TDD/TTY 800-654-5984
R
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THE
ONE
AND
ONLY.
PAGE 54 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011
NOW AT: 4150 Birney Ave., Moosic, PA
(Next to Grande Pizza)
PH: 570-871-4299
75 VEHICLES ONLINE AT:
bl uer i dgecar s . net
C A R S - V A N S - S U V S
Dont Overpay
Due To Credit!
FINANCE
with a
100% CREDIT
APPROVAL
NATIONAL COMPANY!
BLUE RIDGE MOTORS
All
Payments
Come With
National
Extended
Warranty*
$
11,950
2006 DODGE RAM
1500 REG CAB 4X4
Hemi, Step Rails, Bedliner
2000 LINCOLN
NAVIGATOR
$
8,900
Third Row Seat, Leather
08 FORD F-150
EXT CAB
$
17,900
4x4, V8, Auto
2005 CHEVY
EQUINOX 4X4
$
10,500
V6, Auto
07 CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER
$
12,950
V6, Auto, 4x4
06 CHRYSLER
PACIFICA FWD
$
9,450
V6, Auto, 3rd Row Seat
06 CHRYSLER
TOWN &COUNTRY
$
9,900
$
9,450
$
9,675
6 Cyl, Stow & Go Seating
2008 BUICK LA-
CROSSE
V6, Loaded!
2005 FORD
EXPLORER
$
9,975
6 Cyl, Auto, 4x4
2006 BUICK
RENDEZVOUS FWD
V-6, Auto
08 SATURN AURA
$
10,850
V6, Auto, Loaded!
*See Salesperson for details. All Prices + Tax & Tags.
$
5,900
00 FORD
TAURUS
V6, Auto
2006 DODGE
DURANGO 4X4
2005 SUBARU
FORESTER
WAGON AWD
$
9,950
$
11,450
$
12,900
$
11,850
3rd Row Seat, Loaded!
2008 BUICK
LACROSSE
$
9,950
V6, Super Equipped
2004 F-150
CAB & A HALF
V8, Auto
07 FORD
ESCAPE
Auto, 4x4, 6 Cyl
Leather, Loaded!
$
8,900
2005 CHEVY
MALIBU
Auto, Loaded!
DONT PAY MORE!
Its the height of summer, and our prices have never been lower!
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011 PAGE 55
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
THE NUM BER 1NIS S AN DEAL ER IN
THE NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGIO N
S C AN HERE FO R
S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib lefo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs .
All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils .
2011 NISSAN ALTIMA SL 2011 NISSAN ALTIMA SL
$4500
O FF
A NY NEW 2011
NISSA N A LTIM A
IN STO C K
$
28 9
*
L EAS E
FO R
w / $1250 Rebate Included.
A llincentives included.
Sale Price plus tax & tags.
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
M S R P - $28 ,370 M O D EL # 13111
L ea ther, Hea ted S ea ts ,
S u n ro o f, Bo s e Prem iu m S o u n d
S ys tem , S u n ro o f, Allo yW heels
O R
$0
DOW N
*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles
PerY ea rw / Zero d o w n . Ju s tfees
o ffirs tp a ym en t$315.01 + ta g o f
203= $518.01 in fees d u e @
d elivery. Res id u a l= $15319.80
M u s tq u a lify tier1 w / NM AC.
$750 L ea s e Ca s h in clu d ed .
**0% u p to 60
m o n ths . Ca n n o tb e
u s ed in co n ju n ctio n
w / Nis s a n Reb a te.
16.67 p er1000
b o rro w ed .
2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S 2012 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5S
SA LE PRIC E
$21,955
Sales price includes $750 Nissan Rebate &
$500 NM A C C aptive C ash.M ost Finance w /
NM A C .Sales Price plus tax & tags
PW , PL , T ilt, Cru is e, A/ C
O R
*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000
M iles PerY ea rw / Zero d o w n .
Ju s tfees o ffirs tp a ym en t&
T a g d u e @ d elivery= $449.99
d u e. M u s tq u a lify tier1.
Res id u a l= $14,929.00
M O DEL# 13112
M SRP $23,820
0%
A P R
UP TO 60
M ON TH ON
2011N IS S A N
A L TIM A S
**
$0
DOW N
$
249
*
L EAS E
FO R
P ER M O.
P lu s Ta x.
O R
30 Ava ila b le
At This P ric e
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN VERSA HB/AT 2011 NISSAN VERSA HB/AT
M O DEL# 11411
M SRP $16,840
S AL E
P R ICE
$
15,744
*
*S a le p rice in clu d es $500 NM AC Ca p tive Ca s h. M u s tfin a n ce thru
NM AC. 27.77 p er1000 b o rro w ed @ 0% . 17.92 p er1000
b o rro w ed @ 2.9% . S a les p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs .
a n d G e t 0 % u p to 36 m os
or 2.9% u p to 60 m os
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN TITANS 2011 NISSAN TITANS
S TAR TIN G AT
$
24,995
*
*S ta rtin g a tp rice N20096 M o d el# 34211 M S RP $31,810.
All Nis s a n Reb a tes in clu d ed in s a le p rice.
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN ROGUE S AWD 2011 NISSAN ROGUE S AWD
S AL E P R ICE
$
21,995
*
includes $500 Rebate or 0% up to 36m os 1.9% up to 60m os
+ TAX
P ER
M O.
$
299
*
O R
L EAS E FO R
*39 M o n ths @ 12,000 m iles p eryea rw / zero d o w n . Ju s tfees d u e @ d elivery $504.44.
Res id u a l= 13,625.85. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Ca s h in clu d ed . M u s tq u a lify tier1. Reb a te ca n n o tb e
u s ed in co n ju n ctio n w / reb a te. 27.78 p er1000 fin a n ced @ 0% . 17.05 p er1000 fin a n ced @ 1.9%
M O DEL# 22211
M SRP $23,905
$0
DOW N
Ad d l $50 0
Ava ila b le for Cu rre n t
R a v4 a n d CR V
Ow n e rs or L e s s e e s
p roof of ow n e rs hip
is re q u ire d
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN MAXIMA 2011 NISSAN MAXIMA
S AL E P R ICE
$
27,549
*
O R G et 0.9% up to 60m os
+ TAX
P ER
M O.
$
299
*
O R
L EAS E FO R
*S a le p rice in clu d es $1000 Nis s a n Reb a te + $500 Bo n u s Ca s h. 17.05 p er1000 fin a n ced fo r0.9%
in ten t. S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs . 39 M o n ths , 12,000 M iles p eryea rw / zero d o w n . Ju s tfees d u e @
d elivery o f$508.27. M u s tq u a lify tier1. Res id u a l= $17,869.60. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Ca s h in clu d ed .
M O DEL# N19810
M SRP $31,910
$0
DOW N
S u n ro o f, Allo y
W heels , PW , PL ,
Cru is e, A/ C
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN FRONTIER SV 4X4 CREW CAB 2011 NISSAN FRONTIER SV 4X4 CREW CAB
S AL E P R ICE
$
24,78 2
*
O R G et 0% up to 60m os
+ TAX
P ER
M O.
$
299
*
O R
L EAS E FO R
*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs . In clu d es $3000 Nis s a n Reb a te. 16.67 p er1000
b o rro w ed . 39 m o n ths , 12,000 m iles p eryea rw / zero d o w n . Ju s tfees d u e @
d elivery o f$507.35. M u s tq u a lify tier1. Res id u a l= $18052.95.
M O DEL# 32411
M SRP $29,595
4X4, Crew Ca b , A/ C,
PW , PL , Bed lin er, S V
Prem iu m Pa cka ge
$0
DOW N
STK# N20358
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN MURANO S AWD 2011 NISSAN MURANO S AWD
S AL E P R ICE
$
27,8 57
*
O R G et 0.9% up to 36m os 1.9% up to 60m os
+ TAX
P ER
M O.
$
339
*
O R
L EAS E FO R
*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs . In clu d es $500 Nis s a n Reb a te a n d $500 Nis s a n Bo n u s Ca s h. 0%
u p to 36 m o n ths . 27.78 p er1000 b o rro w ed . 17.05 p er1000 b o rro w ed @ 1.9% fo r60 m o s .
M u s tq u a lify tier1. 39 m o n th, 12,000 m iles p eryea r. $750 Nis s a n L ea s e Ca s h in clu d ed . M u s t
q u a lify tier1. Res id u a l= $16,385.40. Zero d o w n . Ju s tfees d u e @ d elivery @ $554.83.
M O DEL# 2311
M SRP $31,540
$0
DOW N
STK# N19879
P ER
M O.
**
2012 NISSAN NV 1500 STANDARD ROOF 2012 NISSAN NV 1500 STANDARD ROOF
S AL E
P R ICE
$
23,995
*
*S a le p rice p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .
STK# N20341
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER S 2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER S
S AL E
P R ICE
$
27,68 9
*
O R G et 1.9% up to 60m os
*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs . In clu d es $3000 Nis s a n Reb a te.
17.05 p er1000 fin a n ced .
M O DEL# 25011
M SRP $31,580
K EN P O L L O C K N IS S A N P R E- O W N ED V A L U ES !
2010 B M W 528i
A W D
$
36,995 + T/T
S tk #N P10691B
R o o f , L ea ther, A u to , C D , XD rive
2005 Jeep L iberty
L im ited 4x4
$
13,495 + T/T
S tk #N 20445A
A u to , A /C , PW , PD L , C hro m e
W heels , S u nro o f
2009 C o ro lla L E
$
14,995 + T/T
S tk #N 20347A
A u to , A /C , Tilt, C D , PW , PD L
2008 N is s a n R o gu e S L
A W D
$
17,995 + T/T
S tk #N 20265A
A u to , PW , PD L , C ru is e, Tilt, B o s e, S a t
R a dio , S u nro o f , B lu eto o th
2008 Inf inity
G 35X
$
26,495 + T/T
S tk #N P10672
C E R TIF IE D
2011 NISSAN JUKE 2011 NISSAN JUKE
AR R IVIN G D AILY!
15
A V A IL A BL E
2008 N is s a n R o gu e S
A W D
$
17,995 + T/T
S tk #N 20129A
A u to , PW , PD L , C ru is e,
Tilt, A /C C E R TIF IE D
PAGE 56 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JULY17, 2011

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