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Homeland Security in India

An Overview

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MESSAGE FROM

SECRETARY GENERAL, ASSOCHAM


It gives me pleasure to announce that ASSOCHAM is committed towards creating more awareness about Homeland Security in the country. For past two years it has been actively involved in creating an interface among the Homeland Security industry and the Government through its meaningful programs. ASSOCHAM feels privileged to have the official support of the Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India, for INDISEC, Indias only exhibition and conference dedicated to Homeland Security since 2009. This white paper providing an overview of the Indian Homeland Security industry, a joint effort of ASSOCHAM and KPMG is a move in this direction. I am delighted to release this white paper at INDISEC 2010 as it intends to help the Government, industry and the citizens in understanding the growing importance of Homeland Security for our nation. I extend my best wishes for the success of INDISEC 2010.

D. S. Rawat
Secretary General The Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India

2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.

MESSAGE FROM

KPMG
Homeland Security is increasingly perceived as being critical to the overall security of the country. Recent events such as the Mumbai terror attacks and other security concerns pertaining to domestic law and order situation have prompted the Central and State governments in the country to focus on the modernization and up gradation of country's Homeland Security infrastructure. This is reflected in the significant increase in budgetary allocation for Homeland Security expenditure and other initiatives like creation of a National Security Agency integrating the entire intelligence gathering framework of different agencies in the country, establishment of the Crime and Criminal Tracking Network and Systems (CCTNS), providing a Unique Identification (UID) Number to all citizens of the country. In an attempt to organize and strengthen the Homeland Security machinery of the country, the Ministry of Home Affairs is targeting the creation of a supporting physical and policy-level framework for long term development of India's Homeland Security focused infrastructure. Over the last few years, significant progress had been made in India in terms of improving legislation, strengthening security forces and streamlining procurement of critical equipment and items to improve the Homeland Security infrastructure. Globally, the private sector has played a significant role in meeting the Homeland Security requirements in various countries. Indian industry is also beginning to take note of the potential growth opportunity offered by the evolving Homeland Security framework in India. The way forward to strengthen the Homeland Security scenario in India would require Government's active management of the policy framework, regulations, process and fiscal environment to create an integrated and self-reliant Homeland Security apparatus in India.

Richard Rekhy
Head of Advisory KPMG in India

2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.

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INTRODUCTION

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INCREASING FOCUS ON HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

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THE HOMELAND SECURITY SECTOR IN INDIA

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CONCLUSION

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ABOUT ASSOCHAM

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ABOUT KPMG

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2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

01

HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

An Overview

2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.

HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

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Introduction
Homeland Security encompasses several dimensions of national focus and relates to safeguarding the internal environment of the country from disruptive activities that can potentially lead to disorder, loss of citizens lives and destruction of public and private property. Indias Homeland Security agencies primarily consist of the paramilitary forces, State and central police forces and the intelligence agencies, all under the aegis of the Indian Ministry of Home Affairs. Homeland Security consists of all activities aimed at preparing for, protecting against and managing the consequences of attacks in various sectors. The Ministry of Home Affairs has identified the following sectors as priority areas which need specific focus to strengthen the Homeland Security of the country;

HOMELAND SECURITY

Border Infiltration

Counter Terrorism

Critical Infrastructure

Maritime Security

Safe City Surveillance

Intelligence

Police Modernization

Border Security

Anti Naxal Anti Terrorist

Industrial Assets Transport Institutions

Coastal Security Coastal Police

Key Events

Databases Communication Cyber Terrorism

Para military State-Center

Homeland Security in India is handled by a multitude of bodies with complex functional and reporting relationships. Law and order is a State subject and the State police are responsible for maintaining law and order internally. The Ministry of Home Affairs is responsible for internal security, management of paramilitary forces, border management, Centre-State relations, administration of Union Territories

and disaster management. The Ministry of Defence obtains policy directions of the government on all defence and security related matters and communicates them for implementation, disaster management and maintenance of law and order1. The Ministry of External Affairs is involved with foreign policy formulation and in matters relating to disarmament and international security2.
1. 2. http://www.mod.nic.in/ http://meaindia.nic.in/

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

02

INCREASING FOCUS ON

Homeland Security in India

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

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Homeland Security in India has witnessed an increasing focus in the recent past. Occurrences like the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks, security concerns emanating from the forthcoming 2010 Commonwealth Games, increasing instances of domestic terrorism, ethnic conflicts and other real and perceived threats have reiterated the critical importance of protecting the internal environment of the country from any potential disruption. In light of these events and threats, the Central and State governments in the country now perceive the modernization and up-gradation of the countrys Homeland Security infrastructure as an area of priority. This has led to an increase in the Defence and Homeland Security expenditure outlay in the country.

Some key areas of focus


India is often referred to as a soft state given its perceived inability to systematically and categorically deal with several threats to the countrys Homeland Security. There is a plethora of State security agencies with a minimal ability to coordinate towards dealing with these threats in an effective manner. In an attempt to organize the Homeland Security apparatus of the country, the Ministry of Home Affairs is gearing itself to create a supporting infrastructure for the long term with an organized and targeted development of Indias Homeland Security focused infrastructure. This includes modernization programs for providing better equipment and training to the security forces deployed with the task of Homeland Security in India, creation of a centralized comprehensive database called National Information Grid (NATGRID) by combining the individual databases of several government agencies, setting up of the CCTNS (Crime and Criminal Tracking Network and Systems) and several other such measures. In this endeavor, there are several areas which are critical to the Homeland Security of India and thus require specific focus.
?and paramilitary Police

Ministry of Home Affairs released INR 1,230 crores as central funds for the modernization of Indias police forces in 2009-10 . Also, in order to enhance the Homeland Security of the country through a specific focus on certain identified cities, the Ministry of Home Affairs allocated over INR 450 crores in 2009 for city surveillance projects . Such initiatives are likely to go a long way in addressing the requirements related to police modernization. Furthermore, in order to strengthen the police apparatus and adequately train the available manpower to face the emerging challenges relating to intelligence and cyber crime, anti terrorist unit, quick response teams, industrial security force and coastal security, the States need to increase their budget allocation so that adequate funds are available for recruitment, creating a modern training infrastructure, acquisition of better weapons and other facets of police modernization like using IT to enable inter-connectivity of police databases of the different States.
3 2

Counter ?

Terrorism

modernization
A well trained, well equipped and efficient police force is the bulwark of the internal security infrastructure of a country. Police modernization has been a focus area for strengthening the Homeland Security apparatus of the country. Presently, the cumulative annual budget allocation for all States and Union Territories under the specific expenditure head of Police is approximately INR 44,354 crores, which, despite a 21.7 per cent increase over the 2008-09 amount of INR 36,434 crores, still amounts to a meager 4.3 per cent of the total budgeted expenditure of all States and Union Territories in 2009-10 . Of this amount, more than 80 percent is spent on salary and maintenance of the forces and only about 20 percent is available for training and other capability building activities. In addition to this amount, the
1. http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/india/document/papers /07feb10_hmspeech.htm
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India has had to contend with terrorism in its different manifestations for a long time. Till a few years back, terror attacks were primarily in the form of sporadic blasts in the target cities. The situation changed somewhere around 2008 when India witnessed a new form of organized, sophisticated terrorism. The synchronized large terror attacks on the Indian soil demonstrated the increasing ability of terrorists to exploit the abundant communication infrastructure for collaboration, financing, intelligence gathering and execution of the terror attacks. This was further accentuated by the weak infrastructure and Homeland Security apparatus. The challenges faced by this sector include an expanding transnational terrorist threat as well as the Maoist/Naxalite activities in eastern and central India. The changing nature of

2. http://www.mha.nic.in/pdfs/HM-Stat-March310310.pdf 3. http://homelandsecurityindia.in

2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

terrorism needs better networked resources to effectively combat the growing instances of such activities in the country. In an attempt to fight terrorism by checking cross-border infiltration, the Indian government has realized the necessity of deploying specialized technologies on all its borders. India is expected to spend INR 4,500 crore on domestic security before 2016 . In this context, the Ministry of Home Affairs has proposed to create a Multi-Agency Centre (MAC) that will work at both the center and State level to compile intelligence from and disperse intelligence to the participating agencies and set up a National Counterterrorism Centre (NCTC) which would be the nodal point for handling all aspects related to terrorism In India. There is approximately INR 324 crore allocated for this endeavor. A further amount of INR 10.50 crore has been released to establish 7 counter insurgency and anti-terrorism schools in 5 States .
? Coastal
6 5 4

terrorists through the sea lanes . In 2009, the Ministry of Home Affairs allocated over INR 225 crores in equipment for detecting arms and ammunitions in containers . The Government also sanctioned 73 coastal police stations under the Coastal Security Scheme, of which 64 are currently operational. Such efforts need to be strengthened through better management of maritime security efforts and specific coordination within different agencies dealing with Indias maritime security. Towards this agenda, the Phase II of the Coastal Security Scheme has been finalized wherein 131 police stations are proposed to be established in the coastal areas of the country.
? Naxalism
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Counter Insurgency and Anti-Terrorist (CIAT) Schools to impart specialized training to State police personnel in respect of counter insurgency, jungle warfare and terrorism in Assam, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Orissa and Jharkhand. Furthermore, the central Government has allocated an amount of INR 515 crore in 2008-09 for Modernization of State Police Forces (MPF) scheme with the entire amount having been released to the 9 affected States of Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Orissa, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal . An integrated approach aimed at relatively more affected areas has been adopted, including programs for special attention on planning, implementation and monitoring of development schemes in 34 naxal violence affected districts in 8 States. Under a similar initiative, called the Backward Districts Initiative, an amount of INR 45 crore per district had been allocated on a nonlapsable basis to focus on integrated development in 147 naxal violence impacted districts .
? Intelligence and Cyber Crime
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and Maritime security

At a meeting organized by Indias Intelligence Bureau, the Prime Minister of India expressed great concern over the naxal violence in India by categorizing it as the gravest internal security threat and also referring to the need for a more professional and welltrained, technologically sound police force to combat this threat . The different States impacted by naxal violence in India are realizing the interState ramifications of naxalite activities and the need for inter-State coordination and cooperation. Issues of good governance, development, and public awareness are increasingly becoming essential in dealing with naxalite activities, in addition to core policing requirements. The Government has taken certain coordinated action steps in this regard including creation of an effective policing mechanism in the impacted States, ensuring adequate provisions for equipment, , training, and other supporting facilities for State police forces, strengthening of the State intelligence set-ups, establishment of
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India has a coastline of about 7 ,500 km running along nine States and four Union Territories. A constant threat to Indias security has been the possibility of terrorists entering the mainland by exploiting the countrys porous maritime borders and perpetrating undesirable activities. These concerns were brought to light yet again when the perpetrators of Mumbai terror attacks entered India by exploiting the weak maritime border security. Concerned with the nature of the porous maritime border and inadequate maritime security of the country, the Ministry of Home Affairs stated in 2008 that the Government of India had planned to enhance surveillance and patrolling of Indias coastline to discourage infiltration attempts by
4. Press Information Bureau, Government of India, Pallum Raju Calls upon Private Industry to Participate in Defence Sector, August 20, 2009, http://www.pib.nic.in/release/rel_print_page 1.asp?relid=51992. 5. P Chidambaram, Intelligence Bureau Centenary Endowment . Lecture, New Delhi, December 23, 2009, http://static.indianexpress.com/frontend/iep/docs/ Chidambaram-speech.pdf.

Intelligence gathering and leveraging the collected information adequately to pre-empt any terrorist or related undesirable activity is central to the efforts targeted towards Homeland Security of the country. Intelligence in internal security management has various components like intelligence collection within India's frontiers, transborder intelligence collection and the use of critical technology for the collection of intelligence specifically required for the internal security management. Indias efforts at intelligence gathering are inadequate with a plethora of agencies involved in this activity

6. February 7 2010, Home Minister Shri P , .Chidambaram's address to the Conference of Chief Ministers on Internal Security in New Delhi 7 . http://pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=63680&kwd=

9. http://www.expressindia.com/latest-news/Naxalism-gravestinternal-security-threat-PM/517294/ 10. http://mha.nic.in/uniquepage.asp?Id_Pk=540

8. Homeland Security on war footing, 18 Dec 2009, 0223 hrs IST, Priyanka Banerjee, ET Bureau

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

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without any single control and coordination authority to manage the intelligence gathering process. Also, intelligence gathering at the State police levels is in a nascent stage with only about 1-1.5 percent of the total police force performing intelligence duties . Intelligence gathering needs to be enlarged, coordinated and managed through modern communication and analysis tools and technologies.
? infrastructure protection Critical
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the overall risk and vulnerability of the assets to any threats. The next step will be the development and maintenance of adequate counter-measures and emergency plans, including programs for providing awareness training to the security staff of such facilities. The Central Industrial Security Force (CISF), which is an elite force protecting the critical infrastructure of the country, was created to provide security cover to key industrial infrastructure units including nuclear power plants, State installations, refineries, ports, etc. However, the major challenge before the authorities is to preempt any such attacks and to have effective monitoring systems that can help in the identification of potential threats to the critical infrastructure of the country. This requires a dedicated focus in terms of special equipment, trained manpower and coordinated intelligence gathering about any potential threats. In this context, a distinct aspect of critical infrastructure protection is a pressing need for public-private partnership, especially since most critical infrastructure is in the hands of private players even though the protection of these assets is still perceived to be the responsibility of the Government. Possible areas where private sector can complement the Governments skills and resources in protecting critical national infrastructure include intelligence analysis to transform information into actionable knowledge, implementation of new information technology tools and communication processes, emergency management and response planning and providing industry specific recommendations for protecting critical national infrastructure.

Impact of inadequate focus on Homeland Security


An inadequate focus on the Homeland Security of the country can have multidimensional impact. Besides the potentially significant risk to the homeland and its citizens, it can have a considerable economic impact manifested in lower credit ratings for the country, negative branding through travel advisories impacting the tourism and hospitality sectors, portrayal of the country as an unsafe place for business and the consequent reduction in foreign investment. A related facet of this is the capital loss pertaining to loss of human life, damage to critical infrastructure such as rail and road networks and to places that are of high heritage value and national significance. An inadequate focus on Homeland Security might also have a psychological impact by creating an environment of high uncertainty and fear in the minds of citizens, which adversely impacts the overall quality of life of the citizens. Given such potential damages, Homeland Security is increasingly becoming critical to the overall security of the country. This is witnessed through a growing focus on this sector by the Government of India manifested through larger budgets and attempts to create a structured approach to Homeland Security of India. Globally, the private sector has played a significant role in meeting the Homeland Security requirements in various countries across the world, and this model is now being replicated in India with the industry taking note of the requirements of this sector and perceiving this as a potential growth opportunity. However, given the lack of specific focus through a dedicated representative industry segment and the disorganized nature of Homeland Security apparatus in India, there is a lack of clarity regarding the extent of opportunity in this sector and specifically the approach and strategy to be adopted towards contributing to the cause in a constructive and significant manner.

Critical infrastructure of a country includes public and private assets that are of strategic importance to the economic, political or security interests of the country and include infrastructure such as airports, industrial installations, national monuments, energy supply pipelines, nuclear and conventional power plants, etc. Besides airports, mass transportation and maritime security the other key segments for Homeland Security market also include large events such as the upcoming Commonwealth Games, border security and first responders. Indias increasing economic power is reflected through mega projects like the Commonwealth Games 2010, BandraWorli Sea Link, the T3 International Terminal of the Indira Gandhi International Airport at Delhi, etc, which are increasingly becoming susceptible to external threats. Such infrastructure is more susceptible to terrorist attacks given its importance to the larger nation. Protection of such infrastructure from tangible and cyber threats requires specific focus and is an essential element of the Homeland Security of the country. There is an immediate requirement for conducting a National Risk Assessment to identify and map the critical assets of the country on the basis of a systematic analysis to assess

11. http://www.goodgovernance.in/governancearticle1.php

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

03

THE

Homeland Security sector in India

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

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Given its increasing focus on Homeland security, the Government of India has initiated several steps to coordinate, consolidate and structure its approach to better manage this sector in the country and to overcome the current internal and external threats. One such initiative involves plans to set up a National Intelligence Grid to link all the intelligence agencies in various ministries and departments that deal with Homeland Security. Another significant initiative is the ongoing drive to provide a Unique Identification (UID) Number to all Indian citizens which is also aligned to the wider cause of intelligently networking the Indian ecosystem . These and several other similar initiatives launched within the larger ambit of Homeland Security have the potential of creating considerable opportunities for large industry players to enter into the Homeland Security market. Over the next decade, India, along with Britain, Germany and France, is expected to emerge as the largest players in the global Homeland security market as opposed to the present situation wherein the US continues to be the dominant player with about 35 percent of global procurement in this field . In fact, China, India, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and UAE are expected to exhibit the fastest market growths in this sector, driven by a combination of economic growth along with increasing threats of terrorism faced by these countries .
2 2 1

India offers a large potential for firms looking to leverage the opportunity manifested in this sector in the country on account of the following factors:
? High GDP growth ? Challenging relationships with

Weaknesses
? Homeland security sector in its current

form is fragmented with no single nodal decision-making authority


? The current procurement processes of

neighbors that are unlikely to be resolved in the years ahead


? Aging and obsolete equipment ? High spending on modernizing military

the Government are complex and need to be simplified


? Defining, designing and developing

Homeland security equipment lacks a coordinated and focused approach.


? an overall guiding policy, which Lack of

capabilities and industrial infrastructure


? Significant efforts towards enhancing

would also lay the foundation for the evolution of this sector.

the intelligence and communication infrastructure


? public-private participation Greater

Opportunities
? A significant market opportunity exists

opportunities emerging. A broad SWOT analysis of the Homeland Security sector in India further highlights the key areas for private industry participation in this sector.

in several domains comprising of the larger Homeland Security sector such as police modernization, critical infrastructure protection and counterterrorism activities
? Expected opening up of nuclear sector

Strengths
? economic growth is leading to a Indias

greater focus on Homeland security initiatives


? The Union Home Minister, P .

post signing of the Civil Nuclear Cooperation Treaty with the US is likely to create a large demand for Nuclear/Radiological Threat Mitigation approaches
? Biometric identification systems and

Chidambaram, has indicated a commitment to increase Indias Homeland Security budget by a massive 35 percent in 2009-10 ; this includes creation of a dedicated Homeland Security department, developing coordinated intelligence gathering, protecting critical infrastructure and upgrading maritime security
? Proactive government initiatives
3

similar smart ID documents are expected to present a large opportunity.

Threats
? market requirements due to Unclear

constant evolution and fragmentation


? High entry costs and other associated

Homeland security expenditure projection as a percent of global spending2:


India - 3.6% France - 3.4% Germany - 3.7% Saudi Arabia - 4.5% U.K. - 3.9% China - 5.2%
Source: www.hsrc.biz

risks including a long gestation period and associated bureaucratic delays


? No assurance of continuous orders.

Other Countries - 42.3%

targeted towards enhancing the countrys internal security environment and basic infrastructure.

USA - 33.3%
1. http://www.financialexpress.com/news/Unique-ID-number-forevery-Indian-citizen-by-2011/420169/ 2. http://www.homelandsecurityresearch.com/2008/09/globalhomeland-security-past-present-and-future/ 2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. 3. http://www.homelandsecurityindia.in/

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

04

CONCLUSION

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

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India is witnessing a growing focus on Homeland security in the backdrop of robust economic growth and an increasing threat of terrorism and related disruptive activities. Over the last few years, significant progress has been made in India in terms of improving legislation, strengthening security forces and streamlining procurement. Mumbai terrorist attacks of 2008 invited increased public scrutiny of the countrys current State of Homeland Security and led to a strong political backing for several much-needed reforms like broadening the definition of terrorist attacks in the Indian legal system and creation of the National Investigative Agency along the lines of FBI in the US. The Ministry of Home Affairs has also announced plans to create a National Information Grid that can essentially integrate 21 existing databases of intelligence and enforcement agencies across the country. In accordance with this increased focus on Homeland Security, the Government of India has also expedited the acquisition of critical equipment and items to improve the Homeland security infrastructure. The Government today is keen to forge strategic partnerships with other countries to learn from their experience and the manner in which the private industry has stepped up to assist the State in tackling the several threats faced by them internally. The way forward to strengthen the Homeland Security scenario in India would entail the following action steps, some of which have already been initiated by the Government of India:
? Strengthen the policy framework in order to fully realize Indias vision for Homeland

Security by encouraging greater public private participation, allowing access to and adoption of latest technologies and leveraging the growing defence sector specific competencies created within the country
? strengthening of the police and paramilitary forces and intelligence machinery Further

at the Centre and in the States through better manpower, training, equipment and other related support
? greater private-public-partnerships and platforms for interactions between Support

the Government and Corporate Institutions, creating a cohesive ecosystem


? the minimum standards for contracts, equipments and training clearly to Defining

enable transparency in overall procurements


? expansion of defence offset policy under the Defence Procurement Holistic

Procedure (DPP) to include equipment for the Homeland Security sector


? Enhanced critical infrastructure protection through increased physical security and

better access control systems at vital installations by leveraging the latest technology
? effective utilization of funds under the Police Modernization Scheme, Coastal Full and

Security Scheme, Backward Districts Initiative and other developmental schemes


? the overall governance and delivery systems of public goods and services Improve ? involvement initiatives aimed at encouraging citizens to partner in Citizen

safeguarding the internal security environment of the country. Given the Governments focus on securing the country from all threats arising from a weak Homeland Security scenario, the outlook for this sector in India is bright. Several reforms have been initiated in the recent past to strengthen and consolidate the existing Homeland Security infrastructure in the country. However, imparting further momentum to the needed reforms will require intensification of the Governments on-going active management and fine tuning of policy, regulations, process and fiscal environment to help ensure strong domestic growth and the achievement of self-sufficiency.

2010 KPMG, an Indian Partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (KPMG International), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

ABOUT

ASSOCHAM
The Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India (ASSOCHAM), India's premier apex chamber covers a membership of over 300,000 companies and professionals across the country. It was established in 1920 by promoter chambers (Bombay Chamber of Commerce & Industry, Cochin Chamber of Commerce & Industry, India Merchants Chamber, Mumbai, The Madras Chamber of Commerce & Industry, PHD Chamber of Commerce & Industry) representing all regions of India. As an apex industry body, ASSOCHAM represents the interests of industry and trade, interfaces with Government on policy issues and interacts with counterpart international organizations to promote bilateral economic issues. ASSOCHAM is represented on all national and local bodies and is, thus, able to pro-actively convey industry viewpoints, as also communicate and debate issues relating to public-private partnerships for economic development. ASSOCHAM members represent the following sectors:
? Trade (National and International) ? (Domestic and International) Industry ? Professionals (e.g. CAs, lawyers, consultants) ? Trade and Industry Associations and other Chambers of Commerce

ASSOCHAM operates through 90 Expert Committees that provide an interactive platform to Members for interaction and aid formulating Policy recommendations so as to facilitate Economic, Industrial and Social Growth. These encompass areas such as: Domestic & International Trade, Commerce, Industry, Services, Agriculture, Education, Food Processing, IT & BPO, Economic Affairs, TQM, Energy, Environment, Capital Market, Banking & Finance, Direct & Indirect Taxation, WTO & IPR, Infrastructure, Pharma, Health, Biotechnology & Nanotechnology, Tourism and Telecom.

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HOMELAND SECURITY IN INDIA

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ABOUT

KPMG in India
KPMG is a global network of professional firms providing Audit, Tax and Advisory services. We operate in 140 countries and have 135,000 people working in member firms around the world. The independent member firms of the KPMG network are affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. Each KPMG firm is a legally distinct and separate entity and describes itself as such. The Indian member firms affiliated with KPMG International were established in September 1993. As members of a cohesive business unit they respond to a client service environment by leveraging the resources of a global network of firms, providing detailed knowledge of local laws, regulations, markets and competition. We provide services to over 2,000 international and national clients, in India. KPMG has offices in India in Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore, Chennai, Hyderabad, Kolkata, Pune, Kochi and Chandigarh. The firms in India have access to more than 4,000 Indian and expatriate professionals, many of whom are internationally trained. We strive to provide rapid, performance-based, industry-focused and technology-enabled services, which reflect a shared knowledge of global and local industries and our experience of the Indian business environment.

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kpmg.com/in

KPMG in India
Bangalore
Maruthi Info-Tech Centre 11-12/1, Inner Ring Road Koramangala, Bangalore 560 071 Tel: +91 80 3980 6000 Fax: +91 80 3980 6999

KPMG Contacts
Kolkata
Infinity Benchmark, Plot No. G-1 10th Floor, Block EP & GP, Sector V Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700 091 Tel: +91 33 44034000 Fax: +91 33 44034199

Richard Rekhy
Head of Advisory Services e-Mail: rrekhy@kpmg.com Tel: +91 124 307 4303

Vikram Utamsingh
Head of Markets e-Mail: vutamsingh@kpmg.com Tel: +91 22 3090 0320

Chandigarh
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Mumbai
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Chennai
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Pune
703, Godrej Castlemaine Bund Garden Pune 411 001 Tel: +91 20 3058 5764/65 Fax: +91 20 3058 5775

Aerospace,Defence and Homeland Security Advisory Services


Shalini Pillay
Executive Director e-Mail: shalinipillay@kpmg.com Tel: +91 80 3065 4500

Delhi
Building No.10, 8th Floor DLF Cyber City, Phase II Gurgaon, Haryana 122 002 Tel: +91 124 307 4000 Fax: +91 124 254 9101

Wg Cdr (Retd) Neelu Khatri


Manager e-Mail: neelukhatri@kpmg.com Tel: +91 124 307 5162

Hyderabad
8-2-618/2 Reliance Humsafar, 4th Floor Road No.11, Banjara Hills Hyderabad 500 034 Tel: +91 40 3046 5000 Fax: +91 40 3046 5299

ASSOCHAM
1, Zamrudpur Community Centre, Kailash Colony, New Delhi-110048 Tel: 011 46550555 (Hunting Line). Fax: 011 46536481/82, 46536497/98

Kochi
4/F, Palal Towers M. G. Road, Ravipuram, Kochi 682 016 Tel: +91 484 302 7000 Fax: +91 484 302 7001

The information contained herein is of a general nature and is not intended to address the circumstances of any particular individual or entity. Although we endeavor to provide accurate and timely information, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate as of the date it is received or that it will continue to be accurate in the future. No one should act on such information without appropriate professional advice after a thorough examination of the particular situation.

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